dunnettreader + high_church   20

Peter Müller - Hobbes, Locke and the Consequences: Shaftesbury's Moral Sense and Political Agitation in Early 18thC England (2013) - Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies - Wiley Online Library
This article examines the political (and Whig) agenda behind the earl of Shaftesbury's moral and religious thought, offering a reading of the so-called ‘moral sense’ that, based on Terry Eagleton's Marxist interpretation of moral-sense philosophy in general and Shaftesbury's use of the concept in particular, illuminates how far the moral sense serves a propagandistic purpose in Shaftesbury's writings. A close examination of this aspect, which has so far not been considered in the relevant literature on Shaftesbury, illuminates the anti-Hobbist and, by implication, anti-Tory (and High Church) tendency of his moral philosophy in the context of Low Church Anglicanism. -- Keywords: Shaftesbury; Thomas Hobbes; John Locke; Latitudinarianism; moral sense; Whiggism; Anglicanism
article  paywall  Wiley  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_culture  Shaftesbury  Hobbes  Locke  Church_of_England  High_Church  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  latitudinarian 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Porter eds. - Toleration in Enlightenment Europe (2000) | Cambridge University Press
The Enlightenment is often seen as the great age of religious and intellectual toleration, and this 1999 volume is a systematic European survey of the theory, practice, and very real limits to toleration in eighteenth-century Europe. A distinguished international team of contributors demonstrate how the publicists of the European Enlightenment developed earlier ideas about toleration, gradually widening the desire for religious toleration into a philosophy of freedom seen as a fundamental attribute and a precondition for a civilized society. Nonetheless Europe never uniformly or comprehensively embraced toleration during the eighteenth century: although religious toleration was central to the Enlightenment project, advances in toleration were often fragile and short-lived. -- excerpt contains TOC and full Chapter 1 - Intro - including ftnts to Chapter 1 - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
High_Church  1730s  Papacy  French_Enlightenment  civil_liberties  Enlightenment  Church_of_England  Church-and-State  Holy_Roman_Empire  Locke  philosophes  Spain  Spinoza  Toland  Italy  British_history  tolerance  anti-Semitism  political_philosophy  Dutch  downloaded  Germany  citizenship  Austria  Inquisition  18thC  religious_history  17thC  church_history  intellectual_history  enlightened_absolutism  books 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Bodies and Interests: Toleration and the Political Imagination in the Later 17thC | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 401-426
Religious fragmentation threatened the notion of a unitary body politic, and conservative Anglicans in the Restoration exploited the organic figure to excoriate dissenters. While scriptural patterns drew the godly too to that trope, its ecclesiastical implications often left them parsing uncomfortably as they urged concessions. In this article Derek Hirst argues that they were largely rescued from such parsing by the new discourse of “interest.” When the promise of trade was taking the court by storm, Independents and Presbyterians had much to gain in re-imagining the polity more pluralistically in terms of interest; Locke too was part of this process. But though the general drift is clear, partisan circumstance could occasion surprising cross-currents, in England and Ireland alike. -- Keywords body politic, religious toleration, John Owen, discourse of “interest”, John Locke -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-religion  economic_history  political_economy  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  dissenters  High_Church  merchants  trade  Restoration  tolerance  political_philosophy  political_order  political_nation  interest-discourse  body_politic  Locke  Locke-religion  court_culture  colonialism  tariffs  Presbyterians  Independents  Ireland  Church_of_England  Anglican  Church_of_Ireland  Ulster  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
HEATHER ELLIS - 'This starting, feverish heart': Matthew Arnold and the Problem of Manliness | JSTOR: Critical Survey, Vol. 20, No. 3, Victorian Masculinities (2008), pp. 97-115
Fascinating re Victorian obsession with sturdy, active "manliness" uncorrupted by effeminate activities like poetry or scholarship - Arnold greatly influenced by Cardinal Newman's revaluation of Christian manliness with what were feminine stereotypes - love of poetry, contemplation, etc. But Arnold also quasi idolized his father, Thomas Arnold, arch critic of Newman and promoter of all the vigorous manly virtues. Lots of quotes across much of 19thC from the literary journals, where conflicts over cultural ideals were waged re education, literary form and style, appropriate models for exemplary history and so on. Among Arnold's critics James Fitzjames Stephen. Leslie Stephen's brother was a nasty piece of work. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  English_lit  19thC  British_history  Victorian  masculinity  culture_wars  Newman_JH  Arnold_Matthew  cultural_critique  Tractarians  Oxford  education-higher  education-civic  Stephen_Leslie  literary_journals  poetics  High_Church  high_culture  downloaded 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
BRENT S. SIROTA -- THE OCCASIONAL CONFORMITY CONTROVERSY, MODERATION, AND THE ANGLICAN CRITIQUE OF MODERNITY, 1700–1714 (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 81-105 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
BRENT S. SIROTA - North Carolina State University -- The occasional conformity controversy during the reign of Queen Anne has traditionally been understood as a straightforward symptom of the early eighteenth-century ‘rage of party’. For all the pious rhetoric concerning toleration and the church in danger, the controversy is considered a partisan squabble for short-term political gain. This traditional interpretation has, however, never been able to account for two features of the controversy: first, the focus on ‘moderation’ as a unique characteristic of post-Revolutionary English society; and second, the prominence of the Anglican nonjurors in the debate. This article revisits the occasional conformity controversy with an eye toward explaining these two related features. In doing so, it will argue that the occasional conformity controversy comprised a referendum on the Revolution settlement in church and state. Nonjurors lit upon the practice of occasional conformity as emblematic of the broader malady of moderation afflicting post-Revolutionary England. From their opposition to occasional conformity, the nonjurors, and soon the broader Anglican high-church movement, developed a comprehensive critique of religious modernity that would inform the entire framework of debate in the early English Enlightenment. -* I thank James Vaughn, Steve Pincus, Bill Bulman, Robert Ingram, and the participants in the ‘God and the Enlightenment’ conference at Ohio University in October 2012 for their generous engagement with earlier drafts of this article. Thanks also to Phil Withington and the anonymous reviewers for their assistance in shaping this article into its final form.
article  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  1700s  1710s  occasional_conformity  nonjurors  High_Church  Church_of_England  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political_press  pamphlets  political_participation  tolerance  latitudinarian  secularization  atheism_panic  partisanship  Tories  Whigs  dissenters  Whig_Junto  moderation  modernity  Enlightenment  Queen_Anne  Harley  Bolingbroke  comprehension-church  Convocation  church-in-danger  sermons  religious_lit  cultural_critique  Atterbury  popular_politics  popular_culture  Revolution_Principles  Glorious_Revolution  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Patriarcha, or the Natural Power of Kings - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Robert Filmer, Patriarcha; of the Natural Power of Kings. By the Learned Sir Robert Filmer Baronet (London: Richard Chiswell, 1680). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/221> -- In the aftermath of the English Revolution which saw the execution of a king and the creation of a Commonwealth and the restoration of the monarchy, Filmer wrote a solid defense of the divine right of kings which in turn prompted John Locke to write a riposte – part 1 of the Two Treatises of Government. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  monarchy  Absolutism  hierarchy  social_order  family  authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_exegesis  divine_right  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  English_Civil_War  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  political_press  Tories  High_Church  resistance_theory  Locke-1st_Treatise  Tyrrell  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Dewey D. Wallace, Jr., historiographical review - Via Media? A Paradigm Shift | JSTOR: Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2003), pp. 2-21
Very useful - he was working in the same stream as Tyacke before publication of Anti-Calvinists. Follows subsequent work that's developed the approach of the Elizabethan church as Reformed with a hankering for bits of Kutheranism. Notes the parallels in tensions between established Erastian church and the hotter sort who wanted to push a second Reformation, following the Reformed scholasticim and the more extreme version of Calvinism post Calvin. Notes different versions of where the via media develooed (the anti Puritan divines connected with James I court, the Oxford Movement? ) - Wallace seems to think it's a Restoration phenomenon, when Hooker is "canonized", and later groups like the Oxford Movement reinforced the claim that the Church of England had pursued the via media, at least by Elizabeth, as a means of marginalizing the evangelical stream. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  religious_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  Reformation  Church_of_England  Calvinist  Lutherans  Arminian  via_media  Laudian  Elizabeth  clergy  godly_persons  Puritans  predestination  Erastianism  politics-and-religion  parish  local_politics  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  High_Church  dissenters  anti-Catholic  popery  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Walter - Popular Iconoclasm and the Politics of the Parish in Eastern England, 1640-1642 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 47, No. 2 (Jun., 2004), pp. 261-290
This article explores the extent of popular iconoclasm in England in the period immediately before the start of civil war and for a region - eastern England - thought to lie at the heart of these events. It explores systematically the evidence for the extent of destruction (and the problems in its recording and recovery), the nature of the targets attacked, and the identities of the iconoclasts. The article argues that this first phase of iconoclasm was directed largely against Laudian innovations. Claiming an agency to police sacred space, iconoclasts derived legitimation from the public condemnation of Laudianism in parliament, print, and pulpit. Narrowing the focus, the article moves on to explore the occurrence of iconoclasm through a series of case studies of the complex process of conflict and negotiation within the politics of the parish that preceded, accompanied, and sometimes pre-empted popular destruction. The evidence of iconoclasm is used to show how the implementation of the Laudian programme might politicize local churches as sites of conflict and the potential therefore inherent in its aggressive enforcement for a wider political conflict. -- interesting references -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  church_history  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  Laudian  Puritans  godly_persons  iconoclasm  parish  Charles_I  High_Church  local_politics  local_government  popular_politics  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Nancy Kendrick, review - Mary Astell, Jacqueline Broad (ed.), The Christian Religion, as Professed by a Daughter of the Church of England // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
This first complete modern edition of Mary Astell's "most profound and significant scholarly achievement" is a much needed and welcome addition to Astell studies, and more generally, to the study of early modern philosophy. -- Follows 2nd edition published in 1717 (1st 1705). -- Drawing on her study of Astell in Women Philosophers of the 17thC (Cambridge, 2002), Broad [discusses] the Cartesianism that empowered Astell and other early modern women to assert themselves as intellectuals capable of engaging in philosophical discourse, and she explores the feminist message of Astell's work in 3 ways. First she examines the instructive purposes of The Christian Religion for its female readers with respect to the development of their reason and virtue and the control of their passions. -- Second, Broad emphasizes Astell's rejection of the implicit sexism of the works critiqued in The Christian Religion, including Locke's The Reasonableness of Christianity, which claimed that because women are incapable of grasping difficult concepts, they must be brought to religious understanding through plain and straight-forward commands. Third, Broad shows that some anti-Lockean positions advanced by the High-Church, Tory-sympathizing Astell are consistent with her feminist aims, despite appearances to the contrary. -- Broad does not, however, give much attention to the ... consequences of the maturation of her views to the feminist message of the text. In addition to advice-giving and instructive purposes, The Christian Religion addresses one of her long-standing philosophical preoccupations -- the metaphysical underpinnings of human relations. Astell's metaphysics was driven by her Platonism, which provided the solution to a concern... about the nature and possibility of friendship. In The Christian Religion, her views about friendship are expanded and developed in ways that highlight her interest in female-female, rather than female-male, social bonds. -- The review is a rich discussion of development of Astell's on reconciling friendship, love of God and the universal benevolence demanded by the Gospels.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_politics  Astell  feminism  Cartesian  Neoplatonism  theology  High_Church  Tories  1690s  1700s  1710s  Locke  Locke-religion  sexism  friendship  love  benevolence  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: S. J. Connolly - Jacqueline Hill, From Patriots to Unionists: Dublin Civic Politics and Irish Protestant Patriotism 1660-1840 | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr, Vol. 13 (1998), pp. 178-180
Interesting review that puts the Whig patriot tendency in Dublin local government into perspective of corporatist rather than liberal or republican tradition. Helps explain the battle with the Tories and High Church during last 4 years of Queen Anne. Connolly highlights areas where he thinks corporatism doesn't work or is one thread in a more complex story. -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  political_history  political_culture  17thC  18thC  19thC  Ireland  Dublin  local_government  corporatism  Ancien_régime  Bolingbroke  High_Church  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
DMITRI LEVITIN -- MATTHEW TINDAL'S "RIGHTS OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH" (1706) AND THE CHURCH—STATE RELATIONSHIP | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 717-740
Matthew Tindal's Rights of the Christian church (1706), which elicited more than thirty contemporary replies, was a major interjection in the ongoing debates about the relationship between church and state in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England. Historians have usually seen Tindal's work as an exemplar of the 'republican civil religion' that had its roots in Hobbes and Harrington, and putatively formed the essence of radical whig thought in the wake of the Glorious Revolution. But this is to misunderstand the Rights. To comprehend what Tindal perceived himself as doing we need to move away from the history of putatively 'political' issues to the histories of ecclesiastical jurisprudence, patristic scholarship, and biblical exegesis. The contemporary significance of Tindal's work was twofold: methodologically, it challenged Anglican patristic scholarship as a means of reaching consensus on modern ecclesiological issues; positively, it offered a powerful argument for ecclesiastical supremacy lying in crown-in-parliament, drawing on a legal tradition stretching back to Christopher St Germain (1460—1540) and on Tindal's own legal background. Tindal's text provides a case study for the tentative proposition that 'republicanism', whether as a programme or a 'language', had far less impact on English anticlericalism and contemporary debates over the church—state relationship than the current historiography suggests. -- extensive references of Cambridge_School articles, refers to Goldie a great deal, whether for support of particular episodes or to attack is unclear -- the quarrel over patristic claims of the Church_of_England important for Bolingbroke's argument re Tillotson etc -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political-theology  ecclesiology  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  patristic_scholarship  Biblical_exegesis  Erastianism  crown-in-parliament  Whigs-Radicals  anticlerical  republicanism  Harrington  Hobbes  civil_religion  High_Church  Convocation  Tindal_Matthew  free-thinkers  religious_lit  political_press  pamphlets  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Sharon Achinstein - Milton's Spectre in the Restoration: Marvell, Dryden, and Literary Enthusiasm JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 1 (1996), pp. 1-29
Censorship and threats of assassination, book burnings etc - not just after Restoration but well into 1670s. Marvell Rehearsal Transpos'd and other writings that were pro toleration treated as necessarily expressing republicanism and commonwealth sentiments if not fully pro regicide. -- a sense of what Bolingbroke's great grandfather going through -- figures associated with Cromwell, excluded in pardon but not tried for treason -- didn't download
article  jstor  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  English_lit  literary_history  17thC  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  persecution  tolerance  Restoration  High_Church  dissenters  poetry  form-poetic  Milton  Marvell  Dryden  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Sarah Apetrei - "Call No Man Master upon Earth": Mary Astell's Tory Feminism and an Unknown Correspondence | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Summer, 2008), pp. 507-523
Downloaded pdf to Note --
This article reexamines the early eighteenth-century writer Mary Astell's paradoxical commitments as a "Tory feminist" in light of a previously unknown correspondence between Astell, an anonymous woman, and the nonjuring cleric George Hickes. Using evidence from these letters and her wider corpus, it proposes not only that Astell's doctrine of passive obedience in Church and State was far less robust and far more provisional than we have often thought; but also that her feminist writings betray an anticlerical instinct which leads her into conflict with her High Church convictions.
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  British_politics  Church_of_England  Glorious_Revolution  nonjurors  feminism  Tories  Astell  anticlerical  High_Church  religious_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Leslie, Charles, 1650-1722 - (1719) The Socinian controversy discuss'd in six dialogues: wherein the chief of the Socinian tracts publish'd of late years are consider'd....| Internet Archive
The Socinian controversy discuss'd in six dialogues: wherein the chief of the Socinian tracts publish'd of late years are consider'd. To which is added, a defence of the first and last dialogues relating to the satisfaction of Jesus Christ
books  online_texts  18thC  1710s  Jacobites  High_Church  free-thinkers  Socinians  anti-Trinitarian  religious_lit  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Ian Campbell Ross: Was Berkeley a Jacobite? Passive Obedience Revisited (2005)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr, Vol. 20 (2005), pp. 17-30 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The publication of Passive Obedience (1712) led to damaging accusations of Jacobitism against George Berkeley that the author attempted, unsuccessfully, to refute. Modern commentators -philosophers and historians - have offered conflicting interpretations of the work, arguing, inter alia, that Berkeley did hold Jacobite views around 1711-12, and that Passive Obedience may be assimilated within broader Anglican attempts to address the issue of the individual's duty of non-resistance to the supreme civil power in post-Williamite Ireland. This essay argues that a consideration of Berkeley's role as Junior Dean in Trinity College, Dublin, in whose chapel he delivered his three discourses on passive obedience; of the manuscript of those discourses; and of his self-declared rhetorical strategies can help resolve the long contentious issue of Berkeley's contemporary political allegiance.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  biography  18thC  political_philosophy  theology  politics-and-religion  Anglican  Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  High_Church  passive_obedience  Revolution_Principles  Jacobites  Berkeley  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Joseph Richardson: Archbishop William King (1650-1729): 'Church Tory and State Whig'? (2000)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr, Vol. 15 (2000), pp. 54-76 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The paper seeks to explain an apparent contradiction in the historiography of William King, Archbishop of Dublin from 1703 to 1729 King apparently faced in both directions, seeking to accommodate the possibilities of Catholic success with King James and Calvimst victory under Pnnce William Considering King's response to the Revolution m Ireland in the years 1688-91, it has been concluded that central to his arguments are two manuscripts, 'The State of the Church' and the 'Principles' The former is presented as a plan for accommodation with Calvimsts, the latter with Catholics Through a study of King's writings both before and after the Glorious Revolution it will be seen that King's views were actually consistently High Church, representing a classic example of High Church rhetoric It will become apparent that no conflict existed, m Ireland, between high churchmanship and the espousal of revolutionary principles, as adumbrated in the Bill of Rights and Act of Settlement This paper will focus on King's controversy with Peter Manby in 1687, the evidence of his diary, written during his imprisonment, the 'Principles' manuscript, and the State of the Protestants of Ireland under the late King James's government of 1692
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  High_Church  apostolic_succession  Anglican  James_II  Glorious_Revolution  passive_obedience  Revolution_Principles  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Aileen Douglas: Reading Swift: Papers from the Third Munster Symposium on Jonathan Swift ed by Hermann J. Real; Helgard Stover-Seidwig(2000)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr, Vol. 15 (2000), pp. 197-199 -- looks mostly uninteresting except D Hayton on High Church part in the Irish Convocation 1703-1713
books  reviews  jstor  18thC  1700s  1710s  Anglican  Protestants-Ireland  High_Church  church_history  Swift  find  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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