dunnettreader + mill   25

Duncan Bell - Reordering the World: Essays on Liberalism and Empire. (2016) | Princeton University Press
Reordering the World is a penetrating account of the complexity and contradictions found in liberal visions of empire. Focusing mainly on 19thC Britain—at the time the largest empire in history and a key incubator of liberal political thought— Bell sheds new light on some of the most important themes in modern imperial ideology. The book ranges widely across Victorian intellectual life and beyond. The opening essays explore the nature of liberalism, varieties of imperial ideology, the uses and abuses of ancient history, the imaginative functions of the monarchy, and fantasies of Anglo-Saxon global domination. They are followed by illuminating studies of prominent thinkers, including J. A. Hobson, L. T. Hobhouse, John Stuart Mill, Henry Sidgwick, Herbert Spencer, and J. R. Seeley. While insisting that liberal attitudes to empire were multiple and varied, Bell emphasizes the liberal fascination with settler colonialism. It was in the settler empire that many liberal imperialists found the place of their political dreams. -- Duncan Bell is Reader in Political Thought and International Relations at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Christ's College. His books include The Idea of Greater Britain: Empire and the Future of World Order, 1860–1900 (Princeton). Intro downloaded to Tab
books  kindle-available  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_Empire-military  liberalism  IR_theory  colonial_governance  settler_colonies  imperialism  intellectual_history  competition-interstate  uses_of_history  national_origins  Anglo-Saxons  Mill  Sidgwick  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  imperialism-critique  monarchy  hegemony 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Ian Hacking - On Boyd (response to Boyd's essay commenting on Hacking re natural kinds) | JSTOR - (1991)
Philosophical Studies: An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition, Vol. 61, No. 1/2, The Twenty-Ninth Oberlin Colloquium in Philosophy (Feb., 1991), pp. 149-154 -- colloquium on Realism and Relativism -- all 3 downloaded to Note
article  jstor  natural_kinds  constructivism  nominalism  Locke-Essay  epistemology  epistemology-social  Mill  Wittgenstein  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Ian Hacking - A Tradition of Natural Kinds | JSTOR - Philosophical Studies (1991)
Philosophical Studies: An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition, Vol. 61, No. 1/2, The Twenty-Ninth Oberlin Colloquium in Philosophy (Feb., 1991), pp. 109-126 -- the colloquium was Realism and Relativism -- Hacking was commented on by Richard Boyd and Hacking responded in writing -- both are also downloaded to Note
article  jstor  metaphysics  ontology  natural_kinds  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  epistemology-social  constructivism  nominalism  Mill  Locke-Essay  Quine  Peirce  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Carmen E. Pavel, review - Sharon R. Krause, Freedom Beyond Sovereignty: Reconstructing Liberal Individualism (U of Chicago 2015) | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - Sept 2015
King's College London -- What unites these experiences of frustrated freedom? It is certainly not the fact that the protagonists in these examples lack the capacity for rational, intentional control over their actions or face legal impediments to their choices. Krause thus parts ways with a long tradition in western political thought dating back to Locke, Kant and Mill, which locates individual freedom in the rational will and the capacity to exercise intentional choice and control. In fact, the originality of Krause's account is showing how freedom can be undermined despite a generally friendly background of political rights and privileges that guarantee the space for intentional choice. Something subtler is going on, which is why certain dimensions of freedom have been absent from standard accounts of what it means to be free. The quality of our everyday interpersonal exchanges matters quite a lot for individual freedom because these interactions are constitutive of personal agency. Krause argues that a proper understanding of agency is inextricably tied to freedom. Following Bernard Williams, she deploys a two-dimensional conception of agency: agency consists both in deliberation and results. To be an agent is both to plan one's actions and to have a recognizable impact on the world. Agency is thus "the affirmation of one's subjective existence, or personal identity, through concrete action in the world." The efficacy dimension of agency distinguishes it from "mere willing or dreaming." (4) Crucially, however, we are not in complete control of how our actions affect the world. Their effect depends, in significant part, on how others perceive and respond to them.
Instapaper  books  reviews  political_philosophy  political_culture  liberty  liberty-negative  liberty-positive  Berlin_Isaiah  Mill  Kant-ethics  Williams_Bernard  agency  rationality  identity  identity_politics  from instapaper
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Josh Chafetz - Democracy’s Privileged Few: Legislative Privilege and Democratic Norms in the British and American Constitutions | Yale University Press - 2011
This book is the first to compare the freedoms and protections of members of the United States Congress with those of Britain’s Parliament. Placing legislative privilege in historical context, Josh Chafetz explores how and why legislators in Britain and America have been granted special privileges in five areas: jurisdictional conflicts between the courts and the legislative houses, freedom of speech, freedom from civil arrest, contested elections, and the disciplinary powers of the houses. Legislative privilege is a crucial component of the relationship between a representative body and the other participants in government, including the people. In recounting and analyzing the remarkable story of how parliamentary government emerged and evolved in Britain and how it crossed the Atlantic, Chafetz illuminates a variety of important constitutional issues, including the separation of powers, the nature of representation, and the difference between written and unwritten constitutionalism. This book will inspire in readers a much greater appreciation for the rise and triumph of democracy. -- see kindle sample
books  kindle-available  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  constitutions  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  democracy  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  representative_institutions  political_participation  UK_Government  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  American_colonies  US_constitution  Congress  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  House_of_Representatives  constituencies  judiciary  judicial_review  exec_branch  monarchy  monarchical_republic  MPs  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_culture  legitimacy  Founders  Madison  Blackstone  Mill  prerogative  bill_of_rights  bills_of_attainder  elections-disputed  Bolingbroke 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Gordon Graham, Wittgenstein and Natural Religion // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - July 2015
In this book, Gordon Graham attempts to breathe new life into an old idea, namely, a naturalized conception of religion; with this goal, he succeeds admirably.…
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july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Dunham, review - W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 22, 2014
This volume is a hugely important contribution to scholarship on 19thC philosophy. ...for many important aspects of British philosophy in the 19thC the scholarship is almost non-existent. As Mander notes in the introduction, when we hear "19thC philosophy", we are more likely to think of 'the great systems of continental thought'. This volume shows that the British tradition boasts a remarkably rich and varied range of philosophical resources, and that it deserves the level of scholarship that the British traditions of the 17thC and 18thC are beginning to enjoy. In a review of another recent volume on 19thC philosophy Frederick Beiser argued that 'No period ... stands in more need of an original historian than 19thC philosophy. The standard tropes and figures do no justice to its depths, riches, and powers'. One of this present volume's greatest virtues is that it answers Beiser's plea as well as offering an impressive number of very original contributions.... It does an outstanding job of introducing a wide range of philosophical figures and ideas that will be unknown... It also includes excellent contributions on well-known philosophers and orientates the reader to the secondary literature.... The... volume provides a clear and comprehensive picture of how 19thC philosophy was practised and understood during the period. -- The Handbook has 6 parts: (1) Logic and Scientific Method; (2) Metaphysics; (3) Science and Philosophy; (4) Ethical, Social, and Political Thought; (5) Religious Philosophy; and, (6) The Practice of Philosophy. As Mander states, these classifications come from our contemporary perspective, and we should not expect the work of 19thC philosophers to neatly fit within them. Nonetheless, the individual authors [present] the aspects of a philosopher or school.. that fits within these categories while ... making clear how these aspects fit within a larger philosophical perspective ....
books  reviews  amazon.com  find  intellectual_history  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Common_Sense  German_Idealism  British_Idealism  Kant  Hegelian  Mill  Sidgwick  Marx  Newman_JH  metaphysics  epistemology  empiricism  mind  perception  ideas-theories  idealism-transcendental  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  social_theory  Coleridge  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  science-and-religion  scientific_method  Darwinism  evolution  evolution-as-model  evolutionary_biology  evolution-social  Spencer_Herbert  political_philosophy  intelligentsia  elite_culture  professionalization  university  Evernote 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
JON GARTHOFF - LEGITIMACY IS NOT AUTHORITY | JSTOR: Law and Philosophy, Vol. 29, No. 6 (November 2010), pp. 669-694
The two leading traditions of theorizing about democratic legitimacy are liberalism and deliberative democracy. Liberals typically claim that legitimacy consists in the consent of the governed, while deliberative democrats typically claim that legitimacy consists in the soundness of political procedures. Despite this difference, both traditions see the need for legitimacy as arising from the coercive enforcement of law and regard legitimacy as necessary for law to have normative authority. While I endorse the broad aims of these two traditions, I believe they both misunderstand the nature of legitimacy. In this essay I argue that the legitimacy of a law is neither necessary nor sufficient for its normative authority, and I argue further that the need for legitimacy in law arises regardless of whether the law is coercively enforced. I thus articulate a new understanding of the legitimacy and authority of law. -- didn't download -- bibliography heavily classic modern and contemporary philosophers
article  jstor  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  institutions  authority  legitimacy  legal_culture  legal_validity  liberalism  social_contract  consent  reasons  enforcement  deliberation-public  Habermas  democracy  norms  normativity  obligation  Enlightenment  Locke  Mill  Rawls  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Decline of Natural Right [chapter] (2009) :: SSRN in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY, Allen Wood and Songsuk Susan Hahn, eds., Cambridge University Press
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-38 -- What happened to the doctrine of natural right in the 19thC? We know that it flourished in the 17thC and 18thC. We know that something like it - the doctrine of human rights and new forms of social contract theory - flourished again in the second half of the 20thC and continues to flourish in the 21stC. In between there was a period of decline and hibernation - ... in which to invoke natural right was always to invite intellectual ridicule and accusations of political irresponsibility. Thus article asks: How far can the decline of natural right in the 19thC be attributed to the reaction against the revolution in France? How far it was the effect of independent streams of thought, like positivism and historicism? Why was radical thought so ambivalent about natural right throughout the 19thC, and why was socialist thought in particular inclined to turn its back on it? As a framework for thought, natural right suffered a radical decline in the social and political sciences. But things were not so clear in jurisprudence, and natural right lived on to a much riper old age in the writings of some prominent economists. What is it about this theory that allowed it to survive in these environments, when so much of the rest of intellectual endeavor in the 19thC was toxic or inhospitable to it. Finally, I shall ask how far American thought represents an exception to all of this. Why and to what extent did the doctrine survive as a way of thinking in the United States, long after it had lost its credibility elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  natural_law  natural_rights  human_rights  counter-revolution  historicism  positivism  legal_theory  nationalism  national_interest  conservatism  socialism  social_contract  relativism  revolutions  1848_revolutions  French_Revolution  anticlerical  Bentham  Burke  Hume  Jefferson  Kant  Locke  Marx  Mill  Savigny  Spencer_Herbert  George_Henry  US_society  American_exceptionalism  liberalism  social_theory  social_sciences  Social_Darwinism  social_order  mass_culture  political_participation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Case Against Free Speech (July 2014 working paper) :: SSRN
Free societies employ a variety of institutions — including courts and schools — in which speech is heavily regulated on the basis of its content ... in order to promote other desirable ends, including discovery of the truth. I illustrate this with the case of courts and rules of evidence. Three differences between courts and the polity might seem to counsel against extending that approach more widely. First, the courtroom has an official and somewhat reliable (as well as reviewable) arbiter of the epistemic merits, while the polity may not. Second, no other non-epistemic values of speech are at stake in the courtroom, whereas they are in the polity. Third, the courtroom’s jurisdiction is temporally limited in a way the polity’s may not be. I argue that only the first of these poses a serious worry about speech regulation outside select institutions like courts. I also argue for viewing "freedom of speech" like "freedom of action": speech, like everything else human beings do, can be for good or ill... and thus the central question in free speech jurisprudence should really be how to regulate speech effectively — to minimize its very real harms, without undue cost to its positive values — rather than rationalizing (often fancifully) the supposed special value of speech. In particular, I argue against autonomy-based defenses of a robust free speech principle. I conclude that the central issue in free speech jurisprudence is not about speech but about institutional competence; I offer some reasons — from the Marxist "left" and the public choice "right"— for being skeptical that capitalist democracies have the requisite competence; and make some suggestive but inconclusive remarks about how these defects might be remedied. - No of Pages: 41
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  free_speech  Mill  Hayek  Adorno  Frankfurt_School  Kant  Kant-ethics  Marx  autonomy  networks-information  evidence  epistemology-social  education  regulation  public_choice  public_sphere  public_opinion  political_participation  competition 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Fitzjames Stephen, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, ed. Stuart D. Warner (LF ed. 1993) - Online Library of Liberty
James Fitzjames Stephen, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, ed. Stuart D. Warner (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1993). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/572> -- The Liberty Fund edition of this work, published 1873. Impugning John Stuart Mill’s famous treatise, On Liberty, Stephen criticized Mill for turning abstract doctrines of the French Revolution into “the creed of a religion.” Only the constraints of morality and law make liberty possible, warned Stephen, and attempts to impose unlimited freedom, material equality, and an indiscriminate love of humanity will lead inevitably to coercion and tyranny. -- he also attacks Mill on subordination of women (he's of course for it as being a natural hierarchy, Virginia must have been proud of her uncle) and Utilitarianism, though Stephen himself was a utilitarian. -- see also short bibliography re Victorian intelligentsia
books  etexts  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_history  human_nature  Stephen_Leslie  Victorian  Mill  utilitarianism  women-rights  hierarchy  social_order  liberalism  democracy  mass_culture  political_participation  liberty  equality  communitarian  individualism  laisser-faire 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Critical Miscellanies: Second Series - John Morley - Google Books
Expanded and revised articles from Fortnightly Review -- Duplicates Macaulay piece from Vol 6 of his collected works -- most devoted to France in 18thC (including a long piece on Robespierre and another long one on Turgot) - looks like JS Mill died during this period, so there are several retrospective pieces on Mill, his Autobiography etc. -- Added to Google_Books library
books  etexts  Google_Books  Morley  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  political_history  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  philosophes  Physiocrats  Turgot  political_economy  Robespierre  French_lit  materialism  Terror  Mill  utilitarianism  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  logic  empiricism  liberalism  British_politics  British_Empire  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Critical Miscellanies - The Works of Lord Morley (Vol 6) - John Morley - Google Books
A mix of biograohical and critical treatment of a range of 19thC authors. Plus an interesting description of the Edinburgh Review after Jeffrey handed editorial duties over to Napier. Added to Google_Books library
books  etexts  Google_Books  19thC  intellectual_history  English_lit  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  Emerson  Carlyle  Macaulay  Byron  Eliot_George  Martineau  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Transcendentals  Locke  Mill  empiricism  religious_belief  religious_culture  Edinburgh_Review  journalism  magazines  Brougham  Bolingbroke  Bagehot  Morley  lit_crit  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
On Compromise (1874) -- The works of Lord Morley, Vol 3 - John Morley - Google Books
Concerned about erosion of acting according to moral and political principles. Analysis of causes (1) French example of claiming that policies deduced from general principles gives principle a bad name (2) historicism (1st rumbles of "relativism" accusation) (3) newspapers responding to short term opinions and prejudices of buyers (4) State Church puts important part of educated elite into defense of status quo and rejection of thinking through implications of new information, conditions etc - as well as encourage hypocrisy (5) nouveau riche that has neither the class tradition of noblesse oblige nor what he takes to be widely shared American attachment to the notion of the common good -- a political and intellectual_history of 19thC England, including reaction to Enlightenment - last chapter focus on free thought vs free speech, Locke, JS Mill, liberty and toleration, ending with remarks by Diderot -- added to Google_Books library
books  etexts  Google_Books  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  intellectual_history  France  Anglo-French  Enlightenment  Hume  Diderot  Locke-religion  Mill  tolerance  free-thinkers  free_speech  public_opinion  newspapers  haute_bourgeoisie  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  political_culture  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  historicism  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  liberalism  Victorian  Morley  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Edmund Fawcett: Liberalism: The Life of an Idea | Princeton University Press
Using a broad idea of liberalism, the book discusses celebrated thinkers from Constant and Mill to Berlin, Hayek, and Rawls, as well as more neglected figures. Its twentieth-century politicians include Franklin D. Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson, and Willy Brandt, but also Hoover, Reagan, and Kohl. The story tracks political liberalism from its beginnings in the 1830s to its long, grudging compromise with democracy, through a golden age after 1945 to the present mood of challenge and doubt. Focusing on the United States, Britain, France, and Germany, the book traces how the distinct traditions of these countries converged on the practice of liberal democracy. Although liberalism has many currents, Fawcett suggests that they are held together by shared commitments: resistance to power, faith in social progress, respect for people's chosen enterprises and beliefs, and acceptance that interests and faiths will always conflict. Edmund Fawcett worked at The Economist for more than three decades, serving as chief correspondent in Washington, Paris, and Berlin, as well as European and literary editor. - Introduction downloaded pdf to Note
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may 2014 by dunnettreader
Ali Hasan, review - Albert Casullo, Essays on A Priori Knowledge and Justification // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
The last thirty years or so have seen a significant resurgence of interest in the a priori. Albert Casullo's collection of excellent essays spans this period. The first six published essays (from 1977 to 2002) provide background to and central arguments for a number of themes covered in A Priori Justification (2003): (1) a defense of a minimal analysis of a priori justified belief as nonexperientially justified belief; (2) a critique of traditional criteriological arguments both for and against the existence of the a priori -- arguments that appeal to necessity, certainty, and empirical irrefutability or indefeasibility as criteria for a priori knowledge (or justification); (3) a critique of Laurence BonJour's (1998) argument that rationalism is preferable to empiricism since the rejection of the a priori leads to radical skepticism; (4) an assessment of the reliabilist approach to the a priori, including a defense of reliabilist responses to concerns with the coherence of the approach and its consistency with fallibilism and epistemological naturalism; and (5) a defense, on the basis of these critiques and the resulting stalemate between rationalism and empiricism, of the coherence of, and need for, empirical investigation into the existence of non-experiential sources of justification. The next four, published after A Priori Justification, explore some of the above issues in more detail. These include an extension of the critique of traditional arguments by considering Mill's, Quine's, Putnam's and Kitcher's arguments against the existence of the a priori ... and other topics such as the relationship between testimony and the a priori, and the relevance of socio-historical accounts of knowledge to the a priori.The final four pieces are unpublished essays that address some issues in the recent literature. The first is an extension of critiques of skeptical arguments for the a priori (like theme 3 above).... The second and third essays raise problems for some recent accounts of modal knowledge or knowledge of the modal status of propositions. The final piece defends the a priori/a posteriori distinction from recent attempts to challenge its cogency and significance, arguing that these attacks all miss their target, and ending by pointing to a different challenge raised by reflection on entitlement theories: that perhaps some warrant or justification is neither a priori nor a posteriori.
books  reviews  epistemology  apriori  rationalist  empiricism  evidence  historicism  fallibility  Putnam  Quine  Mill  scepticism  analytical_philosophy  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Shannon Stimson - Representative Democracy: Principles and Genealogy by Nadia Urbinati | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 5, No. 2 (Jun., 2007), pp. 360-361
Viewing representation and democracy on a continuum rather than antithetical. 18thC theories of representation classed as Rousseau (juridical), Siėyes (institutional) and Condorcet (political). Only the third works after democratization of politics and society -connected with a shift in sovereignty from ontological to unity via political process. She sees Mill as developing this modern representative democracy. Not clear how valid this is as a contemporary vision for democratizing our politics, but the historical analysis looks intriguing. -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  political_culture  18thC  19thC  21stC  democracy  representative_institutions  Rousseau  French_Revolution  Mill  sovereignty  legitimacy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Camic - The Utilitarians Revisited | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 85, No. 3 (Nov., 1979), pp. 516-550
For generations sociologists have attacked utilitarian social theory as inadequate theoretically. At the same time, their presentist orientation toward sociology's past has prevented a direct examination of the utilitarians in their own right. This paper rejects that orientation and investigates the social theory of the major utilitarians. David Hume, Adam Smith, Jeremy Bentham, and John Stuart Mill. No alleged characteristic of utilitarianism-from the atomistic, rationalistic model of social action to the failure to solve the problem of order-adduced in the traditional attack upon it is actually found in the work of the utilitarians. The paper then outlines the historical process whereby the prevailing mythology concerning utilitarianism developed. The hallmark of that process is not the cumulative development of social theories but the displacement, in changing cultural and social circumstances, of the concerns of utilitarian social theory-a displacement succesively evident in the work of Spencer, early American social scintists, and Park and climaxing in Parson's The Structure of Social Action. The paper concludes by offering a sociological interpretation of Parson's selective account of utilitarian social theory and by identifying the constricting, but still pervasive, theoretical implications of that account. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  social_theory  utilitarianism  Hume  Bentham  Mill  Parsons  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul G. Kuntz: THE DIALECTIC OF HISTORICISM AND ANTI-HISTORICISM | JSTOR: The Monist, Vol. 53, No. 4, Philosophy of the History of Philosophy (October, 1969), pp. 656-670
THE DIALECTIC OF HISTORICISM AND ANTI-HISTORICISM
Paul G. Kuntz
The Monist
Vol. 53, No. 4, Philosophy of the History of Philosophy (October, 1969) (pp. 656-670)
Page Count: 15 -- didn't download paper -- see for long quote and discussion of why history important for philosophy by JS Mill re Bentham's narrow personal experience -- nice elaboration re learning about oneself via others and expanding knowledge beyond limits of personal experience
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  Mill  Bentham  Study_and_Uses  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Matt Bruenig - Sorry, John Stuart Mill Was Not a Libertarian | The American Prospect Oct 2013
For Mill, who gets what is a social decision. The only thing that causes anyone to ever have entitlement over pieces of the world are the laws and institutions of society. It is police violence in concert with legal rules that actually demarcate what belongs to whom, and there is no demanded-by-the-universe way of orienting those institutions. Also, it's clear that curtailments of liberty are at the very heart of all economic institutions, laissez-faire ones just as much as socialist ones.
political_philosophy  political_economy  libertarianism  Mill  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Frank Cunningham: Retrieving Macpherson: Critical Appraisal of a New Study (2003)
JSTOR: Science & Society, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 236-244 -- review of C. B. Macpheson and the Problem of Liberal Democracy by Jules Townshend
books  reviews  political_philosophy  liberalism  democracy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Hobbes  Locke  Mill  Bentham  Macpherson  individualism  Marxist  social_sciences-post-WWII  capitalism  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong : Domo Arigato Mister Roboto!: Cardiff Garcia Asks a Question About Growth, Inequality, Malthus, and History
DeLong responds with Keynes from Economic Consequences (pessimistic) and 1930s (long run optimistic) to Garcia Cardiff question re when economists believed we had left the Malthusian trap:
If you had asked economists in 1759 whether such a fundamental shift was ever likely to happen, would they have thought the possibility ludicrous? Would they have argued that in the 12,000 years since the dawn of agriculture, humanity had yet to escape the Malthusian Trap--and therefore why believe that such an escape was even possible?What about in 1780? In 1830? 1850? At what point would it have been clear that the world had changed, permanently? What would have tipped them off? (I’m guessing it wasn’t the Wedgwood porcelain.)
economic_history  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Malthus  Mill  Keynes  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Liberty, Equality, Fraternity by James Fitzjames Stephen. | Questia
Leslie Stephen brother - Liberty Fund edition - Synopsis Students of political theory will welcome the return to print of this brilliant defence of ordered liberty. Impugning John Stuart Mill's famous treatise, On Liberty, Stephen criticised Mill for turning abstract doctrines of the French Revolution into "the creed of a religion". Only the constraints of morality and law make liberty possible, warned Stephen, and attempts to impose unlimited freedom, material equality, and an indiscriminate love of humanity will lead inevitably to coercion and tyranny. Liberty must be restrained by custom and tradition if it is to endure; equality must be limited to equality before the law if it is to be just; and fraternity must include actual men, not the amorphous mass of mankind, if it is to be real and genuine.
books  Questia  19thC  political_philosophy  conservatism  property  rule_of_law  Victorian  liberty  liberalism  Mill 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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