dunnettreader + locke   143

R Kingston, review - Duncan Kelly, The Propriety of Liberty. Persons, Passions and Judgment in Modern Political Thought (2012) | Political Theory - jstor
The Propriety of Liberty. Persons, Passions and Judgment in Modern Political Thought by Duncan Kelly -- Review by: Rebecca Kingston -- Political Theory, Vol. 40, No. 4, August 2012 (pp. 524-527)
Downloaded via Air
article  downloaded  jstor  books  bookshelf  reviews  political_philosophy  liberty  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  Smith 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Peter Müller - Hobbes, Locke and the Consequences: Shaftesbury's Moral Sense and Political Agitation in Early 18thC England (2013) - Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies - Wiley Online Library
This article examines the political (and Whig) agenda behind the earl of Shaftesbury's moral and religious thought, offering a reading of the so-called ‘moral sense’ that, based on Terry Eagleton's Marxist interpretation of moral-sense philosophy in general and Shaftesbury's use of the concept in particular, illuminates how far the moral sense serves a propagandistic purpose in Shaftesbury's writings. A close examination of this aspect, which has so far not been considered in the relevant literature on Shaftesbury, illuminates the anti-Hobbist and, by implication, anti-Tory (and High Church) tendency of his moral philosophy in the context of Low Church Anglicanism. -- Keywords: Shaftesbury; Thomas Hobbes; John Locke; Latitudinarianism; moral sense; Whiggism; Anglicanism
article  paywall  Wiley  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_culture  Shaftesbury  Hobbes  Locke  Church_of_England  High_Church  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  latitudinarian 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Emily Nacol - An Age of Risk: Politics and Economy in Early Modern Britain (2016) | Princeton University Press (eBook and Hardcover)
In An Age of Risk, Emily Nacol shows that risk, now treated as a permanent feature of our lives, did not always govern understandings of the future. Focusing on the epistemological, political, and economic writings of Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Adam Smith, Nacol explains that in 17th-18thC Britain, political and economic thinkers reimagined the future as a terrain of risk, characterized by probabilistic calculation, prediction, and control. Nacol contends, we see 3 crucial developments in thought on risk and politics. While thinkers differentiated uncertainty about the future from probabilistic calculations of risk, they remained attentive to the ways uncertainty and risk remained in a conceptual tangle, a problem that constrained good decision making. They developed sophisticated theories of trust and credit as crucial background conditions for prudent risk-taking, and offered complex depictions of the relationships and behaviors that would make risk-taking more palatable. They also developed 2 narratives that persist in subsequent accounts of risk—risk as a threat to security, and risk as an opportunity for profit. Nacol locates the origins of our own ambivalence about risk-taking. By the end of the 18thC, a new type of political actor would emerge from this ambivalence, one who approached risk with fear rather than hope. -- Emily C. Nacol is assistant professor of political science at Vanderbilt University.
Chapter 1 Introduction 1
Chapter 2 “Experience Concludeth Nothing Universally” - Hobbes and the Groundwork for a Political Theory of Risk 9
Chapter 3 The Risks of Political Authority - Trust, Knowledge, and Political Agency in Locke’s Politics and Economy 41
Chapter 4 Hume’s Fine Balance - On Probability, Fear, and the Risks of Trade 69
Chapter 5 Adventurous Spirits and Clamoring Sophists - Smith on the Problem of Risk in Political Economy 98
Chapter 6 An Age of Risk, a Liberalism of Anxiety 124
Notes 131 -- References 157 -- Index 167
Downloaded Chapter 1 to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  Hobbes  Locke  Locke-Essay  Locke-2_Treatises  Hume  Hume-causation  Hume-politics  Smith  political_economy  trade  commerce  commercial_interest  epistemology  epistemology-history  probability  risk  risk_assessment  uncertainty  insurance  risk_shifting  political_discourse  economic_culture 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Porter eds. - Toleration in Enlightenment Europe (2000) | Cambridge University Press
The Enlightenment is often seen as the great age of religious and intellectual toleration, and this 1999 volume is a systematic European survey of the theory, practice, and very real limits to toleration in eighteenth-century Europe. A distinguished international team of contributors demonstrate how the publicists of the European Enlightenment developed earlier ideas about toleration, gradually widening the desire for religious toleration into a philosophy of freedom seen as a fundamental attribute and a precondition for a civilized society. Nonetheless Europe never uniformly or comprehensively embraced toleration during the eighteenth century: although religious toleration was central to the Enlightenment project, advances in toleration were often fragile and short-lived. -- excerpt contains TOC and full Chapter 1 - Intro - including ftnts to Chapter 1 - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
High_Church  1730s  Papacy  French_Enlightenment  civil_liberties  Enlightenment  Church_of_England  Church-and-State  Holy_Roman_Empire  Locke  philosophes  Spain  Spinoza  Toland  Italy  British_history  tolerance  anti-Semitism  political_philosophy  Dutch  downloaded  Germany  citizenship  Austria  Inquisition  18thC  religious_history  17thC  church_history  intellectual_history  enlightened_absolutism  books 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Leo Damrosh - The Enlightenment: Invention of the Modern Self | The Great Courses
Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self - from opening views in 17thC, through stages of the Enlightenment - a road to its (inevitable?) backlash in Romanticism
24 lectures
Only available as Audio download (and streaming) - list price $130
Rave reviews
Uses literary works and philosophical texts together
Frex completes the 2 lectures on British empiricism (focus on Locke and Hume re the self) with how Pope struggles with capturing complex psychology within the empiricist framework
After an introduction of 17thC religious and secular conceptions of the self, starts with 2 on La Princesse de Clèves
After empiricism, 2 on Voltaire and theodicy in Candide
3 lectures on Diderot and Jacques le fataliste
A lot of Rousseau - not the novels but the autobiographical works - how he analyzes himself in Confessions and Solitary Walker
Lots of biography, with Boswell's Johnson the vehicle
Some Franklin and Smith
Finishes with Laclos and Blake
Romanticism  bibliography  reason-passions  poetry  Boswell  self  moral_psychology  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_Revolution-impact  Rousseau  free_will  Locke-education  buy  human_nature  Diderot  Blake_William  Locke  Hume-causation  autobiography  17thC  Rousseau-self  Hume-ethics  altruism  Johnson  Voltaire  novels  empiricism  18thC  moral_philosophy  Locke-Essay  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Pope_Alexander  courses  French_lit  Smith  Hume  determinism  epistemology  emotions  character  audio  psychology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Joanna Picciotto - Reforming the Garden: The Experimentalist Eden and "Paradise Lost" (2005) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Spring, 2005), pp. 23-78 -- very long article with vast numbers of references to literary, naturao philosophy, and religious works of 17thC and early 18thC plus lit survey of work on sociology of knowledge, English lit since the cultural turn, and religious culture. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  English_lit  experimental_philosophy  Bacon  Boyle  Locke  Milton  Royal_Society  Evelyn  religious_culture  religious_lit  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  microscope  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  scientific_method  curiosity  Fall  original_sin  Paradise_Lost  improvement  instruments  Hooke  Donne  poetry  virtuosos  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  nature-mastery  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Lockean Empathy | Colin Marshall - Academia.edu - forthcoming, Southern Journal of Philosophy
This paper offers an epistemic defense of empathy, drawing on John Locke’s theory of ideas. Locke held that ideas of shape, unlike ideas of color, had a distinctive value: resembling qualities in their objects. I argue that the same is true of empathy, as when someone is pained by someone’s pain. This means that empathy has the same epistemic value or objectivity that Locke and other early modern philosophers assigned to veridical perceptions of shape. For this to hold, pain and pleasure must be a primary quality of the mind, just as shape is a primary quality of bodies. Though Locke did not make that claim, I argue that pain and pleasure satisfy his criteria for primary qualities. I consider several objections to the analogy between empathy and shape-perception, and show how Locke’s theory has resources for answering them. In addition, the claim that empathetic ideas are object-matching sidesteps Berkeley’s influential objection to Locke’s theory of resemblance. I conclude by briefly considering the prospects for a similar defense of empathy in contemporary terms.-- Philosophy of perception, John Locke, Empathy (Philosophy), and Empathy -- bookmark but didn't download
article  Academia.edu  Locke  primary_qualities  epistemology  mind-theory_of  perception  empathy  correspondence  Berkeley  pain  pleasure  cognition 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Caroline Jacot Grapa - Dans le vif du sujet - Diderot, corps et âme ( 2009) | Classiques Garnier - collection L'Europe des Lumières
Ce livre est un essai sur le style du matérialisme de Diderot, sa psychologie, sa métaphysique et sur les figures de l'intériorité des Lumières. La langue de l'intériorité, apanage de la spiritualité, se retrempe au contact sensible des métaphores de l'époque. Elles donnent accès à un savoir nouveau de la vie corporelle. L'actualité de cet essai tient au dialogue qu'il engage avec la phénoménologie et les neurosciences. -- This work is an essay on the style of Diderot's materialism, his psychology and his metaphysics. Its modern pertinence stems from the dialogue established with phenomenology and neurosciences. -- ISBN 978-2-8124-0046-9 -- 504 pages -- looks extremely interesting -- tracking reception of British empiricism, debates over various Cartesian proposals for dealing with animals, and the new directions taken both in life sciences and psychology and the metaphysics of materialism -- downloaded TOC as pdf to Note
books  find  amazon.fr  libraries  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  natural_philosophy  18thC  France  Diderot  d'Alembert  d'Holbach  Cartesian  Locke  Newton  Newtonian  Encyclopédie  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Vitalism  psychology  thinking_matter  anatomy  physiology  scientific_method  organism  subject  subjectivity  phenomenology  neuroscience  materialism  metaphysics  mind  mind-body  soul  human_nature  metaphor  French_language  French_lit  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Faulkner - Two-Stage Reliabilism, Virtue Reliabilism, Dualism and the Problem of Sufficiency « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (8): 121-138 (2013)
University of Sheffield -- Special Issue 2: On the Future Direction of Social Epistemology -- Social epistemology should be truth-centred, argues Goldman. Social epistemology should capture the ‘logic of everyday practices’ and describe socially ‘situated’ reasoning, says Fuller. Starting from Goldman’s vision of epistemology, this paper aims to argue for Fuller’s contention. Social epistemology cannot focus solely on the truth because the truth can be got in lucky ways. The same too could be said for reliability. Adding a second layer of epistemic evaluation helps only insofar as the reasons thus specified are appropriately connected to reliability. These claims are first made in abstract, and then developed with regard to our practice of trusting testimony, where an epistemological investigation into the grounds of reliability must inevitably detail the ‘logic of everyday practices’. -- looks like interesting fit with the virtue focus and collective knowledge practices of Boyle, Locke et al -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  epistemology  epistemology-social  analytical_philosophy  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science  reliabilism  testimony  evidence  Royal_Society  Boyle  Locke  empiricism  virtue_epistemology  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Bodies and Interests: Toleration and the Political Imagination in the Later 17thC | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 401-426
Religious fragmentation threatened the notion of a unitary body politic, and conservative Anglicans in the Restoration exploited the organic figure to excoriate dissenters. While scriptural patterns drew the godly too to that trope, its ecclesiastical implications often left them parsing uncomfortably as they urged concessions. In this article Derek Hirst argues that they were largely rescued from such parsing by the new discourse of “interest.” When the promise of trade was taking the court by storm, Independents and Presbyterians had much to gain in re-imagining the polity more pluralistically in terms of interest; Locke too was part of this process. But though the general drift is clear, partisan circumstance could occasion surprising cross-currents, in England and Ireland alike. -- Keywords body politic, religious toleration, John Owen, discourse of “interest”, John Locke -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-religion  economic_history  political_economy  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  dissenters  High_Church  merchants  trade  Restoration  tolerance  political_philosophy  political_order  political_nation  interest-discourse  body_politic  Locke  Locke-religion  court_culture  colonialism  tariffs  Presbyterians  Independents  Ireland  Church_of_England  Anglican  Church_of_Ireland  Ulster  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Della Rocca, review - Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide (2013) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 2014
Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 264pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780521111607. -- Reviewed by Michael Della Rocca, Yale University -- What explains the continuing power the Meditations has over us, its ability to shape our ways of philosophical thinking even today? As influential as Descartes' arguments have been, it is certainly not the rational compellingness of those arguments that gives the book its exalted place in philosophy. And while Descartes' departures from Aristotelian philosophy (to the extent that he broke with it) are historically and philosophically important, they do little to explain the lasting and powerful attraction of the Meditations. I will return to this mysterious power at the end of this review. But first I want to show how the many fine and well-selected essays in Karen Detlefsen's volume collectively confirm the widespread conviction that engagement with Descartes remains vital to philosophy. -- first rate group of authors, including Garber on Descartes's response to Hobbes's objections re substance
books  reviews  17thC  intellectual_history  Descartes  Hobbes  Locke  metaphysics  epistemology  substance  scepticism  cogito  perception  qualia  natural_philosophy  self  self-knowledge  self-examination  theology  scholastics  Aristotelian  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Meeker, review - Frederick F. Schmitt, Hume's Epistemology in the Treatise (OUP) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 09, 2014
This scholarly and philosophically rich treatment of Hume's epistemology furnishes a clear and comprehensive reading of Hume as a reliabilist about justified belief that is reminiscent of Alvin Goldman's naturalistic epistemology. One might worry that this is simply an anachronistic attempt to impose contemporary categories on Hume. One need not entertain such worries. ...he carefully connects Hume's concepts to contemporary ones and considerable attention relating Hume's views to Descartes, Malebranche, Newton and especially Locke. The book contains four major "divisions", and preceding the first division is a crucial chapter detailing the epistemological framework for this study -- In the first division, Schmitt notes that epistemologists from Plato's time have distinguished between knowledge and probability/belief/opinion - they have differed, though, on how to understand causal inferences in terms of this dichotomy. For Schmitt, although Hume mostly follows Locke's way of drawing the knowledge/probability distinction, Hume departs from Locke in wresting causal inferences from the domain of knowledge and placing them in the category of probability. According to Schmitt, Hume confronts this problem by arguing that knowledge and proofs produced by causal inferences are both types of justified belief because they are both forms of reliable belief. So there is no great gap between the epistemic status of knowledge and causal inferences. -- I hope that by now it is clear that the naturalistic, reliabilist epistemology that he attributes to Hume stands in stark contrast to the sceptical reading of Hume, according to which beliefs lack epistemic justification. -- copied full review to Evernote - put in Millican Treatise notebook
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Hume  epistemology  Descartes  Malebranche  Newton  Locke  Goldman_Alvin  scepticism  causation  epistemology-naturalism  inference  demonstration  fallibility  Evernote 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 9 (Letters and Misc. Works) - Online Library of Liberty
Letters in Latin reflecting correspondence in Republic of Letters; miscellaneous writings on topics he was interested in, including viticulture for the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, a history of navigation, and his book collection Of particular interest, a collection published in 1719 - A COLLECTION OF SEVERAL PIECES OF Mr. JOHN LOCKE. published by Mr. DESMAIZEAUX, under the direction of ANTHONY COLLINS, Esq. *-* THE character of Mr. Locke, by Mr. Peter Coste. *-* The fundamental constitutions of Carolina. *-* A letter from a person of quality to his friend in the country; giving an account of the debates and resolutions of the house of lords, in April and May 1675, concerning a bill, intitled, “An act to prevent the dangers which may arise from persons disaffected to the government.” *-* Remarks upon some of Mr. Norris’s books, wherein he asserts F. Malebranche’s opinion of “our seeing all things in God.” *-* A letter to Mr. Oldenburg, secretary to the Royal Society. *-* Letters to Anthony Collins, Esq. *-* A letter to * * * on Dr. Pococke. *-* Letters to the Rev. Mr. Richard King. *-* Rules of a society which met once a week, for their improvement in useful knowledge, and for the promoting of truth and christian charity --- in Vol 2 of this edition, Elements of natural philosophy. *-* Some thoughts concerning reading and study for a gentleman. -- downloaded mobi to Note
books  etexts  downloaded  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  natural_philosophy  political_philosophy  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  American_colonies  Carolina  constitutions  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  Collins_Anthony  Malebranche  ideas-theories  Whigs  Charles_II  James_II  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  maritime_history  epistemology  free-thinkers  House_of_Lords  opposition 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 8 (Some Thoughts Concerning Education, Posthumous Works [Malebranche, Miracles, Life of 1st Earl of Shaftesbury], Familiar Letters) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
SOME THOUGHTS CONCERNING EDUCATION. *--* POSTHUMOUS WORKS OF JOHN LOCKE, Esq. [OF THE CONDUCT OF THE UNDERSTANDING. - in Vol 2 of this edition] - AN EXAMINATION OF P. MALEBRANCHE’S OPINION OF SEEING ALL THINGS IN GOD. -- A DISCOURSE OF MIRACLES. -- MEMOIRS RELATING TO THE LIFE OF ANTHONY First Earl of Shaftesbury. *--* SOME FAMILIAR LETTERS BETWEEN Mr. LOCKE, AND SEVERAL OF HIS FRIENDS. [Principally between Locke and Molyneux. Also Leibniz's comments on the Essay] -- downloaded mobi to Note
books  etexts  downloaded  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Locke  epistemology  education  mind-body  perception  ideas-theories  Malebranche  Cartesian  Leibniz  Molyneux  Ireland  Locke-religion  miracles  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Whigs  Exclusion_Crisis  Charles_II 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 4 (Essays on money and Two Treatises of Government) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
Essays on money -- SOME CONSIDERATIONS OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE LOWERING OF INTEREST, AND RAISING THE VALUE OF MONEY. IN A LETTER SENT TO A MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT, 1691. Having lately met with a little tract, entitled, “A Letter to a friend concerning usury,” printed this present year, 1660; which gives, in short, the arguments of some treatises, printed many years since, for the lowering of interest; it may not be amiss briefly to consider them. -- Of raising our Coin. *--* SHORT OBSERVATIONS ON A PRINTED PAPER, ENTITLED, For encouraging the coining silver money in England, and after for keeping it here. *--* FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING RAISING THE VALUE OF MONEY. [Dedicated to Lord Somers] -- converted to html -- didn't download
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  Glorious_Revolution  1690s  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  monetary_policy  interest_rates  commerce  currency  bimetalism  FX  prices  usury  Parliament  House_of_Commons  William_III  Whig_Junto 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 2 (An Essay concerning Human Understanding Part 2 and Other Writings) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
Conclusion of the Essay plus some of his important secondary works re epistemology, education plus Elements of Natural Philosophy *--* OF THE CONDUCT of the UNDERSTANDING. *--* SOME THOUGHTS concerning READING AND STUDY for a GENTLEMAN. *--* ELEMENTS of NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. *--* A NEW METHOD of a COMMON-PLACE-BOOK. translated out of the french from the second volume of the bibliotheque universelle. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  epistemology  natural_philosophy  education  gentleman  methodology  scientific_method  Republic_of_Letters 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 7 (Essays and Notes on St. Paul’s Epistles) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
Published posthumously -- preface on hermeneutics, not just biblical, and principles of interpreting texts from another era, context -- Downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  religious_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  Locke-religion  Biblical_exegesis  hermeneutics  New_Testament  Paul 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Liberty Matters Nos. 1-10 (Jan. 2013 – July 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
David M. Hart, The Collected Liberty Matters: Nos. 1-10 (Jan. 2013 – July 2014), ed. David M. Hart and Sheldon Richman (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2014). 08/23/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2629> -- This volume is a collection of the first ten “Liberty Matters” online discussion forums which began in January 2013 and have appeared every two months since. The discussions have focused on authors whose work is well represented in the Online Library of Liberty. A leading scholar is asked to write an interpretative essay about a chosen author, to which other invited scholars respond in a formal essay which is then followed by a free form discussion over the ensuing month. The topics have included “John Locke on Property”, “James Buchanan: An Assessment”, “Gustave de Molinari’s Legacy for Liberty”, “Bastiat and Political Economy”, “George Smith on the System of Liberty”, “Arthur Seldon and the Institute of Economic Affairs”, “Ludwig von Mises’s The Theory of Money and Credit at 101”, “Hugo Grotius on War and the State”, “Tocqueville’s New Science of Politics Revisited”, and “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas”.
books  etexts  downloaded  political_philosophy  political_economy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  liberalism  liberty  IR_theory  Grotius  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  Mises  Buchanan  public_choice  Tocqueville  Bastiat  McCloskey  virtue_ethics  bourgeoisie  property  property_rights  libertarianism  liberty-negative  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Georges Dicker - Don Garrett, Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy | JSTOR: The Review of Metaphysics, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Dec., 1998), pp. 447-449
Summary, chapter by chapter, without critique of Garrett take on Hume as a cognitive psychologist, and especially his brand of scepticism re induction, causation and self, but also covering moral philosophy (moral sentiments and role of reason in moral judgment). Where Garrett sees Hume diverging from Locke -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-causation  scepticism  reason-passions  moral_sentiments  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  Locke  self  identity 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - Dualism and the Problem of Individuation | JSTOR: Religious Studies, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Jun., 1986), pp. 263-276
Quite helpful review of various metaphysical debates from Descartes onwards, how the "substance" debates have evolved, including the old identity of indiscernables claim that's been thoroughly challenged in post WWII analytical_philosophy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  20thC  Descartes  Locke  Butler  Reid  metaphysics  ontology  substance  soul  dualism  physicalism  mind-body  consciousness  immortality  universals  particulars  identity  self  analytical_philosophy  logic  Leibniz  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Jose Luis Bermudez - Jonathan Lowe, Subjects of Experience | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 195 (Apr., 1999), pp. 272-275
Lowe develops his anti-physicalist approach to self, mind-body etc - Cartesian that self is substantial, Locke that it's primarily psychological, Aristotle that it's not immaterial -- implications for other areas beyond philosophy of mind, such as language -- an earlier version of his publications in the 2000s before his death? -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  metaphysics  ontology  philosophy_of_language  mind  mind-body  Descartes  Locke  physicalism  dualism  nominalism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lucy Allais - Intrinsic Natures: A Critique of Langton on Kant | JSTOR: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 73, No. 1 (Jul., 2006), pp. 143-169
This paper argues that there is an important respect in which Rae Langton's recent interpretation of Kant is correct: Kant's claim that we cannot know things in themselves should be understood as the claim that we cannot know the intrinsic nature of things. However, I dispute Langton's account of intrinsic properties, and therefore her version of what this claim amounts to. Langton's distinction between intrinsic, causally inert properties and causal powers is problematic, both as an interpretation of Kant, and as an independent metaphysical position. I propose a different reading of the claim that we cannot know things intrinsically. I distinguish between two ways of knowing things: in terms of their effects on other things, and as they are apart from these. I argue that knowing things' powers is knowing things in terms of effects on other things, and therefore is not knowing them as they are in themselves, and that there are textual grounds for attributing this position to Kant. -- useful bibliography of past few decades of both Kant debate and powers, properties etc metaphysics -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  books  intellectual_history  18thC  Kant  metaphysics  epistemology  causation  Hume-causation  Locke  Leibniz  noumena  phenomena  properties  essence  substance  relations  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Galen Strawson - The Identity of the Categorical and the Dispositional | JSTOR: Analysis, Vol. 68, No. 4 (Oct., 2008), pp. 271-282
Attacks the bad metaphysics that results from projecting our ability to conceptualize different aspects of objects etc separately, project them onto reality where those concepts can't exist independently, and then draw elaborate metaphysical non puzzles from the mess -- quotes Ramsey and Nietzsche, not Wittgenstein -- ftbt Ramsey 1925: 60.
He agrees with Nietzsche, who writes that 'language is built in terms of the most naive prejudices ... we read disharmonies and problems into things because we think only in the form of language - thus believing in the "eternal truth" of "reason" (e.g. subject, predicate, etc.). ... That we have a right to distinguish between subject and predicate - ... that is our strongest belief; in fact, at bottom, even the belief in cause and effect itself, in conditio and conditionatum, is merely an individual case of the first and general belief, our primeval belief in subject and predicate. ... Might not this belief in the concept of subject and predicate be a great stupidity?'" -- claims but without developing that Locke's consistent with his approach read but didn't download
article  jstor  metaphysics  analytical_philosophy  concepts  realism  properties  modal_logic  possible_worlds  Locke  language-bad_metaphysics  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Walter Ott - LOCKE'S EXCLUSION ARGUMENT | JSTOR: History of Philosophy Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 2 (APRIL 2010), pp. 181-196
A different take on Locke's superaddition argument re thinking matter that would align him with materialism that treats mental events as mere epiphenomenal, neither identity with physical, nor supervenience -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  20thC  21stC  mind  mind-body  consciousness  soul  materialism  determinism  Locke  thinking_matter  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
JON GARTHOFF - LEGITIMACY IS NOT AUTHORITY | JSTOR: Law and Philosophy, Vol. 29, No. 6 (November 2010), pp. 669-694
The two leading traditions of theorizing about democratic legitimacy are liberalism and deliberative democracy. Liberals typically claim that legitimacy consists in the consent of the governed, while deliberative democrats typically claim that legitimacy consists in the soundness of political procedures. Despite this difference, both traditions see the need for legitimacy as arising from the coercive enforcement of law and regard legitimacy as necessary for law to have normative authority. While I endorse the broad aims of these two traditions, I believe they both misunderstand the nature of legitimacy. In this essay I argue that the legitimacy of a law is neither necessary nor sufficient for its normative authority, and I argue further that the need for legitimacy in law arises regardless of whether the law is coercively enforced. I thus articulate a new understanding of the legitimacy and authority of law. -- didn't download -- bibliography heavily classic modern and contemporary philosophers
article  jstor  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  institutions  authority  legitimacy  legal_culture  legal_validity  liberalism  social_contract  consent  reasons  enforcement  deliberation-public  Habermas  democracy  norms  normativity  obligation  Enlightenment  Locke  Mill  Rawls  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Lennon, Thomas M., Stainton, Robert J. (Eds.) 2008 The Achilles of Rationalist Psychology
Downloaded Introduction pdf to Note -- Series: Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind, Vol. 7 -- newly written papers addressing each of the main contributors to the discussion of the Achilles. Despite the historical importance and intrinsic interest of the argument, very little has been written about it. *--* Contents. *--* Did Plato Articulate the Achilles Argument?. *-- Aristotle on the Unity of Consciousness. *-- The Neoplatonic Achilles. *-- The Unity of the Soul and Contrary Appetites in Medieval Philosophy. *-- Hume, Spinoza and the Achilles Inference. *-- Locke and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Reverse Achilles in Locke. *-- Cudworth and Bayle: An Odd Couple?. *-- The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke Collins Correspondence. *-- Leibniz’s ‘Achilles’. *-- Hume’s Reply to the Achilles Argument. *-- Kant and Mendelssohn on the Implications of the ‘I Think’. *-- Kant on the Achilles Argument. *-- William James and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Binding Problem: Achilles in the 21st Century.
books  intellectual_history  mind  mind-body  consciousness  perception  thinking_matter  materialism  soul  immortality  substance  Plato  Neoplatonism  Aristotle  Aquinas  Duns_Scotus  Ockham  Augustine  Descartes  Spinoza  Malebranche  Cartesian  Bayle  Locke  Clarke  Collins_Anthony  Leibniz  Hume  Kant  Mendelssohn  Fichte  cognition  neuroscience  psychology  natural_philosophy  metaphysics  rationalist  James_William  history_of_science  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"Empiricism and Multiculturalism" by Kenneth P. Winkler
Kenneth P. Winkler, Wellesley College -- This paper relates the work of the great British empiricists – Locke, Berkeley, and Hume – to issues of multiculturalism. It is argued that these philosophers can help to provide us with some of the tools we need to craft an appropriate response to the diversity of cultures. -- Winkler, Kenneth P. (2004) "Empiricism and Multiculturalism," Philosophic Exchange: Vol. 34: Iss. 1, Article 4. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  21stC  human_nature  17thC  18thC  empiricism  Locke  Berkeley  Hume  multiculturalism  comparative_anthropology  diversity  tolerance  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Toleration and Calumny: Bayle, Locke, Montesquie and Voltaire on Religious Hate Speech (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-80 -- There is a considerable literature on the issue of hate speech. And there is a considerable literature on religious toleration (both contemporary and historic). But the two have not been brought into relation with one another. In this paper, I consider how the argument for religious toleration extends beyond a requirement of non-persection and non-establishment. I consider its application to the question of religious vituperation. The focus of the paper is on 17th and 18th century theories. Locke, Bayle and other Enlightenment thinkers imagined a tolerant society as a society free of hate speech: the kind of religious peace that they envisaged was a matter of civility not just non-persecution. The paper also considers the costs of placing limits (legal or social limits) on religious hate-speech: does this interfere with the forceful expression of religious antipathy which (for some people) the acceptance of their creed requires? -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Bayle, Defamation, Enlightenment, Hate Speech, Locke, Toleration -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  tolerance  religious_belief  religious_wars  religious_lit  anticlerical  anti-Catholic  persecution  free_speech  civil_society  civic_virtue  politeness  hate_speech  freedom_of_conscience  Bayle  Locke  Locke-religion  Montesquieu  Voltaire  universalism  heresy  politics-and-religion  political_culture  minorities  public_sphere  public_disorder  civility-political  respect  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Decline of Natural Right [chapter] (2009) :: SSRN in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY, Allen Wood and Songsuk Susan Hahn, eds., Cambridge University Press
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-38 -- What happened to the doctrine of natural right in the 19thC? We know that it flourished in the 17thC and 18thC. We know that something like it - the doctrine of human rights and new forms of social contract theory - flourished again in the second half of the 20thC and continues to flourish in the 21stC. In between there was a period of decline and hibernation - ... in which to invoke natural right was always to invite intellectual ridicule and accusations of political irresponsibility. Thus article asks: How far can the decline of natural right in the 19thC be attributed to the reaction against the revolution in France? How far it was the effect of independent streams of thought, like positivism and historicism? Why was radical thought so ambivalent about natural right throughout the 19thC, and why was socialist thought in particular inclined to turn its back on it? As a framework for thought, natural right suffered a radical decline in the social and political sciences. But things were not so clear in jurisprudence, and natural right lived on to a much riper old age in the writings of some prominent economists. What is it about this theory that allowed it to survive in these environments, when so much of the rest of intellectual endeavor in the 19thC was toxic or inhospitable to it. Finally, I shall ask how far American thought represents an exception to all of this. Why and to what extent did the doctrine survive as a way of thinking in the United States, long after it had lost its credibility elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  natural_law  natural_rights  human_rights  counter-revolution  historicism  positivism  legal_theory  nationalism  national_interest  conservatism  socialism  social_contract  relativism  revolutions  1848_revolutions  French_Revolution  anticlerical  Bentham  Burke  Hume  Jefferson  Kant  Locke  Marx  Mill  Savigny  Spencer_Herbert  George_Henry  US_society  American_exceptionalism  liberalism  social_theory  social_sciences  Social_Darwinism  social_order  mass_culture  political_participation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - What is Natural Law Like? (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-27 -- “The State of Nature,” said John Locke, “has a Law of Nature to govern it, which obliges every one.” But what is “a law of nature”? How would we tell, in a state of nature, that there was a natural law as opposed to something else...? What form should we expect natural law to take in our apprehension of it? This paper argues three things. (a) John Finnis’s work on natural law provides no answer to these questions; his “theory of natural law” is really just a theory of the necessary basis in ethics for evaluating positive law. (b) We need an answer to the question “What is natural law like” not just to evaluate the work of state-of-nature theorists like Locke, but also to explore the possibility that natural law might once have played the role now played by positive international law in regulating relations between sovereigns. And (c), an affirmative account of what natural law is like must pay attention to (1) its deontic character; (2) its enforceability; (3) the ancillary principles that have to be associated with its main normative requirements if it is to be operate as a system of law; (4) its separability ...from ethics and morality, even from objective ethics and morality; and (5) the shared recognition on earth of its presence in the world. Some of these points — especially 3, 4, and 5 — sound like characteristics of positive law. But the paper argues that they are necessary nevertheless if it is going to be plausible to say that natural law has ever operated (or does still operate) as law in the world. -- Number of Pages: 21 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  IR  IR_theory  international_law  international_system  sovereignty  natural_law  positive_law  norms  Aquinas  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  state-of-nature  enforcement  legal_validity  Finnis  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, Encouragement of Irish Linen Manufacture (August 1697) - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, H.B. Fox Bourne, The Life of John Locke. In Two Volumes (London: Henry S. King, 1876). Vol. 2 pp. 363-372. 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2332> -- Available as Facsimile PDF 352 KB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book -- Locke’s detailed proposals to encourage the Irish linen industry which was quoted in full in Fox Bourne’s The Life of John Locke (1876), vol. 2, pp. 363-372.
etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  political_economy  Locke  biography  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  industry  agriculture  protectionism  development  interest_groups  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  Irish_Parliament  1690s  Whig_Junto  Board_of_Trade  UK_government-colonies  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, Proposed Poor Law Reform (October 1697) - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, H.B. Fox Bourne, The Life of John Locke. In Two Volumes (London: Henry S. King, 1876). Vol. 2 pp. 377-391. 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2331> -- Available as Facsimile PDF 638 KB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. -- Locke’s detailed proposals for the reform of the Poor Laws which was quoted in full in Fox Bourne’s The Life of John Locke (1876), vol. 2, pp. 377-391.
etexts  Liberty_Fund  17thC  British_history  British_politics  governmentality  reformation_of_manners  poverty  charity  Poor_Laws  reform-social  Locke  biography  1690s  Whig_Junto  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters Forum: John Locke on Property (January, 2013) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Eric Mack discusses John Locke’s theory of property to which Jan Narveson, Peter Vallentyne, and Michael Zuckert respond in a series of essays and comments. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  intellectual_history  17thC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_economy  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  property  property_rights  social_contract  natural_law  natural_rights  state-of-nature  labor  landowners  landed_interest  lower_orders  reformation_of_manners  mass_culture  political_participation  popular_politics  popular_culture  public_disorder  public_goods  Native_Americans  colonialism  development  common_good  commons  liberalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d [1681] - Online Library of Liberty
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d: Being Observations on a late treatise and divers other miscellanies, published under the name of Sir Robert Filmer Baronet. In which the falseness of those opinions that would make monarchy Jure Divino are laid open: and the true Principles of Government and Property (especially in our Kingdom) asserted. By a Lover of Truth and of his Country (London: Richard Janeway, 1681). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2168> -- Tyrrell was a friend and supporter of John Locke who also joined in the battle against the ideas in support of the divine right of kings expressed in the work of Sir Robert Filmer. There is much in this book about the power of the husband over his wife and servants and to what extent these powers are applicable to a monarch who claims similar rights over his subjects. -- html version available for kindle or as pdf
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  Whigs  English_constitution  government-forms  Tyrrell  Filmer  divine_right  limited_monarchy  authority  patriarchy  family  property  liberty  Absolutism  Locke  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Selections from the Scottish Philosophy of Common Sense, edited, with an introduction by G.A. Johnston [1910] - Online Library of Liberty
Thomas Reid, Selections from the Scottish Philosophy of Common Sense, edited, with an introduction by G.A. Johnston (Chicago: Open Court, 1915). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2044> The selections in this volume are reprinted from the following editions:— Reid’s Works, edited by Sir William Hamilton, sixth edition, 1863. Beattie’s Essay on the Nature and Immutability of Truth, seventh edition, 1807. Ferguson’s Principles of Moral and Political Science, 1792. Stewart’s Collected Works, edited by Sir William Hamilton, 1854-1858.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Common_Sense  Locke  Hume  Kant  Reid  Stewart_Dugald  Ferguson  metaphysics  epistemology  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  mind  mind-body  soul  dualism  ideas-theories  psychology  perception  scepticism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Parkin & Timothy Stanton, eds. - Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment (2013) | - Oxford University Press
The early enlightenment has been seen as an epoch-making period, marking the beginnings of the transition from a 'religious' to an essentially 'secular' understanding of human relations and generating in the process new accounts of the relationship between religion and politics, in which toleration was a central idea. Leading scholars challenge that view and explore ways that important discussions of toleration were shaped by natural theology and natural law. Far from representing a shift to non-religious ways of thinking about the world, the essays reveal the extent to which early enlightenment discussions of toleration presupposed a world-view in which God-given natural law established the boundaries between church and state and provided the primary point of reference for understanding claims to religious freedom. -- 1. Religious Commitment and Secular Reason: Pufendorf on the Separation between Religion and Politics, Simone Zurbuchen *--* 2. Samuel Pufendorf and Religious Intolerance in the Early Enlightenment, Thomas Ahnert *--* 3. Natural law, Nonconformity and Toleration: Two Stages on Locke's Way, Timothy Stanton *--* 4. John Locke and Natural Law: Free Worship and Toleration, Ian Harris *--* 5. The Tolerationist Programmes of Thomasius and Locke, Ian Hunter *--* 6. Leibniz's Doctrine of Toleration: Philosophical, Theological, and Pragmatic Reasons, Maria Rosa Antognazza *--* 7. Toleration as Impartiality? Civil and Ecclesiastical Toleration in Jean Barbeyrac, Petter Korkman *--* 8. Natural Rights or Political Prudence? Francis Hutcheson on Toleration, Knud Haakonssen *--* Postface. The Grounds for Toleration and the Capacity to Tolerate, John Dunn -- only hdbk
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Peter Walmsley - Tom Jones, Pope and Berkeley: The Language of Poetry and Philosophy | JSTOR: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 57, No. 232 (Nov., 2006), pp. 828-829
This review doesn't present Jones as trying to prove Bolingbroke had no influence -- more focus on Berkeley's differences from Locke in language and the correspondence of idea picture to referent. Tries to make out more particular influence on Providence where Walmsley sees Pope using Shaftesbury language. Quote from Bolingbroke on Berkeley's sublime wronheaded genius. -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  find  18thC  English_lit  philosophy_of_language  Locke  Berkeley  Pope  Essay_on_Man  Shaftesbury  Providence  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Critical Miscellanies - The Works of Lord Morley (Vol 6) - John Morley - Google Books
A mix of biograohical and critical treatment of a range of 19thC authors. Plus an interesting description of the Edinburgh Review after Jeffrey handed editorial duties over to Napier. Added to Google_Books library
books  etexts  Google_Books  19thC  intellectual_history  English_lit  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  Emerson  Carlyle  Macaulay  Byron  Eliot_George  Martineau  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Transcendentals  Locke  Mill  empiricism  religious_belief  religious_culture  Edinburgh_Review  journalism  magazines  Brougham  Bolingbroke  Bagehot  Morley  lit_crit  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Some Considerations of the Consequences of the Lowering of Interest and the Raising the Value of Money, by John Locke 1691
Part 1: Whether the Price of the Hire of Money can be regulated by Law *--* Part 2: Interest makes not Money Exchange for less of any Commodity. *--* Part 3: The Price of Land. -**- Part 4: An infallible sign of your decay of Wealth is the falling of Rents. *--* Part 5: This business of Money and Coinage is by some Men thought a great Mystery
etexts  Locke  monetary_policy  economic_history  economic_theory  17thC  1690s  currency  landowners  rents  agriculture  prices  interest_rates  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik's 2009 Voltaire lecture on 'The Guilt of Science?: Race, Science and Darwinism'
By the end of the eighteenth century, then, scientists had constructed a taxonomy of nature into which humans could be fitted and out of which emerged the categories of race. This seems to lend credibility to the view that it is modernity itself, and in particular the Enlightenment, that give rise both to the idea of race and to the practice of racism. ‘Eighteenth century Europe was the cradle of racism’, the historian George Mosse, argues because ‘racism has its foundations’ in the Enlightenment ‘preoccupation with a rational universe, nature and aesthetics.’ To see why this is not the case, we need to look more closely at how Enlightenment thinkers viewed the concept of human differences. -- If any event could demonstrate the folly of giving into unreason, it is surely Nazism and the Holocaust. Yet now it is regarded as an expression of too much reason.There is no intrinsic link between the idea of race and a rational or scientific view of the world. On the contrary: what made ideas of race plausible were the growth of political sentiments hostile to both the rationalism and the humanism of the Enlightenment.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  racialism  species  biology  evolutionary_biology  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  humanism  anti-humanism  reason  Nazis  Holocaust  imperialism  slavery  civilizing_process  human_nature  diversity  historiography-18thC  social_theory  Social_Darwinism  Herder  Linnaeus  Locke  essentialism  essence  climate  stadial_theories  Romanticism  social_order  progress  atheism_panic  authority  class_conflict  bourgeoisie  liberalism  capitalism  equality  stratification  scientism  science_of_man  science-and-religion  positivism  social_sciences  France  Britain  British_Empire  Germany  Great_Powers  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview with Lisa Downing - Early Mod philosophy » 3:AM Magazine - May 2014
Lisa Downing is the philosopher who thinks all the time about the early modern philosophers of Europe, especially 17th and 18th century philosophy, about how philosophical analysis and historical exactitude compliment each other, on adding to the canonical philosophers of the period, on why Malebranch is the closest to re-entry, and Robert Boyle, on Descartes vs Newton, on avoiding anachronism, on the dynamism of the period, on primary and secondary qualities, on resisting the idea that historical views have to be relevant, on Berkeley, on tensions in Locke, on women philosophers of the time and on rejecting the occult. This one is kick-ass! Yo!
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Descartes  Cartesian  Malebranche  Locke  Boyle  Berkeley  Newton  Clarke  Leibniz  Hobbes  mind-body  causation  God-attributes  Providence  mechanism  substance  metaphysics  Aristotelian  qualia  perception  natural_philosophy  free_will  Scientific_Revolution  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Strawson on Consciousness - Waggish 2005
Long quote from TLS with broken link -- For those of us like me who can’t help wondering about the physical reality of subjective mental events, here’s a passage from the ever-excellent Galen Strawson, from a review of Antonio Damasio: The standard formulation of the “mind-body problem” rests on a huge and wholly unjustified assumption (this assumption, in fact, is Descartes’s deepest error). It is not content with the obvious truth that matter and consciousness seem to us to be utterly heterogeneous things. It slides on to the claim that matter and consciousness are in fact utterly heterogeneous things, in such a way that it is mysterious how one could ever be the basis or “realization” of the other. It shifts from a harmless and true epistemological claim about how things seem to us to a mega-therial metaphysical claim about how things are in reality.Why? Why indeed? .... So, if our best picture of matter makes it seem incomprehensible that matter should be the basis of (or simply be) conscious experience, all this shows is the inadequacy of our best picture of matter. Locke, Hume, Priestley, Kant and others were very clear about this, but few understand it today. Many now make Descartes’s deepest error, in fact, with far less justification than him – while condemning him for his errors.
mind-body  consciousness  reductionism  materialism  metaphysics  epistemology  Descartes  Locke  analytical_philosophy  thinking_matter  dualism  qualia  essence  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Corey W. Dyck, review - Avi Lifschitz, Language and Enlightenment: The Berlin Debates of the Eighteenth Century // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Dec 2013
For its competition of 1771, the Berlin Academy of Sciences asked: "Supposing men abandoned to their natural faculties, are they in a position to invent language? And by what means will they arrive at this invention?" The winning essay was Herder's "On the Origin of Language." This was actually the Academy's 2nd on language. In 1759 they asked: "What is the reciprocal influence of the opinions of people on language, and of language on opinions?" The winner was the orientalist Johann David Michaelis. Lifschitz's lucid and engaging book is about the 1759 contest, as he considers the historical, philosophical, and political circumstances that led to its proposal and the broader scholarly views of Michaelis. -- While one might quibble with Lifschitz's attempt to find deep roots in the Leibnizian-Wolffian philosophy for the 1759 Academy question, there is no doubting that in Berlin of the 1750s a number of thinkers took an active interest in language, its role in framing social institutions, and its relation to the mind, primarily under the influence of the work of Condillac and Rousseau. These include the president of the Academy, Maupertuis, and Moses Mendelssohn There was also lively discussion among Academy members regarding the (synchronic) connection between language and opinions, esp French as the language of the Academy. -- Already in the 1750s ...mainstream Enlightenment figures recognized the "linguistic rootedness of all human forms of life" and the importance of language as a "tool of cognition". Lifschitz rightly contends [this counters the story that such a view ], with its focus on the historical and non-rational aspects of human nature, [came from counter-Enlightenment figures] such as Herder and Hamann. [This directly] challenge[s] the characterization ... in Isaiah Berlin's seminal studies [as well as more recent studies] such as Michael Forster's work on Herder's philosophy of language. ...Herder's claim, as characterized by Forster, that "thought is essentially dependent upon and bounded by language" and that "one cannot think unless one has a language and one can only think what one can express linguistically" must be taken in the broader context of these earlier philosophical (and political) debates.
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march 2014 by dunnettreader
Nancy Kendrick, review - Mary Astell, Jacqueline Broad (ed.), The Christian Religion, as Professed by a Daughter of the Church of England // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
This first complete modern edition of Mary Astell's "most profound and significant scholarly achievement" is a much needed and welcome addition to Astell studies, and more generally, to the study of early modern philosophy. -- Follows 2nd edition published in 1717 (1st 1705). -- Drawing on her study of Astell in Women Philosophers of the 17thC (Cambridge, 2002), Broad [discusses] the Cartesianism that empowered Astell and other early modern women to assert themselves as intellectuals capable of engaging in philosophical discourse, and she explores the feminist message of Astell's work in 3 ways. First she examines the instructive purposes of The Christian Religion for its female readers with respect to the development of their reason and virtue and the control of their passions. -- Second, Broad emphasizes Astell's rejection of the implicit sexism of the works critiqued in The Christian Religion, including Locke's The Reasonableness of Christianity, which claimed that because women are incapable of grasping difficult concepts, they must be brought to religious understanding through plain and straight-forward commands. Third, Broad shows that some anti-Lockean positions advanced by the High-Church, Tory-sympathizing Astell are consistent with her feminist aims, despite appearances to the contrary. -- Broad does not, however, give much attention to the ... consequences of the maturation of her views to the feminist message of the text. In addition to advice-giving and instructive purposes, The Christian Religion addresses one of her long-standing philosophical preoccupations -- the metaphysical underpinnings of human relations. Astell's metaphysics was driven by her Platonism, which provided the solution to a concern... about the nature and possibility of friendship. In The Christian Religion, her views about friendship are expanded and developed in ways that highlight her interest in female-female, rather than female-male, social bonds. -- The review is a rich discussion of development of Astell's on reconciling friendship, love of God and the universal benevolence demanded by the Gospels.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_politics  Astell  feminism  Cartesian  Neoplatonism  theology  High_Church  Tories  1690s  1700s  1710s  Locke  Locke-religion  sexism  friendship  love  benevolence  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Happy birthday John Locke! - Two Treatises with marginalia | Treasures at Christ's College, Cambridge - Aug 2013
The copy held by Christ’s – the third edition, published in 1698 – is of great interest, since it contains extensive annotations and corrections by Locke himself, who was deeply unhappy with the early printings of the work, and determined to produce a flawless edition to be left to posterity. Locke himself did not get further than the first few pages in this laborious correcting process; the rest is in the hand of his amanuensis, Pierre Coste. -- see separate bookmark for link to scanned copy
books  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  etexts  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Online guide to texts in early modern metaethics (Cole Mitchell)
This is an online guide to texts in early modern metaethics, organized by author in rough chronological order, and maintained by Cole Mitchell. I try to keep the focus on topics of metaethical interest: reason and the passions, the status of moral truths and their relation to God, the ‘why be moral?’ question, the relation between morality and self-interest, analogies between morality and other domains (geometry, law, aesthetics), teleology and human nature, etc.
This guide is still pretty rough and messy. Any feedback on this or similar projects would be much appreciated:
website  links  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  metaethics  human_nature  mind-body  reason-passions  natural_religion  rational_religion  Deism  Cambridge_Platonists  Descartes  Malebranche  Hobbes  Locke  Clarke  Leibniz  Butler  Berkeley  Warburton  Hume  Hume-ethics  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel I. O'Neill, review essay - Whither Democracy? | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 564-575
Reviewed -- (1) Liberal Beginnings: Making a Republic for the Moderns by A. Kalyvas; I. Katznelson; *--* (2) James Madison and the Spirit of Republican Self-Government by C. Sheehan; *--* (3) French Political Thought from Montesquieu to Tocqueville by A. de Dijn; *--* (4) Soft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect by P. Rahe
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  liberalism  republicanism  US_constitution  France  French_Revolution  Montesquieu  Rousseau  Hobbes  Locke  Founders  Madison  democracy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism-republicanism_debates  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Horacio Spector - Four Conceptions of Freedom | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 6 (December 2010), pp. 780-808
Contemporary political philosophers discuss the idea of freedom in terms of two distinctions: Berlin's famous distinction between negative and positive liberty, and Skinner and Pettit's divide between liberal and republican liberty. In this essay I proceed to recast the debate by showing that there are two strands in liberalism, Hobbesian and Lockean, and that the latter inherited its conception of civil liberty from republican thought. I also argue that the contemporary debate on freedom lacks a perspicuous account of the various conceptions of freedom, mainly because it leaves aside the classic contrast between natural liberty and civil liberty. Once we consider both the negative/positive distinction and the natural/civil one, we can classify all conceptions of freedom within four basic irreducible categories. In light of the resulting framework I show that there are two distinct conceptions of republican liberty, natural and civil, and that the former is coupled with an ideal of individual self-control. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  liberty  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  republicanism  neo-republicanism  liberty-negative  liberty-positive  domination  slavery  natural_rights  civil_liberties  Hobbes  Locke  Berlin_Isaiah  Skinner  Pettit  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Edmund Leites - Conscience, Leisure, and Learning: Locke and the Levellers | JSTOR: Sociological Analysis, Vol. 39, No. 1 (Spring, 1978), pp. 36-61
In 1962, C. B. Macpherson challenged conventional interpretations of the thought of both John Locke and the English Leveller movement of the 1640s. In the years since the publication of his book, his interpretations have received much acute criticism. Some critics have ably attacked his reading of John Locke; others, his view of the Leveller movement. But the doubtfulness of Macpherson's interpretation has not led his critics to seriously reexamine the question of whether Locke and the Levellers share a common vision. I shall do this, and shall broaden the context of interpretation to include more than their political views. -- developing implications of conscience and character in moral judgment vs casuistry and deference to learned authority -- Putney debates with Ireton re extent of suffrage analyzed for broader implications -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  17thC  British_politics  Levellers  Locke  egalitarian  casuistry  conscience  character  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Vicki Hsueh - Giving Orders: Theory and Practice in the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 63, No. 3 (Jul., 2002), pp. 425-446
In reading Locke and political discourse of liberal constitutionalism based on Locke's Two Treatises, mistake to conflate Carolina Constitutions with the Two Treatises as evidence of exclusion and assimilation policies from outset. Locke was not sole author, the audience and purposes were different, the scheme is Harrington republicanism, and measures for negotiation, adaptation and other more inclusionary but non assimilationist measures were contemplated. So don't read back contemporary unitary vision of liberal constitutionalism into origins. Uses political imaginary congruent and incongruent with lived experience as theme -- useful bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_politics  colonialism  British_Empire  Carolina  Locke  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  Harrington  nobility  rank  property  development  plantations  Native_Americans  liberalism  constitutionalism  assimilation  classes  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Farr - Locke, Natural Law, and New World Slavery | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Aug., 2008), pp. 495-522
This essay systematically reformulates an earlier argument about Locke and new world slavery, adding attention to Indians, natural law, and Locke's reception. Locke followed Grotian natural law in constructing a just-war theory of slavery. Unlike Grotius, though, he severely restricted the theory, making it inapplicable to America. It only fit resistance to "absolute power" in Stuart England. Locke was nonetheless an agent of British colonialism who issued instructions governing slavery. Yet they do not inform his theory--or vice versa. This creates hermeneutical problems and raises charges of racism. If Locke deserves the epithet "racist," it is not for his having a racial doctrine justifying slavery. None of this makes for a flattering portrait. Locke's reputation as the champion of liberty would not survive the contradictions in which new world slavery ensnared him. Evidence for this may be found in Locke's reception, including by Southern apologists for slavery.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  17thC  British_history  colonialism  American_colonies  West_Indies  indigenous_peoples  Native_Americans  Africa  slavery  Locke  Grotius  natural_law  just_war  conquest  liberty  individualism  liberalism  Southern_states  abolition  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jakob De Roover and S. N. Balagangadhara - John Locke, Christian Liberty, and the Predicament of Liberal Toleration | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Aug., 2008), pp. 523-549
Recently, scholars have disputed whether Locke's political theory should be read as the groundwork of secular liberalism or as a Protestant political theology. Focusing on Locke's mature theory of toleration, the article raises a central question: What if these two readings are compatible? That is, what would be the consequences if Locke's political philosophy has theological foundations, but has also given shape to secular liberalism? Examining Locke's theory in the "Letter Concerning Toleration" (1689), the article argues that this is indeed the case. The liberal model of toleration is a secularization of the theology of Christian liberty and its division of society into a temporal political kingdom and the spiritual kingdom of Christ. Therefore, when liberal toleration travels beyond the boundaries of the Christian West or when western societies become multicultural, it threatens to lose its intelligibility. -- helpful bibliography on recent debates -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  tolerance  17thC  Locke  multiculturalism  theology  secularism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Leonard C. Feldman - Judging Necessity: Democracy and Extra-Legalism | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Aug., 2008), pp. 550-577
This article probes the relationship among constitutionalism, extra-legal prerogative power, and citizen judgment. While much has been written about the nature of Lockean prerogative, and while his theory serves as a direct inspiration for contemporary "normative extra-legalists," key participants in the debate over emergency powers, less attention has been paid to how the people judge prerogative. Attention to this issue is useful because an examination of the process of political judgment of extra-legalism in Locke leads to a complication of the current extra-legalist vision of democratic mechanisms of accountability. The author argues that the extra-legal approach is right to consider the role of democratic publics in potentially constraining the exercise of emergency powers but wrong to formulate that role as one extra-constitutional power checking another extra-constitutional power. The author situates both prerogative power and citizen judgment of it at the threshold of the constitutional order. -- between Bush Administration lawlessness and fascination with Schmitt and "state of exception", executive action and Sovereignty have become hot topics in political theory and constitutional law review articles -- didn't download but may be helpful for Locke on prerogative and the alignment of Whigs and Tories on the issue as seen by Bolingbroke
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  legal_theory  constitutionalism  17thC  18thC  20thC  democracy  US_constitution  executive  consent  prerogative  sovereignty  Locke  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eva Botella-Ordinas - DEBATING EMPIRES, INVENTING EMPIRES: British Territorial Claims Against the Spaniards in America, 1670—1714 | JSTOR: Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, Vol. 10, No. 1 (SPRING/SUMMER 2010), pp. 142-168
This essay analyzes the Spanish-British political debate over the right to fell logwood and for the dominion of the Yucatan. It contextualizes archival material as well as printed treatises written by Britons who were engaged in the debate and who gave origin to the ideology of the British Empire before the Union (1707). These writers were members of the Council of Trade and Plantations and of the Royal Society, and they had not only domestic interests but also direct private interests either in the West or the East Indies. John Locke is the main figure in this debate and his concept of property is revised within this new context. Locke and other fellows of the Royal Society and King's councilors argued in favor of British possession of American lands claimed by Spain. Using natural law and political and theological arguments to claim that Spain was unable to improve nature, they described the Spanish as a declining and backward empire and created a successful imperial ideology to bring domestic homogeneity and stability in turbulent times. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  Anglo-Spanish  Spanish_Empire  Atlantic  Royal_Society  Board_of_Trade  Locke  natural_law  property  dominion  West_Indies  Genesis  Biblical_exegesis  Church_of_England  missionaries  American_colonies  colonialism  imperialism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Farr - Political Science and the Enlightenment of Enthusiasm | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 82, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 51-69
I provide a narrative of the emergence of an expressly articulated @'political science@' in the Scottish Enlightenment. Political science was designed by Hume, Smith, and others to advance both a Newtonian method for the study of politics and a politics of moderation whose tasks included a critique of enthusiasm. In this way, poltiical science, moderation, and (anti)enthusiasm were conceptually connected. The emergence of political science, understood in this way, required a number of conceptual changes in a structure of argument shaped largely by Locke. These conceptual changes, in turn, fixed a rhetorical framework for persistent debates over the methodological and political identity of political science, even as ideology literally replaced enthusiasm. These persistent debates reveal the relevance of the history of political science as a forum for remembrance, reflection, and critique. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  18thC  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  science_of_man  social_sciences  Scottish_Enlightenment  Hume  Smith  enthusiasm  Newtonian  ideology  Locke  rhetoric-political  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Timothy Stanton - Authority and Freedom in the Interpretation of Locke's Political Theory | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 6-30
This essay argues that many modern discussions of Locke's political theory are unconsciously shaped by an imaginative picture of the world inherited from the past, on which authority and freedom are fundamentally antipathetic. The consequences of this picture may be seen in the distinction made customarily in Locke studies between the 'authoritarian' Locke of Two Tracts on Government, for whom authority descends from God, and the later, 'liberal,' Locke, for whom authority arises from the will and agreement of individuals, and felt in the emphases placed on consent and resistance in most interpretations of Lockean political thought. The essay examines the composition and contours of this picture and, by holding up a mirror to contemporary Locke scholarship, draws attention to some of the ways in which it unwittingly distorts Locke's thinking. -- paywall Sage -- something similar in terms of binaries and ignoring different audiences in contemporary reading of others of the period including Bolingbroke
article  jstor  paywall  political_philosophy  17thC  Locke  tolerance  liberty  social_contract  majoritarian  authority  Bolingbroke 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
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