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NICOLAS GUILHOT - THE FIRST MODERN REALIST: FELIX GILBERT'S MACHIAVELLI AND THE REALIST TRADITION IN INTERNATIONAL THOUGHT | Modern Intellectual History (Feb 2015) - Cambridge Journals Online
Centre national de la recherche scientifique, New York University E-mail: nicolas.guilhot@nyu.edu -- In the disciplines of political science and international relations, Machiavelli is unanimously considered to be “the first modern realist.” This essay argues that the idea of a realist tradition going from the Renaissance to postwar realism founders when one considers the disrepute of Machiavelli among early international relations theorists. It suggests that the transformation of Machiavelli into a realist thinker took place subsequently, when new historical scholarship, informed by strategic and political considerations related to the transformation of the US into a global power, generated a new picture of the Renaissance. Focusing on the work of Felix Gilbert, and in particular his Machiavelli and Guicciardini, the essay shows how this new interpretation of Machiavelli was shaped by the crisis of the 1930s, the emergence of security studies, and the philanthropic sponsorship of international relations theory. -- * I would like to thank Samuel Moyn and three anonymous reviewers for their comments on a prior version of this paper. I greatly benefited from discussions with Volker Berghahn, Anthony Molho, and Jacques Revel. -- paywall
article  paywall  find  libraries  IR_theory  intellectual_history  IR-realism  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  strategic_studies  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guicciardini  historiography-postWWII  US_foreign_policy  hegemony  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
ERIC COCHRANE, The Transition from Renaissance to Baroque: The Case of Italian Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Feb., 1980), pp. 21-38
The meaning of the term "baroque" has been the subject of much debate. In the field of historiography, historians have not engaged in a dialogue on the subject and have accepted uncritically the value-judgments of eighteenth-century scholarship. One approach to be used in this author's new book, Historians and Historiography in the Italian Renaissance, compares the work of 782 Italian historians from earliest times through the seventeenth century. The humanist historiography of the Italian Renaissance exhibited the concepts of change, contingency, and epoch in history; relied on ancient forms; used methodological principles of causation; and taught moral and political lessons. Italian Baroque historiography, on the other hand, employed the forms of the new bulletins or avvisi, copied the prose style of its contemporaries, discounted its practical utility, and displayed a separation between history as literature and history as research. -- downloaded to Air
article  jstor  historiography  historicism  Renaissance  humanism  historiography-18thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  historiography-19thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Italy  Guicciardini  historical_change  contingency  Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader

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