dunnettreader + freemasonry   9

Leo XIII - Dall'alto dell'Apostolico Seggio - ENCYCLICAL ON FREEMASONRY IN ITALY - Oct 1890 | Vatican
The facts are incontestable which have happened in the clear light of day; not separated one from another, but so connected together as in their series to reveal with fullest evidence a system of which they are the actual operation and development. The system is not new; but the audacity, the fury, and the rapidity with which it is now carried out, are new. It is the plan of the sects that is now unfolding itself in Italy, especially in what relates to the Catholic religion and the Church, with the final and avowed purpose, if it were possible, of reducing it to nothing. - It is needless now to put the Masonic sects upon their trial. They are already judged; their ends, their means, their doctrines, and their action, are all known with indisputable certainty. Possessed by the spirit of Satan, whose instrument they are, they burn like him with a deadly and implacable hatred of Jesus Christ and of His work; and they endeavour by every means to overthrow and fetter it. This war is at present waged more than elsewhere in Italy, in which the Catholic religion has taken deeper root; and above all in Rome, the centre of Catholic unity, and the See of the Universal Pastor and Teacher of the Church. -- YIKES!
religious_history  19thC  religious_culture  religious_wars  Italy  free-thinkers  Freemasonry  anti-Catholic  anticlerical  church_history  Papacy 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Edelstein, ed. - The Super-Enlightenment: Daring to Know Too Much | Voltaire Foundation -Jan 2010
Historians of 18thC thought have implied a clear distinction between mystical or occult writing, often termed ‘illuminist’, and better-known forms of Enlightenment thinking and culture. But where are the boundaries of ‘enlightened’ human understanding? (..the.) contributors (..) put forward a completely new way of configuring these seemingly antithetical currents of thought, and identify a grey area that binds the two, a ‘Super-Enlightenment’. (..) exploring the social, religious, artistic, political and scientific dimensions of the Super-Enlightenment, contributors demonstrate the co-existence of apparent opposites: the enlightened and the esoteric, empiricism and imagination, history and myth, the secretive and the public, mysticism and science. The Enlightenment can no longer be seen as a sturdy, homogeneous movement defined by certain core beliefs, but one which oscillates between opposing poles in its social practices, historiography and even its epistemology: between daring to know, and daring to know too much. ** Dan Edelstein, Introduction to the Super-Enlightenment -- I. What limits of understanding? ** Peter Reill, The hermetic imagination in the high and late Enlightenment ** David Bates, Super-epistemology ** Jessica Riskin, Mr Machine and the imperial me -- II. The arts of knowing ** Liana Vardi, Physiocratic visions ** Anthony Vidler, For the love of architecture: Claude-Nicolas Ledoux and the Hypnerotomachia ** Fabienne Moore, The poetry of the Super-Enlightenment: the theories and practices of Cazotte, Chassaignon, Mercier, Saint-Martin and Bonneville -- III. Sacred societies ** Natalie Bayer, What do you seek from us? Wisdom? Virtue? Enlightenment? Inventing a Masonic science of man in Russia ** Kris Pangburn, Bonnet’s theory of palingenesis: an ‘Enlightened’ account of personal resurrection? ** Dan Edelstein, The Egyptian French Revolution: antiquarianism, Freemasonry and the mythology of nature ** Tili Boon Cuillé, From myth to religion in Ossian’s France
books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  hermeticism  Freemasonry  antiquaries  epistemology  ancient_religions  ancient_Egypt  occult  immortality  myth  religion  comparative_religion  French_lit  poetics  Russia  Physiocrats  laws_of_nature  La_Mettrie  noble_savage  national_origins  antiquity  historiography-18thC 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Andrew Berman - The Architects of Eighteenth Century English Freemasonry, 1720 - 1740 (2010 thesis) | University of Exeter
Advisors: Black, Jeremy & Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas -- Date Issued: 2010-09-22 --
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/2999 -- Following the appointment of its first aristocratic Grand Masters in the 1720s and in the wake of its connections to the scientific Enlightenment, ‘Free and Accepted’ Masonry rapidly became part of Britain’s national profile and the largest and arguably the most influential of Britain’s extensive clubs and societies. (..) Freemasonry became a vehicle for the expression and transmission of the political and religious views of those at its centre, and for the scientific Enlightenment concepts that they championed. The ‘Craft’ also offered a channel through which many sought to realise personal aspirations: social, intellectual and financial. Through an examination of relevant primary and secondary documentary evidence, this thesis seeks to contribute to a broader understanding of contemporary English political and social culture, and to explore the manner in which Freemasonry became a mechanism that promoted the interests of the Hanoverian establishment and connected and bound a number of élite metropolitan and provincial figures. A range of networks centred on the aristocracy, parliament, the magistracy and the learned and professional societies are studied, and key individuals instrumental in spreading and consolidating the Masonic message identified. The thesis also explores the role of Freemasonry in the development of the scientific Enlightenment. The evidence suggests that Freemasonry should be recognised not only as the most prominent of the many 18thC fraternal organisations, but also as a significant cultural vector and a compelling component of the social, economic, scientific and political transformation then in progress. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  British_history  British_politics  Enlightenment  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-politics  Freemasonry  cultural_history  intellectual_history  networks-social  networks-political  networks-business  sociology_of_science_&_technology  elites  aristocracy  Parliament  MPs  political_nation  economic_sociology  economic_culture  commerce-doux  finance_capital  banking  capital_markets  capital_as_power  history_of_science  historical_sociology  historical_change  center-periphery  provinces  clubs  social_capital  judiciary  professions  professionalization  religious_culture  science-and-religion  latitudinarian  natural_religion  Newtonian  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC and Introduction, Nicholas Rogers - Making the English Middle Class, ca. 1700-1850 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 32, No. 4, Oct., 1993
Introduction (pp. 299-304) Nicholas Rogers [downloaded] *--* (1) "A Just and Profitable Commerce": Moral Economy and the Middle Classes in 18thC London (pp. 305-332) Susan E. Brown [questions "aristocratic century" - independent merchants and bourgeoisie in leading charities, urban politics, polite culture etc. Didn't fit a consistent deference pattern; members of middle class could be on all sides of Poor Laws, so Thompson's bipolar moral economy overstates lack of variation in middle and intermediary functions, especially when drawing on civic traditions that didn't depend on aristocracy leadership] *--* (2) Racism, Imperialism, and the Traveler's Gaze in 18thC England (pp. 333-357) Margaret Hunt [unenlightened middle class elements eg freemasonry could be as xenophobic as cosmopolitan; attention to racial, ethnic difference could also be used to stigmatise the poor and set middle class apart] *--* (3) The Masonic Moment; Or, Ritual, Replica, and Credit: John Wilkes, the Macaroni Parson, and the Making of the Middle-Class Mind (pp. 358-395) John Money. *--* (4) "Middle-Class" Domesticity Goes Public: Gender, Class, and Politics from Queen Caroline to Queen Victoria (pp. 396-432) Dror Wahrman [middle class as defenders of family, domesticity, separate spheres only after won political status in 1832 - nobody adopted Hannah More's vision until decades later - use of the term by others or as self identifier is all over the map, even in the same report or work, stabilizing only c 1830s] -- downloaded Rogers pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  political_economy  political_culture  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  urbanization  urban_politics  urban_elites  middle_class  aristocracy  politeness  consumerism  travel  xenophobia  racism  poverty  Poor_Laws  merchants  mercantilism  commercial_interest  interest_groups  corporatism  free_trade  Freemasonry  gender  family  domesticity  moral_economy  creditors  debtors  dissenters  local_government  political_nation  oligarchy  Parliament  anti-Jacobin  Loyalists  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  imperialism  London  status  rank  nouveaux_riches  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Roger Hahn, review - Margaret C. Jacob, Scientific Culture and the Making of the Industrial West | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 105, No. 5 (Dec., 2000), pp. 1793-1794
Good look at how Jacob theories re importance of Newtonianism, its spread, the Republic of Letters and freemasonry had profound effects on mentalities beyond the scientific and philosophical elites - in this narrative linking it to technology and industrial innovation. -- didn't download
books  reviews  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  experimental_philosophy  Newtonian  technology  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  Republic_of_Letters  Freemasonry  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Bernard Fay: Learned Societies in Europe and America in the Eighteenth Century (1932)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Jan., 1932), pp. 255-266 -- highlights importance of Freemasonry -- suggests 2 streams of Freemasonry in 18thC (1) learning and useful knowledge (stress useful - Ramsay may have been a long-time promoter, since 1730s, of Encyclopédie type project) and (2) mystic with alchemy focus. Focus on local societies on both sides of Atlantic with lists and dates formed. Contrast with more formal and "rigid" scientific Royal Society.
article  jstor  18thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment-American  Scottish_Enlightenment  Britain  France  American_colonies  academies  Royal_Society  Encyclopédie  learned_societies  Republic_of_Letters  history_of_science  technology  Freemasonry  Franklin_Ben  Ramsay  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
The Nature of Early Eighteenth-Century Religious Radicalism | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Jacob, Margaret . “The Nature of Early Eighteenth-Century Religious Radicalism.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/42. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note In 1981 I had focused on the Dutch-French-English nexus, and saw a select cast of major seventeenth-century thinkers as influencing the arguments put forward by French refugees and English Whigs for religious freedom, republican government, freedom of the press, habeas corpus, and against monarchical absolutism as practiced by the French king and clergy. These arguments appeared in the journals, books, and clandestine manuscripts originating in both London and Amsterdam. The origin of these new polemics owed much to a particular reading of Hobbes, to Locke, to a heretical reading of Newtonian science (Toland’s distinctive contribution), and of course to Bruno, Spinoza, as well as the English republican thinkers of the 1650s. In 2001 all of those influences were collapsed by Jonathan Israel into an ideengeschichte that fixated on the intellectual legacy of Spinoza to the exclusion of any significant English or French component.But if I think that Israel’s simplification of the way intellectual influence and human agency work—an idealist rendering that also effaces the political—will not stand up under scrutiny, so too I think aspects of my own youthful thinking are in need of a reformulation. The power of the Enlightenment—from this early coterie to latter thinkers like Rousseau and Jefferson—lay in understanding the force of organized religion, and then searching for a set of beliefs which deists, and perhaps even atheists of the age, could live with and accept. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion.
article  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Freemasonry  religious_history  theology  political_philosophy  republicanism  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  church_history  tolerance  heterodoxy  Spinoza  Hobbes  Locke  Toland  Bayle  Huguenots  Edict_of_Nantes  Louis_XIV  Newtonian  Rousseau  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  Picart  sociology_of_religion  Deism  natural_religion  rational_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
The Super-Enlightenment Project | Stanford University Libraries
36 texts in French of the margins and "dark" sides of the search for knowledge of the Enlightenment, including Free Masons. See companion volume to this database, entitled The Super-Enlightenment: Daring to Know Too Much, edited by Dan Edelstein. This volume will be published in 2010 by the Voltaire Foundation of Oxford University as an issue of its journal SVEC. The Age of Philosophy saw a surge of interest in empirical science, humanistic inquiry, and cosmopolitan societies. It also witnessed a surprising fascination with ancient mythologies, alchemy, divine arcana, and secret societies. Did this dark side of the Enlightenment have anything in common with the rational undertakings of the day, or was it a remnant from times past? This digital archive will allow students and scholars to explore the strange, yet uncannily familiar, writings of French authors who went beyond John Locke's famed "limits of human understanding," in order to investigate the mysterious perimeters of knowledge — but often progressed with the same wit and epistemological concerns as Parisian philosophes. The ideas and practices of these writers (often dismissed as "illuminist") may thus best be understood as constituting a sort of "Super-Enlightenment," a category which begs a larger, open question: did the more orthodox Enlightenment thinkers ever cross over to the other side themselves?
18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Freemasonry  bibliography  online_texts  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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