dunnettreader + latin_lit   40

VIRGILE – Géorgiques (Œuvre intégrale) | Litterature audio.com
Traduction versifiée (1770) : Jacques Delille (1738-1813)
Reader - Alain Degandt
audio-books  poetry  Latin_lit  Virgil  French_lit  18thC 
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Folgerpedia - Folger Shakespeare Library
Founded on 9 July 2014, Folgerpedia is the Folger Shakespeare Library's collaboratively-edited, search-based encyclopedia of all things "Folger." Content of the articles has been contributed by various departments within the institution, as well as Folger readers and other scholars. The articles address each topic as it relates to the Folger and the Folger collection. There is a variety of article types that can be found on Folgerpedia, including: lists; how tos; and encyclopedic entries concerning items in the collection, Shakespeare's works and characters, and his works in performance.

To read more about Folgerpedia, check out the Folger research blog, The Collation.
Reformation  Tudor  stagecraft  printing  political_culture  Italian_lit  English-language  English_lit  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_culture  Shakespeare  James_I  theater  Renaissance  digital_humanities  history_of_book  intellectual_history  British_history  publishing  plays  website  literary_language  cultural_history  actors  London  event  playwrights  Latin_lit  politics-and-literature  Elizabeth 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Philippe de Doze - Horace et la question idéologique à Rome : considérations sur un itinéraire politique - Revue Historique (2012) - Cairn.info
Horace combattit dans les rangs des républicains avant de devenir, en apparence au moins, l’un des plus fervents partisans d’Auguste et du régime impérial. Cette volte-face idéologique ne manque pas de surprendre. Sans doute parce que nous accordons aux idéologies une place qui n’était pas la leur dans le monde romain. En réalité, jamais Horace n’eut le sentiment de se renier. Il a seulement changé de protecteurs après la défaite de ses amis républicains, fait un pari sur l’avenir en s’attachant à un nouveau réseau, celui des vainqueurs. Et loin d’avoir été manipulé par le nouveau régime, loin d’être devenu son porte-parole, il a, par ses vers, tenté de l’influencer, adoptant par là même la posture de l’intellectuel. -- recently published his thesis dealing with politics of Augustan Age literature - paywall
article  ancient_Rome  poetry  Roman_Republic  Horace  Latin_lit  patronage  French_language  paywall  Augustus  literary_history  politics-and-literature 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Aude Doody - Pliny's "Natural History: Enkuklios Paideia" and the Ancient Encyclopedia | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2009)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 1-21 -- interesting re expectations when use encyclopedia to think about the work - comparisons with other "desire for universal knowledge" authors, compilers etc -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  antiquity  genre  encyclopedia  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  natural_philosophy  natural_history  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  Pliny_the_Elder  Varro 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
THE WARBURG INSTITUTE: Afterlife of Ovid
The Afterlife of Ovid

 7 - 8 March 2013

This conference will investigate the Medieval and Renaissance reading of Ovid and his influence on poetry and painting.

Hosted by: The Warburg Institute and the Institute of Classical Studies 

Organised by: Philip Hardie (Cambridge), Peter Mack (Warburg Institute) and John North (Institute of Classical Studies) 

Speakers: Alessandro Barchiesi (Stanford), Hélène Casanova-Robin (Sorbonne Paris IV), Frank Coulson (Ohio State), Fátima Díez-Platas (Santiago e Compostela), Ingo Gildenhard (Durham), Philip Hardie (Cambridge), Maggie Kilgour (McGill), Gesine Manuwald (UCL), Elizabeth McGrath (Warburg), John Miller (Virginia), Victoria Moul (King’s College), Caroline Stark (Ohio Wesleyan) and Hérica Valladares (John Hopkins)
-- selected presentations available as podcasts
Latin_lit  Renaissance  literary_history  Ovid  17thC  Milton  audio  English_lit  conference 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
David Sedley - Lucretius and the Transformation of Greek Wisdom | Classical Literature | Cambridge University Press (hbk 1998)
This book studies the structure and origins of De Rerum Natura (On the nature of things), the great first-century BC poem by Lucretius. By showing how he worked from the literary model set by the Greek poet Empedocles but under the philosophical inspiration of the Greek philosopher Epicurus, the book seeks to characterize Lucretius' unique poetic achivement. It is addressed to those interested both in Latin poetry and in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. [A later chapter concerns the "imprint" of Theophrastus *--* The appearance of this book is a great event - a first class modern philosopher writing on a major Roman author *--* Nothing of this kind available elsewhere *--* Contains the first ever full-scale reconstruction of Epicurus' great treatise On Nature -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  literary_history  Lucretius  ancient_philosophy  cosmology  religious_belief  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  Hellenism  Epicurean  atomism  Empedocles  Theophrastus  poetry  rhetoric-moral_basis  epistemology  nature  perception  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Digital Scriptorium
The Digital Scriptorium is a growing image database of medieval and renaissance manuscripts that unites scattered resources from many institutions into an international tool for teaching and scholarly research. As a visual catalog, DS allows scholars to verify with their own eyes cataloguing information about places and dates of origin, scripts, artists, and quality. Special emphasis is placed on the touchstone materials: manuscripts signed and dated by their scribes. DS records manuscripts that traditionally would have been unlikely candidates for reproduction. It fosters public viewing of materials otherwise available only within libraries. Because it is web-based, it encourages interaction between the knowledge of scholars and the holdings of libraries to build a reciprocal flow of information. Digital Scriptorium looks to the needs of a very diverse community of medievalists, classicists, musicologists, paleographers, diplomatists and art historians. At the same time Digital Scriptorium recognizes the limited resources of libraries; it bridges the gap between needs and resources by means of extensive rather than intensive cataloguing, often based on legacy data, and sample imaging.Digital Scriptorium institutional partners have instituted a governance structure to plan jointly for the future of the program, in terms of scope, sustainability, and content.
website  images  Medieval  religious_lit  manuscripts  medieval_history  Latin_lit  art_history 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Livius - Articles on ancient history
Common categories
Roman Empire (1052)
Byzantium (345)
Greece (248)
Museums (196)
Persia (186)
Hellenistic (180)
Roman Republic (137)
Germania Inferior (136)
Greater Iran (84)
Anatolia (80)
ancient_religions  Latin_lit  Mediterranean  ancient_Near_East  ancient_history  art_history  Roman_Empire  ancient_India  Persia  ancient_Israel  ancient_Egypt  Byzantine  Roman_Republic  website  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Greek_lit  ancient_Greece 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas G. Pavel - The Lives of the Novel: A History. (2013 hdbk, 2015 obk) | Princeton University Press
This is a bold and original original history of the novel from ancient Greece to the vibrant world of contemporary fiction. In this wide-ranging survey, Pavel argues that the driving force behind the novel's evolution has been a rivalry between stories that idealize human behavior and those that ridicule and condemn it. Impelled by this conflict, the novel moved from depicting strong souls to sensitive hearts and, finally, to enigmatic psyches. Pavel analyzes more than a hundred novels from Europe, North and South America, Asia, and beyond, resulting in a provocative reinterpretation of its development. According to Pavel, the earliest novels were implausible because their characters were either perfect or villainous. In the 18thC and 19thC, novelists strove for greater credibility by describing the inner lives of ideal characters in minute detail (as in Richardson's case), or by closely examining the historical and social environment (as Scott and Balzac did). Yet the earlier rivalry continued: Fielding held the line against idealism, defending the comic tradition with its flawed characters, while Charlotte Brontë and George Eliot offered a rejoinder to social realism with their idealized vision of strong, generous, and sensitive women. In the twentieth century, modernists like Proust and Joyce sought to move beyond this conflict and capture the enigmatic workings of the psyche. Pavel concludes his compelling account by showing how the old tensions persist even within today's pluralism, as popular novels about heroes coexist with a wealth of other kinds of works, from satire to social and psychological realism. -- Prof. of French, Comparative Literature, and Social Thought at the U. of Chicago, also "Fictional Worlds" and "The Spell of Language." -- downloaded introduction to Note
books  kindle-available  literary_history  literary_theory  lit_crit  novels  fiction  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  Medieval  Renaissance  Cervantes  Fielding  Richardson  Defoe  Scott_Sir_Walter  Balzac  Eliot_George  Proust  satire  cultural_critique  politics-and-literature  cultural_history  sentimentalism  character-fiction  psychology  historical_fiction  realism-literature  Modernism  romances  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Maggie Kilgour - Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid (2012) | Oxford University Press
Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid contributes to our understanding of the Roman poet Ovid, the Renaissance writer Milton, and more broadly the transmission and transformation of classical traditions through history. It examines the ways in which Milton drew on Ovid's oeuvre, as well as the long tradition of reception that had begun with Ovid himself, and argues that Ovid's revision of the past, and especially his relation to Virgil, gave Renaissance writers a model for their own transformation of classical works. Throughout his career Milton thinks through and with Ovid, whose stories and figures inform his exploration of the limits and possibilities of creativity, change, and freedom. Examining this specific relation between two very individual and different authors, Kilgour also explores the forms and meaning of creative imitation. Intertexuality was not only central to the two writers' poetic practices but helped shape their visions of the world. While many critics seek to establish how Milton read Ovid, Kilgour debates the broader question of why does considering how Milton read Ovid matter? How do our readings of this relation change our understanding of both Milton and Ovid; and does it tell us about how traditions are changed and remade through time?
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  Renaissance  English_lit  influence-literary  imitation  Virgil 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Craig Kallendorf - The Other Virgil: 'Pessimistic' Readings of the Aeneid in Early Modern Culture | Oxford University Press
"The Other Virgil" tells the story of how a classic like the Aeneid can say different things to different people. As a school text it was generally taught to support the values and ideals of a succession of postclassical societies, but between 1500 and 1800 a number of unusually sensitive readers responded to cues in the text that call into question what the poem appears to be supporting. This book focuses on the literary works written by these readers, to show how they used the Aeneid as a model for poems that probed and challenged the dominant values of their society, just as Virgil had done centuries before. Some of these poems are not as well known today as they should be, but others, like Milton's Paradise Lost and Shakespeare's The Tempest, are; in the latter case, the poems can be understood in new ways once their relationship to the 'other Virgil' is made clear. -- no pbk, but shows ebook available
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Virgil  epic  politics-and-literature  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_lit  Shakespeare  Milton  influence-literary  imitation  poetry 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Ronald Mellor - Tacitus' Annals (2010) | Oxford University Press
Tacitus' Annals is the central historical source for first-century C.E. Rome. It is prized by historians since it provides the best narrative material for the reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero, as well as a probing analysis of the imperial system of government. But the Annals should be seen as far more than an historical source, a mere mine for the reconstruction of the facts of Roman history. While the Annals is a superb work of history, it has also become a central text in the western literary, political, and even philosophical traditions - from the Renaissance to the French and American revolutions, and beyond. This volume attempts to enhance the reader's understanding of how this book of history could have such a profound effect. Chapters will address the purpose, form, and method of Roman historical writing, the ethnic biases of Tacitus, and his use of sources. Since Tacitus has been regarded as one of the first analysts of the psychopathology of political life, the book will examine the emperors, the women of the court, and the ambitious entourage of freedmen and intellectuals who surround every Roman ruler. The final chapter will examine the impact of Tacitus' Annals since their rediscovery by Boccaccio in the 14th century.
books  kindle-available  historiography-antiquity  historians-and-politics  Tacitus  Latin_lit  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  political_culture  political_philosophy  Renaissance  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  oligarchy  Absolutism  raison-d'-état  government-forms 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Fantham - Ovid's Metamorphoses (2004) | Oxford University Press
Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the original are translated into English. Ovid's Metamorphoses have been seen as both the culmination of and a revolution in the classical epic tradition, transferring narrative interest from war to love and fantasy. This introduction considers how Ovid found and shaped his narrative from the creation of the world to his own sophisticated times, illustrating the cruelty of jealous gods, the pathos of human love, and the imaginative fantasy of flight, monsters, magic, and illusion. Elaine Fantham introduces the reader not only to this marvelous and complex narrative poem, but to the Greek and Roman traditions behind Ovid's tales of transformation and a selection of the images and texts that it inspired.
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  ancient_Greece  Greek_lit  ancient_religions  gods-antiquity  imitation  influence-literary 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Luca Grillo - Cicero's "De Provinciis Consularibus Oratio" | Oxford University Press
Perhaps no other single Roman speech exemplifies the connection between oratory, politics and imperialism better than Cicero's De Provinciis Consularibus, pronounced to the senate in 56 BC. Cicero puts his talents at the service of the powerful "triumviri" (Caesar, Crassus and Pompey), whose aims he advances by appealing to the senators' imperialistic and chauvinistic ideology. This oration, then, yields precious insights into several areas of late republican life: international relations between Rome and the provinces (Gaul, Macedonia and Judaea); the senators' view on governors, publicani (tax-farmers) and foreigners; the dirty mechanics of high politics in the 50s, driven by lust for domination and money; and Cicero's own role in that political choreography. This speech also exemplifies the exceptional range of Cicero's oratory: the invective against Piso and Gabinius calls for biting irony, the praise of Caesar displays high rhetoric, the rejection of other senators' recommendations is a tour de force of logical and sophisticated argument, and Cicero's justification for his own conduct is embedded in the self-fashioning narrative which is typical of his post reditum speeches. This new commentary includes an updated introduction, which provides the readers with a historical, rhetorical and stylistic background to appreciate the complexities of Cicero's oration, as well as indexes and maps. -- Latin text
books  kindle-available  Cicero  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  Roman_Republic  irony  corruption  Caesar  imperialism  Latin_lit  ancient_history  ancient_Rome 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Matthew Bowser - The Golden Age of Rome: Augustus’ program to better the Roman Empire (2013 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2013 -- posted to History of the Ancient World website - Argument continues among historians to this day whether Augustus should be considered the benefactor that Vergil portrays, who restored virtue and order, or as the tyrant Tacitus describes. Using evidence from a variety of contemporary sources, I intend to show that Augustus did in fact work to bring about the Age of Gold that Vergil promises. Whether through warfare, legislation, political maneuvering, or propaganda, I believe that his actions from the start reflect a clear program to make the Roman Empire the most powerful and most secure state that it could be, and that he was not just working for personal ambition. I have narrowed down the concept of the Golden Age, as portrayed by the poets, to three primary qualities: peace and security, the flourishing of the old Republican virtues, and prosperity under a glorious, divine leader. I will address each of these aspects in turn, consulting evidence from the period to show how Augustus’ regime worked to satisfy them. This evidence will include contemporary literature, historical facts and records, art, architecture, religion, and symbolism. I will also address the major criticisms of each facet by eyewitnesses such as Ovid and Propertius, by Roman historians such as Tacitus and Suetonius, and by various modern scholars of Roman history. Studying the success of Augustus’ methods can reap numerous benefits, including a deeper understanding of later dictators and their programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Augustan_Rome  political_history  political_culture  civic_virtue  civil_religion  literary_history  Latin_lit  Virgil  Tacitus  historians-and-politics  state-building  Ovid  Suetonius  historiography  historiography-antiquity  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - « Qual l’alto Ægeo... » : Montaigne et l’essai des poètes italiens | Italique, XI, 2008, p.109-129.
Italique [En ligne], XI | 2008, mis en ligne le 01 février 2012, DOI : 10.4000/italique.213. **--** La poésie est l’expression privilégiée de l’émotion pour Montaigne.1Il cite tout au long des Essais d’innombrables vers, par lesquels il exprime tout ce que sa prose ne peut dire. Ces citations contribuent à un effet d’hétérogénéité stylistique et linguistique, qui définit l’originalité même du livre, dans le cadre d’une « rhétorique des citations » et d’une esthétique de la surprise et de la varietas. Ces vers sont en latin pour la plupart d’entre eux, constituant une véritable anthologie, d’Ovide et de Virgile, cités dès le chapitre 2 du premier livre, à Horace, qui conclut le dernier chapitre du livre III. Montaigne cite également 70 vers de poètes italiens. Ces fragments en langue italienne sont plus importants que les vers français, si l’on excepte, dans les trois premières éditions, le recueil des 29 sonnets d’Etienne de La Boétie, qui constitue à lui seul la matière d’un chapitre dédié à la comtesse de Guiche. La langue italienne, sous le règne de Henri III, était un signe de distinction. De tels vers étaient l’expression ostentatoire d’une culture mondaine, que le livre partageait avec ses lecteurs, dames et gentilshommes dont Montaigne voulait être le pédagogue sans pédantisme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  French_lit  Italian_lit  Latin_lit  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  poetry  poetics  vernacular  epic  epigrammes  prose  style-philosophy  Montaigne  intertextual  influence-literary  elite_culture  Petrarch  Ariosto  Dante  Virgil  Tasso  Lucretius  Seneca  Pléiade  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Betty Rose Nagle, review - William Fitzgerald, How to Read a Latin Poem: If You Can’t Read Latin Yet (2013) | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2014.01.07
This engagingly written and cleverly organized book contains sophisticated discussions of a wide range of poets, periods, and genres, primarily in the form of close readings of the Latin originals. By what means, and how successfully, does its author accommodate that hypothetical Latinless reader? He does not do this by dumbing anything down; these are readings from which the proficient can profit, too. The poets and works included come mostly from the “greatest hits” list, but there are some unorthodox choices as well, such as Sulpicia in the chapter on love poetry, several Priapea included with Catullus and Martial in a chapter on invective, and Persius as the featured satirist. The first two chapters treat antithetical topics (love, hate); the middle two treat respectively a collection (Horace’s Odes) and a corpus (Virgil’s works) written during the same period; the fifth treats another pair of contemporaries, the Neronians Petronius [actually Lucan?] and Seneca; and the sixth, thematic again, pairs Lucretius and Ovid as philosophical and narrative “science fiction.” There is also an introduction for his readers, cleverly followed by a “Prelude” discussing two poems addressed to their readers, and a brief “Epilogue,” using Hadrian’s animula as a bridge to a few comments about the very different poetry of Christian hymns. Ancillaries include a pronunciation guide, suggestions for further reading, a glossary of terms, an index of names and topics, and another of poems. -- Oxford University Press - only hdbk on amazon.com - ebook available on Google_Books for c $20 - is OUP having a kindle fight? From Google preview, looks fabulous
books  reviews  buy  Google_Books  Latin_lit  Horace  Virgil  Ovid  Seneca  Lucretius  satire  Augustan_Rome  politics-and-literature  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  poetry  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) - Home
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) (ISSN 1055-7660) publishes timely open-access, peer-reviewed reviews of current scholarly work in the field of classical studies (including archaeology). This site is the authoritative archive of BMCR's publication, from 1990 to the present. Reviews from August 2008 on are also posted on our blog.
website  books  reviews  intellectual_history  literary_history  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  archaeology  art_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  poetry  theater  Augustan_Rome  pre-Socratics  Plato  Socrates  Aristotle  Hellenism  Cicero  Stoicism  Epicurean  Virgil  Horace  Ovid  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Roman_law 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Hutcheson - Philosophiae moralis institutio compendiaria with a Short Introduction to Moral Philosophy, ed. Luigi Turco - Online Library of Liberty
Francis Hutcheson, Philosophiae moralis institutio compendiaria with a Short Introduction to Moral Philosophy, edited and with an Introduction by Luigi Turco (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2059> This Liberty Fund publication of Philosophiae Moralis Institutio Compendiaria is a parallel edition of the English and Latin versions of a book designed by Hutcheson for use in the classroom. General Editor Knud Haakonssen remarks that “Hutcheson’s Institutio was written as a textbook for university students and it therefore covers a curriculum which has an institutional background in his own university, Glasgow. This was a curriculum crucially influenced by Hutcheson’s predecessor Gershom Carmichael, and at its center was modern natural jurisprudence as systematized by Grotius, Pufendorf, and others… . The Institutio is the first major [published] attempt by Hutcheson to deal with natural law on his own terms… . It therefore encapsulates the axis of natural law and Scottish Enlightenment ideas, which so many other thinkers, including Adam Smith, worked with in their different ways. It is of great significance that this work issued from the class in which Smith sat as a student.”
books  etexts  18thC  moral_philosophy  natural_law  Scottish_Enlightenment  Hutcheson  Hume-ethics  Latin_lit  Cicero  education-higher  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Literature index page
(1) Medieval Attitudes toward Literature (2) Literary Relations -- ** Dante and Boccaccio, ** The Proem of the Decameron: Boccaccio between Ovid and Dante, ** Authorship, ** The Decameron and the English Romantics -- (3) Narratology and Structural Exegesis -- ** Numerology in the Decameron, ** The Novella before Boccaccio, ** Performance and Interpretation, ** Performance and Interpretation 2, ** Nightingales and Filostrato's Apologia (V.4), ** The Rubrics of the Decameron, ** Madonna Filippa (VI.7): Feminist Mouthpiece or Misogynistic Tool? -- (4) Hypertext -- ** Hypertext, Hypermedia and the History of the Text, ** Boccaccio Online: Teaching the Decameron as Hypertext at Brown University -- (5) Theoretical Perspectives -- ** Poststructuralism and a Figural Narrative Model, ** Lotman and the Problem of Artistic Space, ** Weinrich and the Grammar of the Frame, ** The Narrative Frame, ** Framing the Decameron, ** Seduction by Silence in the Frame -- (6) La novella tra Testo e Ipertesto: il Decameron come modello
website  literary_history  lit_crit  Italian_lit  English_lit  14thC  Medieval  Renaissance  humanism  Latin_lit  Boccaccio  Ovid  Dante  Romanticism  narrative  literary_theory  digital_humanities 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
The Great Vowel Shift
Site dedicated to the Great Vowel Shift with audio samples - plug ins don't work on Chrome
English_lit  language  Medieval  Latin_lit  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Catherine Connors, review - Elaine Fantham, Lucan, De Bello Civili Book II | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 04.03.04 (1992)
Elaine Fantham, Lucan, De Bello Civili Book II. Cambridge: Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics, 1992. Pp. x + 244. $59.95 (hb). $22.95 (pb). ISBN 0-521-41010-X (hb). ISBN 0-521-42241-8 (pb). Reviewed by Catherine Connors, University of Washington.
books  reviews  ancient_Rome  Latin_lit  Roman_Republic  poetry  epic 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Michèle Lowrie, review - Kirk Freudenberg, The Walking Muse: Horace on the Theory of Satire | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 04.03.05 (1993)
Kirk Freudenberg, The Walking Muse: Horace on the Theory of Satire. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993. ISBN 0-691-03166-5. -- Reviewed by Michèle Lowrie, New York University. -- very interesting review including schools of Roman literary criticism
books  reviews  ancient_Rome  Latin_lit  Horace  poetry  satire  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Bett - Nietzsche and the Romans (2011) | Project MUSE
From: The Journal of Nietzsche Studies - Issue 42, Autumn 2011 - pp. 7-31 | 10.1353/nie.2011.0023 - Nietzsche interested especially in Horace and in his later work Petronius - Bolingbroke's favorites
article  Project_MUSE  find  intellectual_history  19thC  ancient_Rome  Horace  Latin_lit  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
John Gillingham - From Civilitas to Civility: Codes of Manners in Medieval and Early Modern England | JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12 (2002), pp. 267-289
Argues that to see the contrasts between late medieval 'courtesy books' and early modern manuals of manners as markers of changing ideals of social conduct in England is an interpretation too narrowly based on works written in English. Examination of Latin and Anglo-Norman literature shows that the ideal of the urbane gentleman can be traced back at least as far as the most comprehensive of all courtesy books, the twelfth-century Liber Urbani of Daniel of Beccles, and was itself underpinned by the commonplace secular morality of the much older Distichs of Cato. -- over 100 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  British_history  Medieval  16thC  17thC  Anglo-Norman  virtue  gentleman  manners  elites  Latin_lit  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
William W. Batstone: The Antithesis of Virtue: Sallust's "Synkrisis" and the Crisis of the Late Republic |JSTOR: Classical Antiquity, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Apr., 1988), pp. 1-29
How to interpret the contrasting praise of virtues of Caesar and Cato rhetorically (Sallust objective of effect on reader) and "philosophically" (Sallust's assessment of Republic's historical situation, weaknesses, fault lines as reflected in his treatment of the two contrasting ideologies, goals, virtues etc of Caesar and Cato) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  historiography-antiquity  Roman_Republic  Latin_lit  rhetoric  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Numen - The Latin Lexicon - An Online Latin Dictionary - A Dictionary of the Latin Language
The Latin Lexicon (nicknamed Numen) is an online Latin dictionary (a dictionary of the Latin Language) and Latin grammar tool based on multiple sources, including both An Elementary Latin Dictionary (by Charlton T. Lewis) and A Latin Dictionary (by Lewis & Short). This online dictionary is different from any other you've ever used. It has been built from the ground up using AJAX technology to allow the fastest, most efficient and most useful user interface. Oh, and it includes macrons!
dictionary  language  Latin_lit 
october 2013 by dunnettreader

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