dunnettreader + interregnum   48

Philip Connell - MARVELL, MILTON AND THE PROTECTORAL CHURCH SETTLEMENT (2011) | Review of English Studies on JSTOR
CONNELL, PHILIP. "MARVELL, MILTON AND THE PROTECTORAL CHURCH SETTLEMENT." The Review of English Studies 62, no. 256 (2011): 562-93.
The question of church settlement was one of the most important—and intractable—issues faced by the Cromwellian Protectorate. This essay traces the literary response to the Protector's religious reforms in the poetry and prose of Andrew Marvell and John Milton. It confirms and extends our sense of their creative relationship during the mid-1650s as close, continued and reciprocal. But it also suggests that the two writers were fundamentally divided in their estimation of the Protectoral church. Milton's profound suspicion of that church was evident even at the height of his public support for Cromwell, in the Defensio Secunda. Marvell's The First Anniversary, in contrast, seeks to reconcile the older poet to the Protector's authority as godly magistrate and guarantor of 'sober Liberty'. Milton, however, was unpersuaded. His sonnet of 1655, 'Avenge O Lord', although closely connected to his official duties under the Protectorate, also intimates his deeply ambivalent attitude to Cromwell's self-appointed role as defender of the reformed faith. The essay begins and concludes by considering the extent to which their differences on ecclesiastical polity in the 1650s continued to inform the divergent positions assumed by Milton and Marvell in their responses to the first Restoration crisis, 20 years later.- 5-yr moving paywall
article  jstor  17thC  English_lit  British_history  British_politics  Church-and-State  Interregnum  Cromwell  Milton  Marvell  poetry  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  literary_history  religion-established  religion-and-literature 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Kevin Killeen - Hanging up Kings: The Political Bible in Early Modern England | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (2011)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 72, No. 4 (October 2011), pp. 549-570 -- thinks the Biblical language in which so much 17thC political discourse, including the regicide, was conducted makes much of it out of our audible range, so he's undertaking some geological retrieval --:downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  politics-and-religion  politico-theology  James_I  Charles_I  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Interregnum  Cromwell  Parliamentarians  political_discourse  republicanism  Milton  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Bogart - "There Can Be No Partnership with the King": Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England's East Indian Merchant Empire | via Brad DeLong - Equitablog
Dan Bogart, Department of Economics, UC Irvine - : “There Can Be No Partnership with the King”: Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England’s East Indian Merchant Empire: “The English East India Company helped build Britain’s colonial empire, but the Company was not a leader in East Asian trade for nearly a century after its founding in 1600. This paper argues that its early performance was hindered by a problem of regulatory commitment. It gives a brief history of the torturous renegotiations over its monopoly trading privileges and the fiscal demands by the monarchy. It also analyzes the effects of political instability, warfare, and fiscal capacity on the Company’s investment in shipping tonnage. Regressions show the growth of shipping tonnage declined significantly when there were changes in government ministers, when Britain was at war in Europe and North America, and when shipping capacity exceeded central government tax revenues. The findings point to the significance of regulatory institutions in Britain’s development and its links with politics and war. They also provide an important case where regulatory uncertainty lowers investment.” paper dated Jan 2015 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  downloaded  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  fiscal-military_state  state-building  UK_government-colonies  East_India_Company  trade-policy  trading_companies  trading_privileges  monopolies  British_Navy  17thC  institutional_capacity  regulation  monarchy-proprietary  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  taxes  political_culture  shipping  merchants  interlopers  military_history  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Glorious_Revolution  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  investment  uncertainty-regulation  uncertainty-political  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  parties  faction  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hopper (lecture transcript) - Turncoats and Renegadoes in the English Civil Wars (2011) | National Army Museum (UK) - Lunchtime Lectures
Recorded on 22 September 2011 (transcript updated 2013) -- Dr Andrew Hopper, Lecturer in English Local History at the University of Leicester, discusses the practice of side changing and the role of treachery and traitors during the English Civil Wars -- gave the lecture a couple of weeks before he finished his Oxford University Press book of the same name -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  lecture  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Dr Elliot Vernon, review essay - Andrew Hopper, Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars | Reviews in History (Nov 2013)
Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars - Oxford University Press, 2012, hardback ISBN: 9780199575855; 272pp.; - paperback 2014 - as of Jan 2015 no ebook -- 1st rate review essay, and looks like fascinating book that will be useful for notions of "treason" and, during and after "regime change", factional abuse of legal process against their opponents by tarring them with turncoat accusations - not just revolutions (English_Civil_War, French_Revolution, Russian Revolution) but also Glorious Revolution, Hanoverian Succession -- see also Pinboard bookmark for the lecture Hopper gave on the topic in 2011 at the National Army Museum -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  find  buy  libraries  political_history  political_culture  legal_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Laura Lunger Knoppers, review - Derek Hirst, Richard Strier eds, Writing and Political Engagement in 17thC England; Brendan Dooley, Sabrina Baron, eds, The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR: Renaissance Quarterly, Vol. 56, No. 1 (Spri
Review gives a thumbnail of each contribution to the 2 collections. In the Hirst book his chapter on Marvell's satire of Mr. Bays looks particularly interesting, also a chapter on Algernon Sidney and his attack on Filmer. The information book looks more "ground breaking" studying the pattern across the 17thC of how people in England got news and where print comes in, the continuing life of manuscript newsletters, etc. The latter part of the book has chapters on a number of Continental polities (including Venice, Dutch Republic, Spain), highlighting major periods of development and comparing with the English pattern. -- worth hunting down in a library though since it's from 1999 a lot more news and information studies have been published, so it may be a bit dated -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  find  libraries  cultural_history  social_history  literary_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  newspapers  news  political_press  propaganda  censorship  readership  public_opinion  Venice  Dutch  Spain  espionage  diplomacy  diplomats  intelligence_agencies  poetry  Marvell  Sidney_Algernon  Filmer  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Chris Kyle, Jason Peacey eds. - Parliament at Work: Parliamentary Committees, Political Power and Public Access in Early Modern England | JSTOR: The English Historical Review, Vol. 119, No. 484 (Nov., 2004), pp. 1418-1419
Hirst praises John Adamson's chapter in particular for showing how Independents (looks like links to the cast of his Noble Revolt) were able to mount a coup to restructure military and stymie peace negotiations via their skills in committee, avoiding a larger forum where their policies wouldn't have prevailed. Several other chapters look interesting, though Hirst says the collection doesn't have major surprises or examine larger issues (of the sort he takes up in his "petitioning the Republic article) -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Parliament  legislature-committees  governance  legislature-process  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Making Contact: Petitions and the English Republic | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 45, No. 1 (January 2006), pp. 26-50
A broader study of petitioning is particularly warranted when the prevailing narratives—as of the years of the republic of 1649–609—concentrate on revolution, coercion, and exclusion and thus put a singular slant on the relations of rulers and ruled. (...) The sword certainly put the republic in place, but it neither wrote all its history nor dictated all its practices. In fact, familiar patterns and mechanisms of reciprocity counterpointed the disturbances of revolutionary change, held groups and individuals together, and constituted assets on which the republic could draw. (...) This article will take petitions and the responses they elicited as a measure of the openness, of the responsiveness, of the regime.... In its examination of petitioning—the process, problems of access, tactics, and language used—the article will work within certain narrow limits. Wartime exigencies had proliferated committees and commissions (accounts, army, excise, indemnity, navy, and plundered ministers...) to which countless parties petitioned, before which they pleaded, and from which they often appealed to higher authorities. This article confines itself for several reasons to solicitations of those higher authorities, (...) The descent of Leveller petitioners on parliament, whether in 1649–50, 1653–54, or 1659, certainly produced some revealing exchanges—on each side coercive intentions and language tended to run high—but what was revealed tends to reinforce the traditional picture of an embattled and exclusionary order. This article will accordingly look elsewhere, to more mundane business of governance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  governance  government_officials  petitions  political_participation  political_culture  Cromwell  accountability  popular_politics  political_press  pamphlets  republicanism  political_nation  political_spectacle  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Nicholas McDowell, The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630–1660 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 44, No. 2 (April 2005), pp. 368-369
Reviewed work(s): Nicholas McDowell. The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630–1660. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pp. 219. $72.00 (cloth). ISBN 0‐19‐926626‐3. -- The review puts the book in histriographical debates since Christopher Hill and his "world turned upside down" thesis of radicalism originating from below. Milton wasn't unusual as highly educated among committed radical authors. The review shorthands the historiography debates unfortunately - Peter Lake is a star, but what and who he was revising? where was there pushback? Who else beyond Lake and David Cuomo a couple of other names tossed out? Also mentions parallels with Spinoza and confirming Pocock claim Enlightenment parentage via radicals. -- McDowell has a literary history PhD - this is reworked dissertation - so he's great on digging out obscure texts and tracking authorship, but not a wide scope to his background in all the interrelated streams of political, religious etc thought -- Review this again after looking at more of the last 2 decades of historiography for 17thC intellectual_history and political thought.
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  radicals  Commonwealthmen  cultural_history  university  scholastics  education-higher  education-civic  reform-political  reform-social  elite_culture  religious_culture  dissenters  Levellers  political-theology  political_participation  political_press  pamphlets  to_read  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell (Yale ed., 2 vols) and The Poems of Andrew Marvell (Nigel Smith ed.) | JSTOR: Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Winter, 2004), pp. 697-700
Review of (1) The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell, eds, Annabel Patterson; Martin Dzelzainis, Nicholas von Maltzahn, N. H. Keeble and (2) The Poems of Andrew Marvell, ed. Nigel Smith -- the poetry volume is dinged for not fully reflecting new work on Marvell, not surprisingly since Hirst with Zwicker have led the way on repositioning Marvell's biography (ambiguous sexuality, fraught relationships with families and the constantly shifting system of patronage, and childhood abuse) to see both his politics and poetry dufferently, The more substantive critique of the 2 volume prose works is Patterson hauling Marvell and her co-editors into a "liberal avant la lettre" frame where Marvell generally doesn't belong. Par for Patterson who wants to claim all good things in 17thC and 18thC English_lit to liberalism and "Whig culture" -- 3 pgs, didn't download
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  English_lit  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Marvell  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  English_constitution  anti-absolutism  tolerance  popery  poetry  poetics  political_press  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  political_discourse  pamphlets  censorship  British_foreign_policy  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674 (2004) | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 111, No. 4 (October 2006), p. 1247
Derek Hirst, Washington University in St. Louis -- Reviewed work(s): Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 2004. Pp. xii, 370. $49.50. -- mixed review. -- he thinks she's on to a major way of looking how various metaphors were deployed and evolved in 17, with her readings of Hobbes and Milton 1st rate. She gets some facts and cites wrong when she strays out of her lane (cavalier not in the 17thC sense). But more damning is her lack of sufficient familiarity with Elizabethan and French discourses of romance, passions and bodies politic. Short -- didn't download
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  literary_history  17thC  Hobbes  Milton  British_history  British_politics  English_lit  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  English_constitution  republicanism  social_contract  emotions  passions  human_nature  moral_psychology  obligation  reciprocity  trust  interest-discourse 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst and Steven Zwicker - High Summer at Nun Appleton, 1651: Andrew Marvell and Lord Fairfax's Occasions | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jun., 1993), pp. 247-269
Andrew Marvell's country-house epic, Upon Appleton House, has long been understood as a meditation on conventional philosophical themes. An exact dating allows us to see the topical and polemical force of those themes. Moreover, situating the poem within particular chronological and geographical confines, the summer of 1651 and the household of the recently retired Lord General as well as the political geography of the vale of York, reveals the continuities and the patronage-afflicted contours of the poet's engagement with the crisis of the English revolution, a crisis he had so searchingly explored in An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's return from Ireland. -- Major paper as part of rethinking and repositioning Marvell's poetry and politics -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Marvell  political_philosophy  poetry  poetics  sexuality  Cromwell  patronage  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst and Steven Zwicker - Andrew Marvell and the Toils of Patriarchy: Fatherhood, Longing, and the Body Politic | JSTOR: ELH, Vol. 66, No. 3 (Fall, 1999), pp. 629-654
More of Hirst and Zwicker repositioning Marvell and his poetry and politics after their important reading of Appleton House - they're especially interested in Marvell's personal tortured relations with father figures, patronage and loss of patrons, and homoeroticism -- didn't download
article  jstor  literary_history  lit_crit  political_philosophy  English_lit  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Marvell  poetry  patronage  homosexuality  Cromwell  Biblical_allusion  patriarchy  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Joad Raymond - Framing Libery: Marvell's "First Anniversary" and the Instrument of Government | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 313-350
1st Anniversary has been treated as the middle poem in a triptych of Marvell's poems on Cromwell. What Marvell's doing in this poem has been the subject of an extreme variety of interpretations, and the structure criticized as fragmented or reflecting the awkwardness of Marvell's political commitments in an environment in flux, the demands of propaganda, or panageric tainted by patronage. Raymond sees the poem as focused not on Cromwell but on the 1st anniversary of the Instrument of Government. The positions of Cromwell in the poem represent tensions between the logic of the Instrument to shape governmental action and political behavior and conflict vs the outsized person of Cromwell, whose manner of governing and leadership both made the success of the Instrument more likely yet threatened the core logic of the Instrument. He extensively tracks the specific debates in 1654, including ephemeral publications of propaganda and controversy, arguing that one reason later readers don't follow Marvell's structure and argument is that, beyond failing to understand the subject is the constitution, Marvell is engaging in specific contemporary arguments and the language in which they were then framed, which are unfamiliar to later readers. He looks at positions that would later become identified with The Good Old Cause and Commonwealthmen, and Harringtinian republicanism. Interesting bibliography Raymond in recent books has been specializing in the development and changes in 17thC print culture(s) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Interregnum  Restoration  publishing  propaganda  pamphlets  politics-and-literature  political_press  Marvell  Cromwell  government-forms  English_constitution  Harrington  Nedham  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Gavin Alexander - Fulke Greville and the Afterlife | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 203-231
Fascinating re both Grevill's history writing - his discussion of Sir Philip Sidney in publishing his work (Arcadia) not only influenced Sidney reception but framed Queen Elizabeth as a wise ruler in contrast with the Stuarts. Discussion of how, given "nothing new under the sun" and constancy of human nature, poetry, drama and prose could all be read as speaking to current events -- e, g. Robert Devereaux, Earl of Essex rebellion. Greville treatment of Sidney as in retrospect prophetic re foreign relations especially with Dutch, forms of government -- Greville using Aristotle and Polybius re patterns of historical change. Greville in both his history and prose writing and his poetry and plays was always looking to readers after his death. Suggestive re development of an increasingly sophisticated historiography in 17thC that wrestled with tensions in using history as exemplary vs informing practical reason for contingencies of statecraft as well as hermeneutics for readers in the present and future. Provides a publication history of Greville's works during Commonwealth and Restoration, how it was used politically at different moments, including Exclusion_Crisis. Worden has published articles or chapters in collections that look at the generation of Sidney and Greville as some proto classical republican writings. Also may be useful for Bolingbroke's treatment of Elizabeth as model in Remarks and Study and Uses -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  16thC  17thC  Elizabeth  James_I  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Anglo-Dutch  English_lit  poetry  poetics  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-political  historians-and-politics  historical_change  politics-and-literature  hermeneutics  reader_response  readership  publishing  scribal_circulation  manuscripts  Remarks_on_History_of_England  Study_and_Uses  political_philosophy  republicanism  Polybius  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Brooke Palmieri - The Wild, The Innocent, and The Quaker’s Struggles—Vol. 2, No. 3—The Appendix
Although they were notorious for appearing naked in marketplaces, interrupting sermons, and calling for the overthrow of the church, the Quakers were extraordinarily disciplined about running riot. It made sense for the Quakers to cultivate an exaggerated presence in order to make their voices heard among the clamor of other religious sects formed after English Civil War. But what set them apart was the volume of their printed works. During the early years of their establishment in the 1650s, Quakers published about a pamphlet a week, paid for through a collectively managed fund, and distributed by a network of itinerant preachers known as the “Valiant Sixty.” The Sixty, which were in fact more than sixty people, included George Fox, Margaret -- [collective control of publishing] The Meeting format, which had its origins in collective, mystical experiences of trembling and Quaking in fear of the Lord, and which had formed part of the basis for Quaker survival through terrible persecution, also became a forum for collective skills-sharing in reading, writing, and publication. And in turn, a sense of collective education and advocacy. After all, the subject matter taken up by the Quaker press in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries included a number of incredibly progressive issues: pacifism, gender equality, racial equality, and prison reform. The potential futures imagined by a few seventeenth-century hellraisers have underpinned issues of social justice that still matter today, and may have even helped give rise to them. In other words, when Hell Broke Loose, the outcome wasn’t entirely pandemonium.
article  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  dissenters  publishing  pamphlets  religious_lit  reform-social  reform-legal  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, ed. Blair Worden - Online Library of Liberty
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, edited and with an Introduction by Blair Worden (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2011). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2449> -- This edition brings back into print, after two and a half centuries, the pioneering work of English republicanism, Marchamont Nedham’s The Excellencie of a Free-State, which was written in the wake of the execution of King Charles I. First published in 1656, and compiled from previously written editorials in the parliamentarian newsbook Mercurius Politicus, The Excellencie of a Free-State addressed a dilemma in English politics, namely, what kind of government should the Commonwealth adopt? One possibility was to revert to the ancient constitution and create a Cromwellian monarchy. The alternative was the creation of parliamentary sovereignty, in which there would be a “due and orderly succession of supreme authority in the hands of the people’s representatives.” Nedham was convinced that only the latter would “best secure the liberties and freedoms of the people from the encroachments and usurpations of tyranny.” -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  Charles_I  politics-and-religion  political_press  commonwealth  Cromwell  political_participation  historiography-17thC  ancient_constitution  mixed_government  government-forms  representative_institutions  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Nedham  newspapers  tyranny  civil_liberties  constitutionalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed., 2000), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston - Online Library of Liberty
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed.), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/673> -- Though usually Edmund Burke is identified as the first to articulate the principles of a modern conservative political tradition, arguably he was preceded by a Scotsman who is better known for espousing a brilliant concept of skepticism. As Laurence Bongie notes, “David Hume was undoubtedly the eighteenth-century British writer whose works were most widely known and acclaimed on the Continent during the later Enlightenment period. Hume’s impact [in France] was of undeniable importance, greater even for a time than the related influence of Burke, although it represents a contribution to French counter-revolutionary thought which, unlike that of Burke, has been almost totally ignored by historians to this day.” The bulk of Bongie’s work consists of the writings of French readers of Hume who were confronted, first, by the ideology of human perfection and, finally, by the actual terrors of the French Revolution. Offered in French in the original edition of David Hume published by Oxford University Press in 1965, these vitally important writings have been translated by the author into English for the Liberty Fund second edition. In his foreword, Donald Livingston observes that “If conservatism is taken to be an intellectual critique of the first attempt at modern total revolution, then the first such event was not the French but the Puritan revolution, and the first systematic critique of this sort of act was given by Hume.” -- original on bookshelf - downloaded for Livingston foreword and translations
books  bookshelf  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  history_of_England  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  progress  perfectibility  human_nature  historians-and-politics  historiography-18thC  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  English_Civil_War  Puritans  Levellers  Interregnum  Protectorate  Charles_I  Cromwell  Parliament  Parliamentarians  Ancien_régime  French_Revolution  Terror  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  conservatism  Whigs-Radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Popish_Plot  Rye_House_Plot  tolerance  prerogative  Glorious_Revolution  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Mary  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  loyalty_oaths  Royalists  dissenters  parties  faction  Church_of_England  resistance_theory  religion-established  ecclesiology  nonjurors  defacto_rule  Norman_Conquest  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 1 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 1. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/810> -- Volume I consists of pamphlets written from the reign of James I to the Restoration (1620-1660). -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. Prior, review - Bernard Capp. England's Culture Wars: Puritan Reformation and Its Enemies in the Interregnum, 1649-1660 | H-Net Reviews May 2013
Capp’s new book adds significant depth and nuance to our view of this period, ... Broadly speaking, the reformers were motivated by godly zeal and the desire to establish a civic commonwealth that was animated by humanist values, such as civility and good order. In this sense, the aims of the reformers agreed with the social values of the nobility, magistrates, and city corporations... However, ..a spectrum, along which positions were defined by the relative proportion of godliness to civility. The book is divided into three parts. The first concentrates on the various loci of political power, ...legislative reform carried on by the interregnum parliaments, by the government and the church at the county and local levels, and in an excellent chapter by propaganda and the press. The second part consists of six detailed chapters that take up the puritan “reformation of manners.” The third part of the book looks in some detail at local contexts, illustrating that reform proceeded very much according to the whims and will of local magistrates. Reformers had to contend with a series of structural and practical obstacles. ?..interregnum politics was fragmented. Parliament never really recovered from Pride’s Purge ... In spite of the desire to limit religious expression, a fervent climate of sectarianism remained. The Cromwellian state was obliged to settle for ad hoc compromises on a range of issues. ?...surely all of this detail adds up to something larger. ?...goes some way toward challenging the view that one major effect of the civil war was that the “state” emerged in its modern form. That is, politics transcended confessionalism and embraced legal values, secularism, and the rigid control of religion by the state. By contrast, Capp’s work suggests that religious dispute continued to destabilize politics at all levels, and that the state, if it existed at all, was obliged to defer to local custom.
books  reviews  historiography  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  godly_persons  Parliamentarians  republicanism  Cromwell  sectarianism  state-building  nation-state  local_government  local_politics  reformation_of_manners  authority  authoritarian  church_history  commonwealth  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Alison Games, review - Carla Gardina Pestana. The English Atlantic in an Age of Revolution, 1640–1661 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 44, No. 4 (October 2005), pp. 835-836
Reviewed work(s): Carla Gardina Pestana. The English Atlantic in an Age of Revolution, 1640–1661. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2004. Pp. 342. $49.95 (cloth). -- Alison Games, Georgetown University -- very high praise and helpful outline of how Pestana sees the Civil Wars and Interregnum as affecting migration, religion in the colonies and more intrusive governance from England
books  reviews  jstor  kindle-available  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  godly_persons  Atlantic  migration  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  UK_government-colonies  British_foreign_policy  Cromwell  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Coffey - Puritanism and Liberty Revisited: The Case for Toleration in the English Revolution - JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 961-985
In recent years historians have grown sceptical about attempts to trace connections between puritanism and liberty. Puritans, we are told, sought a godly society, not a pluralistic one. The new emphasis has been salutary, but it obscures the fact that a minority of zealous Protestants argued forcefully for the toleration of heresy, blasphemy, Catholicism, non-Christian religions, and even atheism. During the English revolution, a substantial number of Baptists, radical Independents, and Levellers insisted that the New Testament paradigm required the church to be a purely voluntary, non-coercive community in the midst of a pluralistic society governed by a `merely civil' state. Although their position was not without its ambiguities, it constituted a startling break with the Constantinian assumptions of magisterial Protestantism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  revisionism  religious_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Puritans  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  godly_persons  Parliamentarians  republicanism  Cromwell  Levellers  tolerance  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_culture  church_history  New_Testament  apostolic_succession  Early_Christian  theocracy  heterodoxy  pluralism  civil_liberties  civil_religion  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Ruth E. Mayers - Real and Practicable, Not Imaginary and Notional: Sir Henry Vane, "A Healing Question," and the Problems of the Protectorate | JSTOR: Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 28, No. 1 (Spring, 1996), pp. 37-72
By 1655 the future of the Protectorate, and its capacities in both domestic governance and foreign policy, were increasingly questioned. Various proposals for new constitutional forms were put forward including Nedham's republicanism, Harrington's Oceania and Vane's proposal. Vane advocated the "good" persons (which excluded a lot of non Royalists but included the Army, which some godly critics saw as source of illegitimate Protectorate) uniting to adopt a new form of representative government. Vane's was the only constitutional proposal taken seriously enough for imprisonment and overt response by the Protectorate, though it's not been studied like Nedham and Harrington, and many summary descriptions are erroneous. Quite interesting re the various divisions among the non Royalists from the late 1640s (pre regicide) onwards. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  godly_persons  Parliamentarians  republicanism  Cromwell  politics-and-religion 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel Dennis Glover - The Putney Debates: Popular versus Élitist Republicanism | JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 164 (Aug., 1999), pp. 47-80
Disagrees with Worden and others who don't see Levellers and civil war radicals as source of republicanism - traces influence of ancient historians, radicals during Dutch Revolt etc on mid 17thC English radical republicanism - extensive bibliography - downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Dutch_Revolt  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  radicals  Levellers  Cromwell  Tacitus  Machiavelli  commonwealth  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan Cromartie - Harringtonian Virtue: Harrington, Machiavelli, and the Method of the Moment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 987-1009
This article presents a reinterpretation of James Harrington's writings. It takes issue with J. G. A. Pocock's reading, which treats him as importing into England a Machiavellian `language of political thought'. This reading is the basis of Pocock's stress on the republicanism of eighteenth-century opposition values. Harrington's writings were in fact a most implausible channel for such ideas. His outlook owed much to Stoicism. Unlike the Florentine, he admired the contemplative life; was sympathetic to commerce; and was relaxed about the threat of `corruption' (a concept that he did not understand). These views can be associated with his apparent aims: the preservation of a national church with a salaried but politically impotent clergy; and the restoration of the royalist gentry to a leading role in English politics. Pocock's hypothesis is shown to be conditioned by his method; its weaknesses reflect some difficulties inherent in the notion of `languages of thought'. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Harrington  landed_interest  Machiavelli  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  commerce  common_good  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  Stoicism  gentry  Royalists  mixed_government  English_constitution  politics-and-theory  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  corruption  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John A. Shedd - Legalism over Revolution: The Parliamentary Committee for Indemnity and Property Confiscation Disputes, 1647-1655 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 4 (Dec., 2000), pp. 1093-1107
Royalists of the Civil War period readily employed the English legal system to recover lost estates, even at the nadir of their political fortunes, namely the years just after the king's defeat. Rather than accept the verdict of a war lost, royalist and Catholic `delinquents' successfully sought their own verdicts at law against former tenants for rents on lands that had been confiscated by parliament. The radical MPs staffing the Indemnity Committee respected the principles of due process of law and, ironically, given the fact that the committee's purpose was to protect parliament's supporters, upheld royalist claims to confiscated lands, thereby assisting the law courts in thwarting parliament's plan to repay war debts with rents collected from losers' property. So pervasive was the legalistic mindset in both the courts and the Indemnity Committee that royalists received favourable rulings against many on the winning side of the conflict, including famous leaders such as Sir William Brereton. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  legal_history  economic_history  political_history  political_economy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  property_rights  landowners  Royalists  Catholics-England  Parliamentarians  property-confiscations  legal_culture  economic_culture  political_culture  sovereign_debt  due_process  civil_liberties  judiciary  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Graham Maddox - The Secular Reformation and the Influence of Machiavelli | JSTOR: The Journal of Religion, Vol. 82, No. 4 (Oct., 2002), pp. 539-562
Over 100 references -- extends republicanism and democracy discussion to US and Tocqueville with asides for Levellers and Puritans especially in American colonies. Looks like lots of political theory historiography debates with religious filter -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  American_colonies  Early_Republic  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Puritans  bibliography  secularization  Reformation  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Randall, review essay - Recent Studies in Print Culture: News, Propaganda, and Ephemera | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 67, No. 3 (September 2004), pp. 457-472
In “Recent Studies in Print Culture: News, Propaganda, and Ephemera,” David Randall reviews several monographs and essays concerning aspects of print culture in early modern Britain. These include (1) Paul J. Voss, Elizabethan News Pamphlets: Shakespeare, Spenser, Marlowe, and the Birth of Journalism (Pittsburgh, 2001); (2) three essays by Sabrina Baron, Michael Mendle, and Daniel Woolf in Brendan Dooley and Sabrina Baron, eds., The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe (London and New York, 2001); (3) Jason Peacey, Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum (Aldershot, U.K., 2004); and (4) Joad Raymond, Pamphlets and Pamphleteering in Early Modern Britain (Cambridge, 2003). As the review shows, scholars of ephemeral print culture disagree as to just why this material should be studied, and they have come up with different reasons, asked different questions, and therefore developed very different ways of organizing and interpreting printed ephemera. -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  16thC  17thC  British_history  English_lit  publishing  pamphlets  political_press  political_culture  propaganda  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Shakespeare  Elizabethan  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kate Loveman, review essay - Political Information in the Seventeenth Century | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 555-565
(1) Reading, Society and Politics in Early Modern England by Kevin Sharpe; Steven N. Zwicker; (2) The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe by Brendan Dooley; Sabrina A. Baron; (3) Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State by Andrew McRae; (4) The Writing of Royalism, 1628-1660 by Robert Wilcher; (5) Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum by Jason Peacey; (6)The Ingenious Mr. Henry Care, Restoration Publicist by Lois G. Schwoerer -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  censorship  reader_response  readership  reading  propaganda  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Interregnum  English_lit  satire  pamphlets  Grub_Street  history_of_book  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Hattem - The “War on Christmas” in Early America « The Junto Dec 2013
And so the first English dissenters who settled New England in the early seventeenth century were, like their brethren back home, decidedly anti-Christmas. Puritans were keenly aware of the holiday’s pagan origins, as Increase Mather wrote in A Testimony against Several Prophane and Superstitious Customs, Now Practiced by Some in New England: [3] (fascinating quote from Increase Mather). .... Even after the Revolution, the Congress was known to meet on Christmas Day, if they were in session. Throughout the nineteenth century, as well, there are numerous reports from all over the United States attesting to the lack Christmas observance, particularly by various Protestant and German Pietist sects.
religious_history  religious_culture  legal_history  British_history  British_politics  American_colonies  US_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  21stC  Puritans  Pietist  Interregnum  Reformation  Christianity  right-wing  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
J. T. Peacey: Nibbling at "Leviathan": Politics and Theory in England in the 1650s (1998)
JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 2 (1998), pp. 241-257 -- corrects or elaborates Skinner assumptions re writers who picked up some Hobbesian elements after Leviathan published -- difficulty establishing intentions and reception for "context"
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  Britain  Interregnum  Hobbes  political_press  Cambridge_School  historiography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Leo F. Solt - The New Model Army in England, Ireland and Scotland, 1645-1653 by Ian Gentles (1993)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 98, No. 3 (Jun., 1993), pp. 868-869 -- a revision of Kishlanky's revisionist account --brings religion back in
books  reviews  17thC  British_history  British_politics  military_history  English_Civil_War  religious_history  religious_culture  Calvinist  Interregnum  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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