dunnettreader + george_ii   11

Michael Schaich, ed. - Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in 18thC Europe (2007) - Oxford University Press
OUP/German Historical Institute London Studies of the German Historical Institute London -- 509 pages | 978-0-19-921472-3 | Hardback | This collection of essays is a pioneering survey of the spiritual dimensions of kingship in 18thC Europe. It investigates the role of clergymen in the mechanics of the court, the religious observances of monarchs and their entourages, and the importance of religious images and ceremonial in underpinning royal power. The volume compares the British, French, Russian, and some of the German monarchies in order to allow comparisons to be drawn between different national and especially confessional settings. Based on original research and new source material, the 15 essays by established scholars chart mostly unknown territory. Previous research on the subject has focused on the 16thC and 17thC at the expense of the age of Enlightenment which has widely been regarded as a period of desacralization of monarchy. The essays open up new perspectives on the function of court clerics, conspicuous and internalized forms of aulic devotion, the gendered framing of religion, the purpose of court ritual, and the divide between the public and private spheres of monarchy. Overall the essays maintain that despite the gradual decline of monarchy by divine right, religion still permeated almost all aspects of court life and monarchical representation. The volume thus challenges received wisdom about the disenchantment of kingship and the rise of more rationalized forms of absolutist government during the period between c.1688 and 1789. -- surprise, surprise, leads off with an "ancien régime" essay by JCD Clark
books  cultural_history  religious_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Ancien_régime  secularization  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  divine_right  court_culture  authority  cultural_authority  cultural_change  gender  religion-established  gender-and-religion  British_history  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  courtiers  Jacobite_court  propaganda  art_history  patronage-artistic  William_III  Queen_Anne  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  royal_families  société_des_princes  kingship  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  France  Russia  Holy_Roman_Empire  Catherine_the_Great  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Austria  Spain  ritual 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
OLIVER J. W. COX -- FREDERICK, PRINCE OF WALES, AND THE FIRST PERFORMANCE OF ‘RULE, BRITANNIA!’ (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 931-954. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
OLIVER J. W. COX - University College, Oxford -- The words and music of ‘Rule, Britannia!’ are synonymous with the expansionist, triumphalist, and imperialist Britain symbolized by fluttering Union Jacks on the Last Night of the Proms. This article explores the cultural and political contexts of the first performance of this important national cultural artefact as the finale of Alfred: a masque to suggest that this opening night served a very different purpose. The first audience was a court in exile from the metropolitan heart of London, popular amongst the general public, but without any prospects of government. Two of the most important members of this group of peers, politicians, poets and a prince had recently died, and with them any cohesive identity. Alfred is both a desperate plea for unity, a rallying cry which forcefully restated the key tenets of this group's identity, and a delayed expression of patriotic celebration occasioned by Admiral Vernon's capture of Portobello. Through addressing this performance, this article makes an important contribution to our understanding of Hanoverian political culture and highlights the continuing impact of Anglo-Saxon England on mid-eighteenth-century Britain. -* For comments and advice on earlier versions of my argument, I am grateful to Dr Hannah Smith and Dr Geoffrey Tyack. - Thanks are also due to John and Virginia Murray who ensured archival work at 50 Albemarle Street was always a pleasure.
article  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  1740s  Whigs-opposition  Whigs-oligarchy  George_II  Walpole  Frederick_Prince_of_Wales  Britannia  Bolingbroke  Mallet  political_culture  political_nation  political_spectacle  theater  theatre-politics  elite_culture  patriotism  Anglo-Saxons  cultural_authority  cultural_pessimism  War_of_Austrian_Succession  British_Navy  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Clarissa Campbell Orr, historiographical review - New Perspectives on Hanoverian Britain | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Jun., 2009), pp. 513-529
Reviewed work: War, State and Society in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland by Stephen Conway; Georgian Monarchy: Politics and Culture, 1714-1760 by Hannah Smith; Britain, Hanover and the Protestant Interest, 1688-1756 by Andrew C. Thompson; Hanover and the British Empire, 1700-1837 by Nick Harding -- paywall Cambridge journals -- quite long and looks very useful
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  paywall  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  British_foreign_policy  Britain-Continent  Hanover-Britain_relations  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  monarchy  diplomatic_history  court_culture  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  political_culture  popular_politics  religious_culture  Whigs-oligarchy  Protestant_International  nationalism  national_ID  military_history  British_Empire  British_Army  British_Navy  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  Anglo-French  Anglo-Dutch  Holy_Roman_Empire  Austria  Prussia 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
JAMES WARD - Brass money and wooden shoes: Transmuting anti-Catholic rhetoric in Swift's "Drapier's Letters" | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr, Vol. 25 (2010), pp. 82-97
This article discusses Jonathan Swift's appropriation of anti-Catholic rhetoric in The Drapier's Letters. The discussion draws both on pamphlets which preceded Swift's intervention in the Wood's halfpence affair and on the wider tradition in English and Irish political thought of conceiving political liberty negatively against the threat of Catholic absolutism. Swift exploits the historical resonance of anti-Catholicism while subtly reorienting or 'transmuting' it, retaining its emotional appeal but directing it against a new target. Such manipulations show that The Drapier's Letters construct their audience as both a political constituency to be mobilized and a satiric target to be mocked. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  intellectual_history  literary_history  political_culture  religious_culture  18thC  Ireland  Anglo-Irish_constitution  anti-Catholic  Absolutism  Papacy  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  George_II  Woods_halfpence  Swift  satire  political_press  politics-and-literature  liberty  Ireland-English_exploitation  currency  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Black, review - Nick Harding, Hanover and the British Empire, 1700-1837 | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Summer, 2008), pp. 587-588
Black isn't thrilled but interesting comments re historiography challenges in characterizing attitudes over long periods, Zeitgeist (eg Clark, Colley, Langford different conclusions), whether "strategy" even makes sense in or across the period etc
books  reviews  jstor  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Hanover-Britain_relations  George_I  George_II  George_III  George_IV  William_IV  Britain-Continent  blue_water_strategy  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Paul Langford: The Licensing Act of 1737 by Vincent J. Liesenfeld (1987)
JSTOR: The English Historical Review, Vol. 102, No. 404 (Jul., 1987), p. 726 -- looks like lots of useful details including similar crackdown at Cambridge and Oxford
books  reviews  find  18thC  British_politics  1730s  political_press  censorship  free_speech  theater  university  satire  Walpole  George_II  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay: Linda Colley and Mark Goldie - The Principles and Practice of Eighteenth-Century Party (1979)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Mar., 1979), pp. 239-246 -- downloaded pdf to Note --Works reviewed: --**-- Parliament, Policy and Politics in the Reign of William III by Henry Horwitz;  --**-- The Growth of Parliamentary Parties 1689-1742 by B. W. Hill; Stability and Strife 1714-1760 by W. A. Speck;  --**-- Revolution Principles: The Politics of Party 1689-1720 by J. P. Kenyon; --**--  Liberty and Property: Political Ideology in Eighteenth Century Britain by H. T. Dickinson
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  political_history  Britain  British_history  British_politics  parties  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_I  George_II  Walpole  Bolingbroke  provinces  local_government  elections  Country_Party  Whigs-opposition  ideology  elites  public_opinion  political_press  political_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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