dunnettreader + heidegger   38

Adrian Moore interview with Richard Marshall - Modern Metaphysics - the Analytic/Continental Mix - 3AM - June 2017
Interview by Richard Marshall. ‘ Many contemporary scientists would still need persuading that it was anything other than a pointless exercise—perhaps because…
Evernote  metaphysics  Deleuze  Husserl  Heidegger  Derrida  Spinoza  Hegel  Nietzsche  Bergson  continental_philosophy  from instapaper
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - 1750, Casualty of 1914: Lest We Forget the preKantian Enlightenment | Academia.edu
Draft of chapter for upcoming Crisis and Reconfigurations: 100 years since World War 1 collection. Argues that philosophical understanding (or increasingly, study and reading) of the French, British and preKantian German enlightenments, their intellectual origins and ends, has been a retrospective victim of the European horrors set in chain by 1914, despite a growing volume of excellent, countervailing studies (by Rasmussen, Lloyd, Israel, Wade, and others) in the history of ideas.
Research Interests: Critical Theory, Enlightenment, and Philosophy of the Enlightenment
Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  17thC  18thC  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  neo-Kantian  critical_theory  historiography  historiography-postWWII  historicism  historians-and-politics  Early_Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Enlightenment-sceptical  theodicy  progress  Löwith  Cassirer  Frankfurt_School  Heidegger  Blumenberg  historiography-19thC  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
O. Bradley Bassler, The Pace of Modernity: Reading With Blumenberg (2012) | re-press publishers
Wittgenstein said that philosophers should greet each other, not by saying “hello,” but rather “take your time.”  But what is time?  Time is money, but this points to an even better answer to this basic question for our modern epoch: time is acceleration.  In a cultural system which stresses economic efficiency, the quicker route is always the more prized, if not always the better one.  Wittgenstein’s dictum thus constitutes an act of rebellion against the dominant vector of our culture, but as such it threatens to become (quickly) anti-modern.  We need an approach to “reading” our information-rich culture which is not reactionary but rather meets its accelerated condition.  In this book, O. Bradley Bassler develops a toolkit for acute reading of our modern pace, not through withdrawal but rather through active engagement with a broad range of disciplines.  The main characters in this drama comprise a cast of master readers: Hannah Arendt, Jean Starobinski, Harold Bloom, Angus Fletcher, Hans Blumenberg and John Ashbery, with secondary figures drawn from the readers and critics whom this central group suggests.  We must develop a vocabulary of pacing, reflecting our modern distance from classical sources and the concomitant acceleration of our contemporary condition.  Only in this way can we begin to situate the phenomenon of modernity within the larger scales of human culture and history.

About the Author
O. Bradley Bassler studied in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago and took a second Ph.D. in Mathematics at Wesleyan University.  He has published in areas ranging from philosophy and history of philosophy to literary studies and the foundations of mathematics, with essays appearing in New German Critique, Heidegger Studies, Review of Metaphysics and other journals.  He is also a published poet.  He currently is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Georgia, Athens, USA.
biocultural_evolution  etexts  change-social  technology  open_access  Arendt  dualism  lit_crit  phenomenology  metaphor  Montaigne  Husserl  individualism  books  poetics  modernity  social_theory  Blumenberg  rhetoric  human_nature  Heidegger  Scribd  philosophical_anthropology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Ruairidh James Macleod - The Concept of Temporality in John Dewey's Early Works (2015 thesis) - Academic Commons
Ruairidh James Macleod, 2015, The Concept of Temporality in John Dewey's Early Works, Columbia University Academic Commons, http://dx.doi.org/10.7916/D8M044XW : -- It is well understood that a concept of temporality is central to Dewey’s later work, finding its culmination in his essay “Time and Individuality” (1938). What has not been either acknowledged or established is the fact that a detailed and sophisticated concept of temporality, one which is fully in accord with his later work, was already present in Dewey’s early work, particularly in his essay “The Reflex Arc Concept in Psychology” (1896). This thesis therefore seeks to demonstrate not only that such a concept of temporality exists in Dewey’s early work, but also the nuanced nature of that concept of temporality, particularly in its function as a central, grounding component of the preconditions required for Dewey’s concept of experience. (..) this thesis argues that it in fact constitutes a key contribution to a tradition of philosophy of temporality which starts with the work of Henri Bergson, continues with the philosophy of Martin Heidegger (most saliently with Being and Time), and finds its full contemporary statement in Gilles Deleuze’s work on time, based on his concept of ‘the virtual.’ The fact that Dewey’s concept of temporality, as with that of Deleuze, is based on a sophisticated understanding of contemporary scientific findings is also explored, with the argument made that possessing such a foundation in scientific thought allows Dewey’s concept of temporality to become fully compatible to current research in psychology, particularly as it concerns educational psychology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  downloaded  intellectual_history  18thC  20thC  philosophical_anthropology  mind  consciousness  time  time-perception  subjectivity  Dewey  pragmatism  psychology  physiology  neuroscience  Bergson  Heidegger  Deleuze  education  learning 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Louis Pinto - (Re)traductions -Phénoménologie et «philosophie allemande» dans les années 1930, Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales 5/2002 - Cairn.info
Pinto Louis, « (Re)traductions. Phénoménologie et « philosophie allemande » dans les années 1930», Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales 5/2002 (no 145) , p. 21-33
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-actes-de-la-recherche-en-sciences-sociales-2002-5-page-21.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/arss.145.0021.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
intellectual_history  social_capital  Heidegger  article  politics-and-religion  France  networks-social  Bourdieu  phenomenology  cultural_history  cultural_capital  entre_deux_guerres  downloaded  sociology_of_knowledge 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Harvey Mansfeld - Political Theory as Historical Artifact, review of Gunnell, The Descent of Political Theory | JSTOR - The Political Review (1996)
Review: Political Theory as Historical Artifact
Reviewed Work: The Descent of Political Theory; The Genealogy of an American Vocation by John G. Gunnell
Review by: Harvey C. Mansfield
The Review of Politics
Vol. 57, No. 2 (Spring, 1995), pp. 372-374 -- meow, it's all those darned Germans who lured us permanently away from the science of the founders
social_sciences-post-WWII  19thC  historiography-19thC  reviews  Arendt  20thC  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Hegelian  Strauss  Heidegger  intellectual_history  jstor  Hegel  Founders  article 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Pippin - The Unavailability of the Ordinary: Strauss on the Philosophical Fate of Modernity | JSTOR- Political Theory (2003)
Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Jun., 2003), pp. 335-358 -- In Natural Right and History Leo Strauss argues for the continuing "relevance " of the classical understanding of natural right. Since this relevance is not a matter of a direct return, or a renewed appreciation that a neglected doctrine is simply true, the meaning of this claim is somewhat elusive. But it is clear enough that the core of Strauss's argument for that relevance is a claim about the relation between human experience and philosophy. Strauss argues that the classical understanding articulates and is continuous with the "lived experience" of engaged participants in political life, the ordinary, and he argues (in a way quite similar to claims in Heidegger) that such an ordinary or everyday point of view has been "lost." The author presents here an interpretation and critique of such a claim. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Strauss  modernity  natural_rights  ancient_philosophy  political_culture  Heidegger  liberalism  liberalism-post-WWII  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
CHINATSU KOBAYASHI and MATHIEU MARION - GADAMER AND COLLINGWOOD ON TEMPORAL DISTANCE AND UNDERSTANDING | JSTOR History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 81-103 -- we begin by suggesting an intuitive model of time embodying a notion of temporal distance that we claim is at work in Gadamer's hermeneutics, while it is rejected in Collingwood's theory of interpretation. To show this, after a brief review of the influence of Collingwood on Gadamer and of their disagreement over the possibility of recovering an author's intention, we examine in turn their answers to the problem of transposition, upon which the philosophy of Dilthey supposedly foundered. We show that Gadamer embraced the idea of temporal distance in his solution, which consisted in claiming that the distance between an author from the past and us is filled in by tradition, which opens access to the text for us, while Collingwood considered explanations of the actions of historical agents, and by extension understanding of a text, in intentional or rational terms. Furthermore, he thought that such explanations are not causal, and that the thoughts involved in them do not stand within the flow of physical time, which is involved in any notion of temporal distance. This is why Collingwood felt entitled to anti-relativistic conclusions about the recovery of authorial intentions, conclusions that prompted Gadamer to claim that "the dimension of hermeneutical mediation which is passed through in every act of understanding" escaped him. We then discuss the underlying notions of time at work in both Gadamer and Collingwood, showing that Ricoeur had a better appreciation of the issue, since he saw that Collingwood's moves parallel, up to a point, Heidegger's critique of "vulgar time," albeit with an entirely different result. We also point to the importance in Collingwood's thinking of his notion of "incapsulation." -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  phenomenology  hermeneutics  20thC  Gadamer  Collingwood  Ricoeur  Heidegger  historicism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Étienne Bimbenet, review - Claude Romano, Au cœur de la raison, la phénoménologie - La Vie des idées - 17 décembre 2010
Recensé : Claude Romano, Au cœur de la raison, la phénoménologie. Gallimard (Folio Essais), 2010 ; 1141 p., 13, 50 €. -- Repenser la phénoménologie dans ses présupposés les plus forts, et la transformer de l’intérieur : tel est le geste théorique de Claude Romano qui, à partir des objections formulées par la philosophie analytique et l’empirisme logique, défend une phénoménologie redonnant toute sa place à la sensibilité dans l’analyse de l’expérience et la saisie des essences. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  21stC  continental_philosophy  phenomenology  Heidegger  Merleau-Ponty  Levinas  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  empiricism  metaphysics  experience  sensation  reason  rationality  epistemology  downloaded 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Markus Gabriel interview with Richard Marshall - Why The World Does Not Exist But Unicorns Do | 3AM - May 2015
Markus Gabriel broods on why the world doesn’t exist and never stops wondering about Kant, existence, pluralism, fields of sense, Huw Price, about why he isn’t po-mo, nor a Meinongian, about why unicorns exist, about why he’s a realist, about dissolving the hard problem, about why naturalism and physicalism are wrong, about Schelling and post-Kantian idealism, about Badiou and Meillassouz, Heidegger, about resisting skepticism, about negative philosophy, mythology, madness, laughter and the need for illusions in metaphysics, and about the insult that is the continental/analytic divide . Gird up for an amazing story… -- humongous interview divided into 2 pages - each about twice as long as one of Marshall's regular interviews -- only page 1 picked up by Instapaper, and no single page option -- saved as 2 pdfs to Note
Instapaper  downloaded  intellectual_history  philosophy  metaphysics  ontology  ontology-social  realism  realism-speculative  postmodern  Rorty  Kant  Schelling  German_Idealism  pragmatism  pragmatism-analytic  Husserl  Heidegger  scepticism  myth  Brandom  French_intellectuals  continental_philosophy  philosophy_of_science  analytical_philosophy  Russell_Bertrand  Frege  physicalism  materialism  naturalism  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Turner - Max Weber and the Dispute Over Reason and Value (Routledge, 1984) | bookmark for book abstract - Academia.edu
The problem of the nature of values and the relation between values and rationality is one of the defining issues of twentieth-century thought and Max Weber was one of the defining figures in the debate. In this book, Turner and Factor consider the development of the dispute over Max Weber's contribution to this discourse, by showing how Weber's views have been used, revised and adapted in new contexts. The story of the dispute is itself fascinating, for it cuts across the major political and intellectual currents of the twentieth century, from positivism, pragmatism and value-free social science, through the philosophy of Jaspers and Heidegger, to Critical Theory and the revival of Natural Right and Natural Law. As Weber's ideas were imported to Britain and America, they found new formulations and new adherents and critics and became absorbed into different traditions and new issues. This book was first published in 1984 by Routledge. -- Research Interests: Ethics, Political Theory, Continental Philosophy, Max Weber (Philosophy), Social and Political Philosophy, and Max Weber
books  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Weber  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  epistemology  epistemology-social  positivism  rationality  values  fact-value  constructivism  pragmatism  German_scholarship  German_historical_school  hermeneutics  Heidegger  Frankfurt_School  critical_theory  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicolaas P. Barr Clingan, review essay on Edward Skidelsky and Tobias Bevc histories of the philosophy of Ernst Cassirer (March 2010) | H-Net Reviews - H-German
Nicolaas P. Barr Clingan. Review of Bevc, Tobias, Kulturgenese als Dialektik von Mythos und Vernunft: Ernst Cassirer und die Kritische Theorie and Skidelsky, Edward, Ernst Cassirer: The Last Philosopher of Culture. H-German, H-Net Reviews. March, 2010. Skidelsky offers a welcome, broad introduction of Cassirer's work, but one that is problematic in its approach to broader issues of philosophy and politics. His more polemic claims, often asserted rather than argued, are unlikely to persuade specialists in intellectual history and may misguide general readers about the complex political contours of continental philosophy. Bevc, in contrast, offers a more focused and systematic comparison of Cassirer's philosophy and Critical Theory. His argument is generally compelling. He also skillfully draws a number of significant parallels that would seem to have been precluded by Adorno's dismissive comment, although Bevc does occasionally overstep in the case of the Frankfurt School. But perhaps this faux pas is fitting for a scholar whose efforts at intellectual and political conciliation were so recklessly dismissed in his own time and remain, as Skidelsky observes, foreign to our contentious age.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_culture  20thC  Germany  entre_deux_guerres  Cassirer  Frankfurt_School  Heidegger  culture  symbol  symbols-religious  myth  reason  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  phenomenology  existentialism  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  human_nature  humanism  anti-humanism  culture_industries  irrationalism  rationalization-institutions  modernity  Marxist  continental_philosophy  neo-Kantian  Adorno 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
‘First Philosophy and its Metacritique: The Case of Karl-Otto Apel’ ( 1982) | Piet Strydom - Academia.edu
‘First Philosophy and its Metacritique: The Case of Karl-Otto Apel’, unpublished paper presented to the philosophical society Cogito, University College Cork, 10 December 1982 -- [after noting the recurring battle between metaphysics and anti metaphysics, most recently the strange bedfellows of conservative, liberal and radical from Heidegger to Rorty to Derrida proposes a 4-fold rather than binary model] This quadruple constellation has been in evidence ever since the classical Greek period and can be traced back to the existence side by side of everyday language embodying common sense, the paradigmatically regulated language of science which tends to monopolise rationality as such, philosophical language which claims to embody noetic rationality, and finally the claim of metacritical enlighteners to be able to expose the presuppositions of philosophy and thus to clarify the concept of rationality in its broadest conceivable sense. Accordingly, the following four poles can be seen most basically to determine the dispute between the representative of first philosophy and their metacritics: -- (1) "dogmatic first philosophy", including every form of philosophy of common-sense which elevates conventional forms of language use, cognition and action to the status of criterion of argumentation; (2) "self-critical first philosophy" in the sense of all forms of transcendental philosophy which regard common sense as well as science as explicandum and deduce general conditions for them from an irreducible, final and immutable criterion; -- (3) "dogmatic metacitique" in the sense of the scientistic critique of philosophy which on the basis of a determinate concept of science as final criterion implicitly or explicitly seeks the dissolution of both dogmatic and self-critical forms of first philosophy; -- and, finally, (4) "dialectical metacritique" as that form of critique of philosophy which takes in its stride all the above-mentioned types of philosophy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  metaphysics  scepticism  rationality  foundationalism  anti-foundationalism  Heidegger  Wittgenstein  Rorty  Derrida  Foucault  deconstruction  postmodern  critical_theory  certainty  epistemology  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hartman, review essay - How Americans Have Received Nietzsche and Heidegger and Why It Matters | Reviews in American History > Volume 41, Number 1, March 2013 - Project MUSE
Reviewed -- (1) Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen. American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas. - Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2012. and (2) Martin Woessner. Heidegger in America. - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Heidegger  pragmatism  phenomenology  existentialism  postmodern  Rorty  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Adam Kotsko, review - Sergei Prozorov, Agamben and Politics: A Critical Introduction // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 18, 2014
Reviewed by Adam Kotsko, Shimer College -- The field of secondary works on Agamben is becoming crowded, particularly works on his political thought. This year alone, Sergei Prozorov's Agamben and Politics joins Mathew Abbott's The Figure of This World: Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology (Edinburgh) and Jessica Whyte's Catastrophe and Redemption: The Political Thought of Giorgio Agamben. This multiplication should not be taken as simple repetition, however. In these and other recent studies, it could be said that the scholarship on Agamben's political thought is moving into a second phase, one that emphasizes the need to understand Agamben's project as a whole before grappling with his specifically political works.
books  reviews  21stC  political_philosophy  anthropology  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  Agamben 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
March 2011: The Rise and Fall of Neoconservatism - C. Bradley Thompson, Lead Essay | Cato Unbound
Lead Essay -- Neoconservatism Unmasked by C. Bradley Thompson -- Neoconservative intellectuals often describe themselves as having a particular mode of thinking — maybe even just a “mood.” C. Bradley Thompson argues that neoconservatism is much more than that. Its key philosophical inspiration of comes from Irving Kristol, and particularly from Kristol’s engagement with the philosopher Leo Strauss. Thompson argues that, under Straussian influence, neoconservatives champion the rule of a philosophically cunning elite over a population that will never be able to understand their intellectual masters. Instead, the populace is steered toward self-sacrifice, war, and nationalism — as well as a set of religious and moral beliefs that the elites in no way share. Such a doctrine, Thompson charges, points disturbingly toward fascism.
intellectual_history  political_philosophy  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  Germany  Nazis  fascism  liberalism  Strauss  Straussians  neoconservatism  US_politics  Plato-Republic  elites  esotericism  Heidegger  US_history  democracy  relativism  politics-and-religion  nihilism  mass_culture  political_participation  propaganda 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Joseph Mootz - Hermeneutics and Law (June 30, 2014) in The Blackwell Companion to Hermeneutics (Eds. Naill Keane and Chris Lawn, 2015) :: SSRN
University of the Pacific - McGeorge School of Law -- This chapter will appear in a forthcoming book on hermeneutics. After providing a hermeneutical phenomenology of legal practice that locates legal interpretation at the center of the rule of law, the chapter considers three important hermeneutical themes: (1) the critical distinction between a legal historian writing aboout a law in the past and a judge deciding a case according to the law; (2) the reinvigoration of the natural law tradition against the reductive characteristics of legal positivism by construing human nature as hermeneutical; and. (3) the role of philosophical hermeneutics in grounding critical legal theory rather than serving as a quiescent acceptance of the status quo, as elaborated by reconsidering the famous exchanges between Gadamer, Ricoeur and Habermas. -- I argue that these three important themes are sufficient to underwrite Gadamer's famous assertion that legal practice has exemplary status for hermeneutical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  historiography  lit_crit  critical_theory  legal_reasoning  judiciary  precedent  hermeneutics  natural_law  positivism-legal  legal_realism  rhetoric-writing  human_nature  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  Gadamer  Habermas  Ricoeur  Heidegger  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Rex Gilliland - What Becomes of the Human after Humanism? Heidegger and Derrida | Dartmouth College
We will consider Heidegger’s concept of the human being in the “Letter on ‘Humanism’” and Derrida’s reading of it in “The Ends of Man.” The “Letter on ‘Humanism’” is the first publication in which Heidegger extensively discusses the central themes of his later thought and is also the text that framed Heidegger’s reception in postwar France. In it, Heidegger critically examines the metaphysical foundation of humanism and develops a conception of the human being that attempts to think human decision in terms of its fundamental orientation toward being. Against humanists such as Sartre, Heidegger argues that being, not the human being, is of primary importance. At the same time, he maintains that the human being cannot be reduced to an epiphenomenon of being because being needs the human being to preserve its truth. We will consider Derrida’s response and his own views about the human being. In “The Ends of Man,” a nuanced reading of this text and the debate about humanism it helped to inspire, Derrida highlights the inadequacies of the interpretations of Heidegger found on both sides of the debate. However, Derrida also argues that there is a certain justification for these readings: Due to the fact that he privileges the human being and defines its essence via the proximity and presence of being, Heidegger fails to escape metaphysics. Does Derrida provide an alternate conception that avoids these difficulties? We will explore these questions by examining Derrida’s notions of undecidability and the relationship to an impossible presence: Is the extreme minimalism of Derrida’s position needed to disrupt the metaphysics of presence, or does it lead to a conception of the human being that is unnecessarily meager?
paper  20thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  continental_philosophy  Heidegger  Derrida  humanism  anti-humanism  post-WWII  human_nature  metaphysics  Being  determinism  free_will  responsibility  Sartre  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Nietzsche Against the Philosophical Canon (2013) :: SSRN
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 438 -- Nietzsche views the Western philosophical tradition as organized around a conception of philosophy deriving from Socrates. According to this (loosely) Socratic philosophical canon: (1) Philosophy, as the “love of wisdom,” aims for knowledge of timeless and non-empirical truths, including truths about the good and the right; (2) Knowledge of the truth is the overriding value in philosophy and is also essential for living well; and (3) Philosophical knowledge is acquired through the exercise of reason, understood as a faculty that can operate independently, in whole or in part, of a posteriori evidence. This paper explores Nietzsche's reasons for rejecting this conception of philosophy on each count, especially as developed in his book, Twilight of the Idols. Nietzsche's replacement of metaphysical speculation with psychological diagnosis is compared to Carnap's own critique of metaphysics, and helps explain Carnap's high appraisal of Nietzsche compared to other major figures in post-Kantian German philosophy. Nietzsche's rejection of the traditional philosophical canon is contrasted with that of other critics of the tradition, including Marx, Quine, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein. The reaction against naturalism in recent Anglophone philosophy is offered, finally, as a case study in support of Nietzsche's skepticism about the philosophical canon. --Keywords: Nietzsche, Socrates, Quine, Marx, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Carnap, meta-philosophy, ethics -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  ancient_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  metaphysics  metaethics  epistemology  truth  good  flourishing  Socrates  post-truth  German_Idealism  Marx  Carnap  Quine  Heidegger  Wittgenstein  canon  ethics  reason  apriori  empiricism  naturalism  scepticism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview with Andrew Bowie - schelling, adorno and all that jazz » 3:AM Magazine - June 2014
Andrew Bowie is the ice cool jazz-playing philosopher whose musical riffs can be heard here and gigs checked out here. But when he’s not laying down mood and mellow he’s thinking all the time about how philosophy can fit in with other interests, about the importance of Schelling for the debate about freewill, about the importance of metaphor for Schelling and metaphysics, about Schellings’ links to Heidegger, Davidson and Wittgenstein, about the German philosophical tradition and Romanticism, about what’s wrong with the way analytic philosophers do philosophy of music, about why the East-West Divan Orchestra is an important example, about whether he is a strange pragmatist, about Adorno and how he helps us see what is wrong with some of the contemporary forms of philosophy, and how it might be fixed, about the role of historicism, about Adorno and his criticisms of analytics and Hegelians, about Adorno’s aesthetics, about whether Adorno is an Hegelian, and about Adorno’s writing style.
intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Germany  German_Idealism  Schelling  Romanticism  Heidegger  Adorno  analytical_philosophy  continental_philosophy  aesthetics  music  Hegelian  historicism  Wittgenstein  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Antonio - After Postmodernism: Reactionary Tribalism | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 106, No. 1 (July 2000), pp. 40-87
Revived Weimar‐era “radical conservatism” and fresh “New Right” and “paleoconservative” theories offer a radical cultural critique of global capitalism and liberal democracy. Expressing a broader retribalization and perceived failure of modernization, their defense of communal particularity attacks the multicultural nation‐state, liberal rights, and universal citizenship. This essay links reactionary tribalism to a recurrent 20th‐century theoretical tendency, the “total critique of modernity”—a fusion of oversimplified Nietzschean and Weberian ideas. Historically, total critique has promoted convergence between right and left, such as the current overlapping facets of “radical conservatism” and “strong‐program postmodernism.” Total critique counters the “historicist” method of “internal critique” and the “communication model” characteristic of reflexive social theory. The discussion uncovers the mediating role of social theory in the problematic relationship of science and partially disenchanted public spheres in plural, democratic cultures. -- 200+ references! -- in postmodernism includes range of "end of" thinkers from left and right, and the overlaps between far right and some of the postmodern cultural left -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  cultural_history  modernity  irrational  Germany  Weimar  Nazis  Heidegger  Nietzsche  Schmitt  Strauss  neo-Hegelian  right-wing  cultural_pessimism  Leftist  Marxist  historicism  cultural_critique  Habermas  Dewey  pragmatism  liberalism  democracy  patriarchy  nationalism  ethnic_ID  universalism  citizenship  nation-state  multiculturalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
The Authority of Obscurity: Fludd, Hamann, Heidegger, Kripke - Waggish 2012
Re Kripke's revival of obscurantist essentialist metaphysics based on "intuitions" -- The shorter version of this, again, is: saying makes it so. The way in which we use language somehow makes it possible to generate claims about metaphysical necessity. Can we rigidly refer to Nixon? That seems to be the shaky ground on which cart and horse must ride.

For someone like myself who thinks that simply naming something isn’t even sufficient to be certain it exists, Kripke is far off the mark, but again, that is beside the point here. My consideration here is with the rhetorical tactics involved and how they echo past thinkers who presume a familiarity with the inner nature of reality and use a certain sort of authoritative language to proclaim it.
intellectual_history  metaphysics  theology  language  philosophy_of_language  esotericism  alchemy  macro-microcosm  symbol  analogy  16thC  18thC  20thC  Counter-Enlightenment  Germany  Heidegger  analytical_philosophy  Quine  essence  essentialism  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis J. Mootz III, review - Donatella Di Cesare, Gadamer: A Philosophical Portrait // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Dec 2013
Donatella Di Cesare has written a wonderfully self-reflexive book. What does it mean to claim to have created a portrait of Hans-Georg Gadamer as a philosopher, given that Gadamer regarded the experience of art, and particularly the experience of viewing a portrait, as having profound significance for hermeneutical philosophy? Gadamer emphasized that the portrait necessarily moves beyond pure representation because the meaning of the subject of the portrait is augmented through the play that occurs while viewing the portrait. Di Cesare’s portrait of Gadamer succeeds because it exemplifies, amplifies and exceeds our previous understanding of Gadamer, working from the readers' starting points and stimulating them with new insights. The emerging portrait is at once challenging and provocative; of course, Gadamer would argue that a portrait should be nothing less.
books  reviews  Gadamer  Heidegger  hermeneutics  philosophy_of_language  Socrates 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Antonio Calcagno, review - Rocco Gangle, François Laruelle’s Philosophies of Difference: A Critical Introduction and Guide // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Dec 2013
One of the central debates in contemporary French philosophy consists of evaluating the viability and force of post World War II theories of difference, stemming from Nietzsche and Heidegger, and reworked in more recent positions developed by Derrida, Deleuze, Levinas and postmodern philosophers like Lyotard. Two key figures in this debate are Alain Badiou and François Laruelle. Both challenge the claims of an earlier generation that privileged difference as a response to what were perceived to be authoritarian, reductive and totalising modes of thinking. Rocco Gangle’s book helps readers navigate one of Laruelle’s more critical and important works on the aforementioned issue. -- The final chapter of Gangle’s commentary focuses on Laruelle’s constructive philosophy. He tries to clarify what Laruelle means when he says that he advocates a non-philosophy that investigates the in-One. Again, the in-One refers to the in-between of elements in a relation that are no longer fully identical with the poles of the relation. According to Gangle, Laruelle articulates two key concepts in the last chapter of Philosophies of Difference, namely, (non-)One and non-thetic transcendence (NTT). The former refers to: the aspect in which diversity or multiplicity appears when it is no longer structured through Difference, in other words when multiplicity or diversity is no longer conceived in terms any necessary relation between the multiple and One . . . . It is thus a kind of suspension of Difference with respect to or according to the One. -- I think of the Laruellian (non-)One as becomings without the necessary determination of a beginning or an end, a kind of in-process being. NTT explains how philosophy has traditionally presented the One either as transcendence or as transcendental. -- Laruelle affirms freedom and decision-making as crucial to understanding the (non-)Ones of philosophical reflection.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  metaphysics  Nietzsche  Heidegger  Derrida  Deluze  deconstruction  Absolute  transcendence  unity-multiplicity  continental_philosophy  difference  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Timothy J. Nulty, review - David Egan, Stephen Reynolds, and Aaron James Wendland (eds.), Wittgenstein and Heidegger // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
Readers familiar with both Heidegger and Wittgenstein will find in this book detailed and thorough expressions of perhaps some of their own intuitions about the similarities and differences between these two influential twentieth-century philosophers. The 16 essays provide insights and arguments published for the first time. Even those who consider themselves well-versed in the works of Heidegger and Wittgenstein are sure to find this book worth their time... -- Braver examines Heidegger's and Wittgenstein's views of fundamental logical principles [and] succeeds in showing how Wittgenstein and Heidegger gave very similar answers to questions about the basic principles that are supposed to guide our thinking. For Wittgenstein, the target of critique was the Law of Non-contradiction, while for Heidegger it was the Principle of Sufficient Reason. Both philosophers return logic and reason to the human domain. One is reminded of the American pragmatist William James and his attempt to provide an account of truth that was cognizant of the finite, contextual nature of human understanding. Logic and reason are not transcendent to our practices; they are not answerable to "Meaning or Reason or anything metaphysical or capitalized" ... In giving up a transcendent source of justification, we only lose what we never had in the first place.
books  reviews  20thC  intellectual_history  metaphysics  logic  philosophy_of_language  ontology  Wittgenstein  Heidegger  phenomenology  empiricism  pragmatism  James_William  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
R. Matthew Shockey, review - Jeffrey Powell (ed.), Heidegger and Language // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
This is a collection of fourteen essays organized more-or-less chronologically around Heidegger's writings on language from the mid-1920s (circa Being and Time (1927)) to the end of his career. --These essays seem to be oriented towards readers who are relatively new to or only somewhat familiar with Heidegger's work. That's not to say they are easy reads - Heidegger deliberately makes it impossible to write anything easily digestible about him - only that there is a lot of exposition and summarizing, little positioning of claims made relative to other secondary literature (and almost none to work in philosophy of language that does not draw on Heidegger), and not a lot of critical engagement with what is exposited.... Taken together, these essays all show Heidegger's attempts to wrestle with the limits of language and to bring to language its primordial origin or ground, which, by his own telling, always resists and conceals itself in any such attempt. Heidegger may thus, as Dastur says, reject Augustinian nominalism (as described by Wittgenstein), but he is nevertheless faced with precisely the task of the Augustinian teacher, who must seek to find words that, though they cannot simply tell the student about being, may yet help effect a transformation in the student towards an original understanding of being. As Ziarek observes, however, in the end "the transformation" in our relation to language and being that Heidegger seeks "cannot be compelled or manufactured. In short, it is not up to human doing" (117). Heidegger's being and Augustine's (which for him is, of course, God) must each come to us if we are to be saved - from, respectively, "metaphysics" and original sin, which don't seem so different, given Heidegger's aforementioned seriousness. -- The essays in this volume may not themselves offer us the transformation or salvation Heidegger sought, but they do on the whole contribute to his preparatory project,
books  reviews  intellectual_history  20thC  Germany  continental_philosophy  Heidegger  phenomenology  philosophy_of_language 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Dermot Moran, review - Steven Crowell, Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
C Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 321pp., $29.99 (pbk), ISBN 9781107682559.

Reviewed by University College Dublin

Steven Crowell's latest monograph is a careful and nuanced thematic and historically grounded defense of the philosophical importance of what is now frequently called "classical" phenomenology (specifically Husserl and Heidegger) in addressing the issues of meaning, normativity, agency and first-person knowledge, topics central to contemporary analytic philosophy of mind and action. This well argued book situates Husserl and Heidegger not just at the center of contemporary debates in the philosophy of mind and action, but also as interlocutors in current disputes over normativity and practical knowledge (as found in the neo-pragmatism of John McDowell and Robert Brandom, among others), as well as the current discussions concerning first-person authority and mental content.

Crowell is not just conversant with the intricacy of the texts of Husserl and Heidegger (whom he reads with detailed documentation as in substantial agreement with one another), but also with a wide range of figures in contemporary philosophy of mind, moral psychology, and neo-pragmatism, including John Searle, Hubert Dreyfus, Alva Noë, Richard Moran (no relation), and Christine Korsgaard). In the course of his interpretations of Husserl and Heidegger, moreover, Crowell has a lot of instructive (and corrective) things to say about such issues as mental content, internalism and externalism, causation, the relation between perception and conception, the connection between self-consciousness and normativity, the transparency and immediacy of self-knowledge (in an interesting engagement with Moran) and the meaning of agency (including moral agency) in relation to Heidegger's notion of authenticity. This is a very rich, often dense but never less than lucid book that offers a systematic defense of phenomenology in the language of contemporary philosophy and thereby achieves a double objective, namely to set a new agenda for phenomenological discussion in the twenty-first century and to show why analytic philosophers would be wrong to neglect the phenomenological heritage.
books  reviews  kindle-available  philosophy  phenomenology  Husserl  Heidegger  idealism-transcendental  mind  action-theory  normativity  consciousness  responsibility  conscience  perception  causation  mind-body  agency  moral_psychology  Kant  analytical_philosophy  meaning  concepts  pragmatism  authenticity  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall - Stewart Home’s po-mo homer » 3:AM Magazine
As much an essay on post Kantian (and post Hegelian) German philosophy -- Marxism, materialism, phenomenology hermeneutics, post Kantian, structuralist, poststructuralist, especially Nietzsche and Heidegger -- as on an album of readings of his work by Home. And a further riff on epistemology and varieties of scepticism, including a sort of take on Pyrrhonism as not an extreme version of scepticism. Heidegger's misreading of Nietzsche is of a piece with his embrace of the fascist side of Plato, which was part of Nietzsche's rejection of even the non Socratic Plato. Further long riff on Beiser rejection of Kantian aesthetics in Diotima's Children and the lack of aesthetic criteria after the avant_guard. Home attacks the shallow art world from another direction - mostly as a bourgeois status game.
books  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  fate  free_will  gods-antiquity  ancient_religions  myth  tragedy  Nietzsche  Heidegger  epistemology  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Homer  pre-Socratics  aesthetics  Kant-aesthetics  avant_guard  materialism  Marxist  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Allan Megill, review essay - Historicizing Nietzsche? Paradoxes and Lessons of a Hard Case | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 68, No. 1 (Mar., 1996), pp. 114-152
Reviewed works: *--* (1) Nietzsche Contra Rousseau: A Study of Nietzsche's Moral and Politicial Thought by Keith Ansell-Pearson; *--* (2) The Neitzche Legacy in Germany, 1890-1990 by Steven E. Aschheim; *--* (3) Confrontations: Derrida/Heidegger/Nietzsche by Ernst Behler; *--* (4) Neitzsche on Truth and Philosophy by Steven Taubeneck; *--* (5) Nietzsche Contra Nietzsche: Creativity and the Anti-Romantic by Adrian Del Caro; *--* (6) Neitzsche and the Politics of Aristocratic Radicalism by Bruce Detwiler; *--* (7) Nietzsche's New Seas: Explorations in Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Politics by Michael Allen Gillespie; Tracy B. Strong; *--* (8) Nietzsche and the Origin of Virtue by Lester H. Hunt; *--* (9) Zarathustras Geheimnis: Friedrich Nietzsche und seine verschlüsselte Botschaft by Joachim Köhler; *--* (10) Nietzsche as Postmodernist: Essays Pro and Contra; Clayton Koelb; *--* (11) Nietzsche's Case: Philosophy as/and Literature by Bernd Magnus; Stanley Stewart; Jean-Pierre Mileur; *--* (12) Nietzsche's Philosophy of Nature and Cosmology by Alistair Moles; *--* (13) Nietzsche und der Nietzscheanismus by Ernst Nolte; *--* (14) Young Nietzsche: Becoming a Genius by Carl Pletsch; *--* (15) Nietzsche and the Question of Interpretation: Between Hermeneutics and Deconstruction by Alan D. Schrift; *--* (16) Alcyone: Nietzsche on Gifts, Noise, and Women by Gary Shapiro; *-'* (17) Nietzschean Narratives by Gary Shapiro; *--* (18) Thinker on Stage: Nietzsche's Materialism by Peter Sloterdijk; *--* (19) Reading Nietzsche by Robert C. Solomon; Kathleen M. Higgins; *--* (20) Nietzsche's Voice by Henry Staten; *--* (21) Left-Wing Nietzscheanism: The Politics of German Expressionism, 1910-1920 by Seth Taylor; *--* (22) Friedrich Nietzsche and the Politics of the Soul: A Study of Heroic Individualism by Leslie Paul Thiele; *--* (23) Nietzsche and Political Thought by Mark Warren; *--* (24) Within Nietzsche's Labyrinth by Alan White; *--* (25) Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art by Julian Young -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Rousseau  Heidegger  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  aesthetics  morality-Nietzche  lit_crit  literary_history  individualism  self  self-development  Weimar  hermeneutics  deconstruction  postmodern  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  metaethics  style-philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
ETHAN KLEINBERG -- BACK TO WHERE WE'VE NEVER BEEN: HEIDEGGER, LEVINAS, AND DERRIDA ON TRADITION AND HISTORY | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 51, No. 4 (December 2012), pp. 114-135
This paper will address the topic of "tradition" by exploring the ways that Martin Heidegger, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jacques Derrida each looked to return to traditional texts in order to overcome a perceived crisis or delimiting fault in the contemporary thought of their respective presents. For Heidegger, this meant a return to the pre-Socratics of "early Greek thinking." For Levinas, it entailed a return to the sacred Jewish texts of the Talmud. For Derrida, it was the return to texts that embodied the "Western metaphysical tradition," be it by Plato, Descartes, Rousseau, or Marx. I then want to ask whether these reflections can be turned so as to shed light on three resilient trends in the practice of history that I will label positivist, speculative or teleological, and constructivist. By correlating the ways that Heidegger, Levinas, and Derrida utilize and employ "tradition" with the historical trends of positivism, speculative/teleological history, and constructivism, I hope to produce an engagement between theorists whose concerns implicate history even though they may not be explicitly historical, and historians who may not realize the ways that their work coincides with the claims of these theorists.
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  historiography  20thC  Heidegger  Derrida  tradition 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Salem-Wiseman - Heidegger's Dasein and the Liberal Conception of the Self | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 4 (Aug., 2003), pp. 533-557
Although Heidegger's philosophical complicity with National Socialism has been the focus of virtually all discussions of his politics, little to no attention has been placed on how the conception of human existence developed in Being and Time might shed light on debates about the self between contemporary liberals and communitarians. By situating Heidegger's early work within these ongoing debates, the author will show how his descriptions of Dasein-especially the descriptions of the relationship between Dasein and its community-are actually more consistent with liberal views of the self than with communitarian interpretations. Heidegger helps to clarify how a thickly constituted, social self may nevertheless stand back from its community in ways that communitarians are hard pressed to explain. In the final section, the author will comment on the compatibility of Heidegger's conception of Dasein with liberalism as a political philosophy, focusing in particular on Heidegger's conception of Mitsein or being-with. -- didn't download
political_philosophy  liberalism  communitarian  individualism  Heidegger 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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