dunnettreader + nietzsche   62

Adrian Moore interview with Richard Marshall - Modern Metaphysics - the Analytic/Continental Mix - 3AM - June 2017
Interview by Richard Marshall. ‘ Many contemporary scientists would still need persuading that it was anything other than a pointless exercise—perhaps because…
Evernote  metaphysics  Deleuze  Husserl  Heidegger  Derrida  Spinoza  Hegel  Nietzsche  Bergson  continental_philosophy  from instapaper
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Barry Allen - Another New Nietzsche - review of Bernard Williams, Truth and Truthfulness | JSTOR - History and Theory (2003)
Another New Nietzsche
Reviewed Work: Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy by Bernard Williams
Review by: Barry Allen
History and Theory
Vol. 42, No. 3 (Oct., 2003), pp. 363-377
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
incentives  perspectivism  Williams_Bernard  pragmatism  reviews  norms  downloaded  books  Nietzsche  punishment  sub_species_aeternis  genealogy-method  epistemology-social  kindle  Rorty  morality-conventional  biocultural_evolution  certainty  epistemology  moral_philosophy  relativism  truth 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Harvey Mansfeld - Political Theory as Historical Artifact, review of Gunnell, The Descent of Political Theory | JSTOR - The Political Review (1996)
Review: Political Theory as Historical Artifact
Reviewed Work: The Descent of Political Theory; The Genealogy of an American Vocation by John G. Gunnell
Review by: Harvey C. Mansfield
The Review of Politics
Vol. 57, No. 2 (Spring, 1995), pp. 372-374 -- meow, it's all those darned Germans who lured us permanently away from the science of the founders
social_sciences-post-WWII  19thC  historiography-19thC  reviews  Arendt  20thC  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Hegelian  Strauss  Heidegger  intellectual_history  jstor  Hegel  Founders  article 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Cavell and Rawls on the Conversation of Justice: Moral versus Political Perfectionism | Patton | Conversations: The Journal of Cavellian Studies (2014)
Cavell and Rawls on the Conversation of Justice: Moral versus Political Perfectionism
Paul Patton

Abstract

A primary concern of Stanley Cavell’s Carus Lectures is to respond to the question posed in the first sentence of the Introduction: “Is Moral Perfectionism inherently elitist?” By elitist, he means undemocratic. While there are senses in which he would not want to deny that Moral Perfectionism is elitist, and while he admits that there are perfectionisms that do not require democracy, neither of these are Cavell’s concern. Rather, he wants to showcase his preferred version of perfectionism, variously named Moral, Emersonian and Nietzschean perfectionism.
Nietzsche  perfectionism  democracy  perfectibility  Emerson  moral_philosophy  Rawls  downloaded  Cavell  political_philosophy  liberalism 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Stéphane Madelrieux, review - David Lapoujade, Fictions du pragmatisme. William et Henry James - La Vie des idées -27 juin 2008
Recensé : David Lapoujade, Fictions du pragmatisme. William et Henry James, Paris, Les Éditions de Minuit, 2008, 287 pages, 29 €. -- Qu’est-ce que Henry et William James ont en commun, à part d’être frères ? Peut-être d’avoir partagé une même vision du pragmatisme. Le livre de David Lapoujade renouvelle la comparaison entre l’œuvre de l’écrivain et celle du philosophe à travers une analyse deleuzienne qui ne le cède en rien aux approches biographiques. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  James_William  James_Henry  pragmatism  Deleuze  Bergson  perspectivism  mind-theory_of  alienation  Spinoza  Nietzsche  norms  epistemology  downloaded 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Gerard Passannante - Homer Atomized: Francis Bacon and the Matter of Tradition (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 1015-1047 -- extensive primary and secondary bibliography from Renaissance philology through Montaigne, Bacon, Vico and 18thC German challenges to Homeric "authorship" as well as ancient literary tradition, epistemology, cosmology and physics - Stoics, Epicureans -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography  cosmology  epistemology  philology  natural_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Homer  atomism  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  authors  author_intention  text_analysis  time  void  chance  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  17thC  18thC  scepticism  Montaigne  Bacon  Vico  Nietzsche  tradition  cultural_transmission  knowledge  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - An Ethics of the Event: Deleuze’s Stoicism (2006) | Academia.edu
Angelaki, Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, Vol 11, No. 3, (Dec 2006) -- I may finally start to figure out what Deluze's project was from how Sellars positions him! -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  France  French_intellectuals  Deleuze  Stoicism  empiricism  James_William  Whitehead  Spinoza  Nietzsche  Kierkegaard  style-philosophy  metaphysics  ontology  ethics  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Death of God and the Death of Morality [Nietzsche] :: SSRN - September 16, 2015
University of Chicago -' Nietzsche famously proclaimed the "death of God," but in so doing it was not God's death that was really notable -- Nietzsche assumes that most reflective, modern readers realize that "the belief in the Christian god has become unbelievable" (GS 343) -- but the implications of that belief becoming unbelievable, namely, "how much must collapse now that this faith has been undermined," in particular, "the whole of our European morality" (GS 343). What is the connection between the death of God and the death of morality? I argue that Nietzsche thinks the death of God will undermine two central aspects of our morality: its moral egalitarianism, and its belief in moral responsibility and warranted guilt. I offer an account of how Nietzsche sees the connections, and conclude with some skeptical considerations about whether Nietzsche was right that atheism would, in fact, undermine morality. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Nietzsche, theism, morality -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  moral_philosophy  religious_belief  religious_culture  19thC  Nietzsche  theism  atheism  God-existence  moral_psychology  morality-Nietzche  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  morality-objective  Kant-ethics  egalitarian  guilt  norms  obligation  responsibility  free_will  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter, review - Christian Emden, "Nietzsche's Naturalism: A Critical Assessment" :: SSRN - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, July 22, 2015
I review and evaluate the intellectual historian Christian Emden's recent book Nietzsche's Naturalism: Philosophy and the Life Sciences in the Nineteenth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Topics addressed include: the meaning of naturalism; the relationship between substantive and methodological versions of naturalism and physicalism and other reductionisms; the role of Kant and NeoKantians like Lange and Helmholtz in Nietzsche's philosophy; the actual role of the life sciences in Nietzsche's naturalism; and what is involved in a naturalistic account of normativity. --PDF File: 12 pgs --- Keywords: Nietzsche, Kant, Lange, naturalism, physicalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  German_scholars  Nietzsche  naturalism  materialism-19thC  Kant  neo-Kantian  Lange_FA  biology  Helmholtz  normativity  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  morality-objective  human_nature  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Guyer and Rolf-Peter Horstmann - Idealism | Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy - 1st published August 2015
This entry discusses philosophical idealism as a movement chiefly in the 18thC and 19thC, although anticipated by certain aspects of 17thC philosophy. It examines the relationship between epistemological idealism (the view that the contents of human knowledge are ineluctably determined by the structure of human thought) and ontological idealism (the view that epistemological idealism delivers truth because reality itself is a form of thought and human thought participates in it). After discussing precursors, the entry focuses on the eighteenth-century versions of idealism due to Berkeley, Hume, and Kant, the nineteenth-century movements of German idealism and subsequently British and American idealism, and then concludes with an examination of the attack upon idealism by Moore and Russell. -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Idealism in early modern Rationalism -- 3. Idealism in early modern British philosophy -- 4. Kant -- 5. German Idealism -- 6. Schopenhauer -- 7. Nietzsche -- 8. British and American Idealism -- 9. The Fate of Idealism in the Twentieth Century -- downloaded as pdf to Note (62 pgs!)
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  idealism  idealism-transcendental  German_Idealism  epistemology  ontology  Berkeley  Kant  Hegel  Hegelian  Schopenhauer  Nietzsche  neo-Kantian  Absolute_Idealism  British_Idealism  Royce  Bradley  Moore_GE  Russell_Bertrand  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  Pittsburgh_Hegelians  philosophy_of_science  mind  bibliography  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Neil Sinhababu, review - Maudemarie Clark, Nietzsche on Ethics and Politics (OUP 2015) | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - September 09, 2015
Nietzsche scholarship has made impressive progress over the last thirty years, with lots of excellent work now available to help puzzled readers understand Nietzsche's provocative and often beautiful writing. Maudemarie Clark's Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy was a big step forward in our understanding of his metaphysics and epistemology. Her Nietzsche on Ethics and Politics is a collection of fourteen essays mostly on Nietzsche's practical philosophy, ending with four on metaphysical issues that are related to the normative issues discussed earlier in the book. Most were published previously -- the oldest in 1987 and the newest in 2014 -- though two are revised versions of unpublished lectures and one is a remix of material from her recent book. Some appeared in obscure venues, so this volume helps readers access all of them. -- Highly recommends the introduction discussing each essay and broader framework for placing her discussion
Instapaper  books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  Nietzsche  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  metaphysics  political_philosophy  free_will  responsibility  from instapaper
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Barry Allen, "Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition" (Harvard University Press, 2015)
Barry Allen's new book carefully considers the problem of knowledge in a range of Chinese philosophical discourses, creating a stimulating cross-disciplinary dialogue that's as much of a pleasure to read as it will be to teach with. Taking on the work of Confucians, Daoists, military theorists, Chan Buddhists, Neo-Confucian philosophers, and others, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition (Harvard University Press, 2015) looks at the common threads and important differences in the ways that scholars have attempted to conceptualize and articulate what it is to be a knowing being in the world. Some of the major themes that recur throughout the work include the nature of non-action and emptiness, the relationship between knowledge and scholarship, the possibility of Chinese epistemologies and empiricisms, and the importance of artifice. Allen pays special attention to the ways that these scholars relate knowledge to a fluid conception of "things" that can be "completed" or "vanished into" by the knower, and to their understanding of things as parts of a collective economy of human and non-human relationships. The book does an excellent job of maintaining its focus on Chinese texts and contexts while making use of comparative cases from Anglophone and European-language philosophy that brings Chinese scholars into conversation with Nietzsche, Latour, Deleuze and Guattari, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, and beyond - 1 hour interview
books  interview  audio  intellectual_history  Chinese_philosophy  China  Chinese_history  Asian_philosophy  epistemology  Buddhism  Confucianism  empiricism  epistemology-social  ontology  human_nature  human-non-human_relations  military_theory  military_history  Neo-Confucian  Nietzsche  Deleuze  Aristotle  Machiavelli  Plato  Latour  consciousness  perception 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hartman, review essay - How Americans Have Received Nietzsche and Heidegger and Why It Matters | Reviews in American History > Volume 41, Number 1, March 2013 - Project MUSE
Reviewed -- (1) Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen. American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas. - Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2012. and (2) Martin Woessner. Heidegger in America. - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Heidegger  pragmatism  phenomenology  existentialism  postmodern  Rorty  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Truth is Terrible - in Daniel Came (ed.), Nietzsche on Morality and the Affirmation of Life (Oxford University Press, Forthcoming Feb 2014) :: SSRN
When Nietzsche says, as he frequently does, that "the truth is terrible" he has in mind three kinds of terrible truths: (1) the terrible "existential" truths about the human situation (the inevitability of death and suffering); (2) the terrible "moral" truth that "life is essentially something amoral"; and (3) the terrible "epistemic" truth that most of what we think we know about the world around us is illusory. These terrible truths raise Schopenhauer's question: why continue living at all? Nietzsche's answer, from early in his career to the very end, is that only viewed in terms of aesthetic values can life itself be "justified" (where "justification" really means restoring an affective attachment to life). Something can have aesthetic value even if it has no epistemic value -- indeed, Nietzsche takes it to be a hallmark of art that "the lie hallows itself" and "the willl to deception has good conscience on its side." Similarly, something can have aesthetic value even when it lacks moral value, something well-exemplified, he thinks, by the Homeric sagas. But how could the fact that life exemplifies aesthetic value restore our attachment to life in the face of the terrible existential truths about our situation? I suggest that there are two keys to understanding Nietzsche's answer: first, his assimilation of aesthetic pleasure to a kind of sublimated sexual pleasure; and second, his psychological thesis, central to the Genealogy, that powerful affects neutralize pain, and thus can "seduce" the sufferer back to life. Finally, life can only supply the requisite kind of aesthetic pleasure if it features what I call the "spectacle of genius," the spectacle represented by the likes of Beethoven, Goethe, and Napoleon. Since such geniuses are not possible in a culture dominated by "morality" (in Nietzsche's pejorative sense), the critique of morality is essential to the restoration of an affective attachment to life, since only by defeating morality will the spectacle of genius continue to be possible. - Keywords: Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, life, morality, art, aesthetic value - didn't download
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  morality-Nietzche  values  moral_psychology  genius  aesthetics  Schopenhauer  Dionysian 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Ned Resnikoff - What’s the Matter with New Atheism? | The Baffler August 2014
The fact that Dawkins routinely says embarrassing things is a symptom; the root problem is that his particular brand of atheism is itself rather embarrassing. That’s not a slam against atheism—I’m an unbeliever myself. Dawkins’s problem is that, much like the atheists in Nietzsche’s parable, he fails to take God’s absence seriously. Instead, he seems content to applaud himself and his acolytes for being the smart kids. Whereas the death of God was the starting point for a very long line of inquiry for Nietzsche, it’s the end of a very short one for Dawkins. Thus while Dawkins may have excised God from his vocabulary, he’s only replaced it with a form of deracinated, unreflective, godless Christianism. Platonic epistemology, moral realism, and a sort of blind confidence in the inevitability of human progress all figure heavily into Dawkins’s worldview; the only thing missing is the big guy in the clouds who helped make these concepts intelligible. Dawkins and his ideological fellow travelers are the reason why John Gray described modern atheism as “a Christian heresy that differs from earlier heresies chiefly in its intellectual crudity.”
intellectual_history  19thC  21stC  atheism  atheism-new  Nietzsche 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Rorty and the Philosophical Tradition: A Comment on Professor Szubka :: SSRN
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 298 -- I agree with Tadusz Szubka's thesis that there is a "partial" continuity between Rorty's work in the 1960s (esp. The Linguistic Turn) and his later pragmatic philosophy in which he repudiated "analytic" philosophy. I suggest additional support for the thesis of continuity comes from an examination of Rorty's undergraduate and graduate education. I then argue that the real puzzle about Rorty's intellectual development is not why he gave up on "analytic" philosophy - he had never been much committed to that research agenda, even before it became moribund--but why, beginning with Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature (PMN), he gave up on the central concerns of philosophy going back to antiquity. Many contemporary philosophers influenced by Quine's attack on the analytic-synthetic distinction and Sellars' attack on "the Myth of the Given" (the two argumentative linchpins of PMN) didn't abandon philosophical questions about truth, knowledge, and mind, they just concluded those questions needed to be naturalized, to be answered in conjunction with the empirical sciences. Why didn't Rorty go this route? The paper concludes with some interesting anecdotes about Rorty that invite speculative explanations. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 6 -- Keywords: Rorty, analytic philosophy, Sellars, Quine, Nietzsche, metaphilosophy -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  20thC  Rorty  pragmatism  analytical_philosophy  epistemology  Quine  Sellars  naturalism  anti-foundationalism  scepticism  analytic-synthetic  Nietzsche  linguistic_turn  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Holmes, Nietzsche & Classical Realism (2000) :: SSRN
U Texas School of Law Pub. Law Working Paper No. 003 -- The point of departure is Richard Posner's striking suggestion that Holmes is "the American Nietzsche." -- The Essay argues that the real thematic (and tempermental) affinity between Holmes and Nietzsche lies in the fact that both are proponents of a general, but neglected, perspective on questions of moral, political, and legal theory that I will call "Classical Realism." Importantly, the Classical Realism of Holmes and Nietzsche places them in a long tradition of theories of morals, politics, and society that we find in writers like Thucydides, Machiavelli, Freud and (to some extent) Marx, among others. This tradition, however, has almost vanished from the modern academy. It is the most general aim of this paper to revive the doctrine of Classical Realism as a serious--albeit debunking--position in normative theory. -- a meaning both older than and different from that current in academic debates, especially in philosophy, where it names certain doctrines in semantics and metaphysics. Classical Realism...entails no particular semantic and metaphysical doctrines at all. [It] denotes a certain hard-headed, unromantic, uncompromising attitude towards the world, which manifests itself in a brutal honesty and candor in the assessment of human motives and the portrayal of human affairs. The Essay explores this doctrine in some detail in a variety of thinkers, including Holmes, Posner, Nietzsche, Marx, and the American Legal Realists. The Appendix to the Essay offers a critical discussion of Posner's and David Luban's treatment of the Holmes-Nietzsche relation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  philosophy_of_law  realism  legal_realism  Thucydides  Machiavelli  Marx  Nietzsche  Freud  Holmes  human_nature  motivation  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Moral Skepticism and Moral Disagreement in Nietzsche (2013) :: SSRN - Oxford Studies in Metaethics, Vol. 9 (Oxford University Press, 2014)
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 257 -- This essay offers a new interpretation of Nietzsche's argument for moral skepticism.., an argument that should be of independent philosophical interest as well. On this account, Nietzsche offers a version of the argument from moral disagreement, but, unlike familiar varieties, it does not purport to exploit anthropological reports about the moral views of exotic cultures, or even garden-variety conflicting moral intuitions about concrete cases. Nietzsche, instead, calls attention to the single most important and embarrassing fact about the history of moral theorizing by philosophers over two millennia: namely, that no rational consensus has been secured on any substantive, foundational proposition about morality. Persistent and apparently intractable disagreement on foundational questions, of course, distinguishes moral theory from inquiry in the sciences and mathematics (perhaps in kind, certainly in degree). According to Nietzsche, the best explanation for this disagreement is that, even though moral skepticism is true, philosophers can still construct valid dialectical justifications for moral propositions because the premises of different justifications will answer to the psychological needs of at least some philosophers and thus be deemed true by some of them. The essay concludes by considering various attempts to defuse this abductive argument for skepticism based on moral disagreement and by addressing the question whether the argument "proves too much," that is, whether it might entail an implausible skepticism about a wide range of topics about which there is philosophical disagreement. -- Keywords: Nietzsche, morality, skepticism, metaethics, anti-realism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  moral_philosophy  morality-objective  morality-Nietzche  morality-conventional  morality-critics  scepticism  human_nature  metaethics  epistemology-moral  foundationalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Nietzsche's Philosophy of Action (2009) :: SSRN - in Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Action, 2010
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 270 -- Nietzsche holds that people lack freedom of the will in any sense that would be sufficient for ascriptions of moral responsibility; that the conscious experience we have of willing is actually epiphenomenal with respect to the actions that follow that experience; and that our actions largely arise through non-conscious processes (psychological and physiological) of which we are only dimly aware, and over which we exercise little or no conscious control. At the same time, Nietzsche, always a master of rhetoric, engages in a “persuasive definition” (Stevenson 1938) of the language of “freedom” and “free will,” to associate the positive valence of these terms with a certain Nietzschean ideal of the person unrelated to traditional notions of free will. -- No of Pages: 18 -- Keywords: Nietzsche, free will, moral responsibility, freedom, philosophy of action, epiphenomenalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  action-theory  Nietzsche  free_will  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  mind  consciousness  physiology  psychology  naturalism  responsibility  guilt  freedom  epiphenomenal  aesthetics  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Morality Critics [chapter] :: SSRN - in THE OXFORD HANDBOOK OF CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY, B. Leiter & M. Rosen, eds., Oxford University Press, 2007
U of Texas Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 114 -- One striking feature of post-Kantian philosophy in Europe has been the emergence of morality critics, philosophers who, contra the popular consensus, dispute the value of morality and the moral life. Their views find a faint echo in the work of some Anglophone moral philosophers (Philippa Foot and Bernard Williams are the main exemplars), but, as we will see, the "Continental" criticisms of morality generally cut far deeper and more radically. -- These Continental morality critics object that morality in practice is an obstacle to human flourishing itself. So understood, this attack on morality raises two immediate questions. First, the Continental morality critics are plainly not without ethical views of their own - ..broadly, about the good life for (some or all) human beings - since it is on the basis of these views that they criticize "morality." -- we can usefully divide Continental critics of morality into two camps: .... In the first camp ... see the individual's acceptance of morality as such as an obstacle to the individual's flourishing; in different ways, Nietzsche and Freud .... In the second camp ... see morality as among the "ideological" instruments that sustain socio-economic relations that are obstacles to individual flourishing. On this second account - ..Marx and perhaps some of ..the Frankfurt School - it is not allegiance to morality per se that thwarts individual flourishing, but rather the role such allegiance plays in sustaining certain socio-economic relations.. We will call the former "Direct Morality Critics" and the latter "Indirect Morality Critics." (Foucault straddles both approaches, and so we will discuss him in a transitional section.) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  social_theory  metaethics  continental_philosophy  cultural_critique  Germany  France  Marx  Nietzsche  Freud  Frankfurt_School  Foucault  morality-Nietzche  morality-conventional  normativity  human_nature  social_order  ideology  bourgeoisie  power  morality-critics  Williams_Bernard  values  ethics  human_condition  flourishing  Aristotelian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Nietzsche [chapter] (last revised 2013) :: SSRN for Oxford Handbook of 19thC Philosophy, M. Forster & K. Gjesdal, eds. (2014)
This essay offers a philosophical overview of the central themes of Nietzsche's philosophy, addressing (1) the primary intellectual influences on his work (esp. the PreSocratics, Schopenhauer, and Lange); (2) the style in which he writes and his philosophical reasons for it; (3) his philosophical naturalism and its role in his conception of the mind and agency; (4) his critique of morality and its connection with the idea that there can be an "aethestic" justification for existence, notwithstanding the terrible truths about human existence (such as suffering and death); and (5) competing interpretations of his views on truth and knowledge. Certain well-known Nietzschean ideas -- like "will to power," "eternal recurrence," and perspectivism -- are also located and explained within this philosophical framework. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  books  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  pre-Socratics  Schopenhauer  Lange  naturalism  moral_psychology  epistemology  mind  agency  aesthetics  human_nature  perspectivism  relativism  will_to_power  elite_culture  mass_culture  German_Idealism  human_condition  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Grumley - Theorizing Modernity: Unit of Study Guide 2014 - Sydney, Australia
Lecture notes on each class plus extensive reading lists, - see especially the post on alternative paper questions, each with a reading list -- PHIL 2633 Theorising Modernity -- The popular image of 19th century modernity was of a speeding locomotive clear of form, direction and ultimate destination. In reality, however, and despite unbounded optimism, the great thinkers of the 19th century were at least aware of deep contradictions and these tempered their assessments of modernity. This course will survey the best of these classical theories to discover to what extent they were able to capture the contradictions and problems we know only too well. The work of Hegel, de Tocqueville, Marx and Nietzsche will serve as paradigmatic attempts to discover the essence of modernity. Recurring themes and features will be examined through the prism of these thinkers: these include questions of meaning after the collapse of tradition, and problems arising from capitalism, industrialisation, the nation-state, democracy, bureaucratisation, individualism and the rise of secularism-- their main tendencies, antinomies and problems. The course will demonstrate how much we owe these thinkers for our understanding of modernity, as well as, considering their respective shortcomings from a contemporary perspective.
intellectual_history  19thC  Hegel  Tocqueville  Marx  Nietzsche  modernity  Industrial_Revolution  individualism  secularization  nation-state  nationalism  democracy  mass_culture  elite_culture  class_conflict  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  social_process  historicism  bibliography  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Cole, The Birth of Theory (pub date June 21 2014) eBook: : Amazon.com
Modern theory needs a history lesson. Neither Marx nor Nietzsche first gave us theory—Hegel did. Andrew Cole presents a refreshingly clear and lively account of the origins and legacy of Hegel’s dialectic as theory. Cole explains how Hegel boldly broke from modern philosophy when he adopted medieval dialectical habits of thought to fashion his own dialectic. While his contemporaries rejected premodern dialectic as outdated dogma, Hegel embraced both its emphasis on language as thought and its fascination with the categories of identity and difference, creating what we now recognize as theory, distinct from systematic philosophy. Hegel also used this dialectic to expose the persistent archaism of modern life itself, establishing a method of social analysis that has influenced everyone from Marx and the nineteenth-century Hegelians, to Nietzsche and Bakhtin, all the way to Deleuze and Jameson. By uncovering these theoretical filiations across time, Cole will not only change the way we read Hegel, but also the way we think about the histories of theory. ... chapters that powerfully reanimate the overly familiar topics of ideology, commodity fetishism, and political economy, ...a groundbreaking reinterpretation of master/slave dialectic, ...places the disciplines of philosophy, literature, and history in conversation with one another. Daring to reconcile the sworn enemies of Hegelianism and Deleuzianism, this timely book will revitalize dialectics for the 21stC.
books  kindle-available  buy  intellectual_history  revisionism  medieval_philosophy  19thC  Hegel  dialectic  philosophy_of_language  difference  identity  20thC  theory  postmodern  Hegelian  Hegelians-French  social_theory  social_sciences  Nietzsche  Bakhtin  Deleuze  literary_theory  literary_history  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Antonio - After Postmodernism: Reactionary Tribalism | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 106, No. 1 (July 2000), pp. 40-87
Revived Weimar‐era “radical conservatism” and fresh “New Right” and “paleoconservative” theories offer a radical cultural critique of global capitalism and liberal democracy. Expressing a broader retribalization and perceived failure of modernization, their defense of communal particularity attacks the multicultural nation‐state, liberal rights, and universal citizenship. This essay links reactionary tribalism to a recurrent 20th‐century theoretical tendency, the “total critique of modernity”—a fusion of oversimplified Nietzschean and Weberian ideas. Historically, total critique has promoted convergence between right and left, such as the current overlapping facets of “radical conservatism” and “strong‐program postmodernism.” Total critique counters the “historicist” method of “internal critique” and the “communication model” characteristic of reflexive social theory. The discussion uncovers the mediating role of social theory in the problematic relationship of science and partially disenchanted public spheres in plural, democratic cultures. -- 200+ references! -- in postmodernism includes range of "end of" thinkers from left and right, and the overlaps between far right and some of the postmodern cultural left -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  cultural_history  modernity  irrational  Germany  Weimar  Nazis  Heidegger  Nietzsche  Schmitt  Strauss  neo-Hegelian  right-wing  cultural_pessimism  Leftist  Marxist  historicism  cultural_critique  Habermas  Dewey  pragmatism  liberalism  democracy  patriarchy  nationalism  ethnic_ID  universalism  citizenship  nation-state  multiculturalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Diderot: Rameau's Nephew - Waggish 2005
Remarks include Trilling re authenticity and sincerity, similarities to Nietzsche's attack on morality, Hegel's delight in "He", and Diderot’s critique linking to MacIntyre After Virtue analysis of the weakness of Enlightenment ethics
18thC  Enlightenment  Diderot  self  moral_philosophy  hypocrisy  politeness  virtue  Hegel  Nietzsche 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Antonio Calcagno, review - Rocco Gangle, François Laruelle’s Philosophies of Difference: A Critical Introduction and Guide // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Dec 2013
One of the central debates in contemporary French philosophy consists of evaluating the viability and force of post World War II theories of difference, stemming from Nietzsche and Heidegger, and reworked in more recent positions developed by Derrida, Deleuze, Levinas and postmodern philosophers like Lyotard. Two key figures in this debate are Alain Badiou and François Laruelle. Both challenge the claims of an earlier generation that privileged difference as a response to what were perceived to be authoritarian, reductive and totalising modes of thinking. Rocco Gangle’s book helps readers navigate one of Laruelle’s more critical and important works on the aforementioned issue. -- The final chapter of Gangle’s commentary focuses on Laruelle’s constructive philosophy. He tries to clarify what Laruelle means when he says that he advocates a non-philosophy that investigates the in-One. Again, the in-One refers to the in-between of elements in a relation that are no longer fully identical with the poles of the relation. According to Gangle, Laruelle articulates two key concepts in the last chapter of Philosophies of Difference, namely, (non-)One and non-thetic transcendence (NTT). The former refers to: the aspect in which diversity or multiplicity appears when it is no longer structured through Difference, in other words when multiplicity or diversity is no longer conceived in terms any necessary relation between the multiple and One . . . . It is thus a kind of suspension of Difference with respect to or according to the One. -- I think of the Laruellian (non-)One as becomings without the necessary determination of a beginning or an end, a kind of in-process being. NTT explains how philosophy has traditionally presented the One either as transcendence or as transcendental. -- Laruelle affirms freedom and decision-making as crucial to understanding the (non-)Ones of philosophical reflection.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  metaphysics  Nietzsche  Heidegger  Derrida  Deluze  deconstruction  Absolute  transcendence  unity-multiplicity  continental_philosophy  difference  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Meyer, review - Paul Raimond Daniels, Nietzsche and The Birth of Tragedy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
"The Birth of Tragedy was my first revaluation of all values. Herewith I again stand on the soil out of which my intention, my ability grows -- I, the last disciple of the philosopher Dionysus -- I, the teacher of the eternal recurrence." This claim, found at the end of the 1888 Twilight of the Idols, points the reader of Nietzsche's much-studied late works back to his first book-length publication from 1872, The Birth of Tragedy (BT). That the work of a young philologist should contain the seeds for Nietzsche's later revaluation of values and his teaching of the eternal recurrence will seem puzzling, if not absurd, to many. However, before such a judgment can be fairly rendered, one needs to have a good sense of what BT is about, and this poses some difficulty for many readers because the work requires a familiarity not only with philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, Kant, and Schopenhauer, but also the various genres of ancient Greek poetry and how they might relate to developments in modern opera. It is for these reasons that those interested in Nietzsche's later writings should always welcome informed, accurate, and accessible commentaries on BT, and although not flawless, Daniels' "Nietzsche and The Birth of Tragedy" constitutes such a contribution to the standing literature on Nietzsche's first work. Daniels' book is divided into six chapters and includes both a detailed chronology of Nietzsche's life and a guide for further reading. The first chapter elucidates the influences that inform BT, and the final chapter treats the relationship between BT and Nietzsche's later writings. The intervening four chapters are sensibly divided and largely remain faithful to the structure of Nietzsche's text. -- Meyer thinks Daniels doesn't get the dialectic within Appolonian and Dionysian, not just between them, in part because he doesn't "get" Nietzsche on music, especially dissonance. Recommends on this point another recent guide to BT.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  ancient_Greece  tragedy  theater  Socrates  aesthetics  moral_psychology  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter, review - Christopher Janaway and Simon Robertson (eds.), Nietzsche, Naturalism and Normativity // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
This volume comprises nine new essays, primarily on various topics in Nietzsche's ethics, especially his critique of morality, meta-ethics and moral psychology; only one essay primarily concerns the meaning of "naturalism." The contributors include, besides the editors, several well-known figures in Anglophone Nietzsche studies: R. Lanier Anderson, Nadeem Hussain, Peter Poellner, Bernard Reginster, and Richard Schacht. Of perhaps special interest is that the volume features two essays by well-known moral philosophers, Peter Railton and Alan Thomas, neither of whom has written on Nietzsche previously. Almost all the essays (with an exception to be noted) are written to a high standard of scholarly care and philosophical argumentation, and can be read profitably by philosophers not primarily interested in Nietzsche. The volume as a whole is essential for Nietzsche scholars, and some of the essays will interest moral philosophers more generally.

The essays can be grouped into three main areas. First, when Nietzsche critiques morality, what is his target and how can his critique (and his naturalism) be squared with his own evaluative views (Railton, Simon Robertson)? Call this, following my terminology (Leiter 2002: 74-77, which Robertson explicitly adopts), "the Scope Problem." Second, several essays (Hussain, Poellner, Thomas) address metaethical questions, in particular, what the metaphysical and semantic status and character of Nietzsche's own evaluative judgments are supposed to be. Third, three other authors (Anderson, Christopher Janaway, Reginster) examine aspects of Nietzsche's moral psychology, particularly his conception of human agency, motivation, and the self. Finally, Schacht is the only author to focus exclusively on the question of what Nietzsche's naturalism amounts to; unfortunately, his is the weakest essay in the volume.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  naturalism  free_will  agency  self  values  normativity  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter, review - Christopher Janaway, Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche's Genealogy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // (2007)
.. this intelligent and illuminating book, which aims to defend two rather precise theses about reading Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality: first, that Nietzsche's method of writing is intended to engage the reader emotionally or affectively; and second, that such affective engagement is a necessary precondition for altering the reader's views about evaluative questions -- that "without the rhetorical provocations, without the revelation of what we find gruesome, shaming, embarrassing, comforting, and heart-warming we would neither comprehend nor be able to revalue our current values". -- Janaway and I are farther apart with respect to Nietzsche's conception of human agency and freedom. Janaway takes the passage on "the sovereign individual" (GM II:2) as giving expression to Nietzsche's "positive conception of free will" as "involv[ing] acting fully within one's character, knowing its limits and capabilities, and valuing oneself for what one is rather than for one's conformity to an external standard or to what one ought to be". It seems to me a mistake, however, to read this passage as articulating a kind of ideal of agency or selfhood; in context, I think it is far more plausible to understand the passage as being wholly ironic and mocking. -- very useful re Leiter view of both Hume and Nietzsche's "science of man" based on "speculative naturalism"
books  reviews  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  Hume  naturalism  science_of_man  moral_psychology  free_will  causation  agency  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall - Stewart Home’s po-mo homer » 3:AM Magazine
As much an essay on post Kantian (and post Hegelian) German philosophy -- Marxism, materialism, phenomenology hermeneutics, post Kantian, structuralist, poststructuralist, especially Nietzsche and Heidegger -- as on an album of readings of his work by Home. And a further riff on epistemology and varieties of scepticism, including a sort of take on Pyrrhonism as not an extreme version of scepticism. Heidegger's misreading of Nietzsche is of a piece with his embrace of the fascist side of Plato, which was part of Nietzsche's rejection of even the non Socratic Plato. Further long riff on Beiser rejection of Kantian aesthetics in Diotima's Children and the lack of aesthetic criteria after the avant_guard. Home attacks the shallow art world from another direction - mostly as a bourgeois status game.
books  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  fate  free_will  gods-antiquity  ancient_religions  myth  tragedy  Nietzsche  Heidegger  epistemology  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Homer  pre-Socratics  aesthetics  Kant-aesthetics  avant_guard  materialism  Marxist  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrik Aspers - Nietzsche's Sociology | JSTOR: Sociological Forum, Vol. 22, No. 4 (Dec., 2007), pp. 474-499
Downloaded pdf to Note -- large bibliography looks especially interesting re placing Nietzsche's social constructivism in context of 19thC social sciences and emerging discipline of sociology especially in Germany. -- The aim of this article is to present that part of Friedrich Nietzsche's work that is of special interest to sociologists. To do this, I discuss the relationship between Nietzsche's work and the sociology both of today and of his own time. The most important idea is that he saw reality as a social construction. The idea of social construction is related to the beliefs and values, power and interests of the actors. Nietzsche's discussions of power and of the individual vs. the collective are also analyzed.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  social_sciences  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  sociology  Weber  constructivism  belief  values  power  individualism  subject  civil_society  community  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Graeme Garrard - Nietzsche for and against the Enlightenment | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 70, No. 4 (Fall, 2008), pp. 595-608
This essay explores Nietzsche's attitude to the Enlightenment, which the author argues underwent a major reversal between his so-called middle works and his later writings. The author examines the nature of this change and considers some of the reasons behind it. In the process, some of Nietzsche's "postmodern" admirers are taken to task for appropriating his criticisms of the Enlightenment without acknowledging his ambivalence toward it. Furthermore, the radical change in Nietzsche's view of the Enlightenment is taken as evidence of the periodization of his thought, which some prominent Nietzsche scholars (e.g. Walter Kaufmann) have disputed. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  postmodern  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Allan Megill, review essay - Historicizing Nietzsche? Paradoxes and Lessons of a Hard Case | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 68, No. 1 (Mar., 1996), pp. 114-152
Reviewed works: *--* (1) Nietzsche Contra Rousseau: A Study of Nietzsche's Moral and Politicial Thought by Keith Ansell-Pearson; *--* (2) The Neitzche Legacy in Germany, 1890-1990 by Steven E. Aschheim; *--* (3) Confrontations: Derrida/Heidegger/Nietzsche by Ernst Behler; *--* (4) Neitzsche on Truth and Philosophy by Steven Taubeneck; *--* (5) Nietzsche Contra Nietzsche: Creativity and the Anti-Romantic by Adrian Del Caro; *--* (6) Neitzsche and the Politics of Aristocratic Radicalism by Bruce Detwiler; *--* (7) Nietzsche's New Seas: Explorations in Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Politics by Michael Allen Gillespie; Tracy B. Strong; *--* (8) Nietzsche and the Origin of Virtue by Lester H. Hunt; *--* (9) Zarathustras Geheimnis: Friedrich Nietzsche und seine verschlüsselte Botschaft by Joachim Köhler; *--* (10) Nietzsche as Postmodernist: Essays Pro and Contra; Clayton Koelb; *--* (11) Nietzsche's Case: Philosophy as/and Literature by Bernd Magnus; Stanley Stewart; Jean-Pierre Mileur; *--* (12) Nietzsche's Philosophy of Nature and Cosmology by Alistair Moles; *--* (13) Nietzsche und der Nietzscheanismus by Ernst Nolte; *--* (14) Young Nietzsche: Becoming a Genius by Carl Pletsch; *--* (15) Nietzsche and the Question of Interpretation: Between Hermeneutics and Deconstruction by Alan D. Schrift; *--* (16) Alcyone: Nietzsche on Gifts, Noise, and Women by Gary Shapiro; *-'* (17) Nietzschean Narratives by Gary Shapiro; *--* (18) Thinker on Stage: Nietzsche's Materialism by Peter Sloterdijk; *--* (19) Reading Nietzsche by Robert C. Solomon; Kathleen M. Higgins; *--* (20) Nietzsche's Voice by Henry Staten; *--* (21) Left-Wing Nietzscheanism: The Politics of German Expressionism, 1910-1920 by Seth Taylor; *--* (22) Friedrich Nietzsche and the Politics of the Soul: A Study of Heroic Individualism by Leslie Paul Thiele; *--* (23) Nietzsche and Political Thought by Mark Warren; *--* (24) Within Nietzsche's Labyrinth by Alan White; *--* (25) Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art by Julian Young -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Rousseau  Heidegger  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  aesthetics  morality-Nietzche  lit_crit  literary_history  individualism  self  self-development  Weimar  hermeneutics  deconstruction  postmodern  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  metaethics  style-philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
William W. Sokoloff - Nietzsche's Radicalization of Kant | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 38, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 501-518
According to liberals and postmodernists, Nietzsche and Kant occupy opposing places on the theoretical spectrum. I challenge this assumption and argue that Nietzsche is working both with and against Kant in terms of his new morality. Nietzsche's harsh rhetoric against Kant serves as a mask that, on closer examination, conceals similarities. Through an analysis of some of his texts, I demonstrate that Nietzsche works within a Kantian conception of moral autonomy in terms of two of his most provocative formulations: pathos of distance and law of life. Nietzsche's critique of ressentiment, moreover, illustrates his commitment to Kantian assumptions about moral conduct. Bringing Kant and Nietzsche together yields a new image of autonomy that overcomes the sovereign subjectivity central to the Kantian conception. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  19thC  Germany  Kant-ethics  Nietzsche  morality-Nietzche  autonomy  ressentiment  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Herman Siemens and Gary Shapiro - Special Section Introduction: What Does Nietzsche Mean for Contemporary Politics and Political Thought? | JSTOR: Journal of Nietzsche Studies, No. 35/36 (SPRING-AUTUMN 2008), pp. 3-8
Guest Editors' Introduction: What Does Nietzsche Mean for Contemporary Politics and Political Thought?(pp. 3-8) Herman Siemens and Gary Shapiro. *--* (1) Beyond Peoples and Fatherlands: Nietzsche's Geophilosophy and the Direction of the Earth (pp. 9-27) Gary Shapiro. *--* (2) Nietzsche and the Neoconservatives: Fukuyama's Reply to the Last Man (pp. 28-47) Haroon Sheikh. *--* (3) (downloaded) Nietzsche and the Political: Tyranny, Tragedy, Cultural Revolution, and Democracy (pp. 48-66) Tracy B. Strong. *--* (4) The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the "Innocence of Becoming": Nietzsche, 9/11, and the "Falling Man" (pp. 67-85) Joanne Faulkner *--* (book review) Nietzsche's Political Skepticism by Tamsin Shaw (pp. 177-179) - Review by: Saul Tobias. *--* (long book review) Nietzsche and the Political. Thinking the Political series by Daniel W. Conway (pp. 207-216) - Review by: Herman Siemens [both Conway and Siemens are contributors to the special section]
journal  article  books  reviews  jstor  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  globalization  political_economy  political_culture  Strauss  mass_culture  nationalism  nation-state  territory  Europe  Eurocentrism  post-colonial  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special section 4 authors, 4 recent readings of Genealogy of Morals | JSTOR: Journal of Nietzsche Studies, No. 35/36, SPRING-AUTUMN 2008
Letter from the Assistant Editor(pp. 86-87) Rebecca Bamford. *--* (1) For Whom the Bell Tolls (pp. 88-105) Daniel Conway. *--* (2) How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche's Genealogy? (pp. 106-123) Lawrence J. Hatab. *--* (3) Beyond Selflessness in Ethics and Inquiry (pp. 124-140) Christopher Janaway. *--* (4) Nietzsche's Genealogy Revisited(pp. 141-154) David Owen. -- the group of articles looks quite helpful -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  19thC  Germany  ancient_Greece  Platonism  Nietzsche  Schopenhauer  positivism  Darwinism  asceticism  genealogy-method  morality-conventional  morality-Christian  morality-Nietzche  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
The Innocence of Becoming by Brian Leiter :: SSRN - Oct 2013
I offer an interpretation of Nietzsche’s striking idea of “the innocence of becoming” (die Unschuld des Werdens), and offer a partial defense of its import, namely, that no one is ever morally responsible or guilty for what they do and that the so-called “reactive attitudes” are always misplaced. I focus primarily, though not exclusively, on the arguments as set out in Twilight of the Idols. First, there is Nietzsche’s hypothesis, partly psychological and partly historical or anthropological, that the ideas of “free” action or free will, and of responsibility for actions freely chosen or willed, were introduced primarily in order to justify punishment (“[m]en were considered ‘free’ so that they might be judged and punished”). Call this the Genetic Thesis about Free Will. Second, there is Nietzsche’s claim that the moral psychology, or “psychology of the will” as he calls it, that underlies this picture is, in fact, false — that, in fact, it is not true that every action is willed or that it reflects a purpose or that it originates in consciousness. Call these, in aggregate, the Descriptive Thesis about the Will. (Here I draw on earlier work.) Finally, there is articulation of a programmatic agenda, namely, to restore the “innocence of becoming” by getting rid of guilt and punishment based on guilt — not primarily because ascriptions of guilt and responsibility are false (though they are), but because a world understood as “innocent,” one understood in terms of “natural” cause and effect, is a better world in which to live. I thus try to explain and defend Zarathustra’s recommendation: “Enemy’ you shall say, but not villain; sick you shall say, but not scoundrel; fool you shall say, but not sinner.” Nietzsche’s views are contrasted with those of important modern writers on these topics, including P.F. Strawson and Gary Watson. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  Nietzsche  morality-Nietzche  morality-Christian  accountability  moral_psychology  free_will  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Untimely Review of Friedrich Nietzsche's, Twilight of the Idols by Brian Leiter :: SSRN
Leiter, Brian, Untimely Review of Friedrich Nietzsche's, Twilight of the Idols (October 27, 2013). Topoi (Forthcoming). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2345957 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2345957 -- This review essay of Nietzsche's "Twilight of the Idols" (1888) is part of the journal TOPOI's "Untimely Reviews" series of classic works of philosophy. The journal explains the idea of the series this way: "We take a classic of philosophy and ask an outstanding scholar in the same field to review it as if it had just been published. This implies that the classical work must be contrasted with both past and current literature and must be framed in the wider cultural context of the present day. The result is a litmus test for the work itself: Failure in accounting for relevant issues raised by contemporary literature reveals that, in those respects, our classic has indeed been outpaced by later works. On the other hand, any success in capturing core topics of current discussion, or even anticipating and clarifying issues not yet well brought into focus by contemporary scholars, is the strongest proof of the liveliness of the work, no matter how long ago it was written." -- This essay tries to discharge the task for Nietzsche's TWILIGHT. Themes dealt with are Nietzsche's attacks on morality, on free will, on mental causation, on Socrates, and on Kant. Connections are drawn with contemporary work by Mark Johnston, David Rosenthal, and Daniel Wagner, among others. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  Nietzsche  free_will  morality-Nietzche  Plato  Kant  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Ken Gemes interviewed by Richard Marshall - on the tragedy of life » 3:AM Magazine - Jan 2014
Ken Gemes never stops brooding on what the postmoderns got right about Nietzsche, about the lack of seriously considered theories in Nietzsche, about why his naturalism isn’t of interest, about the stark nihilist fact at the heart of Nietzsche’s philosophical outlook, about the role of the genius, about being strangers to ourselves, ressentiment, Nietzschean localism, about Freud and Nietzsche’s relationship, about the ascetic ideal, about the canonical virtue of scientific empirical testability, about the need for fine grained logical content, about the value of his different philosophical interests and why what Nietzsche says may well be literally true.
article  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Freud  Foucault  philosophy_of_science  Logical_Positivism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomasa H. Brobjer - Nietzsche's Relation to Historical Methods and Nineteenth-Century German Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 46, No. 2 (May, 2007), pp. 155-179
Nietzsche is generally regarded as a severe critic of historical method and scholarship; this view has influenced much of contemporary discussions about the role and nature of historical scholarship. In this article I argue that this view is seriously mistaken (to a large degree because of the somewhat misleading nature of Vom Nutzen und Nachtheil der Historie für das Leben). I do so by examining what he actually says about understanding history and historical method, as well as his relation to the founders of modem German historiography (Wolf, Niebuhr, Ranke, and Mommsen). I show, contrary to most expectations, that Nietzsche knew these historians well and that he fundamentally affirmed their view of historical method. What he primarily objected to among his contemporaries was that historical scholarship was often regarded as a goal in itself, rather than as a means, and consequently that history was placed above philosophy. In fact, a historical approach was essential for Nietzsche's whole understanding of philosophy, and his own philosophical project.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  19thC  Nietzsche  historicism  Germany  Study_and_Uses  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Walter H. Sokel - On the Dionysian in Nietzsche | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Autumn, 2005), pp. 501-520
Dionysian unity - Heraclitus not Spinozist monist substance - as foundational theme even though not explicit after Birth of Tragedy. Sees Nietzsche as protofascist aesthetic and bridge between humanism and postmodernism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  aesthetics  metaphysics  humanism  postmodern  fascism  Nietzsche  Schopenhauer  Dionysian  tragedy  ancient_Greece  Heraclitus  Spinoza  pantheism  monism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Lackey - Killing God, Liberating the "Subject": Nietzsche and Post-God Freedom | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 60, No. 4 (Oct., 1999), pp. 737-754
Nietzsche claims freedom and self overcoming requires killing grammar -- maybe this will explain what Foucault et al mean by the death of the subject. Sounds twisted Hegelian but what do I know?
article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  God-existence  religious_belief  freedom  self  subject  moral_philosophy  postmodern  existentialism  Foucault  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jacqueline Stevens - On the Morals of Genealogy @| JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 4 (Aug., 2003), pp. 558-588
The article describes how an intellectual community of those following French trends in the academy have, for the past forty years, been offering a mistaken reading of Friedrich Nietzsche's concept of genealogy. The essay shows how Nietzsche mocks moral psychologists by calling them genealogists, contrasts Nietzsche's work with that of genealogists, and then documents how subsequent academics, encouraged by the work of Gilles Deleuze and, in turn, Michel Foucault, created a revaluation of genealogy's meaning, thereby fetishizing their own scholarly authority.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Foucault  Deluze  genealogy-method  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Frederick Beiser, review: Alan D. Schrift and Daniel Conway (eds.), Nineteenth Century Philosophy: Revolutionary Responses to the Existing Order, vol 2 of The History of Continental Philosophy (8 vols.) | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - Aug 2011
Alan D. Schrift and Daniel Conway (eds.), Nineteenth Century Philosophy: Revolutionary Responses to the Existing Order, 317pp., vol. 2 of Alan D. Schrift (ed.), The History of Continental Philosophy (8 vols.), University of Chicago Press, 2010, 2700pp., $800.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226740461.
Reviewed by Frederick Beiser, Syracuse University

A thorough and thoroughly delicious evisceration - they follow Anglo-American curriculum (Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Dostoyevsky, Schopenhauer as outsider "rebels" though often reactionary, Counter-Enlightenment etc) and leave out huge tracks of "academic" work (especially neo-Kantians) with much more "revolutionary" or at least leftwing credentials. Leavung out those streams also distorts the 20thC heirs to the ignored traditions, whether a Cassirer or a Carnap.

?....German philosophy, which was decisive for the century as a whole, then "the most influential trends and developments" were the following: the materialism controversy, the rise of historicism, and the emergence of neo-Kantianism, especially the formation of the Southwestern and Marburg schools. None of these developments are even mentioned in this volume. The standard curriculum does not cover these trends and developments; and so the editors have removed them from history itself. The most important representatives of such revolutionary spirit in Germany were the materialists, particularly Ludwig Feuerbach, Ludwig Büchner, Heinrich Czolbe, Jakob Moleschott, Karl Vogt and Ernst Haeckel. ?...(Neither Feuerbach, who stood on the sidelines, nor Marx, who was in exile, took part in this controversy).

The materialism controversy was as important for German philosophy in the late nineteenth century as the pantheism controversy in the late eighteenth century. The position of every philosopher was determined by where he stood in this controversy. It was the very touchstone of whether a thinker was for or against the cause of modernity.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  continental_philosophy  neo-Kantian  neo-Hegelian  materialism  theology  historicism  Germany  Nietzsche  disciplines  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Petr Lom: The Limits of Doubt: The Moral and Political Implications of Skepticism (2001 book SUNY)
The Limits of Doubt studies the skepticism of Nietzsche, Sextus Empiricus, Hobbes, Diderot, and Montaigne in order to illustrate how different forms of skepticism can produce remarkably different implications. These include toleration; chastening of character; the prohibition of cruelty; indifference; corrosiveness of liberal principles; and freeing of the will from moral restraint. Demonstrating how skepticism is an underdetermined and unstable category, accompanied by varying unquestioned intentions and beliefs, this book shows how these limits of doubt shape its various possible implications. A unique examination of skepticism from a moral and political perspective, The Limits of Doubt will interest all those concerned with the possibilities for life in an age of doubt. -- “The Limits of Doubt is the best book that I have seen in over twenty years on moral-political skepticism. There are fresh insights on every page. This is a superb piece of work, clearly argued and beautifully written.” — Patrick Riley, University of Wisconsin-Madison -- downloaded pdf Chapter 1 to Note
books  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  scepticism  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  ancient_philosophy  Montaigne  Hobbes  Diderot  Nietzsche  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Mark Alfano - The Most Agreeable of All Vices: Nietzsche as Virtue Epistemologist (2013) | T & F Online
British Journal for the History of PhilosophyVolume 21, Issue 4, 2013, pages 767- 790 --

It has been argued with some justice by commentators from Walter Kaufmann to Thomas Hurka that Nietzsche's positive ethical position is best understood as a variety of virtue theory – in particular, as a brand of perfectionism. For Nietzsche, value flows from character. Less attention has been paid, however, to the details of the virtues he identifies for himself and his type. This neglect, along with Nietzsche's frequent irony and non-standard usage, has obscured the fact that almost all the virtues he praises are intellectual rather than moral. The vices he most despises include dogmatism, intellectual partisanship, faith, boredom, the desire for certainty and pity. The virtues he most appreciates include curiosity, honesty, scepticism, creativity, the historical sense, intellectual courage and intellectual fastidiousness. These tables of values place Nietzsche squarely among so-called responsibilist virtue epistemologists, such as Lorraine Code and Linda Zagzebski, who emphasize that knowledge is infused with desire and affect. I argue that curiosity construed as the specification of the will to power in the domain of epistemology is the cardinal Nietzschean virtue, and that the others – especially intellectual courage and honesty – are presupposed by curiosity. Thus, Nietzsche turns out to accept his own peculiar brand of the thesis of the unity of virtue.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  virtue_ethics  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Yvonne Sherratt: 9780521670982: (CUP 2006)
Continental Philosophy of Social Science demonstrates the unique and autonomous nature of the continental approach to social science and contrasts it with the Anglo-American tradition. Yvonne Sherratt argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the Continental tradition in order to appreciate its individual, humanist character. Examining the key traditions of hermeneutic, genealogy, and critical theory, and the texts of major thinkers such as Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Nietzsche, Foucault, the Early Frankfurt School and Habermas, she also contextualizes contemporary developments within strands of thought stemming back to Ancient Greece and Rome.

Anthony Pagden recommends re Enlightenment Project
books  intellectual_history  social_theory  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_philosophy  19thC  20thC  Germany  France  Nietzsche  hermeneutics  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  postmodern  Foucault  Habermas 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
Harold Mah: The Epistemology of the Sentence: Language, Civility, and Identity in France and Germany, Diderot to Nietzsche (1994)
JSTOR: Representations, No. 47 (Summer, 1994), pp. 64-84 From special issue on national culture before nationalism

Downloaded pdf to Note

Considerable discussion of French attempts to link epistemology (17thC rationalists and 18thC sensualist) with language structure - especially Condillac and Diderot. Voltaire and Frederick the Great prejudices pro French and anti German and Latin.

Aporia of civility - honnête homme was initially supposed to be transparent re virtue - by mid 18thC and Rousseau the aporia has become a total inversion- sociability as source of vice by encouraging misleading, self promotion etc

Further discusses French attempts to stabilize civility virtue by relegating politesse to the skeevy domain

Follows Herder, Fichte, Hegel who turn German syntax into virtue as closer to sensual experience, which they assert gives Germans access to supersensual and true inner sense of morality that French lack - according to Fichte they're trapped in nihilistic artificiality

Nietzsche shreds the German valorisation of supposed inner depths which aren't connected with transparent form
jstor  article  17thC  18thC  19thC  cultural_history  France  Germany  nationalism  language  epistemology  Diderot  Condillac  Nietzsche  Hegel  Voltaire  Frederick_the_Great  social_theory  politeness  elites  middle_class  salons  Rousseau  social_psychology  virtue_ethics  German_Idealism  society  alienation  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
James Livingston’s Reply to Rivka Maizlish - Usable Past debate | USIH blog June 2013
The following is James Livingston’s latest contribution to a vigorous debate on the uses of history.  Please see the other posts in this exchange by Ben Alpers, Jim Livingston, and Rivka Maizlish.
historiography  intellectual_history  historicism  Machiavelli  Nietzsche  political_culture  political_history  Founders  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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