dunnettreader + ir_theory   65

Richard Ned Lebow - Thucydides the Constructivist (2001) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
The most superficial level of Thucydides' history examines the destructive consequences of domestic and foreign policies framed outside the language of justice. His deeper political-philosophical aim was to explore the relationship between nomos (convention) and phusis (nature) and its implications for civilization. Thucydides concludes that nomos constructs identities and channels and restrains the behavior of individuals and societies. Speech and reason (logos) in turn make nomos possible because all conventions depend on shared meanings. The feedback loop between logoi (words) and ergoi (deeds) created Greek civilization but also the international and civil strife (stasis) associated with the Peloponnesian War. International security and civil order depend upon recovering the meanings of words and the conventions they enable. Thucydides should properly be considered a constructivist. -- Downloaded via iphone
ancient_Greece  article  constructivism  Thucydides  IR_theory  downloaded  ancient_history 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Mark Philp - Realism without Illusions (2012) | Political Theory - jstor
Political Theory, Vol. 40, No. 5 (October 2012), pp. 629-649
This essay engages critically with the recent emergence of "political realism" in political theory (centrally in the work of Raymond Geuss and Bernard Williams). While sympathetic to and convinced of the importance of the core of the enterprise which it identifies, the essay is critical of some of the claims made about the independence of politics from morality and the historically contingent character of political values, and suggests that realism may itself succumb to illusion. The final section sketches an account of the nature of evaluative judgment in the study of politics and, in conclusion, defends both the pluralist character of political theory and the pressing importance of the questions that realism raises and that are inadequately attended to by the bulk of post-war political theory.
Downloaded via Air
article  downloaded  political_philosophy  Geuss  Williams_Bernard  realism  IR_theory  moral_philosophy 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Dario Battistella - Raymond Aron, réaliste néoclassique | Érudit | Études internationales v43 n3 2012, p. 371-388 |
Institut d’études politiques de Bordeaux -- Successivement apprécié, critiqué, et oublié, Raymond Aron a toujours été difficile à classer au sein de la discipline des Relations internationales. Parmi les recensions récentes dont son oeuvre a fait l’objet, celle de Michael Doyle fait une proposition intéressante, en y voyant un réaliste constitutionnaliste. Notre contribution se propose d’approfondir cette piste en montrant qu’Aron est en fait un réaliste néoclassique avant la lettre. Après avoir rappelé les points communs qu’Aron partage avec le réalisme classique de Morgenthau et le néoréalisme de Waltz, cet article démontre les affinités à la fois ontologiques et épistémologiques entre l’internationaliste français et les réalistes néoclassiques nord-américains qui ignorent qu’ils ignorent Aron. -- dowloaded via Air
article  downloaded  intellectual_history  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  WWII  post-WWII  Cold_War  Aron_Raymond  IR  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  French_intellectuals  French_politics  French_history  Vichy  4th_Republic  5th_Republic  political_press  political_discourse 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Stacie Goddard & Daniel Nexon - An Agenda for the Study of the Dynamics of Global Power Politics (2016 forthcoming at the Journal of Global Security Studies) | Academia.edu
We call for a research program focused on the dynamics of global power politics. Rather than link realpolitik to structural-realist theoretical frameworks or the putatively anarchical character of world politics, the program treats power politics as an object of analysis in its own right. It embraces debate over the nature of global power politics among scholars working with distinctive approaches. It sees the structural contexts of power politics as highly variable and often hierarchical in character. It attenuates ex ante commitments to the centrality of states in global politics. And it takes for granted that actors deploy multiple resources and modalities of power in their pursuit of influence. What binds this diverse research program together is its focus on realpolitik as the politics of collective mobilization in the context of the struggle for influence among political communities, broadly understood. Thus, the study of the dynamics of collective mobilization—the causal and constitutive pathways linking efforts at mobilization with enhanced power—brings together approaches to security studies together in a shared study of power politics. -- downloaded via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
article  IR_theory  power-asymmetric  realpolitik  soft_power  international_society  competition-interstate  security_studies  diplomacy  power_politics  influence  hierarchy 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Duncan Bell - Reordering the World: Essays on Liberalism and Empire. (2016) | Princeton University Press
Reordering the World is a penetrating account of the complexity and contradictions found in liberal visions of empire. Focusing mainly on 19thC Britain—at the time the largest empire in history and a key incubator of liberal political thought— Bell sheds new light on some of the most important themes in modern imperial ideology. The book ranges widely across Victorian intellectual life and beyond. The opening essays explore the nature of liberalism, varieties of imperial ideology, the uses and abuses of ancient history, the imaginative functions of the monarchy, and fantasies of Anglo-Saxon global domination. They are followed by illuminating studies of prominent thinkers, including J. A. Hobson, L. T. Hobhouse, John Stuart Mill, Henry Sidgwick, Herbert Spencer, and J. R. Seeley. While insisting that liberal attitudes to empire were multiple and varied, Bell emphasizes the liberal fascination with settler colonialism. It was in the settler empire that many liberal imperialists found the place of their political dreams. -- Duncan Bell is Reader in Political Thought and International Relations at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Christ's College. His books include The Idea of Greater Britain: Empire and the Future of World Order, 1860–1900 (Princeton). Intro downloaded to Tab
books  kindle-available  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_Empire-military  liberalism  IR_theory  colonial_governance  settler_colonies  imperialism  intellectual_history  competition-interstate  uses_of_history  national_origins  Anglo-Saxons  Mill  Sidgwick  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  imperialism-critique  monarchy  hegemony 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Poul F. Kjaer - The Function of Justification in Transnational Governance (2015) | Academia.edu
WZB Berlin Social Science Center Discussion Papers, SP IV 2015-808, 2015 - Developing a sociological informed social theory perspective, this article asks the question why social praxis’ of justification has moved to the centre-stage within the debate on transnational ordering. In contrast to perspectives which see the relationship between national and transnational forms or ordering as characterised by a zero-sum game, the coevolutionary and mutually reinforcing relationship between national and transnational forms of ordering is emphasised. It is, moreover, argued that this complementarity can be traced back to the fundamentally different function and position of national and transnational forms of ordering in world society. The widespread attempt to analyse transnational developments on the basis of concepts of law and the political which emerged in national contexts are therefore seen as problematic. Instead context adequate concepts of transnational law and politics are needed. It is on this background, that a discourse on justification has emerged in relation to transnational settings. Transnational justificatory praxis’ can be understood as functional equivalents to democracy in transnational settings in so far as both can be understood as reflexivity increasing instruments. The central difference is, however, that democratic frameworks implies an ex ante form of the political in contrast to the ex post emphasis of justificatory praxis’. In addition, law gains a central role as the framework through which justificatory praxis’ are structured in transnational settings. - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  Academia.edu  downloaded  sociology_of_law  political_sociology  nation-state  transnational_power  transnational_law  nation-state_decline  state-transnatiinal_relations  supranational_institutions  legitimacy  legitimacy-international  justice  democracy_deficit  political_participation  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  global_governance  regulation-harmonization  regulatory_avoidance  civil_society  NGOs  government-forms  government-roles  international_law  international_political_economy  MNCs 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
John Dunn, ed. - The Economic Limits to Modern Politics (1992) | Cambridge University Press
The central problem of modern government and political action is how to choose and implement effective economic policies. For this reason, the economic considerations of public policy have assumed a more prominent place in contemporary political thought. Despite efforts among political scientists, economists, and sociologists to fathom the complexities of this added dimension, none of these solid sciences offers a satisfying approach to the problem. This volume attempts to display the historical novelty and intellectual importance of this dilemma, to uncover its origins, and to procure a remedy through a clearer and steadier focus. The book's contributors range from historians of ideas to economic theorists, who bring the approach of their own intellectual discipline to bear upon the issue. **--** Introduction, John Dunn *-* 1. The economic limits to modern politics, John Dunn *-* 2. The wealth of one nation and the dynamics of international competition, Istvan Hont *-* 3. The political limits to pre-modern politics, J. G. A. Pocock *-* 4. The economic constraints on political programs, Frank H. Hahn *-* 5. International liberalism reconsidered, Robert O. Keohane *-* 6. Capitalism, socialism, and democracy: compatibilities and contradictions John Dunn. -- ebook Adobe Reader - not clear whether in kindle format -- excerpt (10 ogs Intro) downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  economic_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  capitalism  competition-interstate  economic_growth  development  raison-d'-état  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  trade  trade-policy  Great_Divergence  economic_theory  political_culture  economic_culture  macroeconomic_policy  Innovation  innovation-government_policy  collective_action  property_rights  Labor_markets  redistribution  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  Davenant  Smith  social_order  social_democracy  liberalism  elites-political_influence  IR_theory  globalization  international_political_economy  public_finance  public_goods  class_conflict  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jean-Pierre Bois - Le concert des Nations au XIXe siècle sous le regard d'un historien moderniste (lecture audio) | Canal Académie (2013)
L’objectif de la guerre est de faire la paix rappelle Jean-Pierre Bois, professeur émérite d’histoire moderne. Loin d’une histoire des différents congrès diplomatiques qui ont ponctué le XIXe siècle, l’historien propose de situer ce qu’on appelle "Le concert des nations", expression passée dans le langage courant au XIXe siècle dans un champ historique plus large. -- L’Académie des sciences morales et politiques, à l’initiative de l’académicien Jean Baechler, a organisé un colloque international sur le Thème de la Guerre et de la société. Une vingtaine de participants se sont réunis autour du thème spécifique, cette année, de « la Guerre et de la politique », le premier volet d’une démarche scientifique interdisciplinaire qui durera trois ans.-- la retransmission de la communication de Jean-Pierre Bois, Professeur à l’Université de Nantes..--Jean-Pierre Bois est professeur émérite d'histoire moderne du Centre de Recherches en Histoire Internationale Atlantique (CRHIA. Il a reçu en 2012 le prix Drouyn de Lhuys pour son ouvrage La Paix, histoire politique et militaire.
audio  lecture  19thC  Concert_of_Europe  balance_of_power  IR  IR_theory  military_history  diplomatic_history  diplomacy  IR-domestic_politics  international_system  geopolitics  Great_Powers 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Oscar Widerberg and Philipp Pattberg - International Cooperative Initiatives in Global Climate Governance: Raising the Ambition Level or Delegitimizing the UNFCCC? (2014) | Global Policy Journal - Wiley Online Library
To close the gap between existing country pledges and the necessary ambition level to limit anthropogenic climate change to not more than 2°C average global temperature increase above pre-industrial levels, decision makers from both the public and private domain have started to explore a number of complementary approaches to the top-down targets-and-timetables approach of international climate change policy. Referred to as International Cooperative Initiatives (ICI), these governance arrangements are now also officially acknowledged under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Durban Platform for Enhanced Action. While proponents see ICIs as important bridging devices towards more ambitious climate policy, in particular up to 2020, critical observers note that the voluntary nature of ICIs makes it difficult to assess their contribution to climate change mitigation. This article scrutinizes the potential of ICIs to meaningfully contribute to closing the emissions gap along the criteria of effectiveness, legitimacy and institutional fit. As means of illustration, the analytical framework is applied to a random sample of nine ICIs (out of a total of 45 listed on the UNFCCC Secretariat's website). We find that while potential technical effectiveness is high, legitimacy and institutional fit should be improved with a view towards integrating ICIs into the emerging post-2015 climate governance architecture. -- Wiley available free -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  global_governance  IR_theory  climate  international_organizations  international_law  bilateral_agreements  United_Nations  legitimacy-international  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Jennifer Pitts, review - Isaac Nakhimovsky, The Closed Commercial State: Perpetual Peace and Commercial Society from Rousseau to Fichte | Perspectives on Politics, March 2013 on Isaac Nakhimovsky - Academia.edu
This book presents an important new account of Johann Gottlieb Fichte's Closed Commercial State, a major early nineteenth-century development of Rousseau and Kant's political thought. Isaac Nakhimovsky shows how Fichte reformulated Rousseau's constitutional politics and radicalized the economic implications of Kant's social contract theory with his defense of the right to work. Nakhimovsky argues that Fichte's sequel to Rousseau and Kant's writings on perpetual peace represents a pivotal moment in the intellectual history of the pacification of the West. Fichte claimed that Europe could not transform itself into a peaceful federation of constitutional republics unless economic life could be disentangled from the competitive dynamics of relations between states, and he asserted that this disentanglement required transitioning to a planned and largely self-sufficient national economy, made possible by a radical monetary policy. Fichte's ideas have resurfaced with nearly every crisis of globalization from the Napoleonic wars to the present, and his book remains a uniquely systematic and complete discussion of what John Maynard Keynes later termed "national self-sufficiency." Fichte's provocative contribution to the social contract tradition reminds us, Nakhimovsky concludes, that the combination of a liberal theory of the state with an open economy and international system is a much more contingent and precarious outcome than many recent theorists have tended to assume. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  commerce  IR_theory  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  luxury  trade-policy  protectionism  import_substitution  monetary_policy  French_Revolution  Rousseau  Kant  Fichte  civil_society  civil_liberties  rights-political  perpetual_peace  competition-interstate  free_trade  globalization  imperialism  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Frederick Neuhouser, review - Isaac Nakhimovsky, The Closed Commercial State: Perpetual Peace and Commercial Society from Rousseau to Fichte | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - Nov 2011
Frederick Neuhouser, Barnard College -- Isaac Nakhimovsky has accomplished what I had thought to be impossible: he has made Fichte's The Closed Commercial State (1800) into an interesting text. By carefully situating this long-neglected work within its historical and philosophical context, Nakhimovsky enables us to see it as more than a misguided attempt by a major philosopher to address the political issues of his day by inventing a utopian vision of the free republic so obviously fantastic that it was widely dismissed as such by most of Fichte's own contemporaries. To his credit, Nakhimovsky does not deny the silliness of many of the details of that vision. What he shows, however, is the urgency -- and, more importantly, the continuing relevance -- of the central problem that Fichte's text attempts to solve: how to reconcile a Rousseauean ideal of free citizenship with the realities of modern "commercial" societies (marked, in Fichte's time, by a decline in agriculture in favor of industry and a rapidly increasing division of labor). Since the principal conflict here is the threat posed by international trade relations to the freedom and economic well-being of the citizens of republics enmeshed in those relations, it is not difficult (with Nakhimovsky's assistance) to see this seemingly most untimely of texts as addressing what is merely an earlier version of the same conflict that stands, even today, at the center of Europe's woes. One of the great strengths of Nakhimovsky's book is that it treats The Closed Commercial State as standing in a long line of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century texts that debate the implications for international peace of what we would call "globalized" commerce. (Kant's Perpetual Peace [1795] is the best known of these texts, it merely continues a much longer tradition that includes works by Fenélon, l'Abbé de Saint-Pierre, Rousseau, Sieyès, and many others.) -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  commerce  IR_theory  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  luxury  trade-policy  protectionism  import_substitution  monetary_policy  French_Revolution  Rousseau  Kant  Fichte  civil_society  civil_liberties  rights-political  perpetual_peace  competition-interstate  free_trade  globalization  imperialism  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Liggio, Leonard P. "Richard Cantillon and the French Economists: Distinctive French Contributions to J.B. Say." - The Journal of Libertarian Studies ( 1985) | Mises Institute
Liggio, Leonard P. "Richard Cantillon and the French Economists: Distinctive French Contributions to J.B. Say." Journal of Libertarian Studies 7, No. 2 (1985): 295–304. Richard Cantillon's life and his Essai occurred at a time of transition in European political, economic and intellectual history. The late seventeenth century had experienced the crisis in European thought which paralleled the Scientific Revolution. Accompanying the scientific revolution was a revolution in economic thought. Criticisms of mercantilism began to lay the groundwork for the Economic Revolution of the eighteenth century. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Cantillon  Scientific_Revolution  social_theory  political_economy  IR_theory  mercantilism  economic_theory  economic_growth  methodology-quantitative  political_arithmetick  social_order  financial_system  banking  cross-border  capital_flows  capital_markets  sovereignty  sovereign_debt  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Kelley Vlahos - A Blackwater World Order | The American Conservative - Feb 2015
...a recent examination by Sean McFate, a former Army paratrooper who later served in Africa working for Dyncorp International and is now an associate professor at the National Defense University, suggests that the Pentagon’s dependence on contractors to help wage its wars has unleashed a new era of warfare in which a multitude of freshly founded private military companies are meeting the demand of an exploding global market for conflict. “Now that the United States has opened the Pandora’s Box of mercenarianism,” McFate writes in The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What they Mean for World Order, “private warriors of all stripes are coming out of the shadows to engage in for-profit warfare.” It is a menacing thought. McFate said this coincides with what he and others have called a current shift from global dominance by nation-state power to a “polycentric” environment in which state authority competes with transnational corporations, global governing bodies, non-governmental organizations (NGO’s), regional and ethnic interests, and terror organizations in the chess game of international relations. New access to professional private arms, McFate further argues, has cut into the traditional states’ monopoly on force, and hastened the dawn of this new era. McFate calls it neomedievalism, the “non-state-centric and multipolar world order characterized by overlapping authorities and allegiances.” States will not disappear, “but they will matter less than they did a century ago.” - copied to Pocket
books  global_system  global_governance  IR  IR_theory  military_history  Europe-Early_Modern  nation-state  transnational_elites  privatization  MNCs  NGOs  civil_wars  international_system  international_law  mercenaries  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Pentagon  Afghanistan  warfare-irregular  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  Pocket 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Anna Plassart - The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution (to be released April 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Historians of ideas have traditionally discussed the significance of the French Revolution through the prism of several major interpretations, including the commentaries of Burke, Tocqueville and Marx. This book argues that the Scottish Enlightenment offered an alternative and equally powerful interpretative framework for the Revolution, which focused on the transformation of the polite, civilised moeurs that had defined the 'modernity' analysed by Hume and Smith in the 18thC. The Scots observed what they understood as a military- and democracy-led transformation of European modern morals and concluded that the real historical significance of the Revolution lay in the transformation of warfare, national feelings and relations between states, war and commerce that characterised the post-revolutionary international order. This book recovers the Scottish philosophers' powerful discussion of the nature of post-revolutionary modernity and shows that it is essential to our understanding of 19thC political thought. **--** Part I. The Burke–Paine Debate and Scotland's Science of Man: 1. The Burke–Paine debate and the Scottish Enlightenment *-* 2. The heritage of Hume and Smith: Scotland's science of man and politics **--** Part II. The 1790s: 3. Scotland's political debate *-* 4. James Mackintosh and Scottish philosophical history *-* 5. John Millar and the Scottish discussion on war, modern sociability and national sentiment *-* 6. Adam Ferguson on democracy and empire **--** Part III. 1802–15: 7. The French Revolution and the Edinburgh Review *-* 8. Commerce, war and empire
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Smith  Hume  Hume-politics  civil_society  civilizing_process  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  IR_theory  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  nationalism  national_ID  historiography-18thC  historiography-Whig  military  Military_Revolution  mass_culture  levée_en_masse  conscription  sociability  social_order  empires  empire-and_business  imperialism  Great_Powers  balance_of_power  philosophy_of_history  progress  social_theory  change-social  change-economic  Burke  Paine  Mackintosh_James  Millar_John  Edinburgh_Review  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Scottish_politics  1790s  1800s  1810s  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  democracy  morality-conventional  norms  global_economy  mercantilism 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
NICOLAS GUILHOT - THE FIRST MODERN REALIST: FELIX GILBERT'S MACHIAVELLI AND THE REALIST TRADITION IN INTERNATIONAL THOUGHT | Modern Intellectual History (Feb 2015) - Cambridge Journals Online
Centre national de la recherche scientifique, New York University E-mail: nicolas.guilhot@nyu.edu -- In the disciplines of political science and international relations, Machiavelli is unanimously considered to be “the first modern realist.” This essay argues that the idea of a realist tradition going from the Renaissance to postwar realism founders when one considers the disrepute of Machiavelli among early international relations theorists. It suggests that the transformation of Machiavelli into a realist thinker took place subsequently, when new historical scholarship, informed by strategic and political considerations related to the transformation of the US into a global power, generated a new picture of the Renaissance. Focusing on the work of Felix Gilbert, and in particular his Machiavelli and Guicciardini, the essay shows how this new interpretation of Machiavelli was shaped by the crisis of the 1930s, the emergence of security studies, and the philanthropic sponsorship of international relations theory. -- * I would like to thank Samuel Moyn and three anonymous reviewers for their comments on a prior version of this paper. I greatly benefited from discussions with Volker Berghahn, Anthony Molho, and Jacques Revel. -- paywall
article  paywall  find  libraries  IR_theory  intellectual_history  IR-realism  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  strategic_studies  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guicciardini  historiography-postWWII  US_foreign_policy  hegemony  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc BELISSA - REPENSER L'ORDRE EUROPÉEN (1795-1802). DE LA SOCIÉTÉ DES ROIS AUX DROITS DES NATIONS | JSTOR: Annales historiques de la Révolution française, No. 343 (Janvier/Mars 2006), pp. 163-166
Brief summary of thesis defended 2005, l'Université Paris I Sorbonne - surprise, surprise, Lucien Bély on his committee with the notion of the 18thC as the last stage of the société des princes and the French Revolution forcing the end of the dynastic wars -- though focus is on the period of the Directoire and Napoleon up through Amiens, he places it in the context of the European dynastic system as structured by the Peace of Utrecht -- highlights an interdisciplinary approach -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  thesis  18thC  1790s  1800s  Europe  Europe-19thC  balance_of_power  French_Revolution  IR  IR_theory  Westphalia  sovereignty  dynasties  nation-state  diplomatic_history  political_culture  counter-revolution  Jacobins  republicanism  Europe-federalism  Peace_of_Utrecht  société_des_princes  national_interest  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  France  French_politics  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Directoire  monarchy  social_order  legal_system  international_law  international_system  natural_law  citizenship  subjects  property  elites  political_economy  economic_culture  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Hilde Eliassen Restad - Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 53-76
Most writers agree that domestic ideas about what kind of country the United States is affect its foreign policy. In the United States, this predominant idea is American exceptionalism, which in turn is used to explain US foreign policy traditions over time. This article argues that the predominant definition of American exceptionalism, and the way it is used to explain US foreign policy in political science, relies on outdated scholarship within history. It betrays a largely superficial understanding of American exceptionalism as an American identity. This article aims to clarify the definition of American exceptionalism, arguing that it should be retained as a definition of American identity. Furthermore, it couples American exceptionalism and US foreign policy differently than what is found in most political science literature. It concludes that American exceptionalism is a useful tool in understanding US foreign policy, if properly defined. -- extensive bibliography of both historians and IR theorists -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  US_history  American_Revolution  American_colonies  Puritans  American_exceptionalism  national_ID  nation-state  US_foreign_policy  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  IR  Founders  Manifest_Destiny  multilateralism  international_law  Jefferson  imperialism  republicanism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Nitzan - Global Capital: Political Economy of Capitalist Power (YorkU, Graduate Seminar, Fall Term, 2014-15) | bnarchives
The seminar has two related goals: substantive and pedagogical. The substantive purpose is to tackle the question of capital head on. The course explores a spectrum of liberal and Marxist theories, ideologies and dogmas – as well as a radical alternative to these views. The argument is developed theoretically, historically and empirically. The first part of the seminar provides a critical overview of political economy, examining its historical emergence, triumph and eventual demise. The second part deals with the two ‘materialistic’ schools of capital – the liberal theory of utility and the Marxist theory of labour time – dissecting their structure, strengths and limitations. The third part brings power back in: it analyses the relation between accumulation and sabotage, studies the institutions of the corporation and the state and introduces a new framework – the capitalist mode of power. The final part offers an alternative approach – the theory of capital as power – and illustrates how this approach can shed light on conflict-ridden processes such as corporate merger, stagflation, imperialism and Middle East wars. Pedagogically, the seminar seeks to prepare students toward conducting their own independent re-search. Students are introduced to various electronic data sources, instructed in different methods of analysis and tutored in developing their empirical research skills. As the seminar progresses, these skills are used both to assess various theories and to develop the students’ own theoretical/empirical research projects. -- Keywords: arms accumulation capital capitalism conflict corporation crisis distribution elite energy finance globalization growth imperialism GPE liberalism Marxism military Mumford national interest neoclassical neoliberalism oil ownership peace power profit ruling class security stagflation state stock market technology TNC Veblen violence war -- syllabus and session handouts downloaded pdf to Note
bibliography  syllabus  capital_as_power  international_political_economy  political_economy  economic_theory  liberalism  neoliberalism  neoclassical_economics  Keynesian  Marxist  capital  capitalism  social_theory  power-asymmetric  globalization  financial_system  financial_regulation  risk-systemic  international_finance  finance_capital  financialization  production  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  inequality  MNCs  corporations  corporate_finance  corporate_ownership  corporate_control_markets  economic_growth  economic_models  imperialism  military  military-industrial_complex  IR_theory  ruling_class  class_conflict  energy  energy-markets  MENA  accumulation  accumulation-differential  capital_markets  public_finance  profit  investment  technology  elite_culture  elites-self-destructive  capitalism-systemic_crisis  Veblen  Mumford  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Dan Ward -Outrageous Waste—America’s Secret Strategy for Military Deterrence — War Is Boring - April 2014 — Medium
If BLOAT isn't our strategy it *should* be -- What if we spend decades and billions on cancelled and troubled projects, creating the appearance of difficulty and incompetence, in order to deceive our enemies and dissuade them from building advanced jets, tanks and ships? Making the unaffordable status quo appear inevitable creates a strong disincentive to hostile actors, so there is a genuine national benefit to convincing the world advanced weapon systems cannot be built in less than 25 years, even if we could actually do it in 18 months. I like to think this brilliant strategy has a cool codename like Operation BLOAT, short for Budgets Limit Opponent’s Acquisition of Technology. If BLOAT is real—and I hope it is—it explains why Allied pilots never had to engage Taliban pilots in dogfights over Afghanistan and why Al Qaeda never built a fleet of stealth bombers and submarines. In fact, Operation BLOAT ensures the U.S. military will never again face a Soviet-size opponent equipped with a full set of tanks, jets and ships. Any large nation who tries to follow America’s example will have great trouble fielding new gear, particularly if they steal our designs and try to build knock-offs. Meanwhile, smaller nations and assorted terrorist groups won’t even try in the first place.
US_government  US_foreign_policy  military  military-industrial_complex  IR_theory  strategy 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - THE RESILIENCY OF THE NATION-STATE IN SCHOLARSHIP AND IN FACT | JSTOR: Review (Fernand Braudel Center), Vol. 34, No. 3, 2011
Introduction: "Globalization" and the Nation-State in the Modern World-System (pp. 253-258) - Denis O'Hearn and Thomas M. Wilson. *--* Nationalism in a Post-Hegemonic Era (pp. 259-283) - Richard Lachmann. *--* The State of States in International Organizations: From the WHO to the Global Fund (pp. 285-310) - Nitsan Chorev, Tatiana Andia Rey and David Ciplet. *--* On the Study of Social Optics: Foucault, Counter-Surveillance, and the Political Underground in Northern Peru (pp. 311-331) - David Nugent -- lots of interesting bibliography
article  journal  jstor  20thC  21stC  economic_history  political_history  political_economy  international_political_economy  cultural_history  globalization  global_governance  global_economy  global_system  global_history  social_theory  political_sociology  political_culture  political_nation  nation-state  national_ID  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  international_finance  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  hegemony  Foucault  IFIs  world_systems  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jan-Hendrik Passoth and Nicholas Rowland - Who is acting in International Relations? | Nicholas Rowland - Academia.edu
Chapter draft for edited book - post-humanism or post-anthropology? Extensive footnotes to these post Foucault, Latour, etc trends -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  IR_theory  social_theory  unit_of_analysis  agency-structure  organizations  Actor_Network_Theory  human_nature  bibliography  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jan-Hendrik Passoth and Nicholas J. Rowland -- Actor-Network State: Integrating Actor-Network Theory and State Theory | Nicholas Rowland - Academia.edu
Jan-Hendrik Passoth, University of Bielefeld - Nicholas J. Rowland, Pennsylvania State University -- doi: 10.1177/0268580909351325 International Sociology November 2010 vol. 25 no. 6 818-841 -- This conceptual article draws on literature in the sociology of science on modelling. The authors suggest that if state theory can be conceptualized as an ‘engine’ rather than merely a ‘camera’, in that policy is mobilized to make the world fit the theory, then this has implications for conceptualizing states. To examine this possibility the authors look through the lens of actor-network theory (ANT) and in doing so articulate a relationship between two models of the state in the literature. They find that an ‘actor model’ of the state is accepted by many scholars, few of whom develop ‘network models’ of the state. In response, this study introduces an actor-network model and proposes that its contribution to state theory is in rethinking the character of modern states to be the outcome of actually performed assemblages of all those practices of building it, protecting it, governing it and theorizing about it. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  academia  Actor_Network_Theory  social_theory  political_sociology  political_science  nation-state  IR_theory  modelling  networks-policy  networks-political  sovereignty  unit_of_analysis  agency-structure  organizations  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Historical, Political, and Diplomatic Writings of Niccolo Machiavelli, Vol. 1. (Life of Machiavelli, History of Florence), tr. from the Italian, by Christian E. Detmold (Boston, J. R. Osgood and company, 1882). - Online Library of
<http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/774> - Volume 1 of a 4 volume set of Machiavelli’s writings which contains a lengthy introduction on the life of Machiavelli, the History of Florence, The Prince, Discourses on Livy, and his letters and papers from his time as a diplomat. This volume contains his famous History of Florence. - life and historical context based especially on 19thC Italian historiography -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Machiavelli  Italy  Florence  Italian_Wars  Papacy  France  Louis_XI  nation-state  state-building  military_history  militia  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercenaires  diplomatic_history  IR_theory  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius -- The Enhanced Edition of "The Rights of War and Peace" (1625) [etext edition 2014] - Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Enhanced Edition of The Rights of War and Peace (1625) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2014). 08/28/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2637> -- This “Enhanced Edition” of Grotius’s famous work on the law of war does not contain the entire text of the Rights of War and Peace as it a very long 3 volume work. It comprises some Supplemantary Material including two introductions to different editions of his book, a biographical essay by his 18th century translator (Barbeyrac), and the “Liberty Matters” online discussion forum on Grotius’s views. This is followed by Grotius’s “Preliminary Discourse” on natural law and a selection of chapters from the book which deal with the nature of war, when it is just to go to war, when it is unjust to go war, and how war might be moderated once it has been declared. This Enhanced Edition is only available in PDF, epub, and Kindle ebook formats -- Liberty Fund's edition is based upon that of the Jean Barbeyrac and also includes the "Prolegomena" to the first edition of Rights of War and Peace (1625); and an Introduction by the historian of political thought Richard Tuck.
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  17thC  intellectual_history  natural_law  IR_theory  legal_theory  legal_history  international_law  natural_rights  political_philosophy  just_war  Barbeyrac 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Burke - Metahistory: before and after | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue : Hayden White’s " Metahistory " 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
This article tries to place Hayden White's Metahistory between two trends: one before and one after 1973. The first is the trend towards studying the rhetoric of history: a trend that goes back to classical antiquity itself, was revived at the Renaissance and – following the moment of positivism – enjoyed a second revival in the age of the linguistic turn. The second trend, after 1973, is essentially the story of responses to White's book, whether negative or positive. Particular emphasis is given to attempts to extend his rhetorical analysis to more historians or to utilize his approach in other disciplines, among them anthropology, geography and international relations. -- Peter Burke is Emeritus Professor of Cultural History, University of Cambridge, and Fellow of Emmanuel College. He began his studies of the history of historiography at Oxford in 1961, under the supervision of Hugh Trevor-Roper, and is the author of studies ranging from The Renaissance Sense of the Past (1969) to The French Historical Revolution (1990).
article  paywall  intellectual_history  historiography  post-WWII  rhetoric-writing  narrative  linguistic_turn  constructivism  social_sciences-post-WWII  anthropology  geography  IR_theory  social_theory 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Liberty Matters Nos. 1-10 (Jan. 2013 – July 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
David M. Hart, The Collected Liberty Matters: Nos. 1-10 (Jan. 2013 – July 2014), ed. David M. Hart and Sheldon Richman (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2014). 08/23/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2629> -- This volume is a collection of the first ten “Liberty Matters” online discussion forums which began in January 2013 and have appeared every two months since. The discussions have focused on authors whose work is well represented in the Online Library of Liberty. A leading scholar is asked to write an interpretative essay about a chosen author, to which other invited scholars respond in a formal essay which is then followed by a free form discussion over the ensuing month. The topics have included “John Locke on Property”, “James Buchanan: An Assessment”, “Gustave de Molinari’s Legacy for Liberty”, “Bastiat and Political Economy”, “George Smith on the System of Liberty”, “Arthur Seldon and the Institute of Economic Affairs”, “Ludwig von Mises’s The Theory of Money and Credit at 101”, “Hugo Grotius on War and the State”, “Tocqueville’s New Science of Politics Revisited”, and “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas”.
books  etexts  downloaded  political_philosophy  political_economy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  liberalism  liberty  IR_theory  Grotius  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  Mises  Buchanan  public_choice  Tocqueville  Bastiat  McCloskey  virtue_ethics  bourgeoisie  property  property_rights  libertarianism  liberty-negative  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Ford, Jane (2013) Vampiric enterprise: metaphors of economic exploitation in the literature and culture of the fin de siecle. PhD thesis, University of Portsmouth.
This thesis is about the complex network of metaphors that emerged around late 19thC conceptions of economic self-interest — predatory, conflictual and exploitative basis of relations between nations, institutions, sexes and people in an outwardly belligerent fin-de-siècle economy. This thesis is about the vampire, cannibal and related genera of economic metaphor which penetrate many of the major discourses of the period. In chapters that examine socialist fiction and newspapers; the imperial quest romance; inter-personal intimacies in the writing of Henry James and Vernon Lee; and the Catholic novels of Lucas Malet, I assess the breadth and variety of these metaphors, and consider how they filter the concept of the conflictual ‘economic man’ . The thesis builds on Maggie Kilgour’s "From communion to cannibalism: an anatomy of metaphors of incorporation" (1990), which traces the genealogy – in literature from Homer to Melville – of what she terms ‘metaphors of incorporation’. These are metaphors that originate from a inside-outside binary and involve the assimilation or incorporation of an external reality. Kilgour attempts to demonstrate that with the increasing isolation of the modern individual .. acts of ‘incorporation’ previously imagined as symbiotic, were later conceived as cannibalistic. --However, deploying a combination of historicist and, at times, Post-Structuralist approaches, this thesis demonstrates that these metaphors refuse to accommodate themselves to a simple unified vision of the kind advanced by Kilgour. I map the complexities of these metaphors, explaining how they originate from divergent teleological impulses and how they articulate both simple ideological operations, and more complex feelings of ambivalence about economic realities in the cultural moment of the Victorian fin-de-siècle.
thesis  cultural_history  literary_history  social_history  political_history  IR_theory  IR  19thC  Fin-de-Siècle  20thC  political_economy  political_press  fiction  novels  James_Henry  laisser-faire  domination  imperialism  homo_economicus  socialism  class_conflict  individualism  alienation  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
KATRINA FORRESTER -- CITIZENSHIP, WAR, AND THE ORIGINS OF INTERNATIONAL ETHICS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, 1960–1975 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 773-801. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
KATRINA FORRESTER - St John's College, Cambridge -- This article examines a series of debates about civil disobedience, conscription, and the justice of war that took place among American liberal philosophers, lawyers, and activists during the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. It argues that these debates fundamentally reshaped American political philosophy, by shifting the focus from the welfare state to the realm of international politics. In order to chart this transition from the domestic to the international, this article focuses on the writings of two influential political theorists, John Rawls and Michael Walzer. The turn to international politics in American political philosophy has its origins, in part, in their arguments about domestic citizenship. In tracing these origins, this article situates academic philosophical arguments alongside debates among the American public at large. It offers a first account of the history of analytical political philosophy during the 1960s and 1970s, and argues that the role played by the Vietnam War in this history, though underappreciated, is significant. -* I would like to thank Duncan Bell, Kenzie Bok, Christopher Brooke, Adam Lebowitz, Peter Mandler, Jamie Martin, Samuel Moyn, Andrew Preston, David Runciman, Tim Shenk, Brandon Terry, Mira Siegelberg, Joshua Specht, and two anonymous reviewers for their comments
article  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  20thC  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  post-WWII  Vietnam_War  citizenship  civil_liberties  IR-liberalism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  liberalism  Rawls  Walzer  power  power-asymmetric  justice  welfare_state  just_war  moral_philosophy  US_government  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - A Religious View of the Foundations of International Law (2011) :: SSRN - Charles E. Test Lectures in the James Madison Program at Princeton University
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-29 -- Lecture 1 begins from a specifically Christian point of view, though it also addresses the difficulties of sustaining a viewpoint of this kind in a multi-faith and indeed increasingly secular world. Lecture 2 considers nationhood, sovereignty, and the basis for the division of the world into separate political communities. A religious approach to international order will endorse the position of most modern international jurists that sovereign independence is not to be made into an idol or a fetish, and that the tasks of order and peace in the world are not to be conceived as optional for sovereigns. But sovereigns also have their own mission, ordering particular communities of men and women. Lecture 3 considers the rival claims of natural law and positivism regarding sources of international law. The most telling part of natural law jurisprudence from Aquinas to Finnis has always been its insistence on the specific human need for positive law. This holds true in the international realm as much as in any realm of human order - perhaps more so, because law has to do its work unsupported by the overwhelming power of a particular state. Lecture 3 addresses, from a religious point of view, the sources of law in the international realm: treaty, convention, custom, precedent, and jurisprudence. It will focus particularly on the sanctification of treaties. -- No of Pages : 73 -- Keywords: customary international law, international law, ius cogens, nationalism, natural law, positivism, public reason, religion, self-determination, sovereignty, treaties -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  international_law  natural_law  positivism-legal  IR  IR_theory  diplomacy  international_organizations  legal_system  international_system  sovereignty  nation-state  nationalism  public_sphere  liberalism-public_reason  deliberation-public  decision_theory  customary_law  self-determination  national_interest  national_security  responsibility_to_protect  treaties  universalism  precedent  conflict_of_laws  dispute_resolution  human_rights  community  trust  alliances  politics-and-religion  jurisprudence  jurisdiction  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - What is Natural Law Like? (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-27 -- “The State of Nature,” said John Locke, “has a Law of Nature to govern it, which obliges every one.” But what is “a law of nature”? How would we tell, in a state of nature, that there was a natural law as opposed to something else...? What form should we expect natural law to take in our apprehension of it? This paper argues three things. (a) John Finnis’s work on natural law provides no answer to these questions; his “theory of natural law” is really just a theory of the necessary basis in ethics for evaluating positive law. (b) We need an answer to the question “What is natural law like” not just to evaluate the work of state-of-nature theorists like Locke, but also to explore the possibility that natural law might once have played the role now played by positive international law in regulating relations between sovereigns. And (c), an affirmative account of what natural law is like must pay attention to (1) its deontic character; (2) its enforceability; (3) the ancillary principles that have to be associated with its main normative requirements if it is to be operate as a system of law; (4) its separability ...from ethics and morality, even from objective ethics and morality; and (5) the shared recognition on earth of its presence in the world. Some of these points — especially 3, 4, and 5 — sound like characteristics of positive law. But the paper argues that they are necessary nevertheless if it is going to be plausible to say that natural law has ever operated (or does still operate) as law in the world. -- Number of Pages: 21 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  IR  IR_theory  international_law  international_system  sovereignty  natural_law  positive_law  norms  Aquinas  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  state-of-nature  enforcement  legal_validity  Finnis  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea (Hakluyt trans.) with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage - Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea, trans. Richard Hakluyt, with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2004). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/859> -- Grotius’s influential argument in favor of freedom of navigation, trade, and fishing in Richard Hakluyt’s translation. The book also contains William Welwod’s critque and Grotius’s reply to Welwod. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  international_political_economy  IR_theory  international_law  international_system  sovereignty  maritime_history  exploration  trade  trading_companies  colonialism  piracy  shipping  Dutch  British_history  British_Empire  fishing  free_trade  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius, The Rights of War and Peace (2005, Richard Tuck ed.) vol. 2 (Book II) - from the Edition by Jean Barbeyrac - Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Rights of War and Peace, edited and with an Introduction by Richard Tuck, from the Edition by Jean Barbeyrac (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). Vol. 2. 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1947> -- Grotius’s Rights of War and Peace is a classic of modern public international law which lays the foundation for a universal code of law and which strongly defends the rights of individual agents – states as well as private persons – to use their power to secure themselves and their property. This edition is based upon that of the eighteenth-century French editor Jean Barbeyrac and also includes the Prolegomena to the first edition of Rights of War and Peace (1625); this document has never before been translated into English and adds new dimensions to the great work. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  natural_law  international_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  natural_rights  IR_theory  trade  just_war  property  property_rights  conquest  Grotius  Barbeyrac  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius, The Rights of War and Peace (2005, Richard Tuck ed.) vol. 3 (Book III) - from the Edition by Jean Barbeyrac | Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Rights of War and Peace, edited and with an Introduction by Richard Tuck, from the Edition by Jean Barbeyrac (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). Vol. 3. 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1427> -- Grotius’s Rights of War and Peace is a classic of modern public international law which lays the foundation for a universal code of law and which strongly defends the rights of individual agents – states as well as private persons – to use their power to secure themselves and their property. This edition is based upon that of the eighteenth-century French editor Jean Barbeyrac and also includes the Prolegomena to the first edition of Rights of War and Peace (1625); this document has never before been translated into English and adds new dimensions to the great work. -- Vol 3 has significant appendices and bibliographies re both Grotius and Barbeyrac references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  natural_law  international_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  natural_rights  IR_theory  trade  just_war  property  property_rights  conquest  Grotius  Barbeyrac  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius, The Rights of War and Peace (2005, Richard Tuck ed.) vol. 1 of 3 (Book I) - from the Edition by Jean Barbeyrac | Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Rights of War and Peace, edited and with an Introduction by Richard Tuck, from the Edition by Jean Barbeyrac (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). Vol. 1. 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1425> -- Grotius’s Rights of War and Peace is a classic of modern public international law which lays the foundation for a universal code of law and which strongly defends the rights of individual agents – states as well as private persons – to use their power to secure themselves and their property. This edition is based upon that of the eighteenth-century French editor Jean Barbeyrac and also includes the Prolegomena to the first edition of Rights of War and Peace (1625); this document has never before been translated into English and adds new dimensions to the great work. -- downloaded Vol 1 pdf to Note - for Tuck introduction and apparatus
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  natural_law  international_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  natural_rights  IR_theory  trade  just_war  property  property_rights  conquest  Grotius  Barbeyrac  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Emer de Vattel, The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays on the Origin and Nature of Natural Law and on Luxury ed. Béla Kapossy and Richard Whitmore - O
Emer de Vattel, The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays on the Origin and Nature of Natural Law and on Luxury, edited and with an Introduction by Béla Kapossy and Richard Whitmore (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2246> -- A republication of the 1797 translation of Vattel’s work, along with new English translations of 3 early essays. -- The 1st French edition was 1758, the 2nd 1773..The 1797 translation is of the 1773 edition and posthumous notes Vattel intended for a revised edition. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  international_law  natural_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  IR_theory  political_economy  international_political_economy  mercantilism  commerce  military_history  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  sovereignty  nation-state  raison-d'-état  balance_of_power  government-forms  luxury  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius, The Rights of War and Peace (2005 ed.) 3 vols., ed. Richard Tuck (2005 from Barbeyrac's edition) - Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Rights of War and Peace, edited and with an Introduction by Richard Tuck, from the Edition by Jean Barbeyrac (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 3 vols. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1877> -- Grotius’s Rights of War and Peace is a classic of modern public international law which lays the foundation for a universal code of law and which strongly defends the rights of individual agents – states as well as private persons – to use their power to secure themselves and their property. This edition is based upon that of the eighteenth-century French editor Jean Barbeyrac and also includes the Prolegomena to the first edition of Rights of War and Peace (1625); this document has never before been translated into English and adds new dimensions to the great work.
books  etexts  17th  18thC  Grotius  Barbeyrac  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_history  international_law  natural_law  natural_rights  property_rights  sovereignty  IR_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Tiegs, review - Derek Croxton. Westphalia: The Last Christian Peace (2013) | H-Net Reviews
The work is divided into three sections covering the background, negotiations, and conclusions. The background section is the largest - its fifth chapter, “Structures,” is undoubtedly the highlight of the work. Croxton superbly places the negotiations in their baroque setting, showing how issues of precedence, prestige, gift giving, and logistics all affected the talks. The second section, covering the negotiations - In addition to attempting to resolve contentious religious issues, they also wrangled over the representation of imperial estates at the congress, territorial compensation, the independence of the United Provinces, and arrears for the Swedish soldiers. ...it was nearly impossible to settle any issue independently, and negotiations became a matter of brinksmanship. In the final section on consequences, Croxton takes aim at perceived errors in the historiography. ..he wants to place the focus back on the religious dimensions of negotiations, as the opening lines of the treaty clearly stated, “Let there be a Christian peace”. He believes that the notion of Westphalia as the foundation of modern diplomacy between independent sovereign states is erroneous. Alsace again provides a good example, as he points to the fact that the negotiations led to the curious situation where it was part of both the French crown and the empire. As this case makes clear, internal and external issues were not clear cut post-1648, thus European states were not independent and discrete sovereign units. In fact, he goes on to argue that Westphalia probably had the opposite effect, specifically “the continuation of the idea of mutual interference of states in each other’s internal affairs”.
books  reviews  17thC  diplomatic_history  military_history  religious_history  IR_theory  IR  nation-state  Westphalia  Thirty_Years_War  religious_wars  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Sweden  Spain  Germany  Austria  Habsburgs  Dutch_Revolt  Dutch  state-building  balance_of_power  Great_Powers  sovereignty  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stuart Elden, 2013 The Birth of Territory, reviewed by Gerry Kearns | Society and Space - Environment and Planning D
The Birth of Territory interrogates texts from various dates to see if they describe rule as the legal control over a determined space. Time after time we learn that a set of political writings that concern land, law, terrain, sovereignty, empire, or related concepts do not articulate a fully-fledged notion of territory. We may end up asking like the proverbial kids in the back of the car: “Are we there yet.” Elden is certainly able to show that earlier formulations are reworked in later periods, as with the discussion of Roman law in the medieval period; there is a lot in the political thought of each period, however, that relates to land and power but does not get reworked in later times. This means that what really holds many of the chapters together is that they are studies of how land and power were discussed at that time, and that is not so very far from taking land and power as quasi-universals. In fact, there is probably a continuum between categories that have greater or lesser historical specificity, rather than there being a clear distinction between the two. Yet, I must admit that this singular focus gives a welcome coherence to the book for all that it seems to discard large parts of the exposition as not required for later chapters. -- see review for Elden views on Westphalia and HRE contra Teschke ; review references classic and recent works on geography, terrain, law,mapping
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  geography  bibliography  political_history  legal_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  ancient_history  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Augustine  Papacy  Holy_Roman_Empire  feudalism  Italy  medieval_history  Renaissance  city_states  citizenship  sovereignty  territory  maps  landowners  property  Roman_law  exiles  Absolutism  16thC  17thC  Wars_of_Religion  France  Germany  British_history  Ireland  Irish-Gaelic  IR  IR_theory  colonialism  legal_theory  legitimacy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Abstracts | The Power of Peace: New Perspectives on the Congress of Vienna (1814-1815)
Abstracts of papers presented at the Harvard conference, organized by David Armitage, on the 200th anniversary of the Congress of Vienna
paper  IR_theory  19thC  diplomatic_history  Napoleonic_Wars  Congress_of_Vienna  Great_Powers  international_system 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Louise Arbour - Are Freedom, Peace and Justice incompatible agendas? - International Crisis Group - Feb 2014
Address by the Honorable Louise Arbour, President & CEO of the International Crisis Group, on the occasion of the Inaugural Roland Berger Lecture on Human Rights and Human Dignity, 17 February 2014, Oxford. -- The UDHR, in other words, remains largely aspirational. Its commitments are ultimately hostage to the competing principle of state sovereignty which places on states, almost exclusively, the responsibility for the wellbeing of their citizens, and to the weak institutional structures designed to promote and protect human rights at regional and international levels. -- I would like to examine today how modern doctrines – in particular international criminal justice, the responsibility to protect and the rule of law – have contributed to the advancement of lasting peace, and how to make it more likely that they might do so in the future.
21stC  human_rights  international_law  international_system  international_organizations  sovereignty  nation-state  IR  rule_of_law  responsibility_to_protect  IR_theory  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
RANDALL GERMAIN - Financial governance and transnational deliberative democracy | JSTOR: Review of International Studies, Vol. 36, No. 2 (April 2010), pp. 493-509
Recent concern with the institutional underpinning of the international financial architecture has intersected with broader debates concerning the possibility of achieving an adequate deliberative context for decisions involving transnational economic governance. Scholars working within traditions associated with international political economy, deliberative democracy, cosmopolitanism and critical theory have informed this broader debate. This article uses this debate to ask whether the structure of financial governance at the global level exhibits the necessary conditions to support deliberative democracy. In particular, it considers the extent to which publicness and a public sphere have become part of the broader structure of financial governance. Although in some ways financial governance is a hard case for this debate, an argument can be made that a public sphere has emerged as an important element of the international financial architecture. At the same time, the analysis of the role of the public sphere in financial governance reveals important lessons which public sphere theorists and deliberative democracy advocates need to consider in order to extend their analysis into the realm of global political economy. -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  IR_theory  finance_capital  global_governance  international_political_economy  international_finance  financial_regulation  democracy  deliberation-public  political_participation  public_sphere  international_system  international_law  international_organizations  nation-state  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ryan Balot - Polybius' Advice to the Imperial Republic | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 483-509
Polybius' Histories, written in the mid—second century BC, offers an authoritative account of Rome's rise to uncontested imperial supremacy. The work has been highly influential among political thinkers because of its theory of the "mixed constitution." This essay proposes to return Polybius' mixed constitution to its proper location within the narrative of the Histories. This interpretative approach enables us to appreciate Polybius' frequently neglected emphasis on the connections between republican politics and Roman imperial power. These connections shed light on recent developments in republican political theory. They also lead to an investigation of the didactic purposes of the author, who intended to educate the Roman aristocracy in the virtues necessary for exercising hegemonic power successfully in the ancient Mediterranean world. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Roman_Republic  imperialism  Polybius  mixed_government  military_history  Mediterranean  hegemony  republicanism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
A. Claire Cutler - Critical Reflections on the Westphalian Assumptions of International Law and Organization: A Crisis of Legitimacy | JSTOR: Review of International Studies, Vol. 27, No. 2 (Apr., 2001), pp. 133-150
This article argues that the fields of international law and organization are experiencing a legitimacy crisis relating to fundamental reconfigurations of global power and authority. Traditional Westphalian-inspired assumptions about power and authority are incapable of providing contemporary understanding, producing a growing disjunction between the theory and the practice of the global system. The actors, structures, and processes identified and theorized as determinative by the dominant approaches to the study of international law and organization have ceased to be of singular importance. Westphalian-inspired notions of state-centricity, positivist international law, and 'public' definitions of authority are incapable of capturing the significance of non-state actors, informal normative structures, and private, economic power in the global political economy. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- didn't download
article  jstor  IR_theory  global_system  global_governance  international_political_economy  nation-state  Westphalia  international_organizations  international_law  legitimacy  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark M. Blyth - "Any More Bright Ideas?" The Ideational Turn of Comparative Political Economy | JSTOR: Comparative Politics, Vol. 29, No. 2 (Jan., 1997), pp. 229-250
Review article - (1) Ideas and Foreign Policy: Beliefs, Institutions and Political Change by Judith Goldstein; Robert Keohane; (2) Ideas and Institutions: Developmentalism in Argentina and Brazil by Kathryn Sikkink -- The renewed interest in ideas as an explanatory category in political economy, particularly among rationalist and historical institutionalists, is flawed. This turn to ideas is theoretically degenerate; it treats ideas as desiderata, catch-all concepts to explain variance, rather than subjects in their own right. The two schools ask what stabilizes and what causes change, not what ideas are and what they do. The ideational turn taken by both rationalist and historical institutionalists is best understood as an ad hoc solution to the inherent weaknesses of their research programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  rational_choice  political_economy  ideas-social_theory  social_process  social_movements  socialization  sociology-process  institutions  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutionalization  IR_theory  international_organizations  development  Latin_America  political_change  economic_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Hilde Eliassen Restad - Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 53-76
Most writers agree that domestic ideas about what kind of country the United States is affect its foreign policy. In the United States, this predominant idea is American exceptionalism, which in turn is used to explain US foreign policy traditions over time. This article argues that the predominant definition of American exceptionalism, and the way it is used to explain US foreign policy in political science, relies on outdated scholarship within history. It betrays a largely superficial understanding of American exceptionalism as an American identity. This article aims to clarify the definition of American exceptionalism, arguing that it should be retained as a definition of American identity. Furthermore, it couples American exceptionalism and US foreign policy differently than what is found in most political science literature. It concludes that American exceptionalism is a useful tool in understanding US foreign policy, if properly defined.
article  jstor  US_history  intellectual_history  US_foreign_policy  US_politics  American_colonies  American_Revolution  US_constitution  IR_theory  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Dan Monaco - Thinking Through the Savage Machinery: Peter Temin and Economic Crises | The Straddler Jan 2014
Long interview - though most focused on change in fashion of economic theory and what went wrong in Great Depression, the purpose of the interview is Temin's take on Kindleberger need for global economic hegemon to make coordination feasible. Monaco thinks through some of the links between economic and military hegemony. In Temin's Leaderless World, he marks US loss of hegemony in 2008,with winding down of disastrous wars and global financial crisis. So we're an inflection point in the international political economy regime - what will come next, and how are we going to get there. Temin using Tilly's nation-state theory sketches an approach to IR development from Hobbesian chaos, to kleptocracy that forged the state and monopoly on violence, and as the system stays stable with reduced violence, to better and less violent leadership that becomes possible to emerge. So maybe next shift of hegemony won't have to be based on military power? The interview is more interesting re the power of economic history to challenge conventional wisdom - see his early work on the financial crisis and depression in Jacksonian era (even in this early stage of capitalism, the laissez faire drawn from classical economics didn't work in reality), and comments on Friedman and Schwartz re monetary policy and Great Depression (they got only one factor in a collective worldview that couldn't cope, and to which the global plutocracy seems to be returning to in what's becoming class warfare waged from the top). One common theme to Temin's work in these areas is to put domestic economic factors and policies in context of the international system at the time.
books  economic_history  US_economy  economic_theory  macroeconomics  IR_theory  19thC  20thC  Kindleberger  international_political_economy  Great_Depression  Friedman_Milton  Keynes  Keynesianism  neoclassical_economics  laisser-faire  globalization  plutocracy  Tilly  gold_standard  austerity  rational_choice  behavioral_economics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rob Farley - Offshore Engagement: The Right U.S. Strategy for Asia | The Diplomat Nov 2013
Consequently, it may make more sense to work out a middle path between forward “deep engagement” and offshore balancing. Offshore engagement retains forward operating capability and emphasizes beneficial multilateralism, both to its own ends and in support of broader strategic interests. However, it remains essentially defensive, oriented around preventing the regional dominance of peer competitors rather than primacy in the management of global political affairs. Like offshore balancing, it attempts to take advantage of quasi-natural balancing behavior by threatened local partners, but it also appreciates that partnerships require work, and don’t develop overnight
IR_theory  balance_of_power  IR-realism  US_foreign_policy  China  Asia  alliances  diplomacy  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Howard Williams interviewed by Richard Marshall - kant in syria » 3:AM Magazine Nov 2013
Howard Williams takes his philosophical thoughts into the battelfield of Just War Theory to brood on the point of philosophy and the humanities, on the state of philosophy in Wales, on Kant and how he doesn’t fit with Michael Walzer’s approach, on perpetual peace and its implications, on international humanitarian law, on Syria and what Kant might think, on the idea that current Just War theories are predominatly Hegelian, on Kant, Hobbes and sovereignty and cosmopolitanism, on what Marx didn’t do next and what to do with neo-liberalism
political_philosophy  IR_theory  global_governance  cosmopolitanism  Hobbes  Kant  Hegel  Marx  books  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Michael C. Williams - International Relations Enlightenment and the Ends of International Relations Theory » Duck of Minerva Sept 2013
Overview of his Sage published article -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The idea of an “end of IR theory” that animates the Special Issue of the EJIR provides an intriguing opportunity to open up this issue: to ask where the field is going by looking again at where it came from. -- downloaded -- added to EF on DBox
This story can be told in many ways. One of the most revealing is to take seriously Stanley Hoffmann’s famous claim that IR developed as a quintessentially “American” social science (PDF). Hoffmann was right, though for reasons and with implications quite different from those he advanced. In his eyes, these origins lay mainly in a concern with American hegemony and policy-oriented theory in the context of the Cold War. No one could doubt that these questions were important, yet in many ways IR’s origins and commitments are better located in a wider but generally unrecognized analytic and political sensibility that, in his brilliant study of Desolation and Enlightenment, Ira Katznelson has called the “political studies enlightenment” (note the small ‘e’). Katznelson holds that diverse figures in post-war American social science including Dahl, Hofstaeder, Lasswell, Lindblom, Polanyi, and Arendt were united in the view that the desolation of the previous half century and its apparent refutation of Enlightenment promises of progress, peace, and the reign of reason. In response, they undertook systematic analyses of the limits of a century and a half of increasing rationalism within the liberal Enlightenment tradition. Yet they did so not to reject modernity or liberalism, but to save it.
IR_theory  social_sciences-post-WWII  20thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  political_philosophy  IR-realism  scientism  downloaded  liberalism 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Hilton Root - Dynamics among Nations: The Evolution of Legitimacy and Development in Modern States | The MIT Press
Liberal internationalism has been the West’s foreign policy agenda since the Cold War, and the West has long occupied the top rung of a hierarchical system. In this book, Hilton Root argues that international relations, like other complex ecosystems, exists in a constantly shifting landscape, in which hierarchical structures are giving way to systems of networked interdependence, changing every facet of global interaction. Accordingly, policymakers will need a new way to understand the process of change. Root suggests that the science of complex systems offers an analytical framework to explain the unforeseen development failures, governance trends, and alliance shifts in today’s global political economy.

Root examines both the networked systems that make up modern states and the larger, interdependent landscapes they share. Using systems analysis—in which institutional change and economic development are understood as self-organizing complexities—he offers an alternative view of institutional resilience and persistence. From this perspective, Root considers the divergence of East and West; the emergence of the European state, its contrast with the rise of China, and the network properties of their respective innovation systems; the trajectory of democracy in developing regions; and the systemic impact of China on the liberal world order. Complexity science, Root argues, will not explain historical change processes with algorithmic precision, but it may offer explanations that match the messy richness of those processes.
books  IR_theory  networks  complexity  Great_Divergence  development  legitimacy  nation-state  global_economy  global_system  global_governance  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Phil Arena - The American Civil War as an Illustration of War to Forestall Adverse Shifts in Power » Duck of Minerva Oct 2013
I now discuss the American Civil War after explaining the general logic of commitment problems induced by an anticipation of a future shift in power.Why the American Civil War? Is it because the Union was growing more rapidly than the Confederacy? No, the reason I like this example so much is because of this working paper by Paul Poast, which argues that Lincoln’s decision to invade the South (which was not how he originally intended to respond to the secession) was motivated in no small part by a desire to prevent British recognition of the Confederacy. ,..... if you want to explain (a) war, it is not sufficient to identify what (the) actors disagree(d) over, because most disagreements don’t end in war. If we are to explain war, we must explain why a more efficient means of resolving the disagreement was not chosen. In this case, that means explaining why, after 75  years of doing just that, it was no longer possible for the North and the South to manage their disagreement about slavery peacefully. Lincoln’s election is surely part of the answer to that question, as is the secession, but even then, we know that Lincoln believed the crisis could be resolved short of war. 
IR_theory  19thC  US_history  US_Civil_War  balance_of_power 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Simon Glendinning - J.S. Mill on the differences between European nations | EUROPP @ LSE Sept 2013
Simon Glendinning writes on the English philosopher John Stuart Mill’s views on Europe. He notes that Mill saw Britain as being very much a part of Europe, but that he also recognised important differences between European nations. Far from seeing these differences as a weakness, however, Mill viewed them as part of Europe’s strength. While some academics have called for greater integration and the creation of a federal European state, Mill’s work suggests that Europe would be stronger as an ‘enduring multiplicity’ of sovereign nations. -- contra Habermas proposal for greater integration and strengthening EU institutions with more democracy
19thC  21stC  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  Europe-19thC  EU  British-French_attitudes  British_history  IR_theory  sovereignty  Habermas  democracy  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Benjamin J. Cohen, review essay - Phoenix Risen: The Resurrection of Global Finance (1996)
JSTOR: World Politics, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jan., 1996), pp. 268-296 -- extensive discussion of recent books in immediate post Cold War period -- Of all the many changes of the world economy since World War II, few have been nearly so dramatic as the resurrection of global finance. A review of five recent books suggests considerable diversity of opinion concerning both the causes and the consequences of financial globalization, leaving much room for further research. Competing historical interpretations, stressing the contrasting roles of market forces and government policies, need to be reexamined for dynamic linkages among the variables they identify. Likewise, impacts on state policy at both the macro and micro levels should be explored more systematically to understand not just whether constraints may be imposed on governments but also how and under what conditions, and what policymakers can do about them. Finally, questions are also raised about implications for the underlying paradigm conventionally used for the study of international political economy and international relations more generally.
books  reviews  international_political_economy  international_finance  economic_history  institutional_economics  20thC  globalization  IR_theory  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Christian Reus-Smit: Beyond metatheory? - Special Issue End of IR Theory? I European Journal of International Relations September 2013
Christian Reus-Smit, School of Political Science and International Studies, University of Queensland, 54 Walcott St, Brisbane, St Lucia QLD 4072, Australia. Email: c.reussmit@uq.edu.au --- doi: 10.1177/1354066113495479 European Journal of International Relations September 2013 vol. 19 no. 3 589-608 --- Metatheory is out of fashion. If theory has a purpose, we are told, that purpose is the generation of practically relevant knowledge. Metatheoretical inquiry and debate contribute little to such knowledge and are best bracketed, left aside for the philosophers. This article challenges this all-too-common line of reasoning. First, one can bracket metatheoretical inquiry, but this does not free one’s work, theoretical or otherwise, of metatheoretical assumptions. Second, our metatheoretical assumptions affect the kind of practically relevant knowledge we can produce. If our goal is the generation of such knowledge, understanding how our metatheoretical assumptions enable or constrain this objective is essential. Today, the most sustained articulation of the ‘bracket metatheory thesis’ is provided by analytical eclecticists, who call on the field to leave behind metatheoretical debate, concentrate on concrete puzzles and problematics, and draw selectively on insights from diverse research traditions to fashion middle-range theoretical explanations. Yet by forgoing metatheoretical reflection, analytical eclecticists fail to see how their project is deeply structured by epistemological and ontological assumptions, making it an exclusively empirical-theoretic project with distinctive ontological content. This metatheoretical framing significantly impedes the kind of practically relevant knowledge eclecticist research can generate. Practical knowledge, as both Aristotle and Kant understood, is knowledge that can address basic questions of political action — how should I, we, or they act? Empirical-theoretic insights alone cannot provide such knowledge; it has to be integrated with normative forms of reasoning. As presently conceived, however, analytical eclecticism cannot accommodate such reasoning. If the generation of practical knowledge is one of the field’s ambitions, greater metatheoretical reflection and a more expansive and ambitious form of eclecticism are required. --- Keywords:
analytical eclecticism, epistemology, International Relations theory, metatheory, ontology, practical knowledge --- uploaded to Dropbox
article  IR_theory  empiricism  eclecticism  metatheory  practical_knowledge  epistemology  ontology-social  social_theory  methodology  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Arlene B. Tickner: Core, periphery and (neo)imperialist International Relations | Special Issue End of IR Theory? - European Journal of International Relations September 2013
,Professor of International Relations, Political Science Department, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia --- This article analyzes the core–periphery dynamics that characterize the International Relations discipline. To this end, it explores general insights offered by both science studies and the social sciences in terms of the intellectual division of labor that characterizes knowledge-building throughout the world, and the social mechanisms that reproduce power differentials within given fields of study. These arguments are then applied to International Relations, where specific factors that explain the global South’s role as a periphery to the discipline’s (mainly US) core and the ways in which peripheral communities place themselves vis-à-vis International Relations’ (neo)imperialist structure are both explored. --- doi: 10.1177/1354066113494323, European Journal of International Relations, September 2013 vol. 19 no. 3, 627-646 --- uploaded to Dropbox
article  IR_theory  global_system  international_political_economy  sociology_of_knowledge  center-periphery  neo-imperialism  social_sciences-post-WWII  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Patrick Thaddeus Jackson and Daniel H. Nexon: International theory in a post-paradigmatic era: From substantive wagers to scientific ontologies | Special Issue End of IR Theory? - European Journal of International Relations September 2013
Concerns about the end of International Relations theory pivot around at least three different issues: the fading of the ‘paradigm wars’ associated with the 1990s and early 2000s; the general lack of any sort of ‘great debate’ sufficient to occupy the attention of large portions of the field; and claims about the vibrancy of middle-range theorizing. None of these are terribly helpful when it comes to assessing the health of International Relations theory. We argue that international theory involves scientific ontologies of world politics: topographies of entities, processes, mechanisms, and how they relate to one another. Understood this way, the state of International Relations theory looks strong: there is arguably more out there than ever before. Ironically, this cornucopia helps explain concerns regarding the end of International Relations theory. In the absence of a ‘great debate,’ let alone ways of organizing contemporary International Relations theory, this diversity descends into cacophony. We submit that three major clusters of international theory are emerging: choice-theoretic, experience-near, and social-relational. These clusters map onto two major axes of contention: (1) the degree that actors should be treated as autonomous from their environment; and (2) the importance of thickly contextual analysis. These disputes are both field-wide and high-stakes, even if we do not always recognize them as such...... Keywords: choice-theoretical, experience-near, great debates, International Relations theory, paradigms, scientific ontology, social-relational...... doi: 10.1177/1354066113495482 - European Journal of International Relations, September 2013 vol. 19 no. 3, 543-565 -- uploaded to Dropbox
article  IR_theory  social_theory  philosophy_of_science  ontology-social  networks  causation  thick_analysis  agents  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Michael C. Williams: In the beginning: The International Relations enlightenment and the ends of International Relations theory| Special Issue End of IR Theory? - European Journal of International Relations September 2013
doi: 10.1177/1354066113495477 European Journal of International Relations September 2013 vol. 19 no. 3 647-665 -- uploaded to Dropbox -- The question of endings is simultaneously a question of beginnings: wondering if International Relations is at an end inevitably raises the puzzle of when and how ‘it’ began. This article argues that International Relations’ origins bear striking resemblance to a wider movement in post-war American political studies that Ira Katznelson calls the ‘political studies enlightenment.’ This story of the field’s beginnings and ends has become so misunderstood as to have almost disappeared from histories of the field and accounts of its theoretical orientations and alternatives. This historical forgetting represents one of the most debilitating errors of International Relations theory today, and overcoming it has significant implications for how we think about the past and future development of the field. In particular, it throws open not only our understanding of the place of realism in International Relations, but also our vision of liberalism. For the realism of the International Relations enlightenment did not seek to destroy liberalism as an intellectual and political project, but to save it. The core issue in the ‘invention of International Relations theory’ — its historical origins as well as its end or goal in a substantive or normative sense — was not the assertion of realism in opposition to liberalism: it was, in fact, the defence of a particular kind of liberalism. -- Michael C. Williams, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Ottawa -- keywords: realism liberalism enlightenment Morgenthau Niebuhr
article  IR_theory  intellectual_history  20thC  2013  entre_deux_guerres  social_sciences-post-WWII  liberalism  anti-Communist  US_foreign_policy  IR-liberalism  IR-realism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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