dunnettreader + latin_america   24

William F. Maloney, Felipe Valencia Caicedo - Economic Activity in the Americas- A landscape that Columbus would recognise | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal -June 2016
14 June 2016
The persistence of economic fortune over the long run has been the subject of intense research. This column investigates the persistence of patterns of economic activity in the Americas at the sub-national level over the last half millennium. The location of today’s prosperous cities and regions within each country is closely correlated with the location of indigenous population centres before the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492. Policymakers seeking to make radical changes in the spatial distribution of economic activity should be mindful of the centuries-old, even pre-colonial, forces working against them. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
21stC  North_America  transport  geography  18thC  economic_history  paper  indigenous_peoples  agriculture  17thC  urbanization  19thC  downloaded  Latin_America  20thC  16thC  colonial_era  transport-overland 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - Inequality: the structural aspects - February 2016
Despite the unprecedented attention that income and wealth inequality has received in this year’s presidential campaign in the United States and in several…
Instapaper  inequality-global  inequality-wealth  inequality-opportunity  inequality  political_economy  polarization  economic_growth  economic_history  labor_share  Latin_America  mobility  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Sheehan - Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe - Issue Introduction (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 561-570 **--** Articles in issue on idolatry *--* Jonathan Sheehan, Introduction: Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe (pp. 561-570) *-* Joan-Pau Rubiés, Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry (pp. 571-596) *--* Carina L. Johnson, Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (pp. 597-622) *--* Sabine MacCormack, Gods, Demons, and Idols in the Andes (pp. 623-648) *--* Jonathan Sheehan, The Altars of the Idols: Religion, Sacrifice, and the Early Modern Polity (pp. 649-674) *--* Peter N. Miller, History of Religion Becomes Ethnology: Some Evidence from Peiresc's Africa (pp. 675-696) *--* Martin Mulsow, Idolatry and Science: Against Nature Worship from Boyle to Rüdiger, 1680-1720 (pp. 697-712) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  journal  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_experience  ritual  idolatry  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  theology  sociology_of_religion  political-theology  science-and-religion  historicism  relativism  demons  devil  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  comparative_history  sacrifice  science_of_man  social_sciences  human_nature  Africa  Latin_America  pagans  nature  natural_religion  nature_worship  religious_imagery  religious_practices  Boyle  Antiquarianism  natural_history  Peiresc  virtuosos  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Justin E.H. Smith - Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy (2015) | Princeton University Press
People have always been xenophobic, but an explicit philosophical and scientific view of human racial difference only began to emerge during the modern period. Why and how did this happen? Surveying a range of philosophical and natural-scientific texts, dating from the Spanish Renaissance to the German Enlightenment, (Smith) charts the evolution of the modern concept of race and shows that natural philosophy, particularly efforts to taxonomize and to order nature, played a crucial role. Smith demonstrates how the denial of moral equality between Europeans and non-Europeans resulted from converging philosophical and scientific developments, including a declining belief in human nature’s universality and the rise of biological classification. The racial typing of human beings grew from the need to understand humanity within an all-encompassing system of nature, alongside plants, minerals, primates, and other animals. While racial difference as seen through science did not arise in order to justify the enslavement of people, it became a rationalization and buttress for the practices of trans-Atlantic slavery. From the work of François Bernier to Leibniz, Kant, and others, Smith delves into philosophy’s part in the legacy and damages of modern racism. -- Smith is university professor of the history and philosophy of science at the Université Paris Diderot—Paris VII. ...author of Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life (PUP), coeditor and cotranslator of The Leibniz-Stahl Controversy -- downloaded introduction to Note -- only hdbk, will be in ebook
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  racism  racialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  exploration  Spanish_Empire  Spain  Renaissance  natural_philosophy  biology  taxonomies  Latin_America  West_Indies  North_America  Native_Americans  indigenous_peoples  slavery  West_Africa  Africa  African_trade  life_sciences  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  French_Enlightenment  Leibniz  Kant  anatomy  Adam  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  science-public  science_of_man 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Gabriel Entin & Jeanne Moisand, « Débats autour du 15M. Républicanisme, démocratie et participation politique », | La Vie des idées, Sept 2011
Links to articles in their Débats" -- Nous accueillons les échanges entre philosophes, historiens et politistes, au sujet de la participation politique et de l’interprétation de la pensée républicaine en Espagne et dans nos démocraties. Ces débats, relativement méconnus en France, sont nés de l’emprunt par José Luis Zapatero de références au républicanisme de Philip Pettit pour légitimer son programme et son action. En 2008, le philosophe a cautionné ces emprunts en publiant un diagnostic positif sur la dimension républicaine du premier gouvernement Zapatero. Se revendiquer du républicanisme conduirait-il dès lors à défendre l’ordre institutionnel et à s’opposer aux «Indignés» de mai 2011 ? Leurs revendications d’une participation politique plus intense et plus démocratique ne seraient-elles pas républicaines ? Grâce aux réactions suscitées par cet article, La Vie des Idées peut aujourd’hui approfondir le débat. Les réponses de Philip Pettit et de ses collaborateurs espagnols sont complétées par les essais d’historiens, d’un politiste et d’un sociologue. Le 15M donne ainsi l’occasion de réfléchir sur le républicanisme et sur la participation démocratique en Espagne, dans le monde hispanique et dans les mouvements sociaux actuels.
article  links  political_philosophy  political_culture  Spain  Latin_America  local_government  local_politics  republicanism  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  Pettit  social_movements  political_history  social_democracy  socialism 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Secured Transactions Reform in the Anericas | Institute of the Americas
Diwnloaded to iPhone report of conference co-sponsored by Institute of the Americas and IFC in 2013 -- url is for general page dealing with STR program -- Secured Transactions Reform in Latin America and the Caribbean 2013 - What is one of the single largest barriers to growth for SMEs in the developing world? The lack of access to finance at reasonable rates in the formal banking market. Access to credit promotes productive capacity, competitiveness, job creation and ultimately poverty alleviation
website  paper  downloaded  financial_innovation  access_to_finance  financial_sector_development  Latin_America  SMEs  securitization  banking  legal_system  reform-legal  credit  collateral 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones (HBS Working Papers 2013) - Debating the Responsibility of Capitalism in Historical and Global Perspective
This working paper examines the evolution of concepts of the responsibility of business in a historical and global perspective. It shows that from the nineteenth century American, European, Japanese, Indian and other business leaders discussed the responsibilities of business beyond making profits, although until recently such views have not been mainstream. There was also a wide variation concerning the nature of this responsibility. This paper argues that four factors drove such beliefs: spirituality; self-interest; fears of government intervention; and the belief that governments were incapable of addressing major social issues.

Keywords: Rachel Carson; Sustainability; Local Food; Operations Management; Supply Chain; Business And Society; Business Ethics; Business History; Corporate Philanthropy; Corporate Social Responsibility; Corporate Social Responsibility And Impact; Environmentalism; Environmental Entrepreneurship; Environmental And Social Sustainability; Ethics; Globalization; History; Religion; Consumer Products Industry; Chemical Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; Energy Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Forest Products Industry; Green Technology Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Asia; Europe; Latin America; Middle East; North and Central America; Africa
paper  downloaded  economic_history  business_history  imperialism  US  British_Empire  France  Germany  Japan  Spain  Dutch  Latin_America  Ottoman_Empire  India  18thC  19thC  20thC  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  business  busisness-ethics  business-and-politics  common_good  communitarian  environment  labor  patriarchy  paternalism  labor_standards  regulation  product_safety  inequality  comparative_economics  capital_as_power  capitalism  CSR  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_sociology  self-interest  ideology 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Barry Eichengreen - Restructuring Debt Restructuring - Project Syndicate - September 2014
The US courts debacle re Argentina and the vultures which effectively dismantled sovereign debt market rules and access to the US has finally (30 years kate) resulted in collective action clauses that were obviously needed from the 1980s Latin_America debt crisis -- - Eichengreen: In 2003, in an article in the American Economic Review, Ashoka Mody and I made the case for these provisions. They are basically what the International Capital Market Association of leading investors and issuers has now agreed to implement, subject to some additional details that need not be examined here. Why didn’t it happen sooner? The answer is that getting investors to agree is like herding cats. In this case, it required strong behind-the-scenes leadership from the US Treasury. The agreement is not perfect, and problems remain. Because new contractual provisions are not easily retrofitted into old bonds, it will take years before the clauses are included in the entire stock of debt. Establishing an international bankruptcy court would be a far more efficient solution, but that doesn’t make it feasible. Investors were wise to acknowledge that, in international capital markets, the perfect is the enemy of the good.
sovereign_debt  default  debt-restructuring  capital_markets  US_legal_system  US_judiciary  emerging_markets  collective_action  Argentina  Latin_America 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Nancy Birdsall - Latin America Left Behind: "It’s Inequality Stupid”? | Center For Global Development - March 2014
Since 1990, Latin America has not shared at all in the much-ballyhooed convergence of emerging markets with the advanced economies in the last two decades. Average per capita income in Latin America was approaching 30% of the average in the US in the early 1970s, but fell back to 20% in the last 2 decades, and is now about 25% of the level in the US. Even more worrisome, as shown here, is that Latin America’s income gap has widened with respect to other emerging market economies at similar levels of development. Meanwhile in average per capita income in Asia has increased from less than 15% of US per capita income in the late 1960s to 40% today. One theory is that Latin America is caught in a middle-income trap. More likely, given growing evidence of the effects of inequality on growth, is that the region is caught in an inequality trap — in which a high concentration of economic and political wealth and privilege rooted in its colonial origins and its longstanding dependence on commodity exports stifles opportunities for investment and innovation. The historical record suggests that high inequality in Latin America is not a consequence of low growth. But it does not follow that it is a cause; it could be that low growth and high inequality are outcomes of a common set of other factors. Whatever the specific nature of the relationship between growth and inequality, the following charts suggest they’re worth unpacking.
economic_history  post-WWII  development  Latin_America  emerging_markets  East_Asia  economic_growth  inequality 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Thorstensen, Fernandes Marçal, Ferraz - WTO x PTAs -- Where to Negotiate Trade and Currency :: SSRN June 16, 2014
Vera Thorstensen - São Paulo School of Economics (EESP) at Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) -- Emerson Fernandes Marçal - Sao Paulo School of Economics - FGV; Mackenzie Presbyterian University -- Lucas Ferraz - Sao Paulo School of Economics-FGV. -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/09. *--* The negotiations of mega agreements between the US and the Pacific countries (TPP) and between the US and the EU (TTIP) are raising the attention of experts on international trade law and economics. TPP and TTIP are proclaimed to be the designers of the rules for the XXI Century. Old trade instruments such as tariffs are said to be no more important for TTIP because tariffs are negligible among those partners but significant to for TPP. Another relevant agreement in negotiation is between the EU and Mercosul, where tariffs are the most important issue in discussion. The main purpose of this paper is to shows that tariff are important for all these agreements, not because of its nominal value, but because the impacts of exchange rate misalignments on tariffs are so significant that all concessions can be distorted by overvalued and by devaluated currencies. The article is divided into six sections: the first gives an introduction to the issue; the second explains the methodologies used to determine exchange rate misalignments and also presents some results for Brazil, US and China; the third summarizes the methodology applied to calculate the impacts of exchange rate misalignments on the level of tariff protection through an exercise of “misalignment tariffication” and examines the effects of exchange rate variations on tariffs and their consequences for the multilateral trading system; the fourth creates a methodology to estimate exchange rates against a basket of currencies (a virtual currency of the World) and a proposal to deal with persistent and significant misalignments related to trade rules. The fifth presents some estimates for the main PTAs. The conclusions are present in the last section. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  trade-agreements  tariffs  FX  global_imbalance  US_foreign_policy  China  Brazil  EU  Latin_America  South-South_economics  emerging_markets  capital_flows  international_monetary_system  FX-misalignment  prices  costs  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rodrigo Polanco - The Chilean Experience in South-South Trade and Investment Agreements :: SSRN July 29, 2014
University of Chile - Faculty of Law; World Trade Institute - University of Bern -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014-26. *--* This paper analyzes the main features of Chilean trade and investment treaties, examining if there is a Chilean pattern in the regulation of trade and investment flows or if it is influenced by agreements signed by Chile with developed countries. The article also examines if there are differences between the treaties signed by Chile and other “Southern” developing countries and those negotiated with “Northern” developed economies, and if sustainable development concerns are part of the negotiations of trade and investment agreements by Chile. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 29 -- Keywords: investment treaties, preferential trade agreements, investor-state arbitration, North-South agreements, South-South agreements, law and development, sustainable development, Chile. - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  Latin_America  Chile  trade-policy  trade-agreements  FDI  investment-bilateral_treaties  investor-State_disputes  capital_flows  South-South_economics  US_trade_agreements  US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  law-and-economics  emerging_markets  sustainability  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Matias Vernengo NAKED KEYNESIANISM: Manufacturing matters - Jan 2013
Chart of distribution of manufacturing capacity over the centuries pre and post Industrial Revolution from Robert Allen -- Note that the West, narrowly defined as England the rest of Western Europe, what was to become the US and Russia (called for the whole period USSR) had a share of less than 20% in 1750, it had expanded to more than 80% on the eve of WW-I. If you add Australia, Canada and Latin America (which are all in Rest of the World, but are what Maddison would call Western offshoots), the numbers are even larger. Most of the changes were associated to the squeeze of China. And most of the recent changes are associated with expansion of China and East Asia (which includes Japan). We have not gone full circle, by the way. In other words, the process of development (or indutrialization in the center) went hand in hand with the process of underdevelopment (deindustrialization) in the periphery, and old lesson from a little book by Osvaldo Sunkel which is still worth reading. [1972 study of Latin American development and underdevelopment from 1750, tracking exports, FDI etc]
economic_history  economic_theory  economic_growth  development  emerging_markets  Latin_America  Great_Divergence  China  India  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  manufacturing  exports  British_history  capitalism  18thC  19thC 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Matias Vernengo - NAKED KEYNESIANISM: Institutions, what institutions? - September 2014
Nice breakdown of theorists of causes of development and underdevelopment and problems of trying to catch up -- So if you believe most heterodox economists institutions are relevant, but not primarily those associated to the supply side; the ones linked to the demand side, in Keynesian fashion are more important than the mainstream admits. Poor countries that arrive late to the process of capitalist development cannot expand demand without limits since the imports of intermediary and capital goods cause recurrent balance of payments crises. The institutions that allow for the expansion of demand, including those that allow for higher wages to expand consumption and to avoid the external constraints, are and have been central to growth and development. The role of the State in creating and promoting the expansion of domestic markets, in the funding of research and development, and in reducing the barriers to balance of payments constraints, both by guarantying access to external markets (sometimes militarily, like in the Opium Wars) and reducing foreign access to domestic ones was crucial in the process of capitalist development. In this view, for example, what China did not have that England did, was not lack of secure property rights and the rule of law, but a rising bourgeoisie (capitalists) that had to compete to provide for a growing domestic market that had acquired a new taste (and hence explained expanding demand) for a set of new goods, like cotton goods from India, or china (porcelain) from… well China, as emphasized by economic historian Maxine Berg among others (for the role of consumption in the Industrial Revolution go here). Or simply put, China did not have a capitalist mode of production (for the concept of mode of production and capitalism go here). Again, I argued that Robert Allen’s view according to which high wages and cheap energy forced British producers to innovate to save labor, leading to technological innovation and growth, and the absence of those conditions in China led to stagnation is limited since it presupposes that firms adopt more productive technologies even without growing demand. -- see links
economic_history  economic_theory  economic_growth  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  development  emerging_markets  Latin_America  Great_Divergence  demand  consumer_demand  British_history  China  institutional_economics  institutional_change  institution-building  institutions  supply-side  demand-side  cultural_history  economic_culture  political_culture  industrialization  Industrial_Revolution  international_political_economy  international_monetary_system  balance_of_payments  state-building  rent-seeking  rentiers  commodities  links 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Historical Essays and Studies, edited by John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907) - Online Library of Liberty
A collection of Acton’s articles from journals such as the Quarterly Review, the English Historical Review, the Nineteenth Century, the Rambler, the Home and Foreign Review, the North British Review, and the Bridgnorth Journal. *--* I: WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *-* II: THE BORGIAS AND THEIR LATEST HISTORIAN. &-* III: SECRET HISTORY OF CHARLES II. *-* IV: THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA ITS PLACE IN HISTORY. *-* V: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MEXICAN EMPIRE *-* VI: CALVIN *-* VII: THE CAUSES OF THE FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR *-* VIII: THE WAR OF 1870 *-* IX: GEORGE ELIOT’S LIFE. *-* X: MR. BUCKLE’S THESIS AND METHOD. *-* XI: MR. BUCKLE’S PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. *-* XII: GERMAN SCHOOLS OF HISTORy. *-* XIII: TALLEYRAND’S MEMOIRS. *-* XIV: THE LIFE OF LORD HOUGHTON *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE PAPACY DURING THE PERIOD OF THE REFORMATION. *-*. XVI: A SHORT HISTORY OF NAPOLEON THE FIRST. By John Robert Seeley THE FIRST NAPOLEON: A SKETCH, POLITICAL AND MILITARY. By John Codman Ropes. *-* XVII: MABILLON ET LA SOCIÉTÉ DE L’ABBAYE DE SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS À LA FIN DU XVIIE SIÈCLE. Par Emmanuel de Broglie. *-* XVIII: A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 1837-1880.1 By the Rev. J. Franck Bright, D.D., Master of University College, Oxford. *-* XIX: A HISTORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. By H. Morse Stephens. Vol. II. *-* XX: WILHELM VON GIESEBRECHT -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-17thC  historians  historiography-19thC  Mabillon  historicism  German_scholarship  Eliot_George  Henry_VIII  Reformation  Papacy  Restoration  Charles_II  US_Civil_War  biography-writing  Calvin  Franco-Prussian_war  Napoleon  British_history  French_Revolution  Spanish_Empire  Latin_America  imperialism  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  reviews  diplomatic_history  Napoleonic_Wars  Congress_of_Vienna  Talleyrand  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Eduardo Levy Yeyati - Do capital controls work? | vox - 20 January 2011
The global crisis has reignited debate on the desirability of capital controls. This column examines evidence from Argentina and Chile and argues that capital controls can be effective, but that their effectiveness and efficiency varies. It adds that controls need to be considered as part of a macro-prudential toolkit to prevent asset inflation and overvaluation that is costly to revert in the down cycle. - Chile's controls on inward investment was basically a Tobin tax that worked as designed. Argentina has had so many moving parts and different objectives it's a bit of a dog's breakfast
capital_flows  emerging_markets  international_finance  Chile  Latin_America 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark M. Blyth - "Any More Bright Ideas?" The Ideational Turn of Comparative Political Economy | JSTOR: Comparative Politics, Vol. 29, No. 2 (Jan., 1997), pp. 229-250
Review article - (1) Ideas and Foreign Policy: Beliefs, Institutions and Political Change by Judith Goldstein; Robert Keohane; (2) Ideas and Institutions: Developmentalism in Argentina and Brazil by Kathryn Sikkink -- The renewed interest in ideas as an explanatory category in political economy, particularly among rationalist and historical institutionalists, is flawed. This turn to ideas is theoretically degenerate; it treats ideas as desiderata, catch-all concepts to explain variance, rather than subjects in their own right. The two schools ask what stabilizes and what causes change, not what ideas are and what they do. The ideational turn taken by both rationalist and historical institutionalists is best understood as an ad hoc solution to the inherent weaknesses of their research programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  rational_choice  political_economy  ideas-social_theory  social_process  social_movements  socialization  sociology-process  institutions  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutionalization  IR_theory  international_organizations  development  Latin_America  political_change  economic_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
EquitaBlog | Patrick Iber: What Can the United States Learn about Equitable Growth from Latin America? (December 11, 2013)
When the improbably-named Fernando Fajnzylber published the unappealingly-titled Unavoidable Industrial Restructuring in Latin America in 1990, it hardly had the makings of a classic. But Fajnzylber had identified a problem so fundamental to the region’s economies that it became exactly that. At the beginning of the book, he made a two-by-two grid, labeling the rows by high and low equity and the columns by high and low growth. Looking at the period from 1965 to 1984, Fajnzylber found Latin American countries that had managed high growth, countries that had high equity, and some that had neither. But one box was conspicuously empty: the one showing simultaneous high equity and high growth.[1] Fajnzylber’s work helped make filling his “empty box”—getting to growth with equity—a policy goal of most economists and governments in the region ever since
economic_history  20thC  21stC  Latin_America  economic_growth  inequality  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Panama Canal: Out of the narrows | FT.com August 2013
Great overview of how shipping and port infrastructure changing in US and Latin America. Interesting comments on increased use of Suez Canal for bigger vessels. Growth of East coast traffic since early 2000s.
globalization  shipping  infrastructure  US_economy  Latin_America  transport 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Darcy R. Fryer: The Challenges of Studying, and Teaching, Atlantic World History | Common-place Summer 2013
American Antiquarian Society webzine ...
Designing an Atlantic world course, which I first taught in 2006-2007, was an intellectual experiment for me, as I imagine it is for most who teach Atlantic world history. As a graduate student, I specialized in early American history and did my supporting coursework in early modern European history; I never opened a book on colonial Latin America, and although the Caribbean figured regularly in seminar discussions, I didn't study it in a systematic way. When, around 2005, I searched the Web for sample syllabi, it struck me that other historians were suffering from similar limitations. Most of the "Atlantic World" syllabi I found were really syllabi of the British Atlantic; others were essentially syllabi of the French Atlantic. Few crossed national lines in more than a token manner.
bibliography  Atlantic  16thC  17thC  18thC  colonialism  British_Empire  British_history  US_history  Spain  France  Latin_America  slavery  West_Indies  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  historiography  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Alan Dye: The Politics of Property Rights: Political Instability, Credible Commitments, and Economic Growth in Mexico, 1876-1929 by Stephen Haber; Armando Razo; Noel Maurer
JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Jun., 2007), pp. 545-546

Downloaded pdf to Note

Describes how a clientelist rent-seeking system stabilized governance and property rights for the privileged which allowed investment and development boom post 1880. In aftermath of Revolution, gradually incorporated popular groups, especially unions, into system. Uses New Institutional Economics approach of extending theory of the firm to political arena.

Using concept of Vertical Political Integration, shows how such a system can be stable in long run even in absence of meaningful democracy or limits on government involvement in economy. Democracy vs authoritarianism ignores other configurations that have been successful in terms of stability.
political_economy  19thC  20thC  Latin_America  social_theory  institutional_economics  parties  democracy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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