dunnettreader + hooke   8

Joanna Picciotto - Reforming the Garden: The Experimentalist Eden and "Paradise Lost" (2005) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Spring, 2005), pp. 23-78 -- very long article with vast numbers of references to literary, naturao philosophy, and religious works of 17thC and early 18thC plus lit survey of work on sociology of knowledge, English lit since the cultural turn, and religious culture. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  English_lit  experimental_philosophy  Bacon  Boyle  Locke  Milton  Royal_Society  Evelyn  religious_culture  religious_lit  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  microscope  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  scientific_method  curiosity  Fall  original_sin  Paradise_Lost  improvement  instruments  Hooke  Donne  poetry  virtuosos  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  nature-mastery  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Frédérique Aït-Touati, Stephen Gaukroger, Le monde en images. Voir, représenter, savoir, de Descartes à Leibniz (2015) | Classiques Garnier, coll. « Histoire et philosophie des sciences »
Frédérique Aït-Touati, Stephen Gaukroger, Le monde en images. Voir, représenter, savoir, de Descartes à Leibniz, Paris, Classiques Garnier, coll. « Histoire et philosophie des sciences », 2015, 128 p., ISBN : 978-2-8124-2589-9. -- Dans les débats classiques des 17thC-18thC, la représentation est considérée avant tout comme une question rhétorique et psychologique, mais à la fin du 18thC, elle devient une question épistémologique. Cet ouvrage explore le contexte de cette transformation et ses sources. l’émergence du problème de la représentation -- not edited collection, but co-authored study of a bit over 100 pages -- Chapters in TOC -- 1. Rhétorique et théorie de l’image vive 2. la révolution cartésienne  3. représenter l’invisible - Philosophie naturelle et visualisation chez Robert Hooke   4. les limites de la visualisation - Le débat entre Newton et Leibniz sur l’algèbre (a) La géométrie contre l’analyse  (b) L’analyse infnitésimale et la question de la preuve directe (c) La géométrie contre le calcul diférentiel  (d) Visualisation et capacités cognitives humaines  (e) Visualisation -- online pruce 19€
books  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  astronomy  ontology  epistemology  17thC  18thC  Descartes  representation-metaphysics  ideas-theories  Hooke  Leibniz  Newton  scientific_method  scientific_culture  instruments  microscope  telescope  unobservables  mathematics  geometry  calculus  cognition  analysis-logic  images  rhetoric  rhetoric-visual 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - THE SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENT AND ITS SOUL | Pandaemonium - May 2014
The science writer Philip Ball recently published a post on his blog Homunculus in which he wondered why modern scientific instruments seem to lack the beauty and soul of those of centuries past. Stephen Curry, professor of structural biology at Imperial College, wrote in response, on Occam’s Corner, the Guardian-hosted science blog, a wonderful little essay, in which he questioned some of Philip’s assumptions but made also a case for scientists to have more than an instrumental relationship to their instruments. Philip Ball then wrote an equally insightful reply in which he argued that scientific instruments are made not simply to do a job but also to express a certain image of science, to ‘employ a particular visual rhetoric’ in his words. The changing character of scientific instruments, he suggested, reflects the changing image of science that scientists wish to covey. -- Ball re visual rhetoric - what, and who, these instruments were for. Even for Galileo, the scientific experiment was still at least as much a demonstration as it was an exploration: it was a way of showing that your ideas were right. ...And in the earliest of the early modern era, during the late Renaissance, scientific instruments were objects of power. They were used by the virtuosi to delight and entertain their noble patrons, and thereby to imply a command of the occult forces of nature. For such a display, it was important that a device be impressive to look at: elegance was the key attribute of the courtly natural philosopher.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-public  virtuosos  patrons  scientific_method  experimental_philosophy  Galileo  Hooke  links  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
J. V. Golinski - A Noble Spectacle: Phosphorus and the Public Cultures of Science in the Early Royal Society | JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 80, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 11-39
Huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- chemistry and link to medicine were important for experimental_philosophy, but the flashiness of experiments for the public could both attract public interest and provide ammunition for enemies -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  British_history  Royal_Society  sociology_of_knowledge  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  medicine  chemistry  magic  alchemy  Boyle  Hooke  Harvey  science-public  scientific_culture  Scientific_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Alessadro Arcangeli - Music, Science and Natural Magic in 17thC England by Penelope Gouk |JSTOR: History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 4 (2003), pp. 535-537
Cultural practice of both music and experimental philosophy - private groups supported by patronage or coterie affiliation (court such as masque, aristocracy and universities) - training in both from early education - magus personalities include Hooke, Newton as well as the personalities we find so hard to relate to like Kitchener, who make sense in that environment. Lots of iconography and manuscripts as to be expected from a Warburg priduction. Dedicated to DP Walker.
books  reviews  find  17thC  British_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  music_history  patronage  court_culture  experimental_philosophy  coterie  Newton  Hooke  magic  alchemy  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Christine Stevenson - Robert Hooke's Bethlem | JSTOR: Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Vol. 55, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 254-275
Bethlem Hospital for lunatics, built to the designs of Robert Hooke between 1674 and 1676 in London, is a singularly famous building that has been little studied. This article summarizes the available written evidence, including the minutes of the Court of Governors' deliberations during Bethlem construction and contemporary prose and poetic celebrations of the result, to show that one conventional rhetorical use of the building, as a monstrous emblem of vanity, may be suprisingly apposite given the governors' preoccupation with how it be viewed, both literally and figuratively. However, they seem to have expected that post-Fire and post-Restoration London would be willing to entertain a conception of a lunatic asylum more polysemous than has been possible since, possibly because Bethlem created the type. Hooke's application of the domestic gallery, in particular, not only introduced a wide range of associations with health, hospitality, instruction, and pleasure, it permitted a plan that was concurrently applauded as inherently curative. It is, however, Bethlem's façade which soon became notorious; the article concludes with an explanation for the significance of its grandeur, and for the failure of the signification. -- splendidly illustrated -- over 100 references, covers through 1733 -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  English_lit  architecture  17thC  18thC  British_history  London  Hooke  medicine  psychology  madness  poetry  satire  charity  elites  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rhoda Rappaport - Hooke on Earthquakes: Lectures, Strategy and Audience | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 19, No. 2 (Jul., 1986), pp. 129-146
Separating Hooke's prescient geology and fossil theories from his other speculative evidence, his manner of presentation etc -- an interesting angle on the scientific culture and social processes of knowledge production and communication
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  history_of_science  Scientific_Revolution  Hooke  geology  paleontology  cosmology  sociology_of_knowledge  Royal_Society  virtuosos  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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