dunnettreader + french_revolutionary_wars   23

DUMAS, Alexandre – La Comtesse de Charny | Litterature audio.com
Reader: Gustave - 54 hrs
La Comtesse de Charny, écrit en 1853, fait suite à Ange Pitou (terminé abruptement, ce dont s’explique l’auteur) et termine donc la saga des Mémoires d’un médecin. Le roman raconte la Révolution française, des journées d’octobre 1789 à l’exécution de Louis XVI, et mêle à l’histoire les personnages de fiction : Ange Pitou, Olivier de Charny, dont la reine est éprise, sa femme Andrée et son cadet, amoureux de Catherine Billot. Cagliostro achève ici le travail de destruction entamé dans Joseph Balsamo, et bien peu de personnages, somme toute, survivront à ces terribles événements…
audio-books  downloaded  18thC  French_Revolution  Terror  monarchy  royalists  French_Revolutionary_Wars  French_politics  historical_fiction  novels  19thC  French_lit  French_language  Dumas 
june 2017 by dunnettreader
FRANCE, Anatole – Mémoires d’un volontaire (published in "L’Étui de nacre")' | Litterature audio.com
Donneur de voix : René Depasse | Durée : 1h 30min | Genre : Histoire
Une fois encore, l’auteur de Les Dieux ont soif revient sur les erreurs (ou horreurs) révolutionnaires et insiste sur l’authenticité de son récit qu’il encadre de ces deux notes :
« Toutes les circonstances de ces Mémoires sont véritables, et empruntées à divers écrits du XVIIIe siècle. Il ne s’y trouve pas un détail, si petit qu’il soit, qu’on ne rapporte d’après un témoignage authentique. »
« Écrit au bivouac, sur la Sambre, du septidi 27 frimaire, au sextidi 6 nivôse an II de la République française, par Pierre Aubier, réquisitionnaire. »
Les Mémoires d’un volontaire complètent L’Étui de nacre dont nous avons maintenant l’intégrale.
audio-books  French_lit  French_language  France_Anatole  18thC  19thC  20thC  fiction  historical_fiction  French_Revolution  Directoire  French_Revolutionary_Wars 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
FRANCE, Anatole – L’Étui de nacre (Œuvre intégrale) | Litterature audio.com
Donneur de voix : René Depasse | Durée : 6h 16min | Genre : Nouvelles
L'Étui de nacre est un recueil de nouvelles d’Anatole France paru en 1892.
- Le Procurateur de Judée,
- Amycus et Célestin,
- La Légende des saintes Oliverie et Liberette,
- Sainte Euphrosine,
- Scolastica,
- Le Jongleur de Notre-Dame,
- La Messe des ombres,
- Leslie Wood,
- Gestas,
- Le Manuscrit d’un médecin de village,
- Mémoires d’un volontaire (see separate bookmark - Historical fiction An II of 1st République & French Revolutionary Wars),
- L’Aube,
- Madame de Luzy,
- La Mort accordée,
- Anecdote de floréal, an II,
- La Perquisition,
- Le Petit Soldat de plom
audio-books  French_lit  French_language  France_Anatole  fiction  19thC  satire  tales  novellas  historical_fiction  18thC  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Directoire 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Anthony Page - The Seventy Years War, 1744–1815, and Britain’s Fiscal-Naval State | War and Society, 34:3 (8 2015), pp. 162-186
Anthony.Page@utas.edu.au -- University of Tasmania -- DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/0729247315Z.00000000053 -- This article argues that we should view Britain as fighting a ‘Seventy Years War’ with France between the battles of Fontenoy in 1745 and Waterloo in 1815. Through years of hot and cold war, Britain struggled to build the military power needed to prevent it from falling under the domination of France. In hindsight, many view the British as inevitable imperialists, confidently building towards their global empire of the 19thC. In reality, 18thC Britons frequently fretted about the threat of invasion, military weakness, possible financial collapse, and potential revolution. Historical developments only look inevitable in hindsight and with the aid of the social sciences. The struggle to defend itself in Europe during the Seventy Years War saw Britain develop a ‘fiscal-naval state’ that built a global empire.
Keywords: Britain, ancien regime, warfare, eighteenth century.
article  paywall  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Navy  British_foreign_policy  Anglo-French  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  balance_of_power  fiscal-military_state  colonialism  imperialism  English_Channel  French_foreign_policy  French_army  French_Navy  French_Empire  blue_water_strategy  British_Empire-military  British_Army  Britain-invasion  Britain-Continent 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Bourke, R.: Empire and Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke. (eBook and Hardcover)
Drawing on the complete range of printed and manuscript sources, Empire and Revolution offers a vivid reconstruction of the major concerns of this outstanding statesman, orator, and philosopher.In restoring Burke to his original political and intellectual context, this book strips away the accumulated distortions that have marked the reception of his ideas. In the process, it overturns the conventional picture of a partisan of tradition against progress. In place of the image of a backward-looking opponent of popular rights, it presents a multifaceted portrait of one of the most captivating figures in eighteenth-century life and thought. While Burke was a passionately energetic statesman, he was also a deeply original thinker. Empire and Revolution depicts him as a philosopher-in-action who evaluated the political realities of the day through the lens of Enlightenment thought, variously drawing on the ideas of such figures as Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Hume. A boldly ambitious work of scholarship, this book challenges us to rethink the legacy of Burke and the turbulent era in which he played so pivotal a role. -- Richard Bourke is professor in the history of political thought and codirector of the Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of Peace in Ireland: The War of Ideas and the coeditor of Political Judgement. -- Big early chunk on Vindication of Natural Society -- TOC and Intro (24 pgs) downloaded to Note
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september 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Pfau - Romantic Moods: Paranoia, Trauma, and Melancholy, 1790–1840 (2005 hbk only) | JHU Press
Thomas Pfau reinterprets the evolution of British and German Romanticism as a progress through three successive dominant moods, each manifested in the "voice" of an historical moment. Drawing on a multifaceted philosophical tradition ranging from Kant to Hegel to Heidegger—incorporating as well the psychosocial analyses of Freud, Benjamin, and Adorno—Pfau develops a new understanding of the Romantic writer's voice as the formal encryption of a complex cultural condition. Pfau focuses on 3 specific paradigms of emotive experience: paranoia, trauma, and melancholy. Along the trajectory of Romantic thought paranoia characterizes the disintegration of traditional models of causation and representation during the French Revolution; trauma, the radical political, cultural, and economic restructuring of Central Europe in the Napoleonic era; and melancholy, the dominant post-traumatic condition of stalled, post-Napoleonic history both in England and on the continent. (..) positions emotion as a "climate of history" to be interpretively recovered from the discursive and imaginative writing in which it is objectively embodied. (..) traces the evolution of Romantic interiority by exploring the deep-seated reverberations of historical change as they become legible in new discursive and conceptual strategies and in the evolving formal-aesthetic construction and reception of Romantic literature. In establishing this relationship between mood and voice, Pfau moves away from the conventional understanding of emotion as something "owned" or exclusively attributable to the individual and toward a theory of mood as fundamentally intersubjective and deserving of broader consideration in the study of Romanticism.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  Romanticism  social_psychology  self  subjectivity  self-examination  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  political_culture  political_discourse  aesthetics  cultural_history  Radical_Enlightenment  radicals  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  worldviews  social_history  change-social  change-intellectual  poetics  rhetoric-political  prose  facebook 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Timothy Michael - British Romanticism and the Critique of Political Reason (Dec 2015) | JHU Press
What role should reason play in the creation of a free and just society? Can we claim to know anything in a field as complex as politics? And how can the cause of political rationalism be advanced when it is seen as having blood on its hands? These are the questions that occupied a group of British poets, philosophers, and polemicists in the years following the French Revolution. (..) argues that much literature of the period is a trial, or a critique, of reason in its political capacities and a test of the kinds of knowledge available to it. For Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Burke, Wollstonecraft, and Godwin, the historical sequence of revolution, counter-revolution, and terror in France—and radicalism and repression in Britain—occasioned a dramatic reassessment of how best to advance the project of enlightenment. The political thought of these figures must be understood, Michael contends, in the context of their philosophical thought. Major poems of the period, including The Prelude, The Excursion, and Prometheus Unbound, are in this reading an adjudication of competing political and epistemological claims. This book bridges for the first time two traditional pillars of Romantic studies: the period’s politics and its theories of the mind and knowledge. Combining literary and intellectual history, it provides an account of British Romanticism in which high rhetoric, political prose, poetry, and poetics converge in a discourse of enlightenment and emancipation.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  British_history  English_lit  political_philosophy  political_culture  Enlightenment  epistemology  moral_philosophy  mind  Romanticism  poetry  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Shelley  Burke  Wollstonecraft  Godwin_Wm  reason  rationality  perception  judgment-political  judgment-independence  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  political_discourse  poetics  rhetoric-political  freedom  civil_liberties  civil_society  liberty-positive  scepticism 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Annie Jourdan, review essay - Le Dix-huit Brumaire de Napoléon Bonaparte: Retour sur un coup d’État | May 2008 - La Vie des idées
Review of Patrice Gueniffey, Le Dix-huit Brumaire. L’épilogue de la Révolution française, Collection « Les journées qui ont fait la France », Gallimard, 2008, 422 p., 24 Euros. -- Patrice Gueniffey propose une nouvelle histoire du Dix-huit Brumaire, coup d’État par lequel Napoléon Bonaparte prit le pouvoir le 9 novembre 1799. Il voit dans cet événement « une manière un peu tendue de résoudre les crises graves de l’État » et dresse un parallèle avec la journée du 13 mai 1958 qui mit fin à la IVe République. Annie Jourdan, spécialiste de l’Empire, discute ici les interprétations avancées par l’auteur sur les liens entre Napoléon et la Révolution française et sur la légitimité de ce coup d’État. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  20thC  France  political_history  Napoleon  Directoire  Consulat  coup_d'état  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  French_government  French_politics  4th_Republic  5th_Republic  constitutions  political_order  political_change  elites-self-destructive  political_gridlock  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuelle de Champs - Enlightenment and Utility: Bentham in French, Bentham in France (to be released March 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Jeremy Bentham (..) was a seminal figure in the history of modern political thought. This lively monograph presents the numerous French connections of an emblematic British thinker. (..) Placing Bentham's thought in the context of the French-language Enlightenment through to the post-Revolutionary era, (..) the case for a historical study of 'Global Bentham'. Examining previously unpublished sources, she traces the circulation of Bentham's letters, friends, manuscripts, and books in the French-speaking world. (..) transnational intellectual history reveals how utilitarianism, as a doctrine, was both the product of, and a contribution to, French-language political thought at a key time(..). The debates (re) utilitarianism in France cast new light on the making of modern Liberalism. **--** Intro **--** Part I. An Englishman in the Republic of Letters: 1. Languages of Enlightenment *-* 2. Satire and polemics *-* 3. Defining utilitarianism: private connections and correspondence **--** Part II. 'Projet d'un corps de loix complet' and the Reform of Jurisprudence in Europe: 4. The Genesis of Projet *-* 5. Projet in Enlightenment legal thought *-* 6. The politics of legal reform **--** Part III. Reflections for the Revolution in France: 7. Frenchmen and Francophiles: Lord Lansdowne's network *-* 8. British expertise for French legislators *-* 9. Utility, rights and revolution: missed encounters? **--** Part IV. Utile Dulcis? Bentham in Paris, 1802: 10. Dumont's editorship: from the Bibliothèque Britannique to Traités de législation civile et pénale *-* 11. A mixed reception *-* 12. Autumn 1802: Bentham in Paris **--** Part V. Liberty, Utility and Rights (1815–1832): 13. 'For one disciple in this country, I have 50 at least in France' *-* 14. Utilitarian arguments in French politics *-* 15. A Utilitarian moment? French liberals and utilitarianism *-* Epilogue: Bentham in the July Revolution *-* Conclusion -- marketing materials not yet available
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  legal_theory  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  Bentham  utilitarianism  utility  reform-political  reform-social  reform-legal  reform-economic  jurisprudence  civil_code  Republic_of_Letters  networks-policy  networks-information  Anglo-French  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomacy-environment  francophile  Landsdowne_Marquis_of  faction  British_politics  patrons  patronage  elite_culture  cross-border  cultural_history  cultural_influence  technical_assistance  criminal_justice  liberalism  rights-legal  rights-political  civil_law  civil_liberties  civil_society  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Peace_of_Amiens  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  July_Monarchy  legal_reasoning  positivism-legal 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Anna Plassart - The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution (to be released April 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Historians of ideas have traditionally discussed the significance of the French Revolution through the prism of several major interpretations, including the commentaries of Burke, Tocqueville and Marx. This book argues that the Scottish Enlightenment offered an alternative and equally powerful interpretative framework for the Revolution, which focused on the transformation of the polite, civilised moeurs that had defined the 'modernity' analysed by Hume and Smith in the 18thC. The Scots observed what they understood as a military- and democracy-led transformation of European modern morals and concluded that the real historical significance of the Revolution lay in the transformation of warfare, national feelings and relations between states, war and commerce that characterised the post-revolutionary international order. This book recovers the Scottish philosophers' powerful discussion of the nature of post-revolutionary modernity and shows that it is essential to our understanding of 19thC political thought. **--** Part I. The Burke–Paine Debate and Scotland's Science of Man: 1. The Burke–Paine debate and the Scottish Enlightenment *-* 2. The heritage of Hume and Smith: Scotland's science of man and politics **--** Part II. The 1790s: 3. Scotland's political debate *-* 4. James Mackintosh and Scottish philosophical history *-* 5. John Millar and the Scottish discussion on war, modern sociability and national sentiment *-* 6. Adam Ferguson on democracy and empire **--** Part III. 1802–15: 7. The French Revolution and the Edinburgh Review *-* 8. Commerce, war and empire
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Smith  Hume  Hume-politics  civil_society  civilizing_process  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  IR_theory  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  nationalism  national_ID  historiography-18thC  historiography-Whig  military  Military_Revolution  mass_culture  levée_en_masse  conscription  sociability  social_order  empires  empire-and_business  imperialism  Great_Powers  balance_of_power  philosophy_of_history  progress  social_theory  change-social  change-economic  Burke  Paine  Mackintosh_James  Millar_John  Edinburgh_Review  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Scottish_politics  1790s  1800s  1810s  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  democracy  morality-conventional  norms  global_economy  mercantilism 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeff Horn - Economic Development in Early Modern France: The Privilege of Liberty, 1650–1820 (release date for hardback mid-Feb 2015) | European history after 1450 | Cambridge University Press
Privilege has long been understood as the constitutional basis of Ancien Régime France, legalising the provision of a variety of rights, powers and exemptions to some, whilst denying them to others. In this fascinating new study however, Jeff Horn reveals that Bourbon officials utilized privilege as an instrument of economic development, freeing some sectors of the economy from pre-existing privileges and regulations, while protecting others. He explores both government policies and the innovations of entrepreneurs, workers, inventors and customers to uncover the lived experience of economic development from the Fronde to the Restoration. He shows how, influenced by Enlightenment thought, the regime increasingly resorted to concepts of liberty to defend privilege as a policy tool. The book offers important new insights into debates about the impact of privilege on early industrialisation, comparative economic development and the outbreak of the French Revolution. **--** 1. Introduction: profits and economic development during the Old Régime *--* 2. Privileged enclaves and the guilds: liberty and regulation *--* 3. The privilege of liberty put to the test: industrial development in Normandy *--* 4. Companies, colonies, and contraband: commercial privileges under the Old Régime *--* 5. Privilege, liberty, and managing the market: trading with the Levant *--* 6. Outside the body politic, essential to the body economic: the privileges of Jews, Protestants and foreign residents *--* 7. Privilege, innovation, and the state: entrepreneurialism and the lessons of the Old Régime *--* 8. The reign of liberty? Privilege after 1789 -- look for pdf of Intro once released
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  France  privileges-corporate  economic_culture  economic_policy  development  monarchy  profit  entrepreneurs  guilds  trading_companies  trade-policy  regulation  industrialization  industrial_policy  Colbert  Colbertism  urban_development  urban_elites  commerce  commercial_interest  French_government  Huguenots  Jews  colonialism  French_Empire  colonies  corporate_finance  monopolies  Levant  MENA  Ottomans  liberties  liberty  Ancien_régime  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  haute_bourgeoisie  markets  markets-structure  foreign_trade  foreign_policy  foreigners-resident 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Harding, review essay - History of the Royal Navy [1st 3 volumes in series] | Reviews in History - Jan 2015
(1) Duncan Redford, Philip D. Grove, The Royal Navy : A History since 1900 -- (2) Duncan Redford, A History of the Royal Navy : World War II -- (3) Martin Robson, A History of the Royal Navy : The Napoleonic War -- Reviewer:
Dr Richard Harding, University of Westminister -- ... the first titles in an ambitious new series from I.B.Tauris... in association with the National Museum of the Royal Navy (..) is to throw ‘new light on almost every aspect of Britain’s Royal Navy’ from 1660 to the present day. (1) A History since 1900 ... it is clear that the authors have got a job to do. They have to bring readers, who almost certainly have a firm idea of what they think is significant in the Royal Navy’s past, through more than 100 years of history, present those readers with relatively new research, ... and challenge some of their cherished assumptions. (..) The main point emphasised by the authors is that sea power is not generally understood by the public (and even by planners, for that matter). Its operations are usually out of the public gaze. (..) the authors’ set out to show how sea power worked across the century; how it has been a vital, flexible element in Britain’s defence as diplomatic and military challenges changed; and how it remains essential today. (3) Robson’s narrative is the story of how [British naval dominance which cost the French dearly] was achieved at a tactical and strategic level. The work is divided into two – before 1805 which is characterised as the struggle for sea control, and after the Trafalgar campaign, which Robson describes as the period of exploitation of sea domination. It is a distinction that works better than alternatives (Peace of Amiens in 1802 or the coronation of Napoleon in 1804). The emphasis is, unsurprisingly, on the first period, in which the battles and the expeditions are more dramatic and frequent. (..) [These volumes] are welcome as an important balance to military and diplomatic histories that have ignored the sea and naval power, or which have not kept up to date with the great flowering of naval history that has taken place in the last 40 years. (..) there remains the danger that unless this idea of sea power is embedded into the broader fabric of British social and diplomatic concerns, the message with the authors wish to convey (..) will be overshadowed by the Royal Navy as a tradition and an institution. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  military_history  maritime_history  diplomatic_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_Navy  British_Empire-military  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  WWI  WWII  blue_water_strategy  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Esdaile, Napoleon Review Article | Reviews in History - Jan 2015
Books reviewed -- * (1) * Michael Broers, Napoleon: Soldier of Destiny, London, Faber & Faber, 2014, ISBN: 9780571273430; 400pp. * (2) * Philip Dwyer, Citizen Emperor: Napoleon in Power, 1799-1815, London, Bloomsbury Academic, 2013, ISBN: 9780747578086; 816pp. * (3) * Alan Forrest, Napoleon, London, Quercus, 2011, ISBN: 9781849164108; 352pp * (4) * Munro Price, Napoleon: the End of Glory, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2014, ISBN: 9780199934676; 344pp. * (5) * Michael J. Hughes, Forging Napoleon’s Grande Armée: Motivation, Military Culture and Masculinity in the French Army, 1800-1808, New York, NY, New York University Press, 2012, ISBN: 9780814737484; 296pp. -- Reviewer: Professor Charles Esdaile, University of Liverpool -- Citation: Professor Charles Esdaile, review of Napoleon Review Article, (review no. 1707), DOI: 10.14296/RiH/2014/1707 -- as of Jan 18, Hughes had said Thanks, no further response, and Dwyer has written a considerable response not re any criticism of his own work but on some historiographical issues raised by Esdaile - Dwyer response in a open-close button box, so unfortunately doesn't work in either "print" or "download as pdf" -- review downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  biography  Napoleon  18thC  19thC  France  military_history  political_history  cultural_history  Napoleonic_Wars  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc BELISSA - REPENSER L'ORDRE EUROPÉEN (1795-1802). DE LA SOCIÉTÉ DES ROIS AUX DROITS DES NATIONS | JSTOR: Annales historiques de la Révolution française, No. 343 (Janvier/Mars 2006), pp. 163-166
Brief summary of thesis defended 2005, l'Université Paris I Sorbonne - surprise, surprise, Lucien Bély on his committee with the notion of the 18thC as the last stage of the société des princes and the French Revolution forcing the end of the dynastic wars -- though focus is on the period of the Directoire and Napoleon up through Amiens, he places it in the context of the European dynastic system as structured by the Peace of Utrecht -- highlights an interdisciplinary approach -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  thesis  18thC  1790s  1800s  Europe  Europe-19thC  balance_of_power  French_Revolution  IR  IR_theory  Westphalia  sovereignty  dynasties  nation-state  diplomatic_history  political_culture  counter-revolution  Jacobins  republicanism  Europe-federalism  Peace_of_Utrecht  société_des_princes  national_interest  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  France  French_politics  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Directoire  monarchy  social_order  legal_system  international_law  international_system  natural_law  citizenship  subjects  property  elites  political_economy  economic_culture  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Richard Moores - Representations of France and the French in English satirical prints, c. 1740-1832 (2011 PhD thesis) - White Rose Etheses Online - University of York
This thesis explores representations of France and the French in English satirical prints in the period c. 1740-1832. This was an era of rivalry and conflict between the two nations. It has been suggested that hostility towards France at this time contributed to the formation of English, or British, national identity. This coincided with England’s ‘golden age of caricature’. While much of the satirical art produced focussed on France, most studies of this material have dealt with how the English portrayed themselves and each other. Those which have discussed representations of the French have promoted the view that English perceptions of the French were principally hostile. While there is a temptation to employ such prints as evidence of English Francophobia, a closer investigation reveals greater satirical complexities at work which do not simply conceptualise and employ the French ‘Other’ as target of hatred. Informed by war and rivalry, as well as by trade, travel, and cultural exchange, the prints projected some positive characteristics onto the French ‘Other’, they contain varying degrees of sympathy and affinity with the French, and are demonstrative of a relationship more distinct and intimate than that shared with any other nation. At the same time, the prints expose many of the tensions and divisions that existed within Britain itself. French characters were employed to directly attack British political figures, while in other instances domestic anxieties were projected onto images of the French. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  France  Anglo-French  satire  cultural_history  social_history  national_ID  francophile  xenophobia  prints  popular_culture  popular_politics  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  travel  fashion  political_culture  political_press  art_history  caricature  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Restoration-France  July_Monarchy  reform-political  anti-Catholic  Catholic_emancipation  émigrés  exiles  ruling_class  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Kevin Linch and Matthew McCormack, eds - Britain’s Soldiers: Rethinking War and Society, 1715–1815 | Liverpool University Press
The British soldier was a fascinating and complex figure in the century between the Hanoverian accession and the Battle of Waterloo. The ‘war and society’ approach has shed much light on Britain’s frequent experience of conflict in this period, but Britain’s Soldiers argues that it is time to refocus our attention on the humble redcoat himself, and rethink historical approaches to soldiers’ relationship with the society and culture of their day. Using approaches drawn from the histories of the military, gender, art, society, culture and medicine, this volume presents a more rounded picture of the men who served in the various branches of the British armed forces. This period witnessed an unprecedented level of mass mobilisation, yet this was largely achieved through novel forms of military service outside of the regular army. Taking a wide definition of soldiering, this collection examines the part-time and auxiliary forces of the period, as well as looking at the men of the British Army both during their service and once they had been discharged from the army. Chapters here explore the national identity of the soldier, his sense of his rights within systems of military discipline, and his relationships with military hierarchies and honour codes. They also explore the welfare systems available to old and wounded soldiers, and the ways in which soldiers were represented in art and literature. In so doing, this book sheds new light on the processes through which soldiers were ‘made’ during this crucial period of conflict
books  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Army  British_foreign_policy  militia  military_history  fiscal-military_state  cultural_history  social_history  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  British_Empire-military  working_class  medicine 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Stefan E. Oppers - The Interest Rate Effect of Dutch Money in 18thC Britain | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 53, No. 1 (Mar., 1993), pp. 25-43
An early piece in the financial markets, behavioral_economics, crowding_out debates -- It is generally recognized that the Dutch played a major part in financing British government deficits from the 1720s to the late 1770s. This article argues that even though the Dutch continued to hold large amounts of British debt after 1780, they stopped supplying new capital to the British and started a modest repatriation of some of their previous investments. A comparative econometric study of 3 percent consol yields during the two deficit-inducing wars Britain fought between 1750 and 1795 shows that as a result British interest rates became much more sensitive to increases in government borrowing. -- see bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  finance_capital  18thC  British_history  Dutch  sovereign_debt  capital_markets  capital_flows  interest_rates  North-Weingast  crowding_out  French_Revolutionary_Wars  American_Revolution  public_finance  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jacqueline Hill - Convergence and Conflict in 18thC Ireland | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 4 (Dec., 2001), pp. 1039-1063
Recent writing shows that eighteenth-century Irish society was both less and more divided than was supposed by Lecky, whose "History of Ireland in the eighteenth century" (now over a century old) dominated so much subsequent historiography. Because Lecky enjoyed access to records that were subsequently destroyed his work will never be entirely redundant, but this article looks at ways in which his views have been and continue to be modified. It surveys the various interpretative models now being used to open up the period, which invite comparisons not merely with England, Scotland, Wales, and colonial America but also with Europe. It also considers how that endlessly fascinating decade, the 1790s, has emerged from the spotlight turned on it by a plethora of bicentenary studies. -- fabulous bibliography of work in last few decades -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  18thC  Ireland  political_history  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  Anglo-Irish_constitution  Catholics-Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  Whigs-oligarchy  local_government  gentry  penal_laws  Catholic_emancipation  Jacobite-Ireland  Anglican  United_Irishmen  Irish_Rebellion  Union_1800  Britain-invasion  British_foreign_policy  British_Empire  republicanism  patriotism  national_ID  Atlantic  Three_Kingdoms  Ancien_régime  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  American_Revolution  governing_class  government_officials  church_history  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Emma Vincent Macleod: Historiography review - British Attitudes to the French Revolution (2007)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 50, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 689-709 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The study of British attitudes to the French Revolution continues to attract substantial scholarly attention. In recent years, this has resulted not only in the excavation of a substantial volume of new detail, but also in increasing attention being paid to the political experiences of members of the middling and lower orders during the revolutionary and Napoleonic decades. While historians have been interested in radicals and reformers from these social strata since the publication of E. P. Thompson's "The making of the English working class" in 1963, it is only more recently that their loyalist and less partisan counterparts have been examined by scholars to the same extent. This article begins by summarizing the recent publication of large collections of primary sources and of major biographies in this area. It then discusses recent historiographical advances and debates in the following areas: the British debate over the French Revolution; the political participation of members of the middle and working classes in patriotic and loyalist activities; the culture of popular politics; and the question of national identity.
article  jstor  lit_survey  historiography  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  political_history  political_culture  social_history  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Thomas Bartlett: Why the History of the 1798 Rebellion Has Yet to Be Written (2000)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr, Vol. 15 (2000), pp. 181-190 -- Historiography review in wake of bicentennial asking questions about directions work is trending
article  reviews  jstor  historiography  18thC  19thC  Ireland  Irish_Rebellion  French_Revolutionary_Wars  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Britain-invasion  British_Army  British_politics  Protestants-Ireland  Catholics-Ireland  Union_of_1801  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: R. M. Sunter: The British Armed Nation, 1793-1815 by J. E. Cookson (2000)
JSTOR: The Scottish Historical Review, Vol. 79, No. 208 (Oct., 2000), pp. 260-262 -- 1st thorough study of how extensive mobilization of manpower was in British Isles during French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. Lots of stuff on militias, volunteer units, yeomanry in Ireland (Protestants mostly in North East) and England, and fencibles. Throw away comment that how it hooks up with understanding of society at the time runs counter to Linda Colley and John Brewer.
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  British_history  military_history  British_Army  British_Navy  militia  Ireland  Scotland  Irish_Rebellion  Castlereagh  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  fiscal-military_state  social_history  Britain-invasion  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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