dunnettreader + indian_religion   6

Jay Tolson, Return of the Repressed - review of Michael Walzer, The Paradox of Liberation: Secular Revolutions and Religious Counterrevolutions | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Yale University Press, 2015 -- The paradox explored in this short book, which grew out of the Henry L. Stimson lectures at Yale University, can be summed up in a single question: Why did so many states that gained independence in the post–World War II era and were founded on secular and democratic ideals soon face the powerful challenges of religious revivalism? Walzer’s inquiry into the inability of “the leaders and militants of secular liberation…to consolidate their achievements and reproduce themselves” focuses on three cases: Israel, where the secularist ideology of Labor Zionism now meets with powerful opposition from champions of a more messianic strain of Zionism as well as ultra-Orthodox Judaism; Algeria, where the secularist (and, briefly, democratic) ideals of the National Liberation Front have been repeatedly challenged and were nearly overturned by militant Islamists; and India, where the ambitious reform program of Jawaharlal Nehru’s Congress party has come up against the fervor and electoral successes of Hindu nationalists determined to assert their primacy within the constitutional order. -- behind paywall
books  kindle-available  reviews  paywall  political_history  20thC  post-colonial  nationalism  national_ID  national_origins  national_tale  politics-and-religion  secularism  secularization  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  opposition  modernity  modernization_theory  images-political  Israel  Islamist_fundamentalists  Judaism  Algeria  India  Indian_religion  Hinduism  right-wing  civil_liberties  civil_society  civility-political  tolerance  majoritarian  constitutionalism  post-WWII  religion-fundamentalism  elite_culture  elites-self-destructive  populism 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Bellah - The renouncers « The Immanent Frame - August 2008
This post is a condensed version of a keynote delivered at a conference "The Axial Age and its Consequences for Subsequent History and the Present" sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation in cooperation with Robert Bellah and Hans Joas. -- After discussing Habermas' theory of a legitimation crisis in the axial civilizations and the critique - political, moral and religious - of the key axial age figures whom he calls "the renouncers" -- The great utopias served for the renouncers as stark contrasts to the actual world, and their vision of that other world could be called “theory” in Plato’s sense. But the very distance they felt from the world to which they returned made possible another kind of “theory,” another kind of seeing—that is, a distant, critical view of the actual world in which they lived. The renouncer sees the world with new eyes: as Plato says of the ones who have returned to the cave, they see the shadows for what they are, not naively as do those who have never left. One could say that the ideological illusion is gone. Once disengaged vision becomes possible then theory can take another turn: it can abandon any moral stance at all and look simply at what will be useful, what can make the powerful and exploitative even more so. -- The axial age gave us “theory” in two senses, and neither of them has been unproblematic ever since. The great utopian visions have motivated some of the noblest achievements of mankind; they have also motivated some of the worst actions of human beings. Theory in the sense of disengaged knowing, inquiry for the sake of understanding, with or without moral evaluation, has brought its own kind of astounding achievements but also given humans the power to destroy their environment and themselves. Both kinds of theoria have criticized but also justified the class society that first came into conscious view in the axial age. They have provided the intellectual tools for efforts to reform and efforts to repress. It is a great heritage. ... It has given us the great tool of criticism. How will we use it? -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
sociology_of_religion  intellectual_history  religious_history  axial_age  cultural_critique  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Buddhism  Old_Testament  prophets  China  India  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Confuscianism  ancient_religions  Chinese_history  Plato  Plato-Republic  Aristotle  phronesis  utopian  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Christopher Bartley, review - Matthew R. Dasti and Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 16, 2014
Reviewed by Christopher Bartley, University of Liverpool -- This is a fine collection of learned essays replete with translations from primary sources, but a sense of frustration may be induced in the reader attracted by the book's title. Most of the contributors admit that the topics of free will, agency and selfhood as understood in the West today don't really have equivalents in the Indian traditions of thought and practice under consideration.
books  reviews  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Hinduism  Buddhism  Sanskrit  free_will  self  ontology  metaphysics  reincarnation  metempsychosis  emotions  desire  agency 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Michael Corrigan - The Metempsychotic Mind: Emerson and Consciousness | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 71, No. 3 (July 2010), pp. 433-455
Makes a case for Emerson taking metempsychosis seriously - a widespread interest in Indian religion combined with esotericism - unity of thought across Eastern and Western traditions, Neoplatonism etc - to deal with increased time dimension from geology and eventually Darwinism. Explains part of Nietzsche's attraction and eternal recurrence? Surveys recent literature on Emerson and the Transcendentals, how they're embraced by postmodernism. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  US  Emerson  idealism  metempsychosis  Indian_religion  esotericism  Neoplatonism  soul  consciousness  Hegelian  time  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader

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