dunnettreader + jefferson   19

Jeffrey Edward Green - Rawls and the Forgotten Figure of the Most Advantaged: In Defense of Reasonable Envy toward the Superrich (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
politics-and-money  political_participation  inequality-wealth  regulatory_capture  political_philosophy  political_culture  tax_havens  Early_Republic  inequality  estate_tax  intellectual_history  inheritance  republicanism  Plato-Republic  elites-political_influence  Jefferson  Harrington  crony_capitalism  Europe-Early_Modern  fairness  article  Aristotle  social_capital  social_theory  Rawls  social_democracy  Machiavelli  Plato  inequality-opportunity  jstor  bibliography  ancient_Rome  regulation  justice  liberalism  egalitarian  regulatory_avoidance  interest_groups  legitimacy  deliberative_democracy  political_history  class_conflict  downloaded  education-elites  social_order  elites-self-destructive  Roman_Republic  ancient_Greece  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Richard Brookhiser, review essay - Finally, James Madison Mania | The Daily Beast April 2015
Four new titles join the list: The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789 by Joseph J. Ellis; Becoming Madison: The Extraordinary Origins of the Least Likely Founding Father by Michael Signer; The Bill of Rights: The Fight to Secure America’s Liberties, by Carol Birken; and Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships That Built America by David O. Stewart. -- the Ellis book measures up to expectations from his earlier books -- the most interesting looks like the Stewart book that goes through the presidency period and his relationship with Monroe -- as Brookhiser points out, not enough is being done on Madison as key to his and Jefferson’s "invention" of American political parties and what that involved in flipping from their approach to the Constitution, as well as ideologically obliterating Washington's heritage.
books  reviews  kindle-available  US_history  US_constitution  US_politics  18thC  19thC  Early_Republic  Founders  Madison  Hamilton  Jefferson  political_philosophy  republicanism  political_discourse  parties  faction  biography 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott Montgomery - The Shape of the New: Four Big Ideas and How They Made the Modern World:Amazon:Books
Princeton U Press - release May 2015 - A testament to the enduring power of ideas, The Shape of the New offers unforgettable portraits of Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, Charles Darwin, and Karl Marx--heirs of the Enlightenment who embodied its highest ideals about progress--and shows how their thoughts, over time and in the hands of their followers and opponents, transformed the very nature of our beliefs, institutions, economies, and politics. Yet these ideas also hold contradictions. They have been used in the service of brutal systems such as slavery and colonialism, been appropriated and twisted by monsters like Stalin and Hitler, and provoked reactions against the Enlightenment's legacy by Islamic Salafists and the Christian Religious Right. The Shape of the New argues that it is impossible to understand the ideological and political conflicts of our own time without familiarizing ourselves with the history and internal tensions of these world-changing ideas. With passion and conviction, it exhorts us to recognize the central importance of these ideas as historical forces and pillars of the Western humanistic tradition. It makes the case that to read the works of the great thinkers is to gain invaluable insights into the ideas that have shaped how we think and what we believe.
19thc  books  kindle-available  modernity  political_philosophy  ideology  totalitarian  right-wing  fundamentalism  culture_wars  humanism  anti-humanism  postmodern  sociology_of_religion  science-and-religion  politics-and-religion  social_epistemology  20thc  Smith  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  counter-Enlightenment  18thc  21stc  political_economy  intellectual_history  Smoth  Jefferson  Hamilton  Marx  Darwin 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Hilde Eliassen Restad - Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 53-76
Most writers agree that domestic ideas about what kind of country the United States is affect its foreign policy. In the United States, this predominant idea is American exceptionalism, which in turn is used to explain US foreign policy traditions over time. This article argues that the predominant definition of American exceptionalism, and the way it is used to explain US foreign policy in political science, relies on outdated scholarship within history. It betrays a largely superficial understanding of American exceptionalism as an American identity. This article aims to clarify the definition of American exceptionalism, arguing that it should be retained as a definition of American identity. Furthermore, it couples American exceptionalism and US foreign policy differently than what is found in most political science literature. It concludes that American exceptionalism is a useful tool in understanding US foreign policy, if properly defined. -- extensive bibliography of both historians and IR theorists -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  US_history  American_Revolution  American_colonies  Puritans  American_exceptionalism  national_ID  nation-state  US_foreign_policy  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  IR  Founders  Manifest_Destiny  multilateralism  international_law  Jefferson  imperialism  republicanism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Decline of Natural Right [chapter] (2009) :: SSRN in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY, Allen Wood and Songsuk Susan Hahn, eds., Cambridge University Press
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-38 -- What happened to the doctrine of natural right in the 19thC? We know that it flourished in the 17thC and 18thC. We know that something like it - the doctrine of human rights and new forms of social contract theory - flourished again in the second half of the 20thC and continues to flourish in the 21stC. In between there was a period of decline and hibernation - ... in which to invoke natural right was always to invite intellectual ridicule and accusations of political irresponsibility. Thus article asks: How far can the decline of natural right in the 19thC be attributed to the reaction against the revolution in France? How far it was the effect of independent streams of thought, like positivism and historicism? Why was radical thought so ambivalent about natural right throughout the 19thC, and why was socialist thought in particular inclined to turn its back on it? As a framework for thought, natural right suffered a radical decline in the social and political sciences. But things were not so clear in jurisprudence, and natural right lived on to a much riper old age in the writings of some prominent economists. What is it about this theory that allowed it to survive in these environments, when so much of the rest of intellectual endeavor in the 19thC was toxic or inhospitable to it. Finally, I shall ask how far American thought represents an exception to all of this. Why and to what extent did the doctrine survive as a way of thinking in the United States, long after it had lost its credibility elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  natural_law  natural_rights  human_rights  counter-revolution  historicism  positivism  legal_theory  nationalism  national_interest  conservatism  socialism  social_contract  relativism  revolutions  1848_revolutions  French_Revolution  anticlerical  Bentham  Burke  Hume  Jefferson  Kant  Locke  Marx  Mill  Savigny  Spencer_Herbert  George_Henry  US_society  American_exceptionalism  liberalism  social_theory  social_sciences  Social_Darwinism  social_order  mass_culture  political_participation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Comte Destutt de Tracy A Commentary and Review of Montesquieu’s ’Spirit of Laws’ (and comments by Condorcet and Helvetius) (trans. Thomas Jefferson, 1811- Online Library of Liberty
Antoine Louis Claude, Comte Destutt de Tracy, A Commentary and Review of Montesquieu’s ’Spirit of Laws’: To which are annexed, Observations on the Thirty First Book by the late M. Condorcet; and Two Letters of Helvetius, on the Merits of the same Work, trans. Thomas Jefferson (Philadelphia: William Duane, 1811). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/960> -- One of two books by the French liberal Destutt de Tracy which were translated and published by Thomas Jefferson A COMMENTARY AND REVIEW OF MONTESQUIEU'S 'SPIRIT OF LAWS' TO WHICH ARE ANNEXED, OBSERVATIONS ON THE THIRTY-FIRST BOOK, BY THE LATE M. CONDORCET, AND TWO LETTERS OF HELVETIUS, ON THE MERITS OF THE SAME WORKPREPARED FOR PRESS FROM THE ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT, IN THE HANDS OF THE PUBLISHER -- downloaded French version
books  etexts  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Montesquieu  Condorcet  Helvetius  Jefferson  liberalism  French_politics  Ancien_régime  comparative_history  government-forms  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  monarchy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Lamp of Experience - Online Library of Liberty
Trevor Colbourn, The Lamp of Experience: Whig History and the Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/674> -- In a landmark work, a leading scholar of the eighteenth century examines the ways in which an understanding of the nature of history, seen as as a continual struggle between liberty and virtue on one hand and arbitrary power and corruption on the other, influenced the thinking of the founding fathers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Founders  English_constitution  history_of_England  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret C. Jacob - How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? | Diametros
Distinguished Professor of History, UCLA Email: mjacob@history.ucla.edu
-- The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it of bellicosity would require years of labor. First all the world’s religions had to be surveyed, see Picart’s seven folio volumes; and Rousseau’s Savoyard vicar had to both preach and live religion simply as true virtue; and finally Jefferson editing the Bible so as to get the irrational parts simply removed, thus making people more fit to grant a complete religious toleration. Throughout the century all these approaches to revealed religion may be legitimately described as radical. Each produced a different recommendation for its replacement. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them lay the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion. -- Keywords - Atheism materialism absolutism French Protestant refugees Dutch cities religious toleration Bernard Picart Jonathan Israel English freethinkers Papal condemnation Rousseau pantheism Jefferson -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  Dutch  British_history  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  religious_belief  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  natural_religion  natural_philosophy  materialism  tolerance  natural_rights  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  atheism_panic  anticlerical  Absolutism  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  publishing  public_sphere  Picart  Rousseau  Jefferson  revelation  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  Huguenots  free-thinkers  Papacy  papal_infallibility  censorship  Republic_of_Letters  rational_religion  American_colonies  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  querelle_des_rites  virtue  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven G. Calabresi - Political Parties as Mediating Institutions | JSTOR: The University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 61, No. 4 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 1479-1533
Using Lloyd Cutler proposals to strengthen political parties in order to clarify accountability of politicians which the US system of checks and balances muddies, he discusses why he thinks it's a bad idea to strengthen roles of "mediating" institutions. The first parts of the article look at the history of the Founders deliberately making it difficult for parties to have a major role, and the philosophical and historical basis for their united opposition to party and faction. Big bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  18thC  US_constitution  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Founders  Madison  Adams_John  Jefferson  parties  faction  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Marbury v. Madison: A Bicentennial Symposium - TOC | JSTOR: Virginia Law Review, Vol. 89, No. 6, Oct., 2003
(1) Constitutional Existence Conditions and Judicial Review(pp. 1105-1202)
Matthew D. Adler and Michael C. Dorf. (2) "Marbury," Marshall, and the Politics of Constitutional Judgment (pp. 1203-1234) Christopher L. Eisgruber. (3) Our "Marbury" (pp. 1235-1412) Louise Weinberg. (4)Tom Paine's Constitution (pp. 1413-1461) Robin West. (5) The Constitutional Journey of "Marbury v. Madison" (pp. 1463-1573) G. Edward White
journal  article  jstor  legal_history  legal_theory  US_history  US_constitution  US_politics  judiciary  constitutionalism  18thC  19thC  20thC  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Paine  Jefferson  Madison  Supreme_Court  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Joshua Foa Dienstag - Between History and Nature: Social Contract Theory in Locke and the Founders | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 58, No. 4 (Nov., 1996), pp. 985-1009
Part of the problem with the debate between "liberal" and "republican" historians of early American political thought is the use both sides have made of a false conceptual dichotomy between "nature" and "history" where the first is taken to be the province of liberal theory and the second belongs to republicanism. A careful reading of Locke's philosophy, however, shows that his theory is carefully positioned between history and nature. A further reading of the theoretical texts of Jefferson and Adams then shows that these two Founders, at least, followed Locke's theory at a very high level of detail. It is Locke's theory that authorizes a simultaneous claim of natural and historical rights. -- extensive bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  political_philosophy  Locke  Adams_John  Jefferson  natural_law  natural_rights  liberalism-republicanism_debates  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Joshua Foa Dienstag - Serving God and Mammon: The Lockean Sympathy in Early American Political Thought | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 90, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 497-511
This paper seeks to revive the old theory of a "Lockean consensus" in early American political thought against the prevailing "republican" view. The language of "virtue" and "slavery," which was pervasive at the time of the founding, and which many have been eager to take as evidence for the influence of civic humanism, in fact has a perfectly plain Lockean provenance. This is established first through a reexamination of Locke that links his account of virtue to a Christian asceticism (i.e., the Protestant Ethic) rather than republican philosophy. That the founders understood virtue in this way is then established through an exploration of Adams and Jefferson. In both cases, it was a Lockean slavery which they feared and a Lockean virtue which they sought. A Lockean sympathy did exist among the founders; in order to understand it, however, it must be distinguished from modern liberalism, with which it has only tenuous connections.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Jefferson  Adams_John  slavery  civic_virtue  Locke  liberalism-republicanism_debates  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Arthur Scherr: Inventing the Patriot President: Bache's "Aurora" and John Adams (1995)
JSTOR: The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 119, No. 4 (Oct., 1995), pp. 369-399 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- lots of Bolingbroke and bibliography discussion (eg Presidentx above Parties)
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  US_constitution  parties  faction  US_history  US_politics  Early_Republic  Adams_John  Jefferson  republicanism  Bolingbroke  Patriot_King  political_press  public_opinion  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
The Nature of Early Eighteenth-Century Religious Radicalism | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Jacob, Margaret . “The Nature of Early Eighteenth-Century Religious Radicalism.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/42. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note In 1981 I had focused on the Dutch-French-English nexus, and saw a select cast of major seventeenth-century thinkers as influencing the arguments put forward by French refugees and English Whigs for religious freedom, republican government, freedom of the press, habeas corpus, and against monarchical absolutism as practiced by the French king and clergy. These arguments appeared in the journals, books, and clandestine manuscripts originating in both London and Amsterdam. The origin of these new polemics owed much to a particular reading of Hobbes, to Locke, to a heretical reading of Newtonian science (Toland’s distinctive contribution), and of course to Bruno, Spinoza, as well as the English republican thinkers of the 1650s. In 2001 all of those influences were collapsed by Jonathan Israel into an ideengeschichte that fixated on the intellectual legacy of Spinoza to the exclusion of any significant English or French component.But if I think that Israel’s simplification of the way intellectual influence and human agency work—an idealist rendering that also effaces the political—will not stand up under scrutiny, so too I think aspects of my own youthful thinking are in need of a reformulation. The power of the Enlightenment—from this early coterie to latter thinkers like Rousseau and Jefferson—lay in understanding the force of organized religion, and then searching for a set of beliefs which deists, and perhaps even atheists of the age, could live with and accept. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion.
article  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Freemasonry  religious_history  theology  political_philosophy  republicanism  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  church_history  tolerance  heterodoxy  Spinoza  Hobbes  Locke  Toland  Bayle  Huguenots  Edict_of_Nantes  Louis_XIV  Newtonian  Rousseau  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  Picart  sociology_of_religion  Deism  natural_religion  rational_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jefferson, Pocock, and the Temporality of Law in a Republic | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Crow, Matthew. “Jefferson, Pocock, and the Temporality of Law in a Republic.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/79. -- in "Atlantic Republican Tradition Revisited" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Set in the context of multiple traditions of law and political language, as well as uncertainty in the material and conceptual transmission of those traditions, the textual practices of Thomas Jefferson reflect an experience and usage of what I will call “fractured” constitutional time. Jefferson practiced a distinctly radical politics of reading, collecting, and working on authoritative texts of history, recognizing and teasing out discontinuity, rupture, and constituent moments where others sought solidity in the rationalization of authority. His efforts to resist the transformation of the conceptual bases and practices of political life into static traditions or systems of reconstituted authority grew out of a careful, virtuosic approach to reading and assembling histories of legal systems. This radical politics appears most clearly in his commonplace books, early legal arguments and drafts of constitutions, manuscript collections, and in the open, multidirectional, yet conflicted composition of the Notes on the State of Virginia. Contrary to the oft-depicted image of an almost inspirationally naïve political idealist, Jefferson was critically aware of the relationship between the design and practice of political institutions and the modes of historical understanding that underlay their continued authority. Rupture in the order of historical self-understanding informed the articulation of a fragmented, never fully ordered constitutional politics. Jefferson’s engagement with history was jurisprudential rather than strictly legal or political: his various activities pointed at the situated, institutional framework within which everyday adjudicative and political processes took place.
article  intellectual_history  historiography  lessons-of-history  political_philosophy  political_culture  18thC  Jefferson  legal_history  institutions  historical_change  republicanism  American_colonies  American_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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