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Akeel Bilgrami, ed. - Beyond the Secular West (2016) | Columbia University Press
What is the character of secularism in countries that were not pervaded by Christianity, such as China, India, and the nations of the Middle East? To what extent is the secular an imposition of colonial rule? How does secularism comport with local religious cultures in Africa, and how does it work with local forms of power and governance in Latin America? Has modern secularism evolved organically, or is it even necessary, and has it always meant progress? A vital extension of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age, in which he exhaustively chronicled the emergence of secularism in Latin Christendom, this anthology applies Taylor's findings to secularism's global migration. (...) What began as a modern reaction to—as well as a stubborn extension of—Latin Christendom has become a complex export shaped by the world's religious and political systems. Brilliantly alternating between intellectual and methodological approaches, this volume fosters a greater engagement with the phenomenon across disciplines.
Preface, by Akeel Bilgrami
1. Can Secularism Travel?, by Charles Taylor
2. The Sufi and the State, by Souleymane Bachir Diagne
3. The Individual and Collective Self-Liberation Model of Ustadh Mahmoud Mohamed Taha, by Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
4. Creating Democratically Friendly Twin Tolerations Outside of Latin Christendom: Tunisia, by Alfred Stepan
5. Secularism and the Mexican Revolution, by Claudio Lomnitz
6. Is Confucianism Secular?, by Peter van der Veer
7. Disenchantment Deferred, by Sudipta Kaviraj
8. An Ancient Indian Secular Age?, by Rajeev Bhargava
9. Gandhi's Radicalism: An Interpretation, by Akeel Bilgrami
10. A Secular Age Outside Latin Christendom: Charles Taylor Responds
books  kindle-available  secularization  modernity  modernization  Islam  tolerance  liberalism  decolonization  secularism  universalism  MENA  Tunisia  Mexico  India  ancient_India  Gandhi  Sufis  Confucianism  connected_history  Taylor_Charles  Christianity  Christendom 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Erik Loomis - Book Review: Neil Foley, Mexicans in the Making of America | LG&M - August 2015
You are here: Home » General » U.S. border agents stop Mexican immigrants crossing into United States, 1948 Neil Foley has written what I believe to be the…
Instapaper  books  reviews  US_history  19thC  20thC  Mexico  Spanish_Empire  North_America  Hispanic  social_order  demography  property_rights  status  hierarchy  labor_history  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Junianto James Losari, Michael Ewing-Chow - A Clash of Treaties: The Legality of Countermeasures in International Trade Law and International Investment Law :: SSRN June 20, 2014
Junianto James Losari - National University of Singapore (NUS) - Centre for International Law -- Michael Ewing-Chow - National University of Singapore (NUS) - Faculty of Law -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/18. *--* Countermeasures are well recognized under Customary International Law and have been incorporated into the WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding as a mechanism to facilitate compliance, subject to an authorization by the WTO Dispute Settlement Body. However, such a countermeasure — increased tariffs, quantitative restrictions and permission to breach intellectual property rights — may also affect private investors. When there is an investment treaty between two WTO Members and one of the Members is subject to WTO countermeasures by the other Member, a clash of treaties may arise. This happened in the Sugar Dispute between Mexico and the United States. Mexico claimed that their measures on High Fructose Corn Syrup were trade countermeasures under the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in retaliation for a US breach of NAFTA. US investors affected by these measures brought claims against Mexico for breach of NAFTA Chapter 11 — the Investment Chapter. All three International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes tribunals held for different reasons, that a countermeasure that affects the rights of investors would not be valid. In contrary, this paper argues that a legitimate trade countermeasure should also be legitimate in the investment regime. A failure to consider the need for such coherence between the regimes could lead to a clash between the regimes and limit states’ ability to enforce its legitimate trade interests. - Number of Pages: 37 -- didn't download
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  free_trade  trade-agreements  FDI  investment-bilateral_treaties  arbitration  WTO  global_governance  conflict_of_laws  IP  property_rights  dispute_resolution  US_foreign_policy  Mexico  nation-state  national_interest  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader

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