dunnettreader + machiavelli   48

Jeffrey Edward Green - Rawls and the Forgotten Figure of the Most Advantaged: In Defense of Reasonable Envy toward the Superrich (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
politics-and-money  political_participation  inequality-wealth  regulatory_capture  political_philosophy  political_culture  tax_havens  Early_Republic  inequality  estate_tax  intellectual_history  inheritance  republicanism  Plato-Republic  elites-political_influence  Jefferson  Harrington  crony_capitalism  Europe-Early_Modern  fairness  article  Aristotle  social_capital  social_theory  Rawls  social_democracy  Machiavelli  Plato  inequality-opportunity  jstor  bibliography  ancient_Rome  regulation  justice  liberalism  egalitarian  regulatory_avoidance  interest_groups  legitimacy  deliberative_democracy  political_history  class_conflict  downloaded  education-elites  social_order  elites-self-destructive  Roman_Republic  ancient_Greece  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Timothy Lukes - Lionizing Machiavelli (2001) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
Machiavelli scholarship is prolific but claustrophobic. Even though chapter 18 of The Prince advises the aspiring leader to emulate both lion and fox, commentators ignore or devalue the lion and focus on the fox. Machiavelli is thereby depicted as a champion of cleverness and deception, and not much else. This article takes up the lion. It argues that Machiavelli's lion is not a simple and violent beast, but is rather a complex tutor that complements clinical and lonely foxiness with crucial injections of virility and community. - Downloaded via iphone
Machiavelli  political_theory  downloaded  article  statesmen  republicanism  bibliography 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Donald Kelley & David Hams Sacks, eds - The Historical Imagination in Early Modern Britain: History, Rhetoric & Fiction 1500-1800 (1997) | Cambridge University Press
These essays by some of the most distinguished historians and literary scholars in the English-speaking world explore the overlap, interplay, and interaction between supposedly truthful history and fact-based fiction in British writing from the Tudor period to the Enlightenment. -- downloaded intro via Air
1. Introduction Donald Kelley and David Harris Sacks
2. Example and truth: Deggory Wheare and the ars historica J. H. M. Salmon
3. Truth, lies and fiction in sixteenth-century Protestant historiography Patrick Collinson
4. Thomas More and the English Renaissance: history and fiction in Utopia Joseph Levine
5. Ancestral and antiquarian: Little Crosby and early modern historical culture Daniel Woolf
6. Murder in Faversham: Holinshed's impertinent history Richard Helgerson
7. Foul, his Wife, the Mayor, and Foul's Mare: anecdote in Tudor historiography Annabel Patterson
8. Thomas Hobbes' Machiavellian moments David Wooton
9. The background of Hobbes' Behemoth Fritz Levy
10. Leviathan, mythic history, and natural historiography Patricia Springborg
11. Adam Smith and the history of private life Mark Phillips
12. Protesting fiction, constructing history Paul Hunter
13. Contemplative heroes and Gibbon's historical imagination Patricia Craddock
14. Experience, truth, and natural history in early English gardening books Rebecca Bushnell.
books  downloaded  kindle-available  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  rhetoric-writing  belle-lettres  literary_history  fiction  epistemology-history  exemplarity  moral_philosophy  Hobbes  Machiavelli  Smith  Gibbon  Cicero  Foxe-Book_of_Martyrs  English_lit 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Black - Machiavelli and the Humanist Tradition (2013) | Warburg Institute - School of Advanced Study, University of London
Speaker(s):
Robert Black (Professor of Renaissance History, University of Leeds)
Event date:
Wednesday 19 June 2013
The Warburg Institute
Renaissance  video  Machiavelli  Florence  lecture  intellectual_history  humanism  15thC 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
André Lang - La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines (2005) - Cairn.info
I - L’anacyclosis révisée
II - Les constitutions à l’épreuve de l’histoire
III - Le retour au principe
IV - Le moment Romuléen et le moment Numéen
V - Le principe comme puissance de régénération
VI - Les exécutions ou l’équivoque politique du retour à l’origine
VII - Brutus ou la part souveraine de la violence des principes
De l’exécution à l’exécutif : conclusion et perspectives
Pour citer cet article

Lang André, « La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 213-230
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-213.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0213.
Aristotle  class_conflict  political_participation  Pocock  Polybius  corruption  state_of_exception  republicanism  violence  article  norms  dialectic-historical  common_good  political_philosophy  Machiavelli  interest_groups  civic_virtue  downloaded  politics-and-history  mixed_government  historical_change  history_as_examples  cyclical_history  rule_of_law  cycles  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Symposium on "Democracy Disfigured" - An Answer to My Criticis | Nadia Urbinati - Academia.edu
An answer to my critics in a symposium, organized by John McCormick, held on her book, Democracy Disfigured, by the journal European Political Science, 2015. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_philosophy  democracy  representative_institutions  democracy-direct  political_culture  republicanism  Machiavelli  political_participation  political_discourse  public_opinion  populism  common_good  community  political_nation  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Barry Allen, "Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition" (Harvard University Press, 2015)
Barry Allen's new book carefully considers the problem of knowledge in a range of Chinese philosophical discourses, creating a stimulating cross-disciplinary dialogue that's as much of a pleasure to read as it will be to teach with. Taking on the work of Confucians, Daoists, military theorists, Chan Buddhists, Neo-Confucian philosophers, and others, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition (Harvard University Press, 2015) looks at the common threads and important differences in the ways that scholars have attempted to conceptualize and articulate what it is to be a knowing being in the world. Some of the major themes that recur throughout the work include the nature of non-action and emptiness, the relationship between knowledge and scholarship, the possibility of Chinese epistemologies and empiricisms, and the importance of artifice. Allen pays special attention to the ways that these scholars relate knowledge to a fluid conception of "things" that can be "completed" or "vanished into" by the knower, and to their understanding of things as parts of a collective economy of human and non-human relationships. The book does an excellent job of maintaining its focus on Chinese texts and contexts while making use of comparative cases from Anglophone and European-language philosophy that brings Chinese scholars into conversation with Nietzsche, Latour, Deleuze and Guattari, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, and beyond - 1 hour interview
books  interview  audio  intellectual_history  Chinese_philosophy  China  Chinese_history  Asian_philosophy  epistemology  Buddhism  Confucianism  empiricism  epistemology-social  ontology  human_nature  human-non-human_relations  military_theory  military_history  Neo-Confucian  Nietzsche  Deleuze  Aristotle  Machiavelli  Plato  Latour  consciousness  perception 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
NICOLAS GUILHOT - THE FIRST MODERN REALIST: FELIX GILBERT'S MACHIAVELLI AND THE REALIST TRADITION IN INTERNATIONAL THOUGHT | Modern Intellectual History (Feb 2015) - Cambridge Journals Online
Centre national de la recherche scientifique, New York University E-mail: nicolas.guilhot@nyu.edu -- In the disciplines of political science and international relations, Machiavelli is unanimously considered to be “the first modern realist.” This essay argues that the idea of a realist tradition going from the Renaissance to postwar realism founders when one considers the disrepute of Machiavelli among early international relations theorists. It suggests that the transformation of Machiavelli into a realist thinker took place subsequently, when new historical scholarship, informed by strategic and political considerations related to the transformation of the US into a global power, generated a new picture of the Renaissance. Focusing on the work of Felix Gilbert, and in particular his Machiavelli and Guicciardini, the essay shows how this new interpretation of Machiavelli was shaped by the crisis of the 1930s, the emergence of security studies, and the philanthropic sponsorship of international relations theory. -- * I would like to thank Samuel Moyn and three anonymous reviewers for their comments on a prior version of this paper. I greatly benefited from discussions with Volker Berghahn, Anthony Molho, and Jacques Revel. -- paywall
article  paywall  find  libraries  IR_theory  intellectual_history  IR-realism  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  strategic_studies  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guicciardini  historiography-postWWII  US_foreign_policy  hegemony  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - Dante, l’Aviso piacevole et Henri de Navarre | Italique, I, 1998, p. 79-94.
Italique [En ligne], I | 1998, mis en ligne le 05 mars 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.89. **--** re reception of Dante in France - in fight against Papacy, both French Catholics and Huguenots could use his attacks on the Papacy -- a familiar publication that combined anti -Papal comments in Date, Boccaccio and Petrarch, had a bizarre history linked to Henry IV- -' L’Aviso piacevole était une des nombreuses variations sur ce lieu rhétorique de la pensée protestante. Ce livre étrange, composé d’une matière italienne, édité en Angleterre, opportunément publié pour servir l’action de Henri de Navarre, était destiné à des lecteurs italiens ou italianisants de Genève, de Bâle, de Londres ou de Paris plus qu’aux Italiens de Florence ou de Rome qu’il ne pouvait guère toucher. Le nonce Ragazzoni, dans deux lettres adressées au cardinal Rusticucci, évoquait les autres livres suscités par le bref de Sixte Quint, le Brutum Fulmen de Hotman et le traité de Pierre de Belloy, dont il désignait le commanditaire, le garde des Sceaux Cheverny. Ces deux ouvrages, que le nonce avait eu beaucoup de peine à se procurer furent immédiatement mis à l’Index. L’Aviso piacevole au contraire semble être passé presque inaperçu. Il ne put échapper toutefois ... à la vigilance de Robert Bellarmin, venu en France avec la légation du cardinal Caetani. Bellarmin citait le recueil dans son appendix au traité De summo Pontefice publié dans le De Controversiis christianae fidei, et il entreprit de le réfuter. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  religious_history  Dante  reception  16thC  France  Wars_of_Religion  Henri_IV  Gallican  Huguenots  Protestant_International  publishing  publishing-clandestine  Papacy  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Machiavelli  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Tudor Translations: Machiavelli, 2 vols. - Online Library of Liberty
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Tudor Translations: Machiavelli, with an Introduction by Henry Cust, M.P.. 2 Vols. (London: David Nutt, 1905). 09/01/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1741> -- A two volume collection of inlfuential English translations of the writings of Machiavelli during the Tudor period.-- pdf is of scan -- didn't download
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  political_philosophy  Machiavelli  Tudor  historiography-Renaissance  translation  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Historical, Political, and Diplomatic Writings of Niccolo Machiavelli, Vol. 1. (Life of Machiavelli, History of Florence), tr. from the Italian, by Christian E. Detmold (Boston, J. R. Osgood and company, 1882). - Online Library of
<http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/774> - Volume 1 of a 4 volume set of Machiavelli’s writings which contains a lengthy introduction on the life of Machiavelli, the History of Florence, The Prince, Discourses on Livy, and his letters and papers from his time as a diplomat. This volume contains his famous History of Florence. - life and historical context based especially on 19thC Italian historiography -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Machiavelli  Italy  Florence  Italian_Wars  Papacy  France  Louis_XI  nation-state  state-building  military_history  militia  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercenaires  diplomatic_history  IR_theory  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, Il Principe, edited by L. Arthur Burd, with an Introduction by Lord Acton (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1891) - Online Library of Liberty
Facsimile PDF 23.8 MB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. -- A heavily annotated edition by Burd with the famous introduction by Lord Acton. The text is in the original Italian. -- Burd has an enormous amount of context- historical background for all the players before and after invasion of Italy - and cross-references to other works by Machiavelli, Guicciardini etc -picks up language usage, concepts etc - and comments on previous commentaries on The Prince with which he agrees or has differences -- downloaded pdf to Note -- probably available in Google_Books
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_history  Renaissance  Italian_Wars  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guiccidarini  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Italy  Florence  Papacy  France  raison-d'-état  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  institutions  legal_history  state-building  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, The History of Freedom and Other Essays, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907). - Online Library of Liberty
Acton never completed his projected History of Liberty. We do have however several collections of his writings such as this one which contains 2 chapters from this planned history – on liberty in antiquity and Christianity – and many book reviews where one can piece together Acton’s approach to the writing of such a history. This volume consists of articles reprinted from the following journals: The Quarterly Review, The English Historical Review, The Nineteenth Century, The Rambler, The Home and Foreign Review, The North British Review, The Bridgnorth Journal. *--* CHRONICLE. *-* INTRODUCTION. *-* I: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN ANTIQUITY. *-* II: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN CHRISTIANITY. *-* III: SIR ERSKINE MAY’S DEMOCRACY IN EUROPE. *-* IV: THE MASSACRE OF ST. BARTHOLOMEW. *-* V: THE PROTESTANT THEORY OF PERSECUTION *-* VI: POLITICAL THOUGHTS ON THE CHURCH. *-* VII: INTRODUCTION TO L. A. BURD’S EDITION OF IL PRINCIPE BY MACHIAVELLI. *-* VIII: MR. GOLDWIN SMITH’S IRISH HISTORY. *-* IX: NATIONALITY. *-* X: DÖLLINGER ON THE TEMPORAL POWER. *-* XI: DÖLLINGER’S HISTORICAL WORK. *-* XII: CARDINAL WISEMAN AND THE HOME AND FOREIGN REVIEW. *'* XIII: CONFLICTS WITH ROME. *-* XIV: THE VATICAN COUNCIL. *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES. By Henry Charles Lea. *-* XVI: THE AMERICAN COMMONWEALTH. By James Bryce. *-* XVII: HISTORICAL PHILOSOPHY IN FRANCE AND FRENCH BELGIUM AND SWITZERLAND. By Robert Flint. -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  liberty  Christianity  Christendom  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  democracy  Reformation  persecution  Counter-Reformation  Inquisition  Wars_of_Religion  Bartholomew_Day_massacre  Huguenots  Protestants  national_ID  nationalism  Machiavelli  historiography-19thC  US_constitution  US_government  US_politics 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Holmes, Nietzsche & Classical Realism (2000) :: SSRN
U Texas School of Law Pub. Law Working Paper No. 003 -- The point of departure is Richard Posner's striking suggestion that Holmes is "the American Nietzsche." -- The Essay argues that the real thematic (and tempermental) affinity between Holmes and Nietzsche lies in the fact that both are proponents of a general, but neglected, perspective on questions of moral, political, and legal theory that I will call "Classical Realism." Importantly, the Classical Realism of Holmes and Nietzsche places them in a long tradition of theories of morals, politics, and society that we find in writers like Thucydides, Machiavelli, Freud and (to some extent) Marx, among others. This tradition, however, has almost vanished from the modern academy. It is the most general aim of this paper to revive the doctrine of Classical Realism as a serious--albeit debunking--position in normative theory. -- a meaning both older than and different from that current in academic debates, especially in philosophy, where it names certain doctrines in semantics and metaphysics. Classical Realism...entails no particular semantic and metaphysical doctrines at all. [It] denotes a certain hard-headed, unromantic, uncompromising attitude towards the world, which manifests itself in a brutal honesty and candor in the assessment of human motives and the portrayal of human affairs. The Essay explores this doctrine in some detail in a variety of thinkers, including Holmes, Posner, Nietzsche, Marx, and the American Legal Realists. The Appendix to the Essay offers a critical discussion of Posner's and David Luban's treatment of the Holmes-Nietzsche relation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  philosophy_of_law  realism  legal_realism  Thucydides  Machiavelli  Marx  Nietzsche  Freud  Holmes  human_nature  motivation  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 5 (Defence of the Constitutions Vols. II and III) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 5. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2103> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 5 contains volumes 2 [Italian Republics of the Middle Ages -Florence and Machiavelli] and 3 [other Italian Republics of the Middle Ages] of Defence of the Constitutions of the US. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  Medieval  13thC  14thC  15thC  Renaissance  Italy  city_states  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Florence  Machiavelli  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_order  faction  class_conflict  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel Dennis Glover - The Putney Debates: Popular versus Élitist Republicanism | JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 164 (Aug., 1999), pp. 47-80
Disagrees with Worden and others who don't see Levellers and civil war radicals as source of republicanism - traces influence of ancient historians, radicals during Dutch Revolt etc on mid 17thC English radical republicanism - extensive bibliography - downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Dutch_Revolt  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  radicals  Levellers  Cromwell  Tacitus  Machiavelli  commonwealth  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan Cromartie - Harringtonian Virtue: Harrington, Machiavelli, and the Method of the Moment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 987-1009
This article presents a reinterpretation of James Harrington's writings. It takes issue with J. G. A. Pocock's reading, which treats him as importing into England a Machiavellian `language of political thought'. This reading is the basis of Pocock's stress on the republicanism of eighteenth-century opposition values. Harrington's writings were in fact a most implausible channel for such ideas. His outlook owed much to Stoicism. Unlike the Florentine, he admired the contemplative life; was sympathetic to commerce; and was relaxed about the threat of `corruption' (a concept that he did not understand). These views can be associated with his apparent aims: the preservation of a national church with a salaried but politically impotent clergy; and the restoration of the royalist gentry to a leading role in English politics. Pocock's hypothesis is shown to be conditioned by his method; its weaknesses reflect some difficulties inherent in the notion of `languages of thought'. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Harrington  landed_interest  Machiavelli  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  commerce  common_good  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  Stoicism  gentry  Royalists  mixed_government  English_constitution  politics-and-theory  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  corruption  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue on the Thought of Leo Strauss | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 53, No. 1, Winter, 1991
The entire issue (12 articles and both book reviews) is on Strauss including noted Straussians of several generations(Tarcov, Pangle, Smith). Downloaded Gunnell on Strauss before the Straussians.
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Aquinas  Machiavelli  17thC  18thC  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Strauss  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Cotton - James Harrington as Aristotelian | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Aug., 1979), pp. 371-389
Rather than Harrington within tradition of Machiavelli and Aristotle (Pocock), Cotton argues for direct appropriation from Aristotle -Oceana as polity, Agrarian Law etc. Contra Strauss who denies Harrington as Aristotelian. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_politics  Harrington  Machiavelli  civic_humanism  mixed_government  classes  property  Agrarian_Laws  social_order  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Aristotle  Pocock  Strauss  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Moore - Hume's Political Science and the Classical Republican Tradition | JSTOR: Canadian Journal of Political Science / Revue canadienne de science politique, Vol. 10, No. 4 (Dec., 1977), pp. 809-839
La science politique de Hume et la tradition républicaine classique. La science politique de Hume marque un point tournant dans l'histoire de la pensée politique. On peut mieux apprécier sa signification si on la considère comme une réponse structurée aux essais de construction d'une science politique fondée sur l'expérience tentés par les théoriciens de la tradition républicaine classique. Sa discussion des formes de gouvernement, du régime mixte en Grande Bretagne, du rôle des législateurs, de l'influence du gouvernement sur le comportement social, des sources de la puissance militaire, de la sagesse d'acquérir des colonies, des mérites de la politique de la Grèce et de Rome dans l'Antiquité, et en dernier lieu, sa conception d'une république parfaite, tous ces thèmes font partie d'une réponse systématique aux oeuvres de Machiavel, Harrington, Bolingbroke et autres. La conception de Hume du gouvernement constitutionnel dérive d'une application plus consistante du raisonnement expérimental au domaine politique. Sa science politique offre donc une nouvelle théorie du gouvernement républicain qui a eu une profonde influence sur les penseurs américains, notamment Hamilton et Madison. Ces derniers y trouvèrent une conception du politique qui pouvait être appliquée aux grandes sociétés mercantiles. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  British_politics  Hume-politics  Machiavelli  Harrington  Bolingbroke  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  US_constitution  Founders  Madison  Hamilton  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Vickie B. Sullivan - Neither Christian nor Pagan: Machiavelli's Treatment of Religion in the "Discourses" | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Winter, 1993), pp. 259-280
Is Machiavelli to be understood as entirely sympathetic to either Christianity or paganism? This article examines the Discourses, the work in which Machiavelli praises paganism most lavishly, and argues that Machiavelli actually criticizes paganism for engendering Christianity. To overcome the politically deleterious consequences of Christianity, the author goes on to contend, Machiavelli appeals to certain Christian doctrines-entirely divorced from their theological context-to support his vision of an earthly discipline that exercises the strength that Machiavelli views as essential to sustain political life. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  Renaissance  Machiavelli  political_philosophy  republicanism  neo-Roman  Livy  religious_culture  political-theology  politics-and-religion  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John M. Warner and John T. Scott - Sin City: Augustine and Machiavelli's Reordering of Rome | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 73, No. 3 (JULY 2011), pp. 857-871
We examine Machiavelli's critical appropriation of Augustine's analysis of Rome's decline and fall in order to understand his own interpretation of Rome and the lessons it offers for a successful republic. If Machiavelli's departure from Augustine is obvious, as seen for example in his exculpation of Romulus for the fratricide Augustine condemns, equally illuminating is what Machiavelli borrows from him. For Augustine, Romulus' fratricide discloses the limits of pagan virtue and politics and reveals that the civic republican view of an early virtuous republic is nostalgic if not impossible. Machiavelli agrees with Augustine about the character of Rome, yet embraces the ambitious and acquisitive politics Augustine rebuffs. Machiavelli not only excuses Romulus' fratricide in "ordering" Rome, but makes it the archetypal act that must be repeated through "reordering" to sustain the state against the perennial problem of corruption. We thereby address two of the primary issues in Machiavelli scholarship—the character of his republicanism and the nature and extent of his innovation with regard to his ancient sources—and suggest that the "civic republican" or "neo-Roman" interpretation of Machiavelli is incorrect in its conclusions concerning his republicanism as well as his relationship to his ancient sources. -- paywall Cambridge journals -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Renaissance  Machiavelli  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Livy  Augustine  pagans  civic_virtue  neo-Roman  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Strauss  Skinner  Pocock  Cambridge_School  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Dan Engster - The Montaignian Moment | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 59, No. 4 (Oct., 1998), pp. 625-650
Modification of Pocock's theory - Montaigne's moderation and self knowledge, self-control as 2nd paradigm influencing further political thought - a stage between the activism of civic humanism and state-centered in Hobbes
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  16thC  17thC  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Hobbes  republicanism  civic_humanism  raison-d'-état  nation-state  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John P. McCormick - Machiavelli's Political Trials and "The Free Way of Life" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Aug., 2007), pp. 385-411
This essay examines the political trials through which, according to Machiavelli's "Discourses", republics should punish magistrates and prominent citizens who threaten or violate popular liberty. Unlike modern constitutions, which assign indictments and appeals to small numbers of government officials, Machiavelli's neo-Roman model encourages individual citizens to accuse corrupt or usurping elites and promotes the entire citizenry as political jury and court of appeal. Machiavellian political justice requires, on the one hand, equitable, legal procedures that serve all citizens by punishing guilty parties and discouraging retaliatory reprisals, including foreign intervention. On the other hand, frankly acknowledging the power disparities that exist in every republic, Machiavelli outlines how political trials enable pro-plebeian magistrates and populist reformers to thwart patrician-generated smear campaigns and oligarchic conspiracies. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  16thC  21stC  Machiavelli  republicanism  neo-Roman  oligarchy  impeachment  corruption  accountability  rule_of_law  tribune  populism  class_conflict  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John P. McCormick - Machiavelli against Republicanism: On the Cambridge School's "Guicciardinian Moments" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 5 (Oct., 2003), pp. 615-643
Scholars loosely affiliated with the "Cambridge School" (e.g., Pocock, Skinner, Viroli, and Pettit) accentuate rule of law, common good, class equilibrium, and non-domination in Machiavelli's political thought and republicanism generally but underestimate the Florentine's preference for class conflict and ignore his insistence on elite accountability. The author argues that they obscure the extent to which Machiavelli is an anti-elitist critic of the republican tradition, which they fail to disclose was predominantly oligarchic. The prescriptive lessons these scholars draw from republicanism for contemporary politics reinforce rather than reform the "senatorial," electorally based, and socioeconomically agnostic republican model (devised by Machiavelli's aristocratic interlocutor, Guicciardini, and refined by Montesquieu and Madison) that permits common citizens to acclaim but not determine government policies. Cambridge School textual interpretations and practical proposals have little connection with Machiavelli's "tribunate," class-specific model of popular government elaborated in The Discourses, one that relies on extra-electoral accountability techniques and embraces deliberative popular assemblies.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography  16thC  21stC  Machiavelli  republicanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  oligarchy  elites  populism  public_opinion  popular_politics  political_participation  neo-Roman  class_conflict  accountability  tribune  Guiccidarini  Cambridge_School  rule_of_law  common_good  non-domination  liberty  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John P. Mccormick - Addressing the Political Exception: Machiavelli's "Accidents" and the Mixed Regime | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 87, No. 4 (Dec., 1993), pp. 888-900
First, I will demonstrate that Machiavelli's conception of political phenomena is richer and more varied and conforms to an adequate understanding of political reality more closely than later, more "systematic," or "regular," conceptions often associated with the Enlightenment. Second, I find in Machiavelli strong grounds for resisting authoritarian claims that the variegated and unpredictable nature of political phenomena must be managed with unipartite and, especially, centralized practical political alternatives. I focus upon Machiavelli's frequent use of a particular word by which he refers to politically significant occurrences, accidente. I argue that his employment of this word, especially in the Discourses, serves to accentuate his sensitivity to the irregular, nonsystematic nature of political reality--to the possibility of "exceptions." But I demonstrate that his practical response to this reality, is not a perpetually vigilant, all-powerful sovereign but is, rather, a far more moderate answer, the mixed regime.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  16thC  Machiavelli  republicanism  mixed_government  Absolutism  raison-d'-état  state-of-exception  sovereignty  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eyal Chowers - The Physiology of the Citizen: The Present-Centered Body and Its Political Exile | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 30, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 649-676
Shift from civic humanism's optimistic view of man's capacity to build for the future and control sociopolitical environment to pessimistic view of capacity of citizens under raison d'Etat -- 16thC and 17thC increasingly focused on multipart, shifting self and passions vs reason rather than the development of a stable character that Renaissance humanism concerned with. Ties shift to new views of anatomy (eg Harvey) and connections between physiology and psychology and impact on different notions of time relative to self, society and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  cultural_history  natural_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  British_history  France  Italy  Italian_Wars  Renaissance  humanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  raison-d'-état  Absolutism  emotions  physiology  psychology  medicine  self  time  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Descartes  Gassendi  Hobbes  Locke  Harrington  Harvey  identity  character  mechanism  thinking_matter  mind  mind-body  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Shelley Burtt - The Good Citizen's Psyche: On the Psychology of Civic Virtue | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Autumn, 1990), pp. 23-38
What are the psychological sources of civic virtue in the republican tradition? This article identifies three: the education of the passions, the manipulation of interests, and the compulsion to duty. The author explores each and concludes that an appreciation of their distinctions suggests possibilities for reviving republican virtue in the modern world. -- summary of her virtue for a commercial republic -- She places Bolingbroke with Cicero as advocates of virtue as duty and sacrifice of personal interests -- I think she too narrowly casts Bolingbroke's "theory" as to the particular audience (king and political elites who form and execute policy, not the people who have to guard liberty more generally in his other works; also doesn't adequately account for the enlightened self-interest of the benefits of the common good for all though sacrifice of particular interests may be necessary - eg why enlightened capitalists realize capitalism has to be saved from itself) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  civic_virtue  liberalism-republicanism_debates  republicanism  Machiavelli  Harrington  Cato's_Letters  Bolingbroke  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Collins - Montaigne's Rejection of Reason of State in 'De l'Utile et de l'honneste' | JSTOR: The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring, 1992), pp. 71-94
This article analyzes Book Three, Chapter One of Montaigne's Essais to determine if the interpretation by Quentin Skinner and others (that it demonstrates Montaigne's support of what was later called raison d'Etat) is as clear as it seems to be. Through a close reading of the text and examination of a number of deliberate paradoxes and satirical inversions, it is possible to resolve several seeming contradictions in the essay, and to conclude that the essayist's intention is precisely the opposite of that ascribed to him. There is an inner coherence to this essay that can be shown to be directed against the precepts that underpinned the logic of"reason of state" writings; in fact, he completely undermines that logic. The ambiguous nature of Montaigne's essay, however, is seen as the cause of its misinterpretation from his own time up until the present day. While acknowledging that Montaigne's ambiguity led to his essay being used in support of reason of state thinking, it is hoped that this analysis will lead to a reevaluation of Montaigne's intentions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  16thC  Montaigne  Machiavelli  raison-d'-état  utility  honnête  Skinner  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret Jacob: Was the Eighteenth-Century Republican Essentially Anticapitalist? | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Jacob, Margaret . “Was the Eighteenth-Century Republican Essentially Anticapitalist?.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/66. -- In "Limits of Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- With considerable insight in chapter thirteen of The Machiavellian Moment, Pocock interrogated the many Augustan responses to the reality of markets and credit. Where we have parted ways concerns the assertion that “civic humanist values . . . virtually defined rentier and entrepreneur as corrupt.” The rage against stockjobbers or actionists was so intense on both sides of the Channel, I would suggest, precisely because the republican imagination had come to accept the mercantile entrepreneur as a model citizen characterized by caution and probity, by cooperation in social relations, an exemplar of stability.
article  intellectual_history  political_economy  political_culture  economic_culture  political_philosophy  republicanism  Pocock  Machiavelli  17thC  18thC  Britain  British_politics  Dutch  capital_markets  bubbles  South_Sea_Crisis  international_finance  civic_virtue  corruption  commerce  monied_interest  merchants  monopolies  Cato's_Letters  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Luc Foisneau: Governing a Republic: Rousseau’s General Will and the Problem of Government | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Foisneau, Luc. “Governing a Republic: Rousseau’s General Will and the Problem of Government.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/70. -- in "Limits of Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- In contrast with the widespread notion of the abstract nature of Rousseau’s republic, I would like to stress in the first part of my article that the general will—that is, the sense of the general interest—needs to be forged, shaped, and strengthened by specific institutions that are always linked to a concrete society, to a particular history and to determinate places. This particularization of the general will is both a condition for the very possibility of a republican government and a first response to the accusation of abstraction put forward against Rousseau by his liberal critics.However, that first approach also constitutes a source of theoretical difficulties that I would like to contemplate, in the second part of my article, by analyzing what I call the anarchistic objection to the idea of a republican government. Finally, in response to the argument that Rousseau’s general will would be ungovernable, because he didn’t understand the techniques of government available in his time, I shall try to show that Rousseau actually appropriated concepts that originated in the anti-republican theories of reason of state and used them in his own theory of government.
article  intellectual_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  political_philosophy  political_culture  institutions  republicanism  Rousseau  general_will  lessons-of-history  raison-d'-état  Machiavelli  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
J. G. A. Pocock: The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Pocock, J. G. A.. “The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/72. In "Limits of the Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note-- Hence the debate between ancient and modern liberty, to be found in Britain a century before it was taken up by Benjamin Constant. It was a debate by no means uniquely British, but in the form it took in Britain a class of free landholders, whose history could be traced back through Gothic to classic and Greco-Roman times, played a crucial role. The image of the republic, it needs repeating, was not presented as a norm to be imitated; it was a bench­mark for the interpretation of history, for measuring the gains and losses of movement away from it. This narrative, shaped by a succession of historians from Bruni to Robertson, developed concurrently with a “philosophic” history of human (but European) society, based on the stadial sequence from hunter-gatherers to merchants and capitalists and culminating in the political economy of Adam Smith. In this complex historiography, the role of medieval leagues of merchant republics, Lombard, Hanseatic, and Dutch, was important but problematic; and it is here that the anglophone and Atlantic reader, rightly or wrongly, finds the key to the problem of Dutch republican thought.
article  16thC  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  historiography  lessons-of-history  republicanism  Machiavelli  Britain  British_politics  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Dutch  city_states  Holy_Roman_Empire  commerce  trade  landed_interest  burghers  oligarchy  corruption  civic_virtue  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_III  tyranny  Stadholder  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Thomas Maissen: Why Did the Swiss Miss the Machiavellian Moment? History, Myth, Imperial and Constitutional Law in the Early Modern Swiss Confederation | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Maissen, Thomas. “Why Did the Swiss Miss the Machiavellian Moment? History, Myth, Imperial and Constitutional Law in the Early Modern Swiss Confederation.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/74. -- in "Limits of Atlantic Republican Tradition" -- downloaded pdf to Note-- Didn’t the Swiss share the need that stimulated contemporary Dutch authors like the brothers de la Court, who discovered the Florentine republic as a model in order to conceive and legitimatize republican government against the house of Orange? Both federations originated in a revolt against the Habsburgs; both achieved formal independence from the Holy Roman Empire in 1648, through the Peace of Westphalia; and in spite of important Catholic minorities, both were bastions of the Reformed Church considered already then and even more by twentieth-century researchers to be a hotbed of republicanism. But Zwingli and Calvin were not republicans. What mattered for them was having the right faith, not a precise political constitution. 
article  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  republicanism  Swiss  Calvinist  militia  mercenaires  Machiavelli  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Savoy  city_states  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
AHR Forum - Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism - JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 101, No. 1, Feb., 1996
Articles -- Introduction: Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism (pp. 107-109)  Ronald Witt -**- The Crisis after Forty Years (pp. 110-118)  Ronald Witt -**- Baron's Machiavelli and Renaissance Republicanism (pp. 119-129)  John M. Najemy -**- The Historical Petrarch (pp. 130-141)  Craig Kallendorf -**- Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism: A Comment (pp. 142-144)  Werner Gundersheimer
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  humanism  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  Italy  Petrarch  Machiavelli  republicanism  city_states  political_culture  cultural_history  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik: ON MACHIAVELLI | Pandaemonium April 2013
Nice take on the cynical vs moral reading of Machiavelli (notes many 16thC & 17thC like Bacon read him as moral philosopher) -- " What truly made Machiavelli so different from most previous moral thinkers, however, was his recognition of the importance not simply of doing the right thing but also of persuading people that it was the right thing to do. In one sense it was an idea that harked back to the Greek Sophists and the stress they had placed upon rhetoric. In another sense it was an idea that looked forward to modern democracy in which persuasion and negotiation form a central part of the moral order. "
intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  16thC  17thC  Machiavelli  Bacon  public_opinion  legitimacy 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
J. S. Maloy: The Very Order of Things: Rousseau's Tutorial Republicanism (2005)
JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Apr., 2005), pp. 235-261 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Rousseau's political theory has seemed to many to contemplate the radical transformation of human character through invasive governmental practices. But a classical republican reading of his general concern with moeurs and his developed conception of statecraft shows why he called for regulating or redirecting psychic dispositions, not destroying and then reconstructing them. Intimately related to this theme of moral economy are Rousseau's ideas on liberty and authority, which evince a deep-seated, complex Platonism. Far from displacing the modern categories of natural law, however, Rousseau's classical republicanism was meant to supply critical force for their revision. Thus the more instructive antinomy for students of Rousseau's politics is not Plato and Hobbes but rather Plato and Machiavelli, for the outstanding interpretive dilemma concerns the precise nature of republican authority.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  18thC  France  Rousseau  Plato  Hobbes  Machiavelli  republicanism  liberty  authority  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter Stacey: The Sovereign Person in Senecan Political Theory | Republics of Letters (Stanford): 2011
Citation: Stacey, Peter. “The Sovereign Person in Senecan Political Theory.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 2 (June 1, 2011): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/98......Downloaded pdf to Note.......

After observing how the allegorical terms of the relationship between the prince andFortuna are established in resoundingly Senecan terms in Petrarch’s moral and political thought, I turn to investigate how the account subsequently becomes even more embroidered by Florentine humanists....... One aspect of Machiavelli’s assault on the prevailing contentions of the ideology of the Renaissance prince is a systematic and highly subversive reorganization of a set of concepts with which it had become conventional to map out the terms of that relationship. An integral part of this work is the brilliant reconfiguration of the Petrarchan—and ultimately Senecan—imagery with which the traditional relationship had been portrayed;
article  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  antiquity  Roman_Empire  Roman_law  Seneca  Stoicism  mirror_for_princes  Italy  Renaissance  Petrarch  humanism  Machiavelli  Bodin  sovereignty  15thC  16thC  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Speaking with the Dead: Explorations in Literature and History: Jürgen Pieters: 9780748615889: Amazon.com: Books
Book Description Publication Date: May 9, 2006 | ISBN-10: 0748615881 | ISBN-13: 978-0748615889 This book deals with the special power of literary texts to put us in contact with the past. A large number of authors, coming from different ages, have described this power in terms of 'the conversation with the dead': when we read these texts, we somehow find ourselves conducting a special kind of dialogue with dead authors. The book covers a number of texts and authors that make use of this metaphor -- Petrarch, Machiavelli, Sidney, Flaubert, Michelet, Barthes. In connecting these texts and authors in novel ways, Jürgen Pieters tackles the all-important question of why we remain fascinated with literature in general and with the specific texts that to us are still its backbone. Siituated in the aftermath of New Historicism, the book challenges the idea that literary history as a reading practice stems from a desire to 'speak with the dead'. Key Features• Offers a broad survey (a combination of classical literature, Renaissance literature and modern theory and history)• Issues a plea for the importance of reading literary texts and the power of literature• Discusses key figues from the Western canon -- Homer, Virgil, Dante, Machiavelli -- in light of the idea that we can learn from the past by talking to 'the dead'.• Combines theoretical discussions of the relationsip between literature and history with close reading of works by major literary authors and historians.
books  lit_crit  historiography  historicism  Machiavelli  17thC  18thC  19thC 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
James Livingston’s Reply to Rivka Maizlish - Usable Past debate | USIH blog June 2013
The following is James Livingston’s latest contribution to a vigorous debate on the uses of history.  Please see the other posts in this exchange by Ben Alpers, Jim Livingston, and Rivka Maizlish.
historiography  intellectual_history  historicism  Machiavelli  Nietzsche  political_culture  political_history  Founders  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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