dunnettreader + internet   29

DNS Tools - Ping, Traceroute & DNS | DomainTools
Click on "My IP Address" under in "Your IP Information" in the right sidebar to get info on current IP address for home network, comcast domain address for modem/router etc.
Internet  domains  wi-fi  Mac  home 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Genius.it to Annotate the World - Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality - August 2015
Must-Read: Genius: Annotate the World: "Genius lets you add line-by-line annotations... ...to any page on the Internet. Put Genius.it/ in front of any URL (or install our Chrome extension or our…
Internet  information  knowledge_management  collaboration  research  networks-information  software  tips 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Interview with Seyla Benhabib - On the Public Sphere, Deliberation, Journalism and Dignity | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 4 August 2008
Yale philosopher Seyla Benhabib interviewed by Karin Wahl-Jorgensen Seyla --“We are facing a generation who is getting all its information online. The consequence is that one’s points of reference are so multiple that they may not intersect and a common world may not emerge. But fragmentation can also bring effervescence - says Seyla Benhabib, philosopher and Professor of political science and philosophy at Yale. - One medium that is in great crisis is television. I would like to see a citizens’ forum, rather than these continuously self-referential talking heads and so-called experts. We extend the boundaries of our sympathy by understanding the conditions of others who may be radically different than us – she concludes – At its best journalism does this; it extends your vision of the world by making you see the world through the eyes of the others.” -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  Internet  information-intermediaries  information-markets  media  public_sphere  Habermas  public_opinion  empathy  citizenship  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Nadia Urbinati, - Between hegemony and distrust: Representative democracy in the Internet era | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 7 April 2014
Nadia Urbinati, Columbia University -- Iceland's crowd-sourced constitution and the impact of Beppe Grillo's blog on Italian politics reveal how "Internet democracy" has opened a new phase of democratic innovation. The relationship between citizens and politicians may never be the same again. -- see if this elaborates on some "Disfigured Democracy" ideas -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  democracy_deficit  democracy-direct  political_participation  legitimacy  opposition  Internet  networks-social  networks-information  networks-political  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jürgen Habermas interviewed by Markus Schwering - Essays: Internet and Public Sphere What the Web Can't Do | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 24 July 2014
"After the inventions of writing and printing, digital communication represents the third great innovation on the media plane. With their introduction, these three media forms have enabled an ever growing number of people to access an ever growing mass of information. These are made to be increasingly lasting, more easily. With the last step represented by Internet we are confronted with a sort of “activation” in which readers themselves become authors. Yet, this in itself does not automatically result in progress on the level of the public sphere. [...] The classical public sphere stemmed from the fact that the attention of an anonymous public was “concentrated” on a few politically important questions that had to be regulated. This is what the web does not know how to produce. On the contrary, the web actually distracts and dispels." This is how, among many more subjects, Jürgen Habermas comments the evolution of democratic participation in the internet era. Reset-DoC is pleased to republish the translated version of a long interview published last June on the "Frankfurter Rundschau" for the philosopher's eighty-fifth birthday. -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  public_sphere  information-intermediaries  printing  print_culture  Internet  communication  community-virtual  media  political_culture  political_participation  political_press  Habermas  post-secular  cultural_history  cultural_change  networks-information  networks-political  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Sennett - Humanism IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 13, No. 2 (Summer 2011)
I have wanted, in sum, to explain in this essay why the label “humanist” is a badge of honor, rather than the name for an exhausted worldview. Humanism’s emphasis on life-narratives, on the enriching experience of difference, and on evaluating tools in terms of human rather than mechanical complexity are all living values—and more, I would say, these are critical measures for judging the state of modern society. Looking back to the origins of these values is not an exercise in nostalgia; it is rather to remind us that we are engaged in a project, still in process, a humanism yet to be realized, of making social experience more open, engaging, and layered. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  downloaded  humanism  Renaissance  19thC  technology  communication  Internet  programming  algorithms  robots 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Entretien avec Roger Chartier par Ivan Jablonka - Le livre : son passé, son avenir | La Vie des idées 29 septembre 2008
Roger Chartier, professeur au Collège de France, analyse ces bouleversements à la lumière de l’histoire. Une question inédite se pose à nous: sous sa forme électronique, le texte doit-il bénéficier de la fixité, comme les livres de papier, ou peut-il s’ouvrir aux potentialités de l’anonymat et d’une multiplicité sans fin ? Ce qui est sûr, c’est que la multiplication des supports éditoriaux, des journaux et des écrans diversifie les pratiques d’une société qui, contrairement à ce qu’on entend dire ça et là, lit de plus en plus. -- interview available in audio and video plus English text -- downloaded French pdf to Note
interview  history_of_book  media  publishing  etexts  cultural_history  Internet  mass_culture  elite_culture  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
"No, the Internet Is Not Killing Culture" - Evan Kindley on Scott Timberg's Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class | Slate Jan 2015
Scott Timberg’s Culture Crash begins with a harrowing and by now familiar personal narrative of the Great Recession. In 2008, Timberg, an arts reporter for the Los Angeles Times, was laid off, a casualty of the infamous Sam Zell regime; soon after, the bank foreclosed on his family’s house. These back-to-back misfortunes made Timberg worry about more than making ends meet: They shook his faith in the entire enterprise of American creativity. “I saw myself in the third generation of people who had worked in culture without either striking it rich or going broke,” he writes, but such a career path no longer seemed available in the 21st century, and he wanted to understand why. Though there was a temptation to blame the awesome leveling power of the Internet, he concluded that “this was about more than just technology. … Some of the causes were as new as file sharing; others were older than the nation. Some were cyclical, and would pass in a few years; others were structural and would get worse with time.” -- Kindley points out that precarious living of creative workers is the historical norm, and the few decades in the 2nd half of the 20thC during which a reasonably talented, reasonably hard-working writer, artist etc might be able to have a reasonably secure middle class life was the extreme exception. He also shows how Timberg is mostly writing about the bubble he lives in, so doesn't "get" the experiences of even his contemporaries who weren't middle class white males.
Instapaper  books  reviews  cultural_history  cultural_critique  literary_history  art_history  journalism  lit_crit  middle_class  post-WWII  Internet  media  competition  patrons  1-percent  patronage-artistic  creativity  creative_economy  from instapaper
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Project VRM (Vendor Relationship Management) | Wiki Main Page
R&D connected to the various Harvard internet-related programs (at eg HLS, HBS) -- VRM tools provide customers with both independence from vendors and better ways of engaging with vendors. The same tools can also support individuals' relations with schools, churches, government entities and other kinds of organizations. -- VRM is part of a larger picture as well. Perhaps the best name and description for that larger picture is Life Management Platforms, coined by Martin Kuppinger of Kuppinger Cole. He describes them this way: "Life Management Platforms will change the way individuals deal with sensitive information like their health data, insurance data, and many other types of information – information that today frequently is paper-based or, when it comes to personal opinions, only in the mind of the individuals. They will enable new approaches for privacy- and security-aware sharing of that information, without the risk of losing control of that information.
Internet  privacy  e-commerce  cyberlaw  networks-information  technology  open_source  networks-business  net_neutrality  internet-protocols  business_practices  website 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Aleksi Aaltonen, Stephan Seiler - Wikipedia: The value of open content production | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal - 31 October 2014
Research paper writeup -- Many organisations are developing open platforms to create, store, and share knowledge. This column analyses editing data by Wikipedia users to show how content creation by individuals generates significant ‘spillover’ benefits, encouraging others to contribute to the collective process of knowledge production. -- Our findings on the impact of spillovers on Wikipedia suggest the value of all such platforms providing incentives for users to contribute content or to ‘pre-populate’ articles with content so as to trigger further contributions. Since we also find evidence that the magnitude of the spillover effect varies with the total number of users active on the platform, it seems that achieving a larger mass of potential contributors is important for these platforms to benefit from a stronger spillover effect.
open_access  open_source  sociology_of_knowledge  collaboration  Internet 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Khan, B. - An Economic History of Copyright in Europe and the United States | EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. March 16, 2008
The US created a utilitarian market-based model of intellectual property grants which created incentives for invention, with the primary objective of increasing social welfare and protecting the public domain. The checks and balances of interest group lobbies, the legislature and the judiciary worked effectively as long as each institution was relatively well-matched in terms of size and influence. However, a number of scholars are concerned that the political influence of corporate interests, the vast number of uncoordinated users over whom the social costs are spread, and international harmonization of laws have upset these counterchecks, leading to over-enforcement at both the private and public levels. International harmonization with European doctrines introduced significant distortions in the fundamental principles of US copyright and its democratic provisions. One of the most significant of these changes was also one of the least debated: compliance with the precepts of the Berne Convention accorded automatic copyright protection to all creations on their fixation in tangible form. This rule reversed the relationship between copyright and the public domain that the US Constitution stipulated. According to original US copyright doctrines, the public domain was the default, and copyright a limited exemption to the public domain; after the alignment with Berne, copyright became the default, and the rights of the public and of the public domain now merely comprise a limited exception to the primacy of copyright. The pervasive uncertainty that characterizes the intellectual property arena today leads risk-averse individuals and educational institutions to err on the side of abandoning their right to free access rather than invite challenges and costly litigation. Many commentators are also concerned about other dimensions of the globalization of intellectual property rights, such as the movement to emulate European grants of property rights in databases, which has the potential to inhibit diffusion and learning.
article  economic_history  publishing  property  property_rights  legal_history  legal_system  IP  regulation-harmonization  natural_rights  natural_law  copyright  patents  US_constitution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  international_law  France  French_Revolution  censorship  British_history  authors  artists  playwrights  democracy  knowledge_economy  Internet  globalization  global_economy  digital_humanities  transparency  open_access  scientific_culture  science-public  education  R&D  education-higher  common_law  civil_code  civil_society  civic_humanism  US_legal_system 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Graber, review - Danielle Citron, Hate Crimes in Cyberspace -- Balkinization - September 2014
Citron‘s HCiC redefines as criminal behavior the repeated threats, insults, and gross violations of basic privacy norms on the internet that too many people, police in particular, regard as juvenile behavior. ...a pathbreaking study of how cultural tolerance of bullying and harassment on the internet is threatening to turn the most important contemporary forum for ideas into masculine Wild West where respect and common decency are signs of weakness rather than basic norms of conduct. HciC offers a remarkably thorough survey of the depressing state of the internet for women. The first chapters detail how women are repeatedly attacked on the internet, ... Harassment and bullying have the same impact on the internet as elsewhere. Women participate less in cyberspace, they become more generally fearful, and they lose employment and other opportunities when persons attempt to research their background in cyberspace. The second set of chapters detail problems with present efforts to stop hate crimes on the internet. The first problem is .. anonymity makes attackers difficult to identify. The second are police attitudes. Finally, laws regulating bullying, harassment and stalking were not drafted with the internet in mind. -- The last set of chapters focus on legal and social solutions to the problem of hate crimes on the internet. -- HCiC has the same ambitions as Sexual Harassment of Working Women, but its different is for more successful. McKinnon has always believed Americans need theory to understand what is wrong with sexual harassment. Citron’s assumption is that all Americans need is common sense - people should not urge that women be murdered and raped, post nude photographs of ex-girl friends on revenge porn sites, or spread malicious gossip. -- The debate over HCiC will focus on the First Amendment rights of cyberbullies, but ...the book defines constitutional rights too broadly rather than too narrowly. HciC endorses a populist understanding of the internet in which “All information should be free.” ... why Citron struggles drawing boundaries between posting nude pictures of ex-girlfriends on revenge porn websites and posting other information about ex-girlfriends on various websites that may be constitutionally protected.
books  reviews  Internet  legal_system  legal_theory  privacy  women-rights  free_speech  reform-legal  reform-social  feminism  violence 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
"Toward an Ecology of Intellectual Property: Lessons from Environmental" by Frank Pasquale | 8 Yale Journal of Law and Technology 78 (2006)
Keywords -- copyright, intellectual property, environmental, economics -- The fair use defense in copyright law shields an intellectual commons of protected uses of copyrighted material from infringement actions. In determining whether a given use is fair, courts must assess the new use's potential effect on the market for the copyrighted work. Fair use jurisprudence too often fails to address the complementary, network, and long-range effects of new technologies on the market for copyrighted works. These effects parallel the indirect, direct, and option values of biodiversity recently recognized by environmental economists. Their sophisticated methods for valuing natural resources in tangible commons can inform legal efforts to address the intellectual commons' effect on the market for copyrighted works. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  legal_theory  IP  copyright  Internet  political_economy  economic_theory  environment  commons  property  property_rights  networks-information  technology  valuation  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Big Data and Discrimination | Demos - May 2014
On May 1, the White House released a 90 day review studying the effects of big data and privacy, led by Obama's Counsel, John Podesta. Big data truly has enormous potential for social change and creative innovation. However, a key finding of the review is that big data analytics has the potential to lead to discriminatory outcomes and to evade and stymie hard-won civil rights protections in housing, employment, credit, and the consumer market. Fundamentally, big data creates a power imbalance between those who hold and apply the data and between those who knowingly or unknowingly supply it. The review finds that perfect personalization, which is the fusion of many different kinds of data, processed in real time, can lead to overt and covert forms of discrimination in pricing, services, and opportunities.
US_government  Internet  tech  civil_liberties  inequality  Innovation  consumers 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Izabella Kaminska - The Bitcoin personality cult lives on | FT Alphaville Feb 2014
Izzy being brilliant as usual -- In our minds, no product is more important than ourselves. And that’s because the ultimate reward of propaganda, if used wisely, is the sort of hierarchal positioning that was previously only ever associated with dictator-level personality cults.-- As Caesar and Augustus knew only too well, a personality cult will never successfully penetrate public minds if it is too focused on itself. Conversely it needs to be masterfully disassociated from self promotion, and re-associated with altruistic value, humour, or benevolence. In Caesar and Augustus’ case it was only through publicly rejecting kingly power, that they were able to create a much more powerful empirical office to replace it. A masterful slight of hand and example of misdirection. -- The distribution of highly doctored selfies eventually begins to nauseate. No-one likes a narcissist or a megalomaniac. Meanwhile, too much association with high-end products or exclusivity meanwhile backfires with the “Rich Kids of Instagram” effect. Today’s most effective propaganda consequently is the sort that inspires people to care about things other than themselves. It’s not aspirational as much as experience or ideology based.
consumerism  consumers  Internet  social_media  propaganda  rhetoric  ideology  libertarianism  self-regulation  Augustan_Rome  status  self-love  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Charlie Stross - Spy Kids | Foreign Policy August 2013
We human beings are primates. We have a deeply ingrained set of cultural and interpersonal behavioral rules that we violate only at social cost. One of these rules, essential for a tribal organism, is bilaterality: Loyalty is a two-way street. (Another is hierarchy: Yield to the boss.) Such rules are not iron-bound or immutable -- we're not robots -- but our new hive superorganism employers don't obey them instinctively, and apes and monkeys and hominids tend to revert to tit-for-tat strategies readily when they're unsure of their relative status. Perceived slights result in retaliation, and blundering, human-blind organizations can bruise an employee's ego without even noticing. And slighted or bruised employees who lack instinctive loyalty, because the culture they come from has spent generations systematically destroying social hierarchies and undermining their sense of belonging, are much more likely to start thinking the unthinkable.
US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_military  US_society  NSA  civil_liberties  neoliberalism  nationalism  Internet 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Dealing with digital death | OUPblog
Through the use of email, social media, and other online accounts, our lives and social interactions are increasingly mediated by digital service providers. As the volume of these interactions increases and displaces traditional forms of communication and commerce the question of what happens to those accounts, following the death of the user, takes on greater significance.
legal_system  Internet  privacy  personal 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Evgeny Morozov on Why Our Privacy Problem is a Democracy Problem in Disguise | MIT Technology Review
When all citizens demand their rights but are unaware of their responsibilities, the political questions that have defined democratic life over centuries—How should we live together? What is in the public interest, and how do I balance my own interest with it?—are subsumed into legal, economic, or administrative domains. “The political” and “the public” no longer register as domains at all; laws, markets, and technologies displace debate and contestation as preferred, less messy solutions.

But a democracy without engaged citizens doesn’t sound much like a democracy—and might not survive as one. This was obvious to Thomas Jefferson, who, while wanting every citizen to be “a participator in the government of affairs,” also believed that civic participation involves a constant tension between public and private life. A society that believes, as Simitis put it, that the citizen’s access to information “ends where the bourgeois’ claim for privacy begins” won’t last as a well-functioning democracy.

Thus the balance between privacy and transparency is especially in need of adjustment in times of rapid technological change. That balance itself is a political issue par excellence, to be settled through public debate and always left open for negotiation. It can’t be settled once and for all by some combination of theories, markets, and technologies. As Simitis said: “Far from being considered a constitutive element of a democratic society, privacy appears as a tolerated contradiction, the implications of which must be continuously reconsidered.”
21stC  tech  Internet  civil_liberties  civic_virtue  democracy  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Doug Hill: The Question Concerning Technology | In Defense of Disengagement July 2013
An intriguing essay appeared on Atlantic.com last week. It ran under the headline, "'Camp Grounded,' 'Digital Detox,' and the Age of Techno-Anxiety." The subhead was "What to Make of the New Naturalism."The piece was a reflection by the Atlantic's technology editor, Alexis Madrigal, on Camp Grounded, a three-day retreat that offered 300 or so people in California an opportunity to disconnect completely from their technologies.

Techno anxiety has been a fixture of the American experience from the beginning. To be sure, the shouts of the enthusiasts have always been louder, but they've always been accompanied by an undercurrent of doubt. As Harvard historian Perry Miller put it some fifty years ago, as a nation we leapt eagerly into the technological torrent, only to find ourselves "bobbing like corks in the flood, unable to get our heads high enough above the waves to tell whether there any longer solid banks on either side or whether we have been carried irretrievably into a pitiless sea, there to be swamped and drowned."

By ending his essay with a series of questions Madrigal implies that if we just get serious and put our heads together, answers will be found. It's possible to endorse the effort while pointing out that it's easier said than done. I've studied the history and philosophy of technology for more than twenty years, and every one of the thinkers in those fields I admire most—Jacques Ellul, Marshall McLuhan, Lewis Mumford, Neal Postman, Stephen Talbott—at one time or another explicitly declined to offer prescriptions for taming technology's excesses. They recognized that the scope and depth of the problems don't lend themselves to programmatic solutions, and also that any proposal radical enough to make a substantial difference doesn’t stand the slightest chance of being adopted.
20thC  21stC  US_history  1960s  intellectual_history  cultural_history  technology  Internet  media  social_media  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Journal of Digital Information | Texas Digital Library
Publishing papers on the management, presentation and uses of information in digital environments, JoDI is a peer-reviewed Web journal supported by the University of Texas Libraries.First publishing papers in 1997, the Journal of Digital Information is an electronic-only, peer-reviewed journal covering the broad topics related to digital libraries, hypertext and hypermedia systems and digital repositories, and the issues of digital information. JoDI is supported by the University of Texas Libraries and Texas A&M University Libraries and hosted by the Texas Digital Library. 
Internet  digital_humanities  journal 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
Other Spaces for Spatial Hypertext | Kolb | Journal of Digital Information
Brilliant use of Newton, Leibniz, Aristotle concepts of space for computer and Web concept manipulation - features changes in Tinderbox over time
Internet  apps  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
interfluidity » Tradeoffs (not) - security vs privacy - June 2013
The stupidest framing of the controversy over ubiquitous surveillance is that it reflects a trade-off between “security” and “privacy”. We are putting in jeopardy values much, much more important than “privacy”.The value we are trading away, under the surveillance programs as presently constituted, are quality of governance. This is not a debate about privacy. It is a debate about corruption.

We did manage to reduce the malign influence of the J. Edgar Hoover security state, by placing institutional checks on what law enforcement and intelligence agencies could do, and by placing those agencies under more public and intrusive supervision. I think that much of our task today is devising a sufficient surveillance architecture for our surveillance architecture.
US_government  US_foreign_policy  US_politics  NSA  Internet  civil_liberties  governance  corruption  EF-add  from instapaper
july 2013 by dunnettreader
Bruce Schneier: Power and the Internet - Jan 2013
From Edge January 23, 2013
This essay appeared as a response to Edge's annual question, "What *Should* We Be Worried About?"
Internet  security  privacy  from instapaper
june 2013 by dunnettreader

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