dunnettreader + montaigne   26

O. Bradley Bassler, The Pace of Modernity: Reading With Blumenberg (2012) | re-press publishers
Wittgenstein said that philosophers should greet each other, not by saying “hello,” but rather “take your time.”  But what is time?  Time is money, but this points to an even better answer to this basic question for our modern epoch: time is acceleration.  In a cultural system which stresses economic efficiency, the quicker route is always the more prized, if not always the better one.  Wittgenstein’s dictum thus constitutes an act of rebellion against the dominant vector of our culture, but as such it threatens to become (quickly) anti-modern.  We need an approach to “reading” our information-rich culture which is not reactionary but rather meets its accelerated condition.  In this book, O. Bradley Bassler develops a toolkit for acute reading of our modern pace, not through withdrawal but rather through active engagement with a broad range of disciplines.  The main characters in this drama comprise a cast of master readers: Hannah Arendt, Jean Starobinski, Harold Bloom, Angus Fletcher, Hans Blumenberg and John Ashbery, with secondary figures drawn from the readers and critics whom this central group suggests.  We must develop a vocabulary of pacing, reflecting our modern distance from classical sources and the concomitant acceleration of our contemporary condition.  Only in this way can we begin to situate the phenomenon of modernity within the larger scales of human culture and history.

About the Author
O. Bradley Bassler studied in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago and took a second Ph.D. in Mathematics at Wesleyan University.  He has published in areas ranging from philosophy and history of philosophy to literary studies and the foundations of mathematics, with essays appearing in New German Critique, Heidegger Studies, Review of Metaphysics and other journals.  He is also a published poet.  He currently is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Georgia, Athens, USA.
biocultural_evolution  etexts  change-social  technology  open_access  Arendt  dualism  lit_crit  phenomenology  metaphor  Montaigne  Husserl  individualism  books  poetics  modernity  social_theory  Blumenberg  rhetoric  human_nature  Heidegger  Scribd  philosophical_anthropology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
John Conley - Madeleine de Scudéry (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Long framed by her critics as a pedantic précieuse, Scudéry has only recently attracted the interest of professional philosophers. Critics have dismissed her lengthy novels as unreadable, her famous Saturday salon as amateurish, and her philosophical ideas as derivative and confused. In the recent feminist expansion of the canon of humanities, however, another Scudéry has appeared. In this reevaluation, the philosophical significance of her writings has emerged. Her literary corpus presents a novel version of the ancient philosophical method of dialogue; it also expresses original, sophisticated theories concerning the ethical, aesthetic, and theological disputes of early modernity.
17thC  French_intellectuals  French_lit  Scudéry  intellectual_history  cultural_history  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  Montaigne  scepticism  libertine_erudite  salons  Louis_XIV  court_culture  virtue_ethics  women-intellectuals  women-rights  aesthetics  genre  novels  dialogue  précieuses 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Desmond M. Clarke - French Philosophy, 1572-1675 (June 2016) | Oxford University Press - History of Philosophy Series
Desmond M. Clarke presents a thematic history of French philosophy from the middle of the 16thC to the beginning of Louis XIV's reign. While the traditional philosophy of the schools was taught throughout this period by authors who have faded into permanent obscurity, a whole generation of writers who were not professional philosophers--some of whom never even attended a school or college--addressed issues that were prominent in French public life. Clarke explores such topics as the novel political theory espoused by monarchomachs, such as Beze and Hotman, against Bodin's account of absolute sovereignty; the scepticism of Montaigne, Charron, and Sanches; the ethical discussions of Du Vair, Gassendi, and Pascal; innovations in natural philosophy that were inspired by Mersenne and Descartes and implemened by members of the Academie royale des sciences; theories of the human mind from Jean de Silhon to Cureau de la Chambre and Descartes; and the novel arguments in support of women's education and equality that were launched by De Gournay, Du Bosc, Van Schurman and Poulain de la Barre. The writers involved were lawyers, political leaders, theologians, and independent scholars and they acknowledged, almost unanimously, the authority of the Bible as a source of knowledge that was claimed to be more reliable than the fragile powers of human understanding. Since they could not agree, however, on which books of the Bible were canonical or how that should be understood, their discussions raised questions about faith and reason that mirrored those involved in the infamous Galileo affair.
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  France  political_philosophy  sovereignty  Bodin  Montaigne  scepticism  academies  Gassendi  Pascal  Descartes  mind  mind-body  theology  natural_philosophy  Biblical_authority  women-education  women-intellectuals 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Gerard Passannante - Homer Atomized: Francis Bacon and the Matter of Tradition (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 1015-1047 -- extensive primary and secondary bibliography from Renaissance philology through Montaigne, Bacon, Vico and 18thC German challenges to Homeric "authorship" as well as ancient literary tradition, epistemology, cosmology and physics - Stoics, Epicureans -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography  cosmology  epistemology  philology  natural_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Homer  atomism  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  authors  author_intention  text_analysis  time  void  chance  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  17thC  18thC  scepticism  Montaigne  Bacon  Vico  Nietzsche  tradition  cultural_transmission  knowledge  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Montaigne Studies
Home page for Montaigne Project -- once a year journal, searchable text of Essais with different stages of publication indicated, Extensive critical bibliography
scepticism  reception  Montaigne  bibliography  16thC  journals-academic  French_language  French_lit  website  ancient_philosophy  intellectual_history  etexts  literary_history  Wars_of_Religion 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Publications en ligne de Guy de Pernon
iFrame site with a variety of projects, a running journal etc -- he's transkated the Essais into modern French, available in ePub formats
ebooks  French_language  Montaigne  French_lit  website  etexts  16thC 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Michel de MONTAIGNE
La page de Trismégiste Version HTML d'après l'édition de 1595 Livre I Livre II Livre III Le livre I en un seul fichier ZIP : Essais I (295 ko). Le livre II en un seul fichier ZIP : Essais II
16thC  books  French_lit  French_language  Montaigne  etexts 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Bourke and Raymond Geuss, eds. - Political Judgement: Essays for John Dunn (2009) | Cambridge University Press
From Plato to Max Weber, the attempt to understand political judgement took the form of a struggle to define the relationship between politics and morals. (...) explores a series of related problems in philosophy and political thought, raising fundamental questions about democracy, trust, the nature of statesmanship, and the relations between historical and political judgement. (...) reconsiders some classic debates in political theory – about equality, authority, responsibility and ideology – Introduction **--** Part I. The Character of Political Judgement: *-* 1. What is political judgement? Raymond Geuss *-* 2. Sticky judgement and the role of rhetoric Victoria McGeer and Philip Pettit *-* 3. Theory and practice: the revolution in political judgement Richard Bourke **--** Part II. Trust, Judgement and Consent: *-* 4. On trusting the judgement of our rulers Quentin Skinner *-* 5. Adam Smith's history of law and government as political theory Istvan Hont *-* 6. Marxism in translation: critical reflections on Indian radical thought Sudipta Kaviraj **--** Part III. Rationality and Judgement: *-* 7. Pericles' unreason Geoffrey Hawthorn
8. Accounting for human actions: individual agency and political judgement in Montaigne's Essais Biancamaria Fontana *-* 9. Nehru's judgement Sunil Khilnani **--** Part IV. Democracy and Modern Political Judgement: *-* 10. Democracy, equality and redistribution Adam Przeworski *-* 11. Democracy and terrorism Richard Tuck -- excerpt from Intro downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  political_culture  ancient_Greece  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  18thC  Montaigne  Smith  agency  decision_theory  democracy  equality  redistribution  political_participation  public_opinion  rhetoric-political  Marxism  India  colonialism  post-colonial  terrorism  legitimacy  authority  moral_philosophy  responsibility  accountability  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - « Qual l’alto Ægeo... » : Montaigne et l’essai des poètes italiens | Italique, XI, 2008, p.109-129.
Italique [En ligne], XI | 2008, mis en ligne le 01 février 2012, DOI : 10.4000/italique.213. **--** La poésie est l’expression privilégiée de l’émotion pour Montaigne.1Il cite tout au long des Essais d’innombrables vers, par lesquels il exprime tout ce que sa prose ne peut dire. Ces citations contribuent à un effet d’hétérogénéité stylistique et linguistique, qui définit l’originalité même du livre, dans le cadre d’une « rhétorique des citations » et d’une esthétique de la surprise et de la varietas. Ces vers sont en latin pour la plupart d’entre eux, constituant une véritable anthologie, d’Ovide et de Virgile, cités dès le chapitre 2 du premier livre, à Horace, qui conclut le dernier chapitre du livre III. Montaigne cite également 70 vers de poètes italiens. Ces fragments en langue italienne sont plus importants que les vers français, si l’on excepte, dans les trois premières éditions, le recueil des 29 sonnets d’Etienne de La Boétie, qui constitue à lui seul la matière d’un chapitre dédié à la comtesse de Guiche. La langue italienne, sous le règne de Henri III, était un signe de distinction. De tels vers étaient l’expression ostentatoire d’une culture mondaine, que le livre partageait avec ses lecteurs, dames et gentilshommes dont Montaigne voulait être le pédagogue sans pédantisme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  French_lit  Italian_lit  Latin_lit  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  poetry  poetics  vernacular  epic  epigrammes  prose  style-philosophy  Montaigne  intertextual  influence-literary  elite_culture  Petrarch  Ariosto  Dante  Virgil  Tasso  Lucretius  Seneca  Pléiade  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
T.S. Eliot. - "Hamlet and His Problems." The Sacred Wood; Essays on Poetry and Criticism 1921. | bartleby.com
The only way of expressing emotion in the form of art is by finding an “objective correlative”; in other words, a set of objects, a situation, a chain of events which shall be the formula of that particular emotion; such that when the external facts, which must terminate in sensory experience, are given, the emotion is immediately evoked. If you examine any of Shakespeare’s more successful tragedies, you will find this exact equivalence; you will find that the state of mind of Lady Macbeth walking in her sleep has been communicated to you by a skilful accumulation of imagined sensory impressions; the words of Macbeth on hearing of his wife’s death strike us as if, given the sequence of events, these words were automatically released by the last event in the series. The artistic “inevitability” lies in this complete adequacy of the external to the emotion; and this is precisely what is deficient in Hamlet. Hamlet (the man) is dominated by an emotion which is inexpressible, because it is in excess of the facts as they appear. -- Why he attempted it at all is an insoluble puzzle; under compulsion of what experience he attempted to express the inexpressibly horrible, we cannot ever know. We need a great many facts in his biography; and we should like to know whether, and when, and after or at the same time as what personal experience, he read Montaigne, II. xii., Apologie de Raimond Sebond. We should have, finally, to know something which is by hypothesis unknowable, for we assume it to be an experience which, in the manner indicated, exceeded the facts. We should have to understand things which Shakespeare did not understand himself.
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  English_lit  literary_history  lit_crit  Shakespeare  Montaigne  Eliot_TS 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Frederick Neuhouser, review - Lee MacLean, The Free Animal: Rousseau on Free Will and Human Nature // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
Two interpretive questions guide MacLean's study: first, whether Rousseau's ascription of free will to humans, especially in the Second Discourse, is to be taken at face value (rather than as part of an esoteric strategy to hide his "true" view from the masses); and second, what implications the ascription or non-ascription of free will has for interpreting his moral and political thought. -- most of book on No. 1, to counter Straussians esoteric reading -- The textual arguments offered here are deft and attentive to nuance, and, unlike most treatments of Rousseau by philosophers, they cover not only his three central philosophical texts, but also less studied works such as Reveries of the Solitary Walker. Chapter 3 contains one of the best extended treatments of Emile's "Savoyard Vicar" that I have read. -- Especially intriguing is the suggestion that the religious views expressed by the Vicar are to be read as playing a crucial role in The Social Contract's argument that a legitimate republic requires a civil religion. -- She demonstrates a sure and confident grasp of Rousseau's texts, including unpublished material. Even more impressive, she knows a surprising amount about the views of Rousseau's contemporaries and predecessors on the topic of free will - Buffon, Montaigne, and Condillac, for example - and she very helpfully brings this knowledge to bear on her carefully constructed interpretations of Rousseau. For this reason her book is a must-read for scholars interested in the historical context within which Rousseau's views develop.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  human_nature  18thC  Rousseau  free_will  self-love  self-interest  civil_religion  social_contract  Buffon  Condillac  Montaigne  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Cécile Alduy, Roland Greene - Forum Introduction - Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads | Republics of Letters - Volume 1, Issue 2 ( February 2010)
Nice overview of the entangling and untangling of our notions of experience and experiment from Petrarch to Montaigne -- downloaded pdf to Note -- TOC of Forum -- Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads by Cécile Alduy, by Roland Greene. (1) Artificial Men: Alchemy, Transubstantiation, and the Homunculus by Mary Baine Campbell. (2) Machines in the Garden by Jessica Riskin. (3) Atheism as a Devotional Category by George Hoffmann. (4) Montaigne: The Eclectic Pragmatist by Anthony Long. (5) Putting Experience First by Timothy Hampton
article  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  epistemology  empiricism  self  metaphor  cultural_history  literary_history  Seneca  Montaigne  scepticism  atheism_panic  pragmatism  alchemy  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Hassan Melehy - Silencing the Animals: Montaigne, Descartes, and the Hyperbole of Reason | JSTOR: symplokē, Vol. 13, No. 1/2 (2005), pp. 263-282
Toulmin on Cartesian hyper rationality and Derrida on man animal, Montaigne and Descartes -- useful postmodern bibliography as well as articles in last few decades on whether Descartes was a friend or enemy of animals based on where he drew the boundary.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  modernity  rationality  scepticism  anti-foundationalism  Montaigne  Descartes  animals  humanism  reason  emotions  perception  sensibility  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Dana Chabot - Thomas Hobbes: Skeptical Moralist | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 89, No. 2 (Jun., 1995), pp. 401-410
Thomas Hobbes is usually held to have been a skeptic in matters of religion and morality. I accept the claim that there is a distinctive skeptical strain in Hobbes' thought but argue that his skepticism informs his moral vision, rather than depriving him of a conception of morality. As evidence for this reading, I situate Hobbes in a tradition of "skeptical moralism," along with Montaigne and certain other Renaissance figures. As opposed to moral skeptics, skeptical moralists think of moral agents as divided selves, pulled in one direction by law and another by conscience. Skeptical moralists use skepticism to make people aware of this tension, and I argue that (especially in his remarks on religion) Hobbes was doing just that. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  religious_belief  scepticism  moral_psychology  emotions  virtue  Montaigne  French_moralists  libertine_erudite  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Dan Engster - The Montaignian Moment | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 59, No. 4 (Oct., 1998), pp. 625-650
Modification of Pocock's theory - Montaigne's moderation and self knowledge, self-control as 2nd paradigm influencing further political thought - a stage between the activism of civic humanism and state-centered in Hobbes
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  16thC  17thC  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Hobbes  republicanism  civic_humanism  raison-d'-état  nation-state  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eyal Chowers - The Physiology of the Citizen: The Present-Centered Body and Its Political Exile | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 30, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 649-676
Shift from civic humanism's optimistic view of man's capacity to build for the future and control sociopolitical environment to pessimistic view of capacity of citizens under raison d'Etat -- 16thC and 17thC increasingly focused on multipart, shifting self and passions vs reason rather than the development of a stable character that Renaissance humanism concerned with. Ties shift to new views of anatomy (eg Harvey) and connections between physiology and psychology and impact on different notions of time relative to self, society and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  cultural_history  natural_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  British_history  France  Italy  Italian_Wars  Renaissance  humanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  raison-d'-état  Absolutism  emotions  physiology  psychology  medicine  self  time  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Descartes  Gassendi  Hobbes  Locke  Harrington  Harvey  identity  character  mechanism  thinking_matter  mind  mind-body  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Gaile Pohlhaus and John R. Wright - Using Wittgenstein Critically: A Political Approach to Philosophy | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 30, No. 6 (Dec., 2002), pp. 800-827
Rejects claim that Wittgenstein focus on practice puts him in the conservative tradition of Montaigne or Oakeshott. But also rejects Rorty's approach of dismissing felt problems of sceptics or foundationalists. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  praxis  conservatism  Montaigne  Wittgenstein  Rorty  liberalism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Collins - Montaigne's Rejection of Reason of State in 'De l'Utile et de l'honneste' | JSTOR: The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring, 1992), pp. 71-94
This article analyzes Book Three, Chapter One of Montaigne's Essais to determine if the interpretation by Quentin Skinner and others (that it demonstrates Montaigne's support of what was later called raison d'Etat) is as clear as it seems to be. Through a close reading of the text and examination of a number of deliberate paradoxes and satirical inversions, it is possible to resolve several seeming contradictions in the essay, and to conclude that the essayist's intention is precisely the opposite of that ascribed to him. There is an inner coherence to this essay that can be shown to be directed against the precepts that underpinned the logic of"reason of state" writings; in fact, he completely undermines that logic. The ambiguous nature of Montaigne's essay, however, is seen as the cause of its misinterpretation from his own time up until the present day. While acknowledging that Montaigne's ambiguity led to his essay being used in support of reason of state thinking, it is hoped that this analysis will lead to a reevaluation of Montaigne's intentions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  16thC  Montaigne  Machiavelli  raison-d'-état  utility  honnête  Skinner  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eugen Weber, The ups and downs of honor | The American Scholar v. 68 no1 (Winter 1999)
Author: Weber, Eugen. Source: The American Scholar v. 68 no1 (Winter 1999) p. 79-91 -- from Homer to the Wire with lots of Latin, German, French and English etymology and a digression on the democratization of 19thC French duelling
article  cultural_history  social_history  political_history  ethics  honor  etymology  medieval_history  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Montesquieu  Montaigne  Rousseau  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Julian H. Franklin Philosophy and the State in France by Nannerl O. Keohane (1982)
JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 93, No. 1 (Oct., 1982), pp. 173-176 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his discussion of importance of moral philosophy and public-private re political for the French from the wars of religion (Montaigne) onwards
reviews  books  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  France  16thC  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Absolutism  scepticism  Stoicism  emotions  self-interest  self-love  corruption  Montaigne  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Chapter 11: Paul Rahe, "Blaise Pascal, Pierre Nicole, and the Origins of Liberal Sociology." Enlightenment and Secularism: Essays on the Mobilization of Reason edited by Christopher Nadon (2013) - Google Books
Interesting tale by Rahe of links between Port Royale expurgation of Pascal's Pensées (especially Pascal's attacks on Montaigne, Charron, Descartes) and later Locke's reading of Pierre Nicole and development of "liberal sociology" -- in new intellectual_history of the Enlightenment collection by guy from Claremont -- despite their reactionary contemporary politics, some of papers look quite useful
Rahe eems to overstate degree to which Pascal was "misunderstood" by contemporaries -- Voltaire attack suggests otherwise, and Pope grasped theological base of human condition, just didn't have to accept Original Sin and hellfire (presume not God to span) while adapting Pascal's jest and riddle of the world
chapter  books  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  social_theory  social_sciences  liberalism  Pascal  Locke  moral_philosophy  human_nature  Montaigne  Descartes  Port_Royale  Enlightenment  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Petr Lom: The Limits of Doubt: The Moral and Political Implications of Skepticism (2001 book SUNY)
The Limits of Doubt studies the skepticism of Nietzsche, Sextus Empiricus, Hobbes, Diderot, and Montaigne in order to illustrate how different forms of skepticism can produce remarkably different implications. These include toleration; chastening of character; the prohibition of cruelty; indifference; corrosiveness of liberal principles; and freeing of the will from moral restraint. Demonstrating how skepticism is an underdetermined and unstable category, accompanied by varying unquestioned intentions and beliefs, this book shows how these limits of doubt shape its various possible implications. A unique examination of skepticism from a moral and political perspective, The Limits of Doubt will interest all those concerned with the possibilities for life in an age of doubt. -- “The Limits of Doubt is the best book that I have seen in over twenty years on moral-political skepticism. There are fresh insights on every page. This is a superb piece of work, clearly argued and beautifully written.” — Patrick Riley, University of Wisconsin-Madison -- downloaded pdf Chapter 1 to Note
books  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  scepticism  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  ancient_philosophy  Montaigne  Hobbes  Diderot  Nietzsche  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Pierre Force: Montaigne and the Coherence of Eclecticism (2009)
Project MUSE - Pierre Force. "Montaigne and the Coherence of Eclecticism." Journal of the History of Ideas70.4 (2009): 523-544 -- no abstract -- Because Montaigne writes in the ancient tradition of philosophy as a way of life, one may recall Hadot's suggestion that Foucault's notion of "writing the self" is an intriguing but historically inaccurate description of ancient philosophical practice. But perhaps Hadot agrees with Foucault after all, since in his most recent interviews, he speaks favorably of eclecticism, a notion that is central to Foucault's analysis of self-fashioning through writing. The case of Montaigne is particularly interesting for these purposes, not only because the Essays seem to be the prototypical example of "writing the self," but also because eclecticism is both discussed and practiced throughout the Essays. I propose to take a fresh look at this issue by investigating the status of eclecticism in Montaigne's Essays. This must start with an examination of the philosophical tradition most closely associated with the practice of eclecticism, the Skeptical tradition.
article  Project_MUSE  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  16thC  Stoicism  Epicurean  Seneca  Cicero  Montaigne  scepticism  eclecticism  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Stephen H Gregg: Defoe and Descartes’ beast-machine: a brief bibliography | The Daniel Defoe Blog
Recently, I became rather obsessed with two small pieces in Defoe’s Review of March 27th, 1705 and the ‘Supplement of January 1705’ (published after March). They debate the extent to which dogs can reason. Researching the contexts for this involved a deep dive into the complex history of the debate about reasoning animals, the animal soul, and Descartes’ ‘beast-machine’ as outlined in his Discourse on Method. The debate spun across religious, philosophical, classical, literary, journalistic and scientific writings for over a century after. But I particularly needed to map out the writings published in the years immediately before Defoe’s 1705 piece.[1] The results revealed a gratifying surge in the English debate from around 1690.
Britain  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  cultural_history  intellectual_history  Defoe  Descartes  metaphysics  theology  publishing  public_sphere  bibliography  soul  reason  human_nature  animals  Bolingbroke  EF-add  Montaigne  Lucretius  Locke 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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