dunnettreader + hume   89

PJE Kail - UNDERSTANDING HUME'S NATURAL HISTORY OF RELIGION (2007) - The Philosophical Quarterly - Wiley Online Library
Hume's ‘Natural History of Religion’ offers a naturalized account of the causes of religious thought, an investigation into its ‘origins’ rather than its ‘foundation in reason’. Hume thinks that if we consider only the causes of religious belief, we are provided with a reason to suspend the belief. I seek to explain why this is so, and what role the argument plays in Hume's wider campaign against the rational acceptability of religious belief. In particular, I argue that the work threatens a form of fideism which maintains that it is rationally permissible to maintain religious belief in the absence of evidence or of arguments in its favour. I also discuss the ‘argument from common consent’, and the relative superiority of Hume's account of the origins of religious belief.
article  paywall  Wiley  18thC  Hume  Hume-religion  philosophical_anthropology  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  religious_belief  reason  fideism 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
RJW Mills - Lord Kames's analysis of the natural origins of religion: the 'Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion' (1751) - (2016) - Historical Research - Wiley Online Library
This article investigates the discussion of the origins and development of religious belief within the Scottish jurist and philosopher Henry Home, Lord Kames's Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion (1751). Kames's work is argued to be a significant yet understudied contribution to the Scottish Enlightenment's examination of religion as a human phenomenon. The Principles contained one of the lengthiest analyses on the topic published by a Scottish literatus. In particular, Kames placed into a historical trajectory the internal sense theory's account of the non-rational origins of religious belief. In doing so, he provided an apologetic account of the progress from polytheism to monotheism resulting from the emergence of civil society, which set the tone for later Scottish discussions of religion.
article  paywall  Wiley  18thC  philosophical_anthropology  historiography-18thC  historical_change  stadial_theories  Kames  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  polytheism  monotheism  Bolingbroke  Hume  natural_religion  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  civil_society  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kirk 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Emily Nacol - An Age of Risk: Politics and Economy in Early Modern Britain (2016) | Princeton University Press (eBook and Hardcover)
In An Age of Risk, Emily Nacol shows that risk, now treated as a permanent feature of our lives, did not always govern understandings of the future. Focusing on the epistemological, political, and economic writings of Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Adam Smith, Nacol explains that in 17th-18thC Britain, political and economic thinkers reimagined the future as a terrain of risk, characterized by probabilistic calculation, prediction, and control. Nacol contends, we see 3 crucial developments in thought on risk and politics. While thinkers differentiated uncertainty about the future from probabilistic calculations of risk, they remained attentive to the ways uncertainty and risk remained in a conceptual tangle, a problem that constrained good decision making. They developed sophisticated theories of trust and credit as crucial background conditions for prudent risk-taking, and offered complex depictions of the relationships and behaviors that would make risk-taking more palatable. They also developed 2 narratives that persist in subsequent accounts of risk—risk as a threat to security, and risk as an opportunity for profit. Nacol locates the origins of our own ambivalence about risk-taking. By the end of the 18thC, a new type of political actor would emerge from this ambivalence, one who approached risk with fear rather than hope. -- Emily C. Nacol is assistant professor of political science at Vanderbilt University.
Chapter 1 Introduction 1
Chapter 2 “Experience Concludeth Nothing Universally” - Hobbes and the Groundwork for a Political Theory of Risk 9
Chapter 3 The Risks of Political Authority - Trust, Knowledge, and Political Agency in Locke’s Politics and Economy 41
Chapter 4 Hume’s Fine Balance - On Probability, Fear, and the Risks of Trade 69
Chapter 5 Adventurous Spirits and Clamoring Sophists - Smith on the Problem of Risk in Political Economy 98
Chapter 6 An Age of Risk, a Liberalism of Anxiety 124
Notes 131 -- References 157 -- Index 167
Downloaded Chapter 1 to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  Hobbes  Locke  Locke-Essay  Locke-2_Treatises  Hume  Hume-causation  Hume-politics  Smith  political_economy  trade  commerce  commercial_interest  epistemology  epistemology-history  probability  risk  risk_assessment  uncertainty  insurance  risk_shifting  political_discourse  economic_culture 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
The Philosopher's Stone: BE PREPARED! - July 2016
Now let me turn to a more important matter, namely my forthcoming lecture series on the Critique of Pure Reason . The launch of the series is only five weeks… Preparation reading - especially sections of Hume's Treatise
Kant  courses  video  Hume  Hume-causation  Wolff_RP  from instapaper
july 2016 by dunnettreader
(107) NOW Published: How Hume
How Hume and Kant Reconstruct Natural Law: Justifying Strict Objectivity  without Debating Moral Realism, Clarendon Press (2016)
Front matter including both overview TOC and very detailed TOC plus introductory chapter -- He explains in the intro how both Hume and Kant (via Rousseau) pursued "moral constructivist" approaches using a (modified) "natural law" framework - after Hume had successfully attacked weaknesses in traditional approach to natural law. Notes that "justice" traditionally one of the 2 branches of moral philosophy (the other ethics). He's especially concerned with failure of "business ethics " as cause of financial crisis and Great Recession - but "business ethics" meaningless without a framework of "Justice." His target audience includes lawyers and legal/jurisprudence students and scholars - he thinks legal positivism and legal realism has run out of steam. He returns to accountancy standards in final chapter. -- pdf is the same material as kindle sample -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
books  legal_system  constructivism  morality-objective  justice  legal_theory  norms  accountability  legal_realism  18thC  norms-business  downloaded  moral_sentiments  moral_economy  jurisprudence  morality-conventional  legal_positivism  accounting  moral_realism  moral_psychology  Hume  kindle-available  natural_law  moral_philosophy  morality  Kant 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Leo Damrosh - The Enlightenment: Invention of the Modern Self | The Great Courses
Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self - from opening views in 17thC, through stages of the Enlightenment - a road to its (inevitable?) backlash in Romanticism
24 lectures
Only available as Audio download (and streaming) - list price $130
Rave reviews
Uses literary works and philosophical texts together
Frex completes the 2 lectures on British empiricism (focus on Locke and Hume re the self) with how Pope struggles with capturing complex psychology within the empiricist framework
After an introduction of 17thC religious and secular conceptions of the self, starts with 2 on La Princesse de Clèves
After empiricism, 2 on Voltaire and theodicy in Candide
3 lectures on Diderot and Jacques le fataliste
A lot of Rousseau - not the novels but the autobiographical works - how he analyzes himself in Confessions and Solitary Walker
Lots of biography, with Boswell's Johnson the vehicle
Some Franklin and Smith
Finishes with Laclos and Blake
Romanticism  bibliography  reason-passions  poetry  Boswell  self  moral_psychology  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_Revolution-impact  Rousseau  free_will  Locke-education  buy  human_nature  Diderot  Blake_William  Locke  Hume-causation  autobiography  17thC  Rousseau-self  Hume-ethics  altruism  Johnson  Voltaire  novels  empiricism  18thC  moral_philosophy  Locke-Essay  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Pope_Alexander  courses  French_lit  Smith  Hume  determinism  epistemology  emotions  character  audio  psychology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Davide Panagia - Theory Syllabus, Winter 2016, UCLA (Political Theory) graduate study| Academia.edu
Two guiding themes in our investigations and readings will be that theories of affect are (1.) a radicalization of modern moral sentimental theories of sociality (think David Hume on associationism, Adam Smith on sympathy, and Jane Austen on agreeableness); and (2.) a response to the hermeneutic turn in literary and political analysis. Thus, an important site of consideration will be the contributions that theories of affect make to issues of political equality, solidarity, mediation, and language.

The first half of the course is dedicated to selected writings of Gilles Deleuze and Gilbert Simondon, to Simondon’s influence on Deleuze’s account of assemblages (agencement), and to the latter’s unique articulation of a process theory of difference and repetition. The idea here is that Deleuze on repetition and Simondon on disparation offer the ontological grounds for affect theory.

The second half of the course is dedicated to the exploration of diverse writers in/around affect theory and their critics – all of whom, in direct or indirect ways, take up some of the ideas articulated and explored in the first half of the course. Important to this second half of the course will be the function of political and aesthetic judgment to affect theory.
Downloaded 2 versions with somewhat different reading lists and class schedules
syllabus  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  affect_theory  cultural_studies  downloaded  Spinoza  Deluze  Hume  Smith  Simondon  cultural_critique  cultural_change 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Spencer J. Pack, Eric Schliesser - Smith's Humean Criticism of Hume's Account of the Origin of Justice (2006) | Project MUSE
From: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Volume 44, Number 1, January 2006 pp. 47-63 | 10.1353/hph.2006.0004 *--* It is argued that Adam Smith criticizes David Hume's account of the origin of and continuing adherence to the rule of law for being not sufficiently Humean. ["Humean" is used for his tendency to use proto-evolutionary explanations of social phenomena in terms of psychological and material factors acting on individuals rather than rationalistic explanations] Hume explained that adherence to the rule of law originated in the self-interest to restrain self-interest. [Treatise 3.2.2,13-14, 316] [Smith says Hume's account is "too refined - TMS II, ii.3.5 ] According to Smith, Hume does not pay enough attention to the "unsocial" passion of resentment and the passion of admiration, which have their source in the imagination. Smith's offers a more naturalistic and evolutionary account [more Humean than Hume] of the psychological pre-conditions of the establishment and morality of justice. Yet, Smith's account also makes room for a thin conception of Lockean natural right to property, while rejecting the contractualist and rationalistic elements in Locke. It emerges that Smith severs the intimate connection that Hobbes and Hume made between justice and property. - paywall
article  paywall  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  human_nature  18thC  Smith  Hume  justice  passions  imagination  resentment  property  property_rights  self-interest  Hobbes  self-protection  Locke-2_Treatises  natural_law  natural_rights 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Christian Ruby - L'expérience du spectateur, dans le programme « esthétique » humien (2011) - Cairn.info
Nous ne pouvons vouer le xviiie siècle esthétique à la seule théorie kantienne du jugement. Ce siècle produit plusieurs esthétiques, les unes orientées vers le transcendantal, les autres vers l’expérience, notamment. La philosophie de Hume, par exemple, nous permet de poser la question de savoir comment le spectateur empiriste se forme, quelle place il entend occuper dans son opposition aux autres types de spectateurs, et quelles implications esthétiques permettent d’assurer sa supériorité sur eux. Par son empirisme, Hume ne réduit cependant pas la fabrication du goût à la médiation d’humeurs diverses. Il renvoie l’émergence et le développement du gout à une éducation, une formation qui ne sauraient être le fruit que d’une pratique répétée de l’art et de la contemplation de la beauté. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
18thC  cultural_history  Hume-aesthetics  judgment-aesthetics  Hume  aesthetics  article  education  taste  intellectual_history  art_history  empiricism  downloaded 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Ryu Susato - Hume's Advocacy of Religious Establishments | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (April 2012)
Taming "The Tyranny of Priests": Hume's Advocacy of Religious Establishments -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 2 (April 2012), pp. 273-293 -- excellent big bibliography, especially on reception of Hume and how his notions fit with other Scots -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  Hume-politics  Hume  Hume-religion  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Church_of_England  Kirk  tolerance  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Warburton  Enlightenment-conservative  clergy  priestcraft  enthusiasm  fanatics  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Lennon - Imagination and the Imaginary // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - July 2015
Kathleen Lennon’s new monograph joins a growing number of studies reclaiming the imagination from the dominance of a rationalist positivism.It marks the steps…
Instapaper  books  reviews  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Cartesian  Kant  Hume  imagination  self  phenomenology  Sartre  Merleau-Ponty  rationalist  perception  epistemology  creativity  positivism  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Gordon Graham, Wittgenstein and Natural Religion // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - July 2015
In this book, Gordon Graham attempts to breathe new life into an old idea, namely, a naturalized conception of religion; with this goal, he succeeds admirably.…
Instapaper  books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  philosophy_of_religion  Hume  Schleiermacher  Kant  Mill  theology  theism  metaphysics  Wittgenstein  natural_religion  enthusiasm  human_nature  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Anna Plassart - The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution (to be released April 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Historians of ideas have traditionally discussed the significance of the French Revolution through the prism of several major interpretations, including the commentaries of Burke, Tocqueville and Marx. This book argues that the Scottish Enlightenment offered an alternative and equally powerful interpretative framework for the Revolution, which focused on the transformation of the polite, civilised moeurs that had defined the 'modernity' analysed by Hume and Smith in the 18thC. The Scots observed what they understood as a military- and democracy-led transformation of European modern morals and concluded that the real historical significance of the Revolution lay in the transformation of warfare, national feelings and relations between states, war and commerce that characterised the post-revolutionary international order. This book recovers the Scottish philosophers' powerful discussion of the nature of post-revolutionary modernity and shows that it is essential to our understanding of 19thC political thought. **--** Part I. The Burke–Paine Debate and Scotland's Science of Man: 1. The Burke–Paine debate and the Scottish Enlightenment *-* 2. The heritage of Hume and Smith: Scotland's science of man and politics **--** Part II. The 1790s: 3. Scotland's political debate *-* 4. James Mackintosh and Scottish philosophical history *-* 5. John Millar and the Scottish discussion on war, modern sociability and national sentiment *-* 6. Adam Ferguson on democracy and empire **--** Part III. 1802–15: 7. The French Revolution and the Edinburgh Review *-* 8. Commerce, war and empire
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Smith  Hume  Hume-politics  civil_society  civilizing_process  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  IR_theory  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  nationalism  national_ID  historiography-18thC  historiography-Whig  military  Military_Revolution  mass_culture  levée_en_masse  conscription  sociability  social_order  empires  empire-and_business  imperialism  Great_Powers  balance_of_power  philosophy_of_history  progress  social_theory  change-social  change-economic  Burke  Paine  Mackintosh_James  Millar_John  Edinburgh_Review  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Scottish_politics  1790s  1800s  1810s  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  democracy  morality-conventional  norms  global_economy  mercantilism 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Clement Fatovic - Reason and Experience in Alexander Hamilton’s Science of Politics | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Spring 2013), pp. 1-30
Alexander Hamilton is often described as an enterprising modernist who promoted forward-looking reforms that broke with established institutions and ideas. However, the scale and apparent novelty of his reforms have tended to obscure the extent to which those innovations were rooted in a belief that knowledge and practice must be guided by “experience.” This article argues that even Hamilton’s most far-reaching reforms were grounded in a Humean understanding of the limits of rationality in explaining and controlling the world. Hamilton’s agreement with David Hume on the epistemic authority of experience helps explain his positions on constitutional design, executive power, democratic politics, public opinion, and other important political issues. Moreover, the epistemological underpinnings of Hamilton’s political thought are significant because they suggest that a “science of politics” grounded in experience can avoid some of the dangers associated with more rationalistic approaches yet still be quite open to significant innovation in politics. - as much or more Hume's various essays as Hamilton
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  US_constitution  US_politics  US_economy  political_economy  political_culture  economic_culture  epistemology  epistemology-social  US_government  public_opinion  public_finance  democracy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  fiscal-military_state  sovereign_debt  Hume  Hume-politics  Hamilton  Founders  Early_Republic  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Kevin Meeker, review - Frederick F. Schmitt, Hume's Epistemology in the Treatise (OUP) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 09, 2014
This scholarly and philosophically rich treatment of Hume's epistemology furnishes a clear and comprehensive reading of Hume as a reliabilist about justified belief that is reminiscent of Alvin Goldman's naturalistic epistemology. One might worry that this is simply an anachronistic attempt to impose contemporary categories on Hume. One need not entertain such worries. ...he carefully connects Hume's concepts to contemporary ones and considerable attention relating Hume's views to Descartes, Malebranche, Newton and especially Locke. The book contains four major "divisions", and preceding the first division is a crucial chapter detailing the epistemological framework for this study -- In the first division, Schmitt notes that epistemologists from Plato's time have distinguished between knowledge and probability/belief/opinion - they have differed, though, on how to understand causal inferences in terms of this dichotomy. For Schmitt, although Hume mostly follows Locke's way of drawing the knowledge/probability distinction, Hume departs from Locke in wresting causal inferences from the domain of knowledge and placing them in the category of probability. According to Schmitt, Hume confronts this problem by arguing that knowledge and proofs produced by causal inferences are both types of justified belief because they are both forms of reliable belief. So there is no great gap between the epistemic status of knowledge and causal inferences. -- I hope that by now it is clear that the naturalistic, reliabilist epistemology that he attributes to Hume stands in stark contrast to the sceptical reading of Hume, according to which beliefs lack epistemic justification. -- copied full review to Evernote - put in Millican Treatise notebook
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Hume  epistemology  Descartes  Malebranche  Newton  Locke  Goldman_Alvin  scepticism  causation  epistemology-naturalism  inference  demonstration  fallibility  Evernote 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeff McDonough's CV - Harvard University - Philosophy Department
Areas of Specialization: Early Modern Philosophy, History and Philosophy of Science. -- Areas of Competence:Medieval Philosophy, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Religion -- papers, conference presentations focus on Leibniz with some Berkeley, Hume
academia  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  philosophy_of_religion  17thC  18thC  Leibniz  Berkeley  causation  teleology  theodicy  Descartes  Spinoza  Hume  Malebranche  bibliography 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Georges Dicker - Don Garrett, Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy | JSTOR: The Review of Metaphysics, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Dec., 1998), pp. 447-449
Summary, chapter by chapter, without critique of Garrett take on Hume as a cognitive psychologist, and especially his brand of scepticism re induction, causation and self, but also covering moral philosophy (moral sentiments and role of reason in moral judgment). Where Garrett sees Hume diverging from Locke -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-causation  scepticism  reason-passions  moral_sentiments  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  Locke  self  identity 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lennon, Thomas M., Stainton, Robert J. (Eds.) 2008 The Achilles of Rationalist Psychology
Downloaded Introduction pdf to Note -- Series: Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind, Vol. 7 -- newly written papers addressing each of the main contributors to the discussion of the Achilles. Despite the historical importance and intrinsic interest of the argument, very little has been written about it. *--* Contents. *--* Did Plato Articulate the Achilles Argument?. *-- Aristotle on the Unity of Consciousness. *-- The Neoplatonic Achilles. *-- The Unity of the Soul and Contrary Appetites in Medieval Philosophy. *-- Hume, Spinoza and the Achilles Inference. *-- Locke and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Reverse Achilles in Locke. *-- Cudworth and Bayle: An Odd Couple?. *-- The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke Collins Correspondence. *-- Leibniz’s ‘Achilles’. *-- Hume’s Reply to the Achilles Argument. *-- Kant and Mendelssohn on the Implications of the ‘I Think’. *-- Kant on the Achilles Argument. *-- William James and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Binding Problem: Achilles in the 21st Century.
books  intellectual_history  mind  mind-body  consciousness  perception  thinking_matter  materialism  soul  immortality  substance  Plato  Neoplatonism  Aristotle  Aquinas  Duns_Scotus  Ockham  Augustine  Descartes  Spinoza  Malebranche  Cartesian  Bayle  Locke  Clarke  Collins_Anthony  Leibniz  Hume  Kant  Mendelssohn  Fichte  cognition  neuroscience  psychology  natural_philosophy  metaphysics  rationalist  James_William  history_of_science  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"Empiricism and Multiculturalism" by Kenneth P. Winkler
Kenneth P. Winkler, Wellesley College -- This paper relates the work of the great British empiricists – Locke, Berkeley, and Hume – to issues of multiculturalism. It is argued that these philosophers can help to provide us with some of the tools we need to craft an appropriate response to the diversity of cultures. -- Winkler, Kenneth P. (2004) "Empiricism and Multiculturalism," Philosophic Exchange: Vol. 34: Iss. 1, Article 4. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  21stC  human_nature  17thC  18thC  empiricism  Locke  Berkeley  Hume  multiculturalism  comparative_anthropology  diversity  tolerance  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Decline of Natural Right [chapter] (2009) :: SSRN in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY, Allen Wood and Songsuk Susan Hahn, eds., Cambridge University Press
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-38 -- What happened to the doctrine of natural right in the 19thC? We know that it flourished in the 17thC and 18thC. We know that something like it - the doctrine of human rights and new forms of social contract theory - flourished again in the second half of the 20thC and continues to flourish in the 21stC. In between there was a period of decline and hibernation - ... in which to invoke natural right was always to invite intellectual ridicule and accusations of political irresponsibility. Thus article asks: How far can the decline of natural right in the 19thC be attributed to the reaction against the revolution in France? How far it was the effect of independent streams of thought, like positivism and historicism? Why was radical thought so ambivalent about natural right throughout the 19thC, and why was socialist thought in particular inclined to turn its back on it? As a framework for thought, natural right suffered a radical decline in the social and political sciences. But things were not so clear in jurisprudence, and natural right lived on to a much riper old age in the writings of some prominent economists. What is it about this theory that allowed it to survive in these environments, when so much of the rest of intellectual endeavor in the 19thC was toxic or inhospitable to it. Finally, I shall ask how far American thought represents an exception to all of this. Why and to what extent did the doctrine survive as a way of thinking in the United States, long after it had lost its credibility elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  natural_law  natural_rights  human_rights  counter-revolution  historicism  positivism  legal_theory  nationalism  national_interest  conservatism  socialism  social_contract  relativism  revolutions  1848_revolutions  French_Revolution  anticlerical  Bentham  Burke  Hume  Jefferson  Kant  Locke  Marx  Mill  Savigny  Spencer_Herbert  George_Henry  US_society  American_exceptionalism  liberalism  social_theory  social_sciences  Social_Darwinism  social_order  mass_culture  political_participation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Political Political Theory: An Oxford Inaugural Lecture (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-26 -- "Inaugural Lecture" for the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory. -- Political theorists study (1) political virtue, (2) political processes and institutions, and (3) political ideals (like justice, liberty, and equality). Since the time of Hume, Madison, and Kant, it has been thought that (2) is more important than (1), because maybe we can set up institutions that work for the general good whatever the state of virtue of the people... But in the revival of political philosophy heralded by Rawls in 1971, there has been great emphasis on (3) and not nearly enough on (2)... particularly in the UK. Chichele chair -holders G.A. Cohen and Isaiah Berlin focused almost exclusively on (3) -- with Berlin announcing that political philosophy was really just the study of "the ends of life." -- I argue for a reorientation of political theory teaching and scholarship back towards institutions -- particularly the normative evaluation of the political process and the exploration of institutional principles like democracy, representation, bicameralism, the rule of law, the separation of powers, federalism and so on. ..these issues should not be left to empirical or comparative politcial science, because they raise important and complex questions of evaluation that may be sold short by the pragmatic and consequentialist emphasis of empirical and comparative work. But political theory should respect the empirical study of institutions more than it does, and it should dovetail the normative and evaluative work that political theory involves with the understanding of institutions, processes, and practices that political science generates. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_philosophy  political_science  human_nature  social_theory  institutions  government-forms  governmentality  constitutions  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  institution-building  institutional_change  political_change  political_participation  political_culture  Arendt  Berlin_Isaiah  Hume  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  comparative_history  political_order  legitimacy  democracy  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  legislature  executive  judicial_review  justice  civic_virtue  dignity  egalitarian  rule_of_law  citizenship  education-civic  federalism  social_process  socialization  civil_liberties  Founders  Madison  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
David Womersley, ed. - Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century (2006) - Online Library of Liberty
David Womersely, Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century, edited and with an Introduction by David Womersley (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1727> -- This volume is a collection of essays which examines some of the central themes and ideologies central to the formation of the United States including Edmund Burke’s theories on property rights and government, the influence of Jamaica on the American colonies, the relations between religious and legal understandings of the concept of liberty, the economic understanding of the Founders, the conflicting viewpoints between moral sense theory and the idea of natural rights in the founding period, the divisions in thought among the revolutionaries regarding the nature of liberty and the manner in which liberty was to be preserved, and the disparity in Madison’s political thought from the 1780s to the 1790s. -- authors include Jack Greene, David Wootton, Gordon Wood. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  West_Indies  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  colonialism  British_Empire  Anglo-American  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  property  property_rights  liberty  liberalism-republicanism_debates  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  natural_law  human_nature  Founders  Parliamentary_supremacy  Patriot_King  Burke  Madison  Hume  Scottish_Enlightenment  commerce  luxury  commerce-doux  corruption  tyranny  Absolutism  US_constitution  American_Revolution  UK_government-colonies  partisanship  common_good  common_law  Whigs  democracy  political_participation  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  government-forms  mixed_government  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 4 (Novanglus, Thoughts on Government, Defence of the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 4. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2102> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 4 contains Novanglus [history of the American colonies and their relations with Britain from 1754 to 1774], Thoughts on Government, and Defence of the Constitutions [descriptions of modern and ancient republics (categorized as democratic, aristocratic and, some ancient, as monarchic), and writings on the history and theories of forms of government by ancient and modern historians and philosophers. Lists Dr Swift as well as Hume -must have read 4 Last Years. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Adams_John  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  government-forms  historians-and-politics  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  Swift  Hume  American_colonies  American_Revolution  George_III  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  English_constitution  UK_government-colonies  British_Empire  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Selections from the Scottish Philosophy of Common Sense, edited, with an introduction by G.A. Johnston [1910] - Online Library of Liberty
Thomas Reid, Selections from the Scottish Philosophy of Common Sense, edited, with an introduction by G.A. Johnston (Chicago: Open Court, 1915). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2044> The selections in this volume are reprinted from the following editions:— Reid’s Works, edited by Sir William Hamilton, sixth edition, 1863. Beattie’s Essay on the Nature and Immutability of Truth, seventh edition, 1807. Ferguson’s Principles of Moral and Political Science, 1792. Stewart’s Collected Works, edited by Sir William Hamilton, 1854-1858.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Common_Sense  Locke  Hume  Kant  Reid  Stewart_Dugald  Ferguson  metaphysics  epistemology  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  mind  mind-body  soul  dualism  ideas-theories  psychology  perception  scepticism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R. Westphal - Enlightenment Fundamentals: Rights, Responsibilities & Republicanism | Diametros
Kenneth R. Westphal is Professorial Fellow in the School of Philosophy, University of East Anglia (Norwich), and currently Visiting Professor of Philosophy at the Martin-Luther-Universität Halle Wittenberg. -- This essay re-examines some key fundamentals of the Enlightenment regarding individual rights, responsibilities and republicanism which deserve and require re-emphasis today, insofar as they underscore the character and fundamental importance of mature judgment, and how developing and fostering mature judgment is a fundamental aim of education. These fundamentals have been clouded or eroded by various recent developments, including mis-guided educational policy and not a little scholarly bickering. Clarity about these fundamentals is more important today than ever. Sapere aude! -- Keywords - Hobbes Hume Rousseau Kant Hegel, rational justification, mature judgment, moral constructivism, realism objectivity rights responsibilities republicanism media culture, Euthyphro question, natural law, Dilemma of the Criterion -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  French_Enlightenment  Germany  German_Idealism  voluntarism  obligation  morality-conventional  morality-objective  natural_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  civic_virtue  Hobbes  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  Rousseau  Kant  Kant-ethics  Hegel  judgment-political  public_sphere  media  political_culture  values  education-civic  education-higher  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  21stC  Dewey  Quine  Sellars  analytical_philosophy  academia  professionalization 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Rousseau (in 2 volumes, 1873) - John Morley - Google Books
This bookmark is to a reprint of Vol 1 in the late 1880s. The quality of the original edition on Google_Books is very poor. Unfortunately the reprint of Vol 2 isn't available on Google_Books. Check Hathi Trust or Internet Archive. Added to Google_Books library -- both 1873 volumes and the reprint of Vol 1
books  etexts  Google_Books  18thC  biography  intellectual_history  French_Enlightenment  Rousseau  Voltaire  d'Alembert  Diderot  Hume  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  Geneva  general_will  cultural_critique  cultural_history  music_history  social_contract  elite_culture  Paris  theater  Morley  EF-add  philosophes  libertine 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
On Compromise (1874) -- The works of Lord Morley, Vol 3 - John Morley - Google Books
Concerned about erosion of acting according to moral and political principles. Analysis of causes (1) French example of claiming that policies deduced from general principles gives principle a bad name (2) historicism (1st rumbles of "relativism" accusation) (3) newspapers responding to short term opinions and prejudices of buyers (4) State Church puts important part of educated elite into defense of status quo and rejection of thinking through implications of new information, conditions etc - as well as encourage hypocrisy (5) nouveau riche that has neither the class tradition of noblesse oblige nor what he takes to be widely shared American attachment to the notion of the common good -- a political and intellectual_history of 19thC England, including reaction to Enlightenment - last chapter focus on free thought vs free speech, Locke, JS Mill, liberty and toleration, ending with remarks by Diderot -- added to Google_Books library
books  etexts  Google_Books  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  intellectual_history  France  Anglo-French  Enlightenment  Hume  Diderot  Locke-religion  Mill  tolerance  free-thinkers  free_speech  public_opinion  newspapers  haute_bourgeoisie  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  political_culture  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  historicism  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  liberalism  Victorian  Morley  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Kivy - The Seventh Sense: Francis Hutchenson and 18thC British Aesthetics (2003) : Book Depository
The Seventh Sense is the definitive study of the aesthetic theory of the great 18thC philosopher Francis Hutcheson, arguably the founder of the modern discipline of aesthetics, and one of the most important figures of the Scottish Enlightenment. This new edition brings Peter Kivy's seminal work back into print, substantially expanded by the addition of seven essays, which deal primarily with Hutcheson's relation to other thinkers, and his influence on 18thC and early 19thC aesthetics. Part I of The Seventh Sense presents a detailed analysis of Hutcheson's aesthetic theory. Part II traces the considerable influence of Hutcheson's theory up to the early years of the 19thC. Part III is a new and substantial addition to the original work, collecting Peter Kivy's essays on this topic since the first edition appeared, which deal primarily with Hutcheson, David Hume, and Thomas Reid. Philosophers of art, historians of philosophy, and historians working on 18thC European art and culture will find this new edition an invaluable resource.
books  intellectual_history  art_history  art_criticism  18thC  19thC  aesthetics  Hutcheson  Scottish_Enlightenment  Hume  Reid  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Joyce - Is Moral Projectivism Empirically Tractable? | JSTOR: Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, Vol. 12, No. 1 (Feb., 2009), pp. 53-75
Vol. 12, No. 1, Empirically Informed Moral Theory -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Different versions of moral projectivism are delineated: minimal, metaphysical, nihilistic, and noncognitivist. Minimal projectivism (the focus of this paper) is the conjunction of two subtheses: (1) that we experience morality as an objective aspect of the world and (2) that this experience has its origin in an affective attitude (e.g., an emotion) rather than in perceptual faculties. Both are empirical claims and must be tested as such. This paper does not offer ideas on any specific test procedures, but rather undertakes the important preliminary task of clarifying the content of these subtheses (e.g., what is meant by "objective"? what is meant by "experience"?). Finally, attention is given to the relation between (a) acknowledging that the projectivist account might be true of a token moral judgment and (b) maintaining moral projectivism to be true as a general thesis. -- starts with 17thC and 18thC philosophy, especially Hume
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  morality-objective  morality-conventional  moral_sentiments  consciousness  mind  cognition  17thC  18thC  Hume  empiricism  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jacob T. Levy - Not So Novus an Ordo: Constitutions Without Social Contracts | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 37, No. 2 (April 2009), pp. 191-217
Social contract theory imagines political societies as resting on a fundamental agreement, adopted at a discrete moment in hypothetical time, that binds individual persons together into a polity and sets fundamental rules regarding that polity's structure and powers. Written constitutions, adopted at real moments in historical time, dictating governmental structures, bounding governmental powers, and entrenching individual rights, look temptingly like social contracts reified. Yet something essential is lost in this slippage between social contract theory and the practice of constitutionalism. Contractarian blinders lead us to look for greater individualism, social unity, and coherence of principles than should be expected. Real constitutional orders appropriate, incorporate, and channel the histories and divisions of the societies they govern. Treating them as social contracts flattens and distorts them, making those engagements with the past or with social plurality appear anomalous and encouraging their minimization. Accordingly this article redirects attention to non-contractarian strands within constitutionalism's intellectual inheritance and lived practice. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  legal_history  legal_theory  constitutionalism  social_contract  political_philosophy  Bolingbroke  Hume  legitimacy  institutions  political_culture  individualism  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter, review - Christopher Janaway, Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche's Genealogy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // (2007)
.. this intelligent and illuminating book, which aims to defend two rather precise theses about reading Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality: first, that Nietzsche's method of writing is intended to engage the reader emotionally or affectively; and second, that such affective engagement is a necessary precondition for altering the reader's views about evaluative questions -- that "without the rhetorical provocations, without the revelation of what we find gruesome, shaming, embarrassing, comforting, and heart-warming we would neither comprehend nor be able to revalue our current values". -- Janaway and I are farther apart with respect to Nietzsche's conception of human agency and freedom. Janaway takes the passage on "the sovereign individual" (GM II:2) as giving expression to Nietzsche's "positive conception of free will" as "involv[ing] acting fully within one's character, knowing its limits and capabilities, and valuing oneself for what one is rather than for one's conformity to an external standard or to what one ought to be". It seems to me a mistake, however, to read this passage as articulating a kind of ideal of agency or selfhood; in context, I think it is far more plausible to understand the passage as being wholly ironic and mocking. -- very useful re Leiter view of both Hume and Nietzsche's "science of man" based on "speculative naturalism"
books  reviews  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  Hume  naturalism  science_of_man  moral_psychology  free_will  causation  agency  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
The Self Illusion: How Our Social Brain Constructs Who We Are | Brain Pickings
Discusses Bruce Hood book, "The Self Illusion" [not that the self doesn't exist but it's constructed by the brain] -- Hood goes on to trace how the self emerges in childhood and examines why this notion of the illusory self is among the hardest concepts to accept, contrasting the “ego theory” of the self, which holds that we are essential entities inside bodies, with Hume’s “bundle theory,” which constructs the self not as a single unified entity but as a bundle of sensations, perceptions, and thoughts lumped together. Neuroscience, Hood argues, only supports the latter. The Self Illusion tells the story of how that bundle forms and why it sticks together, revealing the brain’s own storytelling as the centripetal force of the self.
books  human_nature  self  consciousness  Hume  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Terence Penelhum - Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume's Moral Psychology. by John Bricke | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 108, No. 3 (Apr., 1998), pp. 630-633
Gives the book high marks - the review discusses ways Bricke reconciles key pieces of the Treatise and the problems for Hume's motivation of action generally via desires versus moral action via moral sentiments - and how this works (or causes difficulties) with the bundled self and identity -- didn't download
books  reviews  find  amazon.com  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  Hume  human_nature  action-theory  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  Hume-ethics  moral_sentiments  reason-passions  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Summary of Hume's Treatise (Cole Mitchell)
This is a summary of David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature, written by Cole Mitchell. I originally started writing it for Wikipedia, but decided to first put it on my website (where it will on occasion be carefully edited by me) and then add it to Wikipedia (where it will be mercilessly edited and re-edited by unruly commoners). No summary can be perfectly interpretation-free, but I’ve tried my best.
website  Hume  Hume-ethics  epistemology  metaphysics  human_nature  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Online guide to texts in early modern metaethics (Cole Mitchell)
This is an online guide to texts in early modern metaethics, organized by author in rough chronological order, and maintained by Cole Mitchell. I try to keep the focus on topics of metaethical interest: reason and the passions, the status of moral truths and their relation to God, the ‘why be moral?’ question, the relation between morality and self-interest, analogies between morality and other domains (geometry, law, aesthetics), teleology and human nature, etc.
This guide is still pretty rough and messy. Any feedback on this or similar projects would be much appreciated:
website  links  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  metaethics  human_nature  mind-body  reason-passions  natural_religion  rational_religion  Deism  Cambridge_Platonists  Descartes  Malebranche  Hobbes  Locke  Clarke  Leibniz  Butler  Berkeley  Warburton  Hume  Hume-ethics  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton, "Aesthetics and Evolutionary Psychology" in The Oxford Handbook for Aesthetics, edited by Jerrold Levinson (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003).
Starts with Aristotle and Hume - common elements of human nature that would make certain aspects of poetics common across cultures and over time and make visual and aural experiences aestheticly pleasing. Attacks 20thC extreme blank slate as cultural relativism. Goes through evolutionary psychology theories about sexual selection and fitness, including costliness of effort and display. Returns to Kant re limits on evolutionary psychology that the more reductionist of evo-devo types seem incapable of understanding.
article  books  aesthetics  intellectual_history  Aristotle  Hume  Kant  human_nature  cultural_history  relativism  judgment-aesthetics  taste  evolutionary_biology  psychology  evo_psych  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Stone - Skepticism as a Theory of Knowledge | JSTOR: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 60, No. 3 (May, 2000), pp. 527-545
Bringing something like mitigated skepticism up to date with brains in vats and conditional truths in possible worlds. In addition to external world he deals with induction and knowledge of the past -- Skepticism about the external world may very well be correct, so the question is in order: what theory of knowledge flows from skepticism itself? The skeptic can give a relatively simple and intuitive account of knowledge by identifying it with indubitable certainty. Our everyday `I know that p' claims, which typically are part of practical projects, deploy the ideal of knowledge to make assertions closely related to, but weaker than, knowledge claims. The truth of such claims is consistent with skepticism; various other vexing problems don't arise. In addition, even if no claim about the world outside my mind can be more probable than its negation, the project of pure scientific research remains well motivated.
article  jstor  epistemology  analytical_philosophy  21stC  scepticism  Hume  Hume-causation  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Camic - The Utilitarians Revisited | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 85, No. 3 (Nov., 1979), pp. 516-550
For generations sociologists have attacked utilitarian social theory as inadequate theoretically. At the same time, their presentist orientation toward sociology's past has prevented a direct examination of the utilitarians in their own right. This paper rejects that orientation and investigates the social theory of the major utilitarians. David Hume, Adam Smith, Jeremy Bentham, and John Stuart Mill. No alleged characteristic of utilitarianism-from the atomistic, rationalistic model of social action to the failure to solve the problem of order-adduced in the traditional attack upon it is actually found in the work of the utilitarians. The paper then outlines the historical process whereby the prevailing mythology concerning utilitarianism developed. The hallmark of that process is not the cumulative development of social theories but the displacement, in changing cultural and social circumstances, of the concerns of utilitarian social theory-a displacement succesively evident in the work of Spencer, early American social scintists, and Park and climaxing in Parson's The Structure of Social Action. The paper concludes by offering a sociological interpretation of Parson's selective account of utilitarian social theory and by identifying the constricting, but still pervasive, theoretical implications of that account. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  social_theory  utilitarianism  Hume  Bentham  Mill  Parsons  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven Lestition - Kant and the End of the Enlightenment in Prussia | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Mar., 1993), pp. 57-112
Didn't download - looks like good summary of Spinozist flap over Lessing in broader context of Lutheran clergy, political and religious authoritarianism in some Prussia estates even before death of Frederick_the_Great - works through some of Kant’s non Critique writings -- loads of references
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  18thC  Prussia  Germany  Enlightenment  Lessing  Jacobi  Kant  freedom_of_conscience  Lutherans  fideism  Pietist  Biblical_criticism  religion-established  tolerance  Spinozism  Hume  rationalist  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Raynor - Hume on Wilkes and Liberty: Two Possible Contributions to The London Chronicle | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 13, No. 4 (Summer, 1980), pp. 365-376
Hume less positive re continued excellence in the arts in a commercial republic without an aristocracy in a monarchical system to enduce emulation, encourage excellence - would prefer enlightened absolutism to Wilkes type of republicanism -- check Hume Studies and Google if these attributions have been challenged or accepted -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  cultural_history  cultural_critique  18thC  Hume  Hume-politics  commerce-doux  arts-promotion  enlightened_absolutism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Wilkes  progress  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan G. W. Conlin - High Art and Low Politics: A New Perspective on John Wilkes | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 356-381
Fascinating for mid to late 18thC issues for both Continental Enlightenment and British thinkers and artists re scope of public sphere and state responsibility for promotion of the arts, its benefits for polite culture including middle classes with polite aspirations -- Wilkes connections with philosophes including Holbach and Diderot -- and how Wilkes wove his political reforms and promotion of arts and industry together. Useful discussion of range of historian takes on Wilkes, who he mobilized, relation with older republican opposition and later dissenters and radical opposition. Hume opposition to Wilkes' anti monarchy and anti aristocracy republicanism leads to different assessment of progress in civilizing arts and role of doux commerce. Each historian seems to put Wilkes in their own narrative resulting in dramatically different assessments of both Wilkes himself and his impact. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  art_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  George_III  Wilkes  Hume  Diderot  d'Holbach  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  opposition  public_sphere  public_opinion  governing_class  political_nation  political_culture  accountability  Parliament  franchise  Septennial_Act  nationalism  national_ID  xenophobia  anti-monarchy  anti-aristocracy  middle_class  merchants  state-roles  Grand_Tour  patriotism  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Catherine_the_Great  Walpole  Walpole_Horace  museums  academies  bibliography  enlightened_absolutism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. Samuel Preus - Peter Harrison, "Religion" and the Religions in the English Enlightenment | JSTOR: Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 60, No. 3 (Autumn, 1992), pp. 553-555
High marks for explaining why deists were important for developing comparative religion. Harrison sees Hume as fatal step where excision of apologetics sends inquiry off into non scientific - Preus thinks this probably reflects world religions vision of Harrison's mentor WH Smith which actually interferes with a scientific approach to comparative religion.
books  reviews  religious_history  intellectual_history  comparative_religion  sociology_of_religion  17thC  18thC  Deism  Toland  Hume  human_nature  comparative_anthropology  Early_Christian  Neoplatonism  Biblical_criticism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Farr - Political Science and the Enlightenment of Enthusiasm | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 82, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 51-69
I provide a narrative of the emergence of an expressly articulated @'political science@' in the Scottish Enlightenment. Political science was designed by Hume, Smith, and others to advance both a Newtonian method for the study of politics and a politics of moderation whose tasks included a critique of enthusiasm. In this way, poltiical science, moderation, and (anti)enthusiasm were conceptually connected. The emergence of political science, understood in this way, required a number of conceptual changes in a structure of argument shaped largely by Locke. These conceptual changes, in turn, fixed a rhetorical framework for persistent debates over the methodological and political identity of political science, even as ideology literally replaced enthusiasm. These persistent debates reveal the relevance of the history of political science as a forum for remembrance, reflection, and critique. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  18thC  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  science_of_man  social_sciences  Scottish_Enlightenment  Hume  Smith  enthusiasm  Newtonian  ideology  Locke  rhetoric-political  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Scott Yenor - Revealed Religion and the Politics of Humanity in Hume's Philosophy of Common Life | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Jul., 2006), pp. 395-415
Hume's philosophy of common life consists in two moments: philosophic agnosticism about deep irresolvable metaphysical issues and a willingness to assume the common sense of the matter so that philosophy can proceed. This method works so long as he maintains agnosticism in the metaphysical issues as he entertains the common sense assumptions. When Hume turns his attention to revealed religion, however, his common life philosophy breaks down as his anti-transcendent metaphysic contaminates his assumptions; his embrace of humanity as the chief virtue of the modern world illuminates this contamination, as does his suggestion that religious belief might be extinguished in the modern world. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  Hume  scepticism  Hume-causation  anti-foundationalism  epistemology  religious_belief  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Manzer - Hume's Constitutionalism and the Identity of Constitutional Democracy | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 90, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 488-496
Modern constitutional democracy entails a particular kind of political self-understanding that uniquely centers on a constitution. While many recent studies have focused on how constitutional text shapes this self-understanding, little attention has been paid to the implications of different views of constitutional authority. This is a critical consideration, however, because constitutional authority has always been intrinsically fragile within constitutional democracy, and never more so than at present. In this article, I explore the potential of constitutional science to generate a conception of constitutional authority and collective identity. I focus on David Hume's effort to use constitutional science to shape opinion about liberty and the nature of the political community. This analysis also provides a basis for reflecting on the problematic relation of democracy to constitutionalism and on the peculiar problem of constitutional opinion in constitutional democracy. -- extensive bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  British_history  Hume  Hume-politics  constitutionalism  democracy  public_opinion  legitimacy  national_ID  community  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Millican - Hume, Causal Realism, and Causal Science | JSTOR: Mind, New Series, Vol. 118, No. 471 (Jul., 2009), pp. 647-712
The 'New Hume' interpretation, which sees Hume as a realist about 'thick' Causal powers, has been largely motivated by his evident commitment to causal language and causal science. In this, however, it is fundamentally misguided, failing to recognise how Hume exploits his anti-realist conclusions about (upper-case) Causation precisely to support (lower-case) causal science. When critically examined, none of the standard New Humean arguments—familiar from the work of Wright, Craig, Strawson, Buckle, Kail, and others—retains any significant force against the plain evidence of Hume's texts. But the most devastating objection comes from Hume's own applications of his analysis of causation, to the questions of 'the immateriality of the soul' and 'liberty and necessity'. These show that the New Hume interpretation has misunderstood the entire purpose of his 'Chief Argument', and presented him as advocating some of the very positions he is arguing most strongly against. -- paywall Oxford Journals 7 years until jstor
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Hume  causation  scepticism  soul  free_will  determinism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Boyd - Reappraising the Scottish Moralists and Civil Society | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 33, No. 1 (Autumn, 2000), pp. 101-125
Michael Sandel and others have faulted liberal constitutionalism for its "proceduralism," its "bracketing" of divisive moral issues, and its pursuit of the "unencumbered self." As a contemporary diagnosis, there is much to be said on behalf of these criticisms. Yet in recounting the story of liberalism's development as the deliberate and inevitable pursuit of moral individuality, these accounts fail to consider the anticipated benefits-as well as the costs-of modern constitutionalism that were evident to eighteenth-century thinkers like David Hume and Adam Smith. We will see that classical liberals like Hume and Smith did not defend liberal constitutionalism in the name of the "unencumbered self." Instead they saw liberal neutrality, the separation between public and private, and the relegation of religion to a private matter of civil society as the best way to accommodate sectarianism, ethical pluralism and the religious conflicts of the post-Reformation world. Only by challenging contemporary presumptions of liberal teleology and by understanding classical liberalism's development as the product of eighteenth-century encounters with the perils of pluralism can we fully reckon the advantages and disadvantages of liberal constitutionalism. These lessons of classical liberalism suggest both the presumptive virtues of liberalism and the dangers of communitarian efforts to encourage shared purposes and a thicker public life in the modern polity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  liberalism  communitarian  pluralism  constitutionalism  18thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  civil_society  public_sphere  individualism  religious_wars  politics-and-religion  political_culture  Hume  Smith  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John Greco: Agent Reliabilism | JSTOR: Noûs, Vol. 33 (1999), pp. 273-296
Didn't download paper -- helpful re how theorists have tried to deal with Hume's non-demonstrative knowledge that Hume refuses to give the "knowledge" label to - some treating him as the ultimate skeptical challenge, others adjusting "knowledge" criteria for what's Hume's common sense observations about what is derived from different types of evidence and experience of varying reliability, what from "reason" in the sense of logical proof. Develops "agent reliabilism" drawing on virtue epistemology (esp Sosa) and Alston social reliabilism. At least we seem to have progressed beyond Gettier problems! Would seem to fit a pragmatist approach since further inquiry would adjust what would be justifiable as "reliable"
article  jstor  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  reliabilism  scepticism  Hume  probability  evidence  pragmatism  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
John Mikhail - Review of Patricia S. Churchland, 'Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality':: SSRN
The treatment of these subjects is generally informative and often quite illuminating, albeit occasionally superficial. Churchland writes elegantly and presents a clear, distinctive, and forceful viewpoint on the science of morality, which draws inspiration from Aristotle, Hume, and Darwin. Her principal thesis, that moral and social values are rooted in the neurobiology of care, trust, and cooperation, deserves to be taken seriously by scientists and philosophers alike. In this review, I focus on three perceived weaknesses of Churchland’s stimulating book that likely will be of particular interest to philosophers: her interpretation of Hume, her skepticism toward innate moral principles, and her treatment of moral rules. I then conclude by making a few brief observations about the general significance of Braintrust. Keywords: Churchland, Darwin, Hume, Aristotle, Plato, morality, nativism, epistemology, computation, rules, neurobiology, care, attachment, norms, genes, evolution -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle  reviews  moral_philosophy  cognition  neuroscience  Hume  naturalism  evolutionary_biology  evo_psych  epistemology  genetics  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
NIALL O'FLAHERTY - WILLIAM PALEY'S MORAL PHILOSOPHY AND THE CHALLENGE OF HUME: AN ENLIGHTENMENT DEBATE? (2010) - Modern Intellectual History - Cambridge Journals Online
NIALL O'FLAHERTY (2010). WILLIAM PALEY'S MORAL PHILOSOPHY AND THE CHALLENGE OF HUME: AN ENLIGHTENMENT DEBATE?. Modern Intellectual History, 7, pp 1-31. doi:10.1017/S1479244309990254. -- paywall rent 24 hours $5.99 -- This essay offers a reassessment of William Paley's Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy (1785). It focuses on his defence of religious ethics from challenges laid down in David Hume's Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals (1751). By restoring the context of theological/philosophical debate to Paley's thinking about ethics, the essay attempts to establish his genuine commitment to a worldly theology and to a programme of human advancement. This description of orthodox thought takes us beyond the bipolar debate about whether intellectual culture in the period was religious or secular: it was clearly religious; the question is: what kind of religion? It also makes questionable the view that England was somehow isolated from so-called Enlightenment currents of thought that were thriving elsewhere on the Continent. The “science of man”, far from being the sole preserve of Scottish and continental thinkers, also provided the basis for moral thought in eighteenth-century England.
article  paywall  find  18thC  intellectual_history  theology  Enlightenment  God-existence  moral_philosophy  religious_culture  improvement  Hume  Paley  human_nature  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jerome Christensen: Hume's Social Composition (1985)
JSTOR: Representations, No. 12 (Autumn, 1985), pp. 44-65 -- a postmodern reading of Hume - his epistemology as basis of his literary fashioning of self, the society he describes, analyzes and portrays, and the reading public he refines -- interesting approach and bibliography
article  jstor  lit_crit  intellectual_history  postmodern  Hume  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock - Hume's Philosophical Politics by Duncan Forbes (1978)
JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 72, No. 2 (Jun., 1978), pp. 638-639 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Finds Forbes writing and analysis both hopelessly confused -- some great stuff re where Hume sits vis à vis various flavors of Whigs, Tories and political historians at different times from 1740s onwards. Here's where Pocock's idée fixe on corrupting commerce is useful in explaining how the Essays fit with History of England -- not just against "vulgar Whiggism" (by time Hume wrote History based on Modern constitution theory of the Court Whigs, both oligarchic and radical Whigs had returned to Ancient Constitution) but pro the civilizing virtues of economic development. His target is the austere civic virtue of the republicans. Here's where Pocock misses -- Britain post Fletcher had few austere republicans - only found among idolators of Sparta on the Continent. That there was a luxury debate across the 18thC in both Continental Europe and Britain is clear, but it's not a debate re republicanism -- it's about the new "civil society", about foundation of morals if not biblicalrevelation or fear of hell, it's about human nature, and it's involved in comparative anthropology (geographic and historical) In short, it's about the science of man. Pocock's terrific observations re time, and the shift from anxiety re inevitable decline to possibility of progress fits in the science of man luxury and corruption debates that go far wider and deeper than classical republicanism. Though on Continent it takes on more of a republican angle after Montesquieu.
books  reviews  Pocock  Hume  18thC  historiography-18thC  political_philosophy  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Whigs-oligarchy  Tories  clientelism  British_politics  British_history  commerce-doux  fiscal-military_state  sovereign_debt  parties  UK_government-colonies  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  Pitt_the_Elder  British_Empire  political_economy  downloaded  EF-add  bookshelf 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Donald S. Lutz: The Relative Influence of European Writers on Late Eighteenth-Century American Political Thought (1984)
JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 78, No. 1 (Mar., 1984), pp. 189-197 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Drawing upon a comprehensive list of political writings by Americans published between 1760 and 1805, the study uses a citation count drawn from these 916 items as a surrogate measure of the relative influence of European writers upon American political thought during the era. Contrary to the general tendencies in the recent literature, the results here indicate that there was no one European writer, or one tradition of writers, that dominated American political thought. There is evidence for moving beyond the Whig-Enlightenment dichotomy as the basis for textual analysis, and for expanding the set of individual European authors considered to have had an important effect on American thinking. Montesquieu, Blackstone, and Hume are most in need of upgrading in this regard. The patterns of influence apparently varied over the time period from 1760 to 1805, and future research on the relative influence of European thinkers must be more sensitive to this possibility.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  US_history  Founders  US_constitution  political_culture  reading  publishing  Whigs  Montesquieu  Blackstone  Locke  Cato's_Letters  Hume  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Serap Ayşe Kayatekin: The relation of morality to political economy in Hume (2013) | Cambridge Journal of Economics
Cambridge Journal of Economics. (2013) doi: 10.1093/cje/bes072 First published online: January 29, 2013 -- In his Treatise of Human Nature, Hume argues that reason does not motivate action but rather directs our judgement by informing us about their causes and effects. He distances, in his argument, passions from reason by claiming that passions are not ideas, do not represent anything, are self-contained and thus cannot be contradictory to truth or reason. Moral judgements, according to Hume, are passions and as such they cannot be contrary to reason. For Hume, morality does not consist of immutable principles to be discovered by reason; it is based on human passions, which, through repetition, human beings come to associate with certain moral characteristics. Following on this statement, I here explore the following point: to the extent economic behaviour is determined by passions such as greed, benevolence and pleasure, we cannot separate economic activity and morality. As an extension, morality and political economy are inextricably linked in Hume. This suggests that ethics, through the study of morality and political economy, and the study of economic behaviour and institutions are inseparable subjects. It is interesting to observe this in the work of Hume, a fundamental influence on Adam Smith, one of the most important precursors of modern economics. The paper underlines the importance of understanding the evolution of the history of economic thinking that led to modern-day economics and which, though claiming Hume via Smith as one of its progenitors, argues for a complete separation of ethics and economics. In particular, the separation of positive from normative economics becomes infeasible in light of Hume’s analysis, rendering problematic the claim of modern economics that Hume is the founding father. -- Anatolia School of Arts, Sciences and Technology. I thank my co-editors, Alan Freeman and Vicky Chick, my colleague, Sheila Dow, and my friend, Antonio Callari, for incisive comments throughout the different phases of the writing of this paper. 
article  paywall  intellectual_history  economic_history  economic_theory  18thC  Hume  reason  moral_philosophy  emotions  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sean Elliott: Contending for liberty : principle and party in Montesquieu, Hume, and Burke (2010 thesis)
University of St Andrews -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This thesis explores the political reformation of “faction” in the political thought of Montesquieu, David Hume, and Edmund Burke, three thinkers whose works span what Pierre Manent calls “an exquisite moment of liberalism.” It examines the transformation of faction from one based largely on class to one based largely on political function and argues that as the political emphasis of “party” overtook that of class, a disconnect in constitutional theory appeared between the principles formerly associated with class, such as honor, and the principles now associated with parties. This disconnect is examined by focusing on the interrelated concepts of political principle, or that which motivates and regulates men, and faction, itself divided into two types, principled and singular. This thesis further considers the role of political principle to faction in each thinker’s thought in order to demonstrate how limited domestic political conflict could sustain itself via a party system. Each thinker recognized that limited political conflict did not weaken the state but rather strengthened it, if engendered by “principled faction” cognizant of a nominal sovereign. Accordingly, it is argued that a similar understanding of “principled faction,” though focused largely on aristocratic ideas of prejudice, self-interest, and inequality, better promoted political liberty within the state and contributed to a greater acceptance of party in political thought.
thesis  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  18thC  Britain  France  British_politics  faction  parties  Montesquieu  Hume  Burke  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Carl Wennerlind: David Hume’s Monetary Theory Revisited: Was He Really a Quantity Theorist and an Inflationist? (2005)
JSTOR: Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 113, No. 1 (February 2005), pp. 223-237....Downloaded pdf to Note. ?...see bookshelf for 2011 Hume Political Economy collection. ?... David Hume’s monetary theory has been controversial since its formulation. Lately, the focus has been on Hume’s alleged misapplication of the quantity theory of money. While he appears to subscribe to a simple quantity theory with money neutrality, in a famously contested passage in the essay Of Money, he violates the neutrality condition by claiming that an increase in the money stock has favorable output effects. While most commentators argue about the persistence of the output effect, this paper suggests that we can derive an alternative understanding of Hume’s monetary thinking by recognizing that he made an analytical distinction between endogenous and exogenous money. Realization that only the former has a favorable output effect forces us to overturn the long‐standing consensus that Hume instructed the government to use monetary or trade policy to engineer a gradually increasing money stock.
article  jstor  bookshelf  economic_history  monetary_policy  18thC  economic_models  currency  money  FX  prices  inflation  trade  Hume  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1790s  1800s  1810s  1848_revolutions  Absolutism  academia  academies  accountability  accounting  action-theory  Adams_John  aesthetics  affect_theory  agency  altruism  amazon.com  American_colonies  American_exceptionalism  American_Revolution  analytical_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Anglo-American  Anglo-French  anti-aristocracy  anti-foundationalism  anti-humanism  anti-monarchy  anticlerical  Aquinas  Arendt  Aristotle  article  arts-promotion  art_criticism  art_history  atheism  atheism_panic  Atlantic  audio  Augustine  authors-women  autobiography  a_priori  balance_of_power  Bayle  Bentham  Berkeley  Berlin_Isaiah  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  bibliography  biocultural_evolution  biography  Blackburn  Blackstone  Blake_William  Bolingbroke  books  bookshelf  Boswell  Britain  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_politics  Burke  Butler  buy  Cambridge_Platonists  Cantillon  Cartesian  Cassirer  Catherine_the_Great  Cato's_Letters  causation  change-economic  change-social  character  charity  checks-and-balances  Church_of_England  citizenship  civic_virtue  civilizing_process  civil_liberties  civil_society  Clarke  classical_economics  clergy  clientelism  climate  cognition  Collins_Anthony  colonialism  commerce  commerce-doux  commercial_interest  common_good  common_law  Common_Sense  communitarian  community  comparative_anthropology  comparative_history  comparative_religion  complexity  consciousness  conscription  conservatism  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  constitutions  constructivism  corruption  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  courses  creativity  Cudworth  cultural_change  cultural_critique  cultural_history  cultural_studies  culture_wars  currency  d'Alembert  d'Holbach  decision_theory  Deism  Deluze  democracy  demonstration  Derrida  Descartes  determinism  Dewey  Diderot  dignity  diversity  downloaded  dualism  Duns_Scotus  Early_Christian  Early_Republic  economic_culture  economic_history  economic_models  economic_theory  Edinburgh_Review  education  education-civic  education-higher  EF-add  egalitarian  elite_culture  emergence  emotions  empire-and_business  empires  empiricism  English_constitution  English_lit  enlightened_absolutism  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-conservative  Enlightenment_Project  enthusiasm  epistemology  epistemology-history  epistemology-moral  epistemology-naturalism  epistemology-social  etexts  Evernote  evidence  evil  evolution-as-model  evolution-social  evolutionary_biology  evo_psych  executive  existentialism  experimental_philosophy  faction  fallibility  fanatics  federalism  Ferguson  Fichte  fideism  find  fiscal-military_state  Founders  France  franchise  Frankfurt_School  Frederick_the_Great  free-thinkers  freedom_of_conscience  free_speech  free_will  Frege  French_Enlightenment  French_lit  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  FX  general_will  genetics  Geneva  George_Henry  George_III  Germany  German_Idealism  Gibbon  global_economy  God-attributes  God-existence  Goldman_Alvin  Google_Books  governing_class  government-forms  governmentality  Grand_Tour  Great_Powers  Habermas  Hamilton  haute_bourgeoisie  Haywood  Hegel  Heidegger  historians-and-politics  historical_change  historicism  historiography  historiography-18thC  historiography-Marxist  historiography-Whig  history_of_England  history_of_science  Hobbes  humanism  human_nature  human_rights  Hume  Hume-aesthetics  Hume-causation  Hume-ethics  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Hume-religion  Husserl  Hutcheson  idealism  ideas-theories  identity  ideology  imagination  immortality  imperialism  improvement  individualism  inference  inflation  Instapaper  institution-building  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutions  insurance  intellectual_history  international_law  international_political_economy  international_system  IR_theory  Jacobi  James_William  Jefferson  Johnson  jstor  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-political  judicial_review  jurisprudence  justice  Kames  Kant  Kant-aesthetics  Kant-ethics  Kierkegaard  kindle  kindle-available  Kirk  Labor_markets  laws_of_nature  lecture  legal_history  legal_positivism  legal_realism  legal_system  legal_theory  legislature  legitimacy  Leibniz  Lessing  levée_en_masse  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  libertine  liberty  limited_monarchy  links  literary_history  lit_crit  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  Locke-education  Locke-Essay  Locke-religion  Logical_Positivism  love  Lutherans  luxury  Mackintosh_James  Madison  Malebranche  Mandeville  Marx  Marxist  mass_culture  materialism  media  medieval_history  Mendelssohn  mercantilism  merchants  Merleau-Ponty  metaethics  metaphysics  middle_class  military  Military_Revolution  Mill  Millar_John  mind  mind-body  miracles  mixed_government  modernity  monetary_policy  money  monotheism  Montesquieu  morality  morality-conventional  morality-objective  moral_economy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_realism  moral_reform  moral_sentiments  Morley  motivation  multiculturalism  museums  music_history  Napoleonic_Wars  nationalism  national_ID  national_interest  naturalism  natural_law  natural_philosophy  natural_religion  natural_rights  Navigation_Acts  neo-Kantian  Neoplatonism  neuroscience  newspapers  Newton  Newtonian  Nietzsche  nihilism  norms  norms-business  North-Weingast  novels  obligation  Ockham  opposition  ordinary_language_philosophy  Paine  Paley  Paris  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parsons  parties  partisanship  Pascal  passions  patriotism  Patriots  Patriot_King  paywall  perception  phenomenology  philosophes  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  Physiocrats  Pietist  Pitt_the_Elder  Plato  pluralism  Pocock  poetry  politeness  political_change  political_culture  political_discourse  political_economy  political_history  political_nation  political_order  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_science  politics-and-religion  polytheism  Poor_Laws  Pope  Pope_Alexander  positivism  postmodern  poverty  pragmatism  prices  priestcraft  probability  professionalization  progress  property  property_rights  Providence  Prussia  psychology  public_finance  public_opinion  public_sphere  publishing  Putnam  Pyrrhonism  Quine  rationalist  rationality  rational_religion  readership  reading  realism  reason  reason-passions  Reid  relativism  reliabilism  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_history  religious_lit  religious_wars  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  resentment  revelation  reviews  revolutions  rhetoric-political  Ricardo  risk  risk_assessment  risk_shifting  Romanticism  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Rorty  Rousseau  Rousseau-self  rule_of_law  Sartre  Savigny  scepticism  scepticism-Academic  Schleiermacher  science-and-religion  science_of_man  scientific_method  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  self  self-interest  self-love  self-protection  Sellars  separation-of-powers  Septennial_Act  Seven_Years_War  Shaftesbury  Simondon  Smith  sociability  socialism  socialization  social_contract  Social_Darwinism  social_order  social_process  social_sciences  social_theory  society  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_religion  soul  sovereign_debt  Spencer_Herbert  Spinoza  Spinozism  SSRN  stadial_theories  state-roles  Stewart_Dugald  substance  Swift  syllabus  taste  taxes  technology  teleology  theater  theism  theodicy  theology  thesis  thinking_matter  thought  Toland  tolerance  Tories  trade  truth  tyranny  UK_government-colonies  uncertainty  unemployment  US_constitution  US_economy  US_government  US_history  US_politics  US_society  utilitarianism  values  Victorian  video  virtue_epistemology  virtue_ethics  Voltaire  voluntarism  Walpole  Walpole_Horace  Warburton  War_of_Austrian_Succession  website  West_Indies  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whitehead  Wiley  Wilkes  Wittgenstein  Wolff_RP  women-intellectuals  xenophobia 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: