dunnettreader + hume-ethics   42

Richard McCarty, review - Kenneth Westphal, Hume and Kant Reconstruct Natural Law: Justifying Strict Objectivity without Debating Moral Realism (2016) | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, July 2016
Published: July 20, 2016

Kenneth R. Westphal, How Hume and Kant Reconstruct Natural Law: Justifying Strict Objectivity without Debating Moral Realism, Oxford University Press, 2016, 252pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198747055. - Reviewed by Richard McCarty, East Carolina University - gives high marks for way he approaches history of philosophy and current relevance, though thinks he's unfair to Hume and very untidy in how he applies his version of Kant - comment about re Pufendorf as predecessor to Hume's approach is useful - see quote and cite
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  moral_philosophy  natural_law  morality-objective  morality-conventional  moral_sentiments  morality-divine_command  obligation  constructivism  contractualism  Hume-ethics  Kant-ethics 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Leo Damrosh - The Enlightenment: Invention of the Modern Self | The Great Courses
Enlightenment Invention of the Modern Self - from opening views in 17thC, through stages of the Enlightenment - a road to its (inevitable?) backlash in Romanticism
24 lectures
Only available as Audio download (and streaming) - list price $130
Rave reviews
Uses literary works and philosophical texts together
Frex completes the 2 lectures on British empiricism (focus on Locke and Hume re the self) with how Pope struggles with capturing complex psychology within the empiricist framework
After an introduction of 17thC religious and secular conceptions of the self, starts with 2 on La Princesse de Clèves
After empiricism, 2 on Voltaire and theodicy in Candide
3 lectures on Diderot and Jacques le fataliste
A lot of Rousseau - not the novels but the autobiographical works - how he analyzes himself in Confessions and Solitary Walker
Lots of biography, with Boswell's Johnson the vehicle
Some Franklin and Smith
Finishes with Laclos and Blake
Romanticism  bibliography  reason-passions  poetry  Boswell  self  moral_psychology  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_Revolution-impact  Rousseau  free_will  Locke-education  buy  human_nature  Diderot  Blake_William  Locke  Hume-causation  autobiography  17thC  Rousseau-self  Hume-ethics  altruism  Johnson  Voltaire  novels  empiricism  18thC  moral_philosophy  Locke-Essay  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Pope_Alexander  courses  French_lit  Smith  Hume  determinism  epistemology  emotions  character  audio  psychology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Bourke, R.: Empire and Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke. (eBook and Hardcover)
Drawing on the complete range of printed and manuscript sources, Empire and Revolution offers a vivid reconstruction of the major concerns of this outstanding statesman, orator, and philosopher.In restoring Burke to his original political and intellectual context, this book strips away the accumulated distortions that have marked the reception of his ideas. In the process, it overturns the conventional picture of a partisan of tradition against progress. In place of the image of a backward-looking opponent of popular rights, it presents a multifaceted portrait of one of the most captivating figures in eighteenth-century life and thought. While Burke was a passionately energetic statesman, he was also a deeply original thinker. Empire and Revolution depicts him as a philosopher-in-action who evaluated the political realities of the day through the lens of Enlightenment thought, variously drawing on the ideas of such figures as Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Hume. A boldly ambitious work of scholarship, this book challenges us to rethink the legacy of Burke and the turbulent era in which he played so pivotal a role. -- Richard Bourke is professor in the history of political thought and codirector of the Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of Peace in Ireland: The War of Ideas and the coeditor of Political Judgement. -- Big early chunk on Vindication of Natural Society -- TOC and Intro (24 pgs) downloaded to Note
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september 2015 by dunnettreader
Review by: Georges Dicker - Don Garrett, Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy | JSTOR: The Review of Metaphysics, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Dec., 1998), pp. 447-449
Summary, chapter by chapter, without critique of Garrett take on Hume as a cognitive psychologist, and especially his brand of scepticism re induction, causation and self, but also covering moral philosophy (moral sentiments and role of reason in moral judgment). Where Garrett sees Hume diverging from Locke -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-causation  scepticism  reason-passions  moral_sentiments  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  Locke  self  identity 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Collier - HUME'S THEORY OF MORAL IMAGINATION | JSTOR: History of Philosophy Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 3 (JULY 2010), pp. 255-273
See re neuroscience research re mirroring processes and different types of empathy that suggest something similar to Hume's explanation of two different processes for near and dear vs strangers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  neuroscience  18thC  Hume-ethics  human_nature  empathy  mirroring  moral_sentiments  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed., 2000), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston - Online Library of Liberty
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed.), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/673> -- Though usually Edmund Burke is identified as the first to articulate the principles of a modern conservative political tradition, arguably he was preceded by a Scotsman who is better known for espousing a brilliant concept of skepticism. As Laurence Bongie notes, “David Hume was undoubtedly the eighteenth-century British writer whose works were most widely known and acclaimed on the Continent during the later Enlightenment period. Hume’s impact [in France] was of undeniable importance, greater even for a time than the related influence of Burke, although it represents a contribution to French counter-revolutionary thought which, unlike that of Burke, has been almost totally ignored by historians to this day.” The bulk of Bongie’s work consists of the writings of French readers of Hume who were confronted, first, by the ideology of human perfection and, finally, by the actual terrors of the French Revolution. Offered in French in the original edition of David Hume published by Oxford University Press in 1965, these vitally important writings have been translated by the author into English for the Liberty Fund second edition. In his foreword, Donald Livingston observes that “If conservatism is taken to be an intellectual critique of the first attempt at modern total revolution, then the first such event was not the French but the Puritan revolution, and the first systematic critique of this sort of act was given by Hume.” -- original on bookshelf - downloaded for Livingston foreword and translations
books  bookshelf  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  history_of_England  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  progress  perfectibility  human_nature  historians-and-politics  historiography-18thC  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  English_Civil_War  Puritans  Levellers  Interregnum  Protectorate  Charles_I  Cromwell  Parliament  Parliamentarians  Ancien_régime  French_Revolution  Terror  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  conservatism  Whigs-Radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Lord Kames, Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion [1779], ed. Mary Catherine Moran - Online Library of Liberty
Henry Home, Lord Kames, Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion, Corrected and Improved, in a Third Edition. Several Essays Added Concerning the Proof of a Deity, Edited and with an Introduction by Mary Catherine Moran (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1352> -- The Essays is commonly considered Kames’s most important philosophical work. In the first part, he sets forth the principles and foundations of morality and justice, attacking Hume’s moral skepticism and addressing the controversial issue of the freedom of human will. In the second part, Kames focuses on questions of metaphysics and epistemology to offer a natural theology in which the authority of the external senses is an important basis for belief in the Deity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kames  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  free_will  metaphysics  epistemology  epistemology-moral  scepticism  justice  virtue  Hume-ethics  natural_religion  empiricism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R. Westphal - Enlightenment Fundamentals: Rights, Responsibilities & Republicanism | Diametros
Kenneth R. Westphal is Professorial Fellow in the School of Philosophy, University of East Anglia (Norwich), and currently Visiting Professor of Philosophy at the Martin-Luther-Universität Halle Wittenberg. -- This essay re-examines some key fundamentals of the Enlightenment regarding individual rights, responsibilities and republicanism which deserve and require re-emphasis today, insofar as they underscore the character and fundamental importance of mature judgment, and how developing and fostering mature judgment is a fundamental aim of education. These fundamentals have been clouded or eroded by various recent developments, including mis-guided educational policy and not a little scholarly bickering. Clarity about these fundamentals is more important today than ever. Sapere aude! -- Keywords - Hobbes Hume Rousseau Kant Hegel, rational justification, mature judgment, moral constructivism, realism objectivity rights responsibilities republicanism media culture, Euthyphro question, natural law, Dilemma of the Criterion -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  French_Enlightenment  Germany  German_Idealism  voluntarism  obligation  morality-conventional  morality-objective  natural_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  civic_virtue  Hobbes  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  Rousseau  Kant  Kant-ethics  Hegel  judgment-political  public_sphere  media  political_culture  values  education-civic  education-higher  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  21stC  Dewey  Quine  Sellars  analytical_philosophy  academia  professionalization 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Christian Nadeau, review essay - Blaise Bachofen (dir.), Le libéralisme au miroir du droit. L’État, la personne, la propriété - Philosophiques v36 n1 2009, p. 249-253 | Érudit 
Christian Nadeau - Université de Montréal -- Ces auteurs, pour la plupart spécialistes de philosophie politique moderne, se sont penchés sur des notions fondamentales du libéralisme en les situant dans leur contexte théorique d’émergence. Sont ainsi passés au crible de l’analyse philosophique les oeuvres de Locke, Hume, Montesquieu, Bentham, Constant et Tocqueville, mais aussi, celles des auteurs associés au conservatisme, comme Burke ou Bonald. Dans son introduction, Blaise Bachofen explique les raisons pour lesquelles les textes rassemblés dans ce recueil se recoupent sur la notion de libéralisme normatif, et plus précisément de libéralisme juridique. La norme de droit propre au libéralisme permet en effet de rendre compte à la fois de sa dimension politique et de sa dimension économique. L’égal traitement de droit contient en lui-même les motivations morales des principes fondamentaux du libéralisme. -- Trois grandes notions ont été retenues pour expliciter le paradigme du libéralisme juridique : L’État, comme lieu des échanges et des protections individuelles ; la personne, comme sujet du droit et de la liberté ; la propriété, comme notion canonique du rapport de l’individu à lui-même et aux objets qu’il peut légitimement faire siens. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  Locke-2_Treatises  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  Montesquieu  Bentham  Burke  Constant  Tocqueville  liberalism  property  property_rights  equality  civil_liberties  nation-state  utilitarianism  legal_system  counter-revolution  social_contract  legitimacy  public_opinion  political_culture  natural_law  natural_rights  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - A BOOK IN PROGRESS [PART 11]: HUME, IS AND OUGHT | Pandaemonium - Dec 2012
For Hume, then, moral duties and obligations cannot be rationally deduced from purely factual premises. Hence the failure of much traditional moral philosophy that sought through reasoned argument to deduce ought from is. He does not argue, however, that values cannot derive from the facts of the world, nor that there is an unbridgeable chasm between facts and values. Distinctions between good and evil, right and wrong, were, for Hume, the products not of reason but of a moral sense. But moral sense was itself a natural disposition, an aspect of human nature. Indeed, Hume claims that ‘no action can be virtuous, or morally good, unless there be in human nature some motive to produce it, distinct from the sense of its morality’. Patricia Churchland’s reading of Hume seems more appropriate, then, than that of philosophers who claim that for Hume values do not, and cannot, derive from the facts of the world. Her insistence that Hume accepted that ‘in a much broader sense of “infer” than derive you can infer (figure out) what you ought to do, drawing on knowledge, perception, emotions and understanding, and balancing considerations against each other’, and that morally, just as socially, humans could ‘figure out what to do based on the facts of the case, and our background understanding’ appears in keeping with the spirit of Hume’s argument.
intellectual_history  18thC  Hume-ethics  Hume-causation  moral_sentiments  taste  induction  fact-value  scepticism-Academic  Pyrrhonism  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Hutcheson - An Essay on the Nature and Conduct of the Passions and Affections, with Illustrations on the Moral Sense, ed. Aaron Garrett - Online Library of Liberty
Francis Hutcheson, An Essay on the Nature and Conduct of the Passions and Affections, with Illustrations on the Moral Sense, ed. Aaron Garrett (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/885> The first half of the work presents a rich moral psychology built on a theory of the passions and an account of motivation deepening and augmenting the doctrine of moral sense developed in the Inquiry. The second half of the work, the Illustrations, is a brilliant attack on rationalist moral theories and is the font of many of the arguments taken up by Hume and used to this day.
books  etexts  18thC  moral_philosophy  Scottish_Enlightenment  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  passions  emotions  Hume-ethics  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Hutcheson - Philosophiae moralis institutio compendiaria with a Short Introduction to Moral Philosophy, ed. Luigi Turco - Online Library of Liberty
Francis Hutcheson, Philosophiae moralis institutio compendiaria with a Short Introduction to Moral Philosophy, edited and with an Introduction by Luigi Turco (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2059> This Liberty Fund publication of Philosophiae Moralis Institutio Compendiaria is a parallel edition of the English and Latin versions of a book designed by Hutcheson for use in the classroom. General Editor Knud Haakonssen remarks that “Hutcheson’s Institutio was written as a textbook for university students and it therefore covers a curriculum which has an institutional background in his own university, Glasgow. This was a curriculum crucially influenced by Hutcheson’s predecessor Gershom Carmichael, and at its center was modern natural jurisprudence as systematized by Grotius, Pufendorf, and others… . The Institutio is the first major [published] attempt by Hutcheson to deal with natural law on his own terms… . It therefore encapsulates the axis of natural law and Scottish Enlightenment ideas, which so many other thinkers, including Adam Smith, worked with in their different ways. It is of great significance that this work issued from the class in which Smith sat as a student.”
books  etexts  18thC  moral_philosophy  natural_law  Scottish_Enlightenment  Hutcheson  Hume-ethics  Latin_lit  Cicero  education-higher  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan Goldman - DESIRES AND REASONS | JSTOR: American Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 46, No. 4 (OCTOBER 2009), pp. 291-304
Works through a more elaborate process of how information can interact with desires and deeper concerns to motivate, provide reasons for acting, or for changing desires, preferences or actions (reasons for acting) -- this "modified" internalist view still mostly Humean and doesn't accept premises of externalist that presumes external objective values -- didn't download
article  jstor  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  action-theory  practical_reason  reasons-internalism  reasons-externalism  rationality  values  Hume-ethics  reason-passions  Scanlon  contractualism  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Terence Penelhum - Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume's Moral Psychology. by John Bricke | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 108, No. 3 (Apr., 1998), pp. 630-633
Gives the book high marks - the review discusses ways Bricke reconciles key pieces of the Treatise and the problems for Hume's motivation of action generally via desires versus moral action via moral sentiments - and how this works (or causes difficulties) with the bundled self and identity -- didn't download
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february 2014 by dunnettreader
Christine M. Korsgaard - Skepticism about Practical Reason | JSTOR: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 83, No. 1 (Jan., 1986), pp. 5-25
Looks like a key fairly early article in Korsgaard Kantian revival and debates over moral realism, internalist theories, moral_psychology and various versions of Hume. -- frequently cited -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  action-theory  Kant-ethics  practical_reason  practical_knowledge  reason-passions  reasons-internalism  reasons-externalism  normativity  Hume-ethics  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
SIMON BLACKBURN - The Majesty of Reason | JSTOR: Philosophy, Vol. 85, No. 331 (January 2010), pp. 5-27
In this paper I contemplate two phenomena that have impressed theorists concerned with the domain of reasons and of what is now called ‘normativity’. One is the much-discussed ‘externality’ of reasons. According to this, reasons are just there, anyway. They exist whether or not agents take any notice of them. They do not only exist in the light of contingent desires or mere inclinations. They are ‘external’ not ‘internal’. They bear on us, even when through ignorance or wickedness we take no notice of them. They thus very conspicuously shine the lights of objectivity, and independence, and even necessity. By basking in this light, ethics is rescued from the slough of sentiment and preference, and regains the dignity denied to it by theorists such as Hobbes or Hume, Williams, Gibbard or myself. Hence, many contemporary philosophers compete to stress and to extol the external nature of reasons, their shining objectivity. The other phenomenon is that of the inescapable ‘normativity’ of means-ends reasoning. Here the irrationality of intending an end but failing to intend the means is a different shining beacon. It is that of pure practical reason in operation: an indisputable norm, again showing a sublime indifference to whatever weaknesses people actually have, and ideally fitted to provide a Trojan horse for inserting rationality into practical life. If the means-end principle is both unmistakably practical and yet the darling child of rationality itself, then other principles of consistency or of humanity, or of universalizing the maxims of our action, can perhaps follow through the breach in the Humean citadel that it has spearheaded. And so we get the dazzling prospect that if people who choose badly are choosing against reason, then this can be seen to be a special and grave defect. It would locate the kind of fault they are indulging. It would give us, the people of reason, a special lever with which to dislodge their vices. Being able to herd knaves and villains in a compound reserved for those who trespass against reason and rationality therefore represents definite progress. -- paywall Cambridge -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  Hume-ethics  Hume-causation  reason-passions  reasons-internalism  reasons-externalism  action-theory  normativity  practical_reason  practical_knowledge  Williams_Bernard  judgment-emotions  reason  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Book Symposium: Jonathan Dancy, "Practical Reality" | JSTOR: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 67, No. 2, Sep., 2003
(1) Précis of "Practical Reality"(pp. 423-428) Jonathan Dancy. *--* (2) Explanation, Deliberation, and Reasons (pp. 429-435) R. Jay Wallace. *--* (3) Desires, Reasons, and Causes(pp. 436-443) Stephen Darwall. *--* (4) Two Accounts of Objective Reasons(pp. 444-451) Christian Piller. *--* (5) Psychologism and Humeanism(pp. 452-459) Wayne A. Davis. *--* (6) Humeanism, Psychologism, and the Normative Story(pp. 460-467) Michael Smith. *--* (7) Replies(pp. 468-490) Jonathan Dancy
journal  books  reviews  article  jstor  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  action-theory  normativity  practical_reason  practical_knowledge  Hume-ethics  reason-passions  judgment-emotions  reasons-internalism  reasons-externalism  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Summary of Hume's Treatise (Cole Mitchell)
This is a summary of David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature, written by Cole Mitchell. I originally started writing it for Wikipedia, but decided to first put it on my website (where it will on occasion be carefully edited by me) and then add it to Wikipedia (where it will be mercilessly edited and re-edited by unruly commoners). No summary can be perfectly interpretation-free, but I’ve tried my best.
website  Hume  Hume-ethics  epistemology  metaphysics  human_nature  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Online guide to texts in early modern metaethics (Cole Mitchell)
This is an online guide to texts in early modern metaethics, organized by author in rough chronological order, and maintained by Cole Mitchell. I try to keep the focus on topics of metaethical interest: reason and the passions, the status of moral truths and their relation to God, the ‘why be moral?’ question, the relation between morality and self-interest, analogies between morality and other domains (geometry, law, aesthetics), teleology and human nature, etc.
This guide is still pretty rough and messy. Any feedback on this or similar projects would be much appreciated:
website  links  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  metaethics  human_nature  mind-body  reason-passions  natural_religion  rational_religion  Deism  Cambridge_Platonists  Descartes  Malebranche  Hobbes  Locke  Clarke  Leibniz  Butler  Berkeley  Warburton  Hume  Hume-ethics  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Sharon R. Krause - Hume and the (False) Luster of Justice | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 32, No. 5 (Oct., 2004), pp. 628-655
The close connection between norms and motives that is characteristic of Hume's moral theory threatens to break down when it comes to the political matter of justice. Here a gap arises between the moral approval of justice, which is based on its utility, and the desires that motivate just action, which utility cannot fully explain. Therefore the obligation to justice may seem to be motivationally unsupported. This difficulty is compounded by the fact that, for Hume, no obligation can arise unless a normally effective motivation exists for it. In addition to disabling just action, then, the motivational deficit threatens to undercut the normative status of justice as a virtue. A solution to this dilemma lies in what Hume calls the "immediately agreeable" condition of "integrity" or "character." The agreeableness of integrity indirectly confers upon justice a luster that makes it attractive and obligatory even when it does not actually serve the interests of individual or society, and when self-interest and sympathy fall short in sustaining compliance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  moral_sentiments  justice  character  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Franklin A. Kalinowski - David Hume on the Philosophic Underpinnings of Interest Group Politics | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 25, No. 3 (Spring, 1993), pp. 355-374
This article explores Hume's theory of passion and interest, which for him were simply two sides of the same philosophical phenomenon. The significant distinction, the author argues, is that between the violent passions, embodied in short-range private interests, and the calm passions, reflected in long-range public interests. The goal of politics for Hume is then to construct a system in which the calm passions and public interests could be achieved in a society wherein all individuals exercise violent passions by seeking their self interests. The author assesses the implications of this view of Hume for the analysis of the thought of James Madison. -- see Vermeule who disagrees -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  self-interest  ambition  interest_groups  US_constitution  Madison  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey Church - Selfish and Moral Politics: David Hume on Stability and Cohesion in the Modern State | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 69, No. 1 (Feb., 2007), pp. 169-181
In Hume's dialogue with the Hobbesian-Mandevillian "selfish system" of morals, Hume seems to reject its conclusions in morals, but accept them in politics. No skeptic of moral claims like Mandeville, Hume sought to ground objective moral standards in his moral sentiment philosophy, yet, like Mandeville, Hume argued that in political life human beings act based largely on self-interest and a limited generosity. I argue that Hume, however, is ultimately ambivalent about the selfish system's conclusions in politics. He puts forth both a nonmoral and a moral solution to the problem of cohesion in modern liberal states. First, he agrees with the selfish system's nonmoral tactic of channeling the self-interest of citizens through well-constructed institutions toward salutary ends. Second, arguing that the first solution is insufficient for the health of a political regime, Hume seeks to expand the limited moral sense of citizens through moral and aesthetic education and through an empowerment of local politics. Hume's second solution is a means within liberalism to combat its own tendencies toward the dissolution of communal ties and the creation of conditions ripe for the emergence of "sensible knaves." Bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  self-interest  social_order  commerce-doux  moral_sentiments  civic_virtue  education-civic  community  liberalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Manzer - Hume on Pride and Love of Fame | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 28, No. 3 (Spring, 1996), pp. 333-355
Though resting liberal constitutionalism on appeals to human passion, David Hume was not as dismissive of human virtue as some contemporary critics contend. Rather, he sought to preserve a place for virtue in the private sphere of honor and character, where they would help prevent the excesses of libertinism. This article explores Hume's understanding of how pride and the desire for fame help elevate the character of liberal commercial society and then explores his responses to the problems that arise because pride and love of fame are not fully compatible with the egalitarian and humanitarian ethos of liberal constitutionalism. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  civic_virtue  commerce-doux  virtue_ethics  ambition  constitutionalism  egalitarian  moral_sentiments  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen G. Salkever - "Cool Reflexion" and the Criticism of Values: Is, Ought, and Objectivity in Hume's Social Science | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 74, No. 1 (Mar., 1980), pp. 70-77
Is the fact/value distinction incompatible with the possibility of a social science which is both objective and evaluative (or normative)? Does support of the latter require rejection of the former and vice versa? This article presents an indirect argument against the incompatibility of the fact/value distinction and an objectively evaluative social science. My procedure is to show that David Hume, whose is/ought distinction is the locus classicus of the fact/value distinction, is committed both to the view that values cannot be derived from facts and to the view that social science is not (and should not be) value-neutral. Furthermore, Hume's position is free from any logical laws. My conclusion is that it is false to say that the fact/value distinction entails a value-neutral social science, and that it is therefore utterly unnecessary for critics of such a science to waste their time attempting to @'bridge the gap@' between facts and values -- didn't download
article  jstor  metaethics  fact-value  intellectual_history  18thC  Hume-ethics  science_of_man  epistemology  moral_philosophy  reason  social_sciences  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Sabl - The Last Artificial Virtue: Hume on Toleration and Its Lessons | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 37, No. 4 (August 2009), pp. 511-538
David Hume's position on religion is, broadly speaking, "politic": instrumental and consequentialist. Religions should be tolerated or not according to their effects on political peace and order. Such theories of toleration are often rejected as immoral or unstable. The reading provided here responds by reading Hume's position as one of radically indirect consequentialism. While religious policy should serve consequentialist ends, making direct reference to those ends merely gives free reign to religious-political bigotry and faction. Toleration, like Hume's other "artificial virtues" (justice, fidelity to promises, allegiance to government), is a universally useful response to our universal partiality—as Established uniformity, however tempting, is not. This implies that toleration can progress through political learning, becoming broader and more constitutionally established over time. A sophisticated Humean approach thus shares the stability and normative attractiveness of respect- or rights-based arguments while responding more acutely and flexibly to problems the former often slights: antinomian religious extremism; underdefined political agency; and internationalized, politicized religious movements. -- extensive bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  religion-established  tolerance  civil_liberties  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  social_order  freedom_of_conscience  faction  bigotry  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Will R. Jordan - Religion in the Public Square: A Reconsideration of David Hume and Religious Establishment | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 64, No. 4 (Autumn, 2002), pp. 687-713
While recent scholarship has attempted to clarify the Founders' opposition to religious establishment, few pause to consider public establishment as a viable alternative. This study examines one of the eighteenth century's least likely proponents of religious establishment: David Hume. Despite his reputation as an avowed enemy of religion, Hume actually defends religion for its ability to strengthen society and to improve morality. These salutary qualities are lost, however, when society is indifferent about the character of the religion professed by its citizens. Hume's masterful "History of England" reveals that a tolerant established church is best equipped to reap the advantages of religion while avoiding the dangers of fanaticism. Hume's differences in this respect from Adam Smith and Alexis de Tocqueville are explored. -- Hume not all that unique among sceptical philosophes in thinking that a moderate established religion - that didn't run around actively persecuting dissent - would be socially and politically salutary if not necessary
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  political_philosophy  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  Hume-ethics  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church_of_England  Kirk  tolerance  dissenters  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Ryan Patrick Hanley - Hume's Last Lessons: The Civic Education of "My Own Life" | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 64, No. 4 (Autumn, 2002), pp. 659-685
Hume's concern to promote public virtue is a central element of his philosophical project which deserves more attention than it has received. This article examines one of his most focused efforts at public moralism: his largely forgotten autobiography, "My Own Life". By attending to its account of how Hume employed his vanity and ambition in his pursuit of fame and fortune-and discovered such virtues as temperance, industry, moderation, and independence in the process-it is argued that "My Own Life" was intended to serve as a "mirror-for-citizens" for citizens of modern commercial republics, offering a model of civic virtue and worldly success for them to emulate. To show this Hume's didactic autobiography is compared to that of his friend Benjamin Franklin, which may have served as a model for Hume's. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  civic_virtue  community  commerce-doux  ambition  Franklin_Ben  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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