dunnettreader + evernote   48

Oliver Hart and the Poetry of Economic Theory -
At this year’s annual ASSA meeting, Stigler Center Director Luigi Zingales delivered a lecture honoring Oliver Hart, winner of the 2016 Nobel Prize for…
firms-theory  firms-structure  incentives-distortions  human_capital  organizations  microeconomics  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Back To Gradualism
My reading of the consensus view is that the change in personnel at the Federal Reserve has coincided with a more hawkish outlook, although the tax cut…
Fed  interest_rates  inflation  fiscal_policy  monetary_policy  tax_cuts  multipliers  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
A New Study of Labor Market Concentration - Roosevelt Institute
Labor economists have traditionally focused on worker-side characteristics, such as education, as the crucial causal variable for explaining outcomes like…
Labor_markets  antitrust  monopsony  unemployment  skills  human_capital  wages  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
New Brandeis Movement: America’s Antimonopoly Debate | Journal of European Competition Law & Practice | Oxford Academic
Over the last two years, a growing number in America have concluded that the United States has a monopoly problem. The Obama Administration’s Council of…
antitrust  monopolies  industry_concentration  competition  Labor_markets  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
New Study Shows Just How Bad the US Labor Market’s Competition Problem Really Is -
In recent decades, antitrust policy has all but ignored the issue of monopsony power. Yet a new paper shows that across the US economy, labor markets are highly…
Labor_markets  monopsony  labor_share  antitrust  industry_concentration  Evernote  wages  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Antitrust in the Labor Market: Protectionist, or Pro-Competitive? -
Redirecting antitrust enforcement to confront monopsony power would be a substantial departure from the way it has been conducted in recent decades, but just…
Labor_markets  wages  monopsony  antitrust  competition  industry_concentration  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Strong Employers and Weak Employees: Study Sheds New Light on How Labor Market Concentration Hurts Workers -
New study finds that wages are significantly lower in concentrated labor markets—and even lower in labor markets where unionization rates are low. Strikers and…
Labor_markets  wages  unions  human_capital  monopsony  antitrust  competition  industry_concentration  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Notes on the Global Condition: Nuclear aircraft carriers in the age of the anthropocene – ADAM TOOZE
The refusal of the Trump administration to engage with the question of climate change not only causes consternation worldwide. It also causes tension within the…
US_military  climate  climate-adaptation  military-industrial_complex  Trump_administration  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
In the 1950s everybody cool was a little alienated. What changed? – Martin Jay | Aeon Essays
The fear of ‘alienation’ from a perceived state of harmony has a long and winding history. Western culture is replete with stories of expulsion from paradise…
post-WWII  existentialism  alienation  Frankfurt_School  intellectual_history  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
This Day in Labor History: March 11, 1811 - Lawyers, Guns & Money
On March 11, 1811, the Luddite movement began in Arnold, Nottingham, England, when textile workers destroyed the machines where they worked as a protest against…
Luddites  19thC  labor_history  technology  Industrial_Revolution  unemployment  labor_standards  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
The Big Picture: A Desperate Man
Prime Beta Editor's Brief Russia probe 02.23.18. 5:29 pm By 610 words back to tpm This page contains TPM PRIME members-only content Already a member? sign in…
Evernote  Trump  Trump-Russia  from instapaper
february 2018 by dunnettreader
David James, ed., Hegel's Elements of the Philosophy of Right: A Critical Guide - review by William Desmond | BDPR - Dec 2017
David James (ed.), Hegel's Elements of the Philosophy of Right: A Critical Guide, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 234 pp.,
Reviewed by William Desmond, Villanova University/KU Leuven
Evernote  political_philosophy  19thC  Hegel  intellectual_history  individualism  books  community  social_theory  Marx  German_Idealism  free_will  German_philosophy  reviews  Hegelian  Hegel-philosophy_of_right 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Pets or Livestock? | Chris Lehmann
Say you’re an overprivileged tech bro looking for a challenge. Sure, you could take another crack at vanquishing the Grim Reaper , or some variation of a…
Evernote  AI  utopian  singularity  technology  techno-libertarian  from instapaper
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Corporate Criminal Accountability for International Crimes
Above: The International Criminal Court Ed. note. This post is the latest in our series on the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case Jesner. v. Arab Bank , a case…
corporate_citizenship  corporate_personhood  accountability  international_law  international_crimes  Evernote  from instapaper
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Locking Palestinians in a Flawed Peace Process
by Khaled Elgindy and Lara Friedman The Trump administration’s recent decision to allow the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) mission in Washington—the de…
Evernote  Israel  Palestinians  Trump-foreign_policy  Congress  MidEast_peace_process  from instapaper
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Bob Bauer - Alan Dershowitz’s Worries About the Russia Investigation and the Criminalization of Politics | Lawfare
Worried about a “ criminalized politics ,” Alan Dershowitz argues that “malleable” laws should be reserved for proper and not blatantly political uses. He fears…
Evernote  US_politics  political_culture  politicians-crimes  criminalization_of_politics  accountability  Trump-Russia  from instapaper
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Michael Kang - Gerrymandering and the Constitutional Norm Against Government Partisanship (2017) :: SSRN
Win election law prize - Michigan Law Review, Vol. 116, No. 3, Dec. 2017, Forthcoming- Emory Legal Studies Research Paper
71 Pages
Posted: 17 Aug 2017; Last revised: 28 Oct 2017
Michael S. Kang, Emory University School of Law
The Article challenges the basic premise in the law of partisan gerrymandering that government partisan purpose is constitutional at all. The central problem, Justice Scalia once explained in Vieth v. Jubelirer, is that partisan gerrymandering becomes unconstitutional only when it “has gone too far,” giving rise to the intractable inquiry into “how much is too much.” But the premise that partisanship is an ordinary and lawful purpose, articulated as settled law and widely understood as such, is largely wrong as constitutional doctrine. The Article surveys constitutional law to demonstrate the vitality of an important, if implicit norm against government partisanship across a variety of settings. From political patronage, to government speech, to election administration and even in redistricting itself, Vieth is the exception in failing to bar tribal partisanship as a legitimate state interest in lawmaking. The puzzle therefore is why the Supreme Court in Vieth diverged from this overarching norm for legislative redistricting where the need for government nonpartisanship is most acute and so rarely met. The Article proposes a purpose-focused approach that identifies partisanship as an illegitimate basis for lawmaking and requires the government to justify its redistricting with reference to legitimate state interests beyond partisanship, irrespective of extreme partisan effects. The importance of consolidating and reifying the norm against government partisanship, in its most salient legal context, cannot be overstated at a time when hyperpolarization between the major parties dominates national politics and is at its most severe in our lifetime.
Keywords: gerrymandering, redistricting, Whitford v. Gill, partisanship, parties, Bandemer
constitutional_law  political_participation  Evernote  gerrymandering  public_interest  SSRN  accountability  partisanship  liberalism-public_reason  democracy  article  downloaded  US_constitution  corruption  legitimacy  SCOTUS  elections 
november 2017 by dunnettreader
New industry clusters are springing up in the same old places
You have to love the fact that all four of China’s main private-sector express-delivery companies–the guys shuttling all those Taobao packages around the…
economic_history  economic_geography  Evernote  China-economy  Chinese_history  industry_clusters  from instapaper
november 2017 by dunnettreader
Thomas Nail - Lucretius and the immanence of motion | The Immanent Frame - Sept 2017
Lucretius was the first philosopher of immanence. It is he and not Democritus or Epicurus who holds this title. If we want to understand the historical…
Epicurean  ancient_philosophy  Evernote  atomism  immanence  transcendence  materialism  Lucretius  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Patrick Collinson - John Foxe as Historian | The Acts and Monuments Online
John Foxe as Historian
by Patrick Collinson
John Foxe disowned the title of 'martyrologist', the label most often attached to his name, almost to the extent that for English writers and readers of history it belongs to nobody else. Foxe wanted to be known as a 'story teller', which is to say, an historian. (How we distinguish between story tellers and historians, and even whether we should make such a distinction, are questions to which we shall have to return.) What was 'history' for those who inhabited the sixteenth century?
Evernote  16thC  Foxe-Book_of_Martyrs  Reformation  historiography-Renaissance  humanism  historiography  ancient_history  church_history  Eusebius  Elizabeth  Church_of_England  persecution  martyrs  objectivity  historians-and-religion  historians-and-state  intellectual_history  Protestants  Early_Christian  More_Sir_Thomas  Bacon  antiquaries  antiquity-source_of_narratives  history_of_England  Holinshed_Chronicles  nshed  rhetoric-writing  Cicero 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Bibliographical Aspects of the Acts and Monuments - Julian Roberts & Elizabeth Evenden | The Acts and Monuments Online
Bibliographical Aspects of the Acts and Monuments
by Julian Roberts and Elizabeth Evenden
This section is concerned less with the editorial problems posed by the Acts and Monuments than with what happened to the masses of manuscript and print which John Foxe brought, at approximately seven year intervals into the printing house of John Day in Aldersgate. (...) The kind of material which Foxe produced, how much of it was in the hands of his various transcribers, how much in the form of letters by or about the principal actors, and how much in his own hand, is a matter for editors and other analysts to determine. Here we can only offer some clues as to how that material was mediated by the printer, in the light of the known practices of an Elizabethan printing house. This knowledge has hitherto been only partial, and partly reconstructed from the descriptions of Joseph Moxon a century later, but it has been considerably augmented in the course of the present study.
Evernote  16thC  British_history  Protestants  Reformation  printing  print_culture  history_of_book 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
David Loades - Foxe in theological context | The Acts and Monuments Online
Foxe in theological context
by David Loades
The issues covered by the trials and inquisitions which Foxe narrates in these books are limited and endlessly repetitive. Christology is hardly ever discussed. The taking of oaths and obedience to secular authority are raised in some cases, usually when the inquisitors are trying to pin charges of anabaptism on their victims. In the unusual case of Cranmer considerable use is made of 'lawful authority', because of his own high profile insistence upon obedience to the Royal Supremacy. Foxe is always at pains to ensure that his martyrs insist upon the lawfulness of oaths. Obedience is more difficult, and the normal response is 'we must obey God rather than man'. However this is always qualified by some statement to the effect that a Christian who is required by his conscience to disobey a lawful command will submit willingly to the penalties prescribed. Foxe is extremely sensitive to the catholic charge that protestantism is a religion of disobedience.The issues which dominate the great majority of trials are: vernacular liturgy and scripture, and the nature and number of the sacraments.
Evernote  16thC  British_history  Reformation  Protestants  religious_belief  religious_practices  sacraments  transubstantiation  priestcraft  priesthood  priests-authority  hierarchy  ecclesiology  Papacy  purgatory  indulgences  dogmatism  church_history  sola_scriptura 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Total Quality Revolution | Emmett Rensin - The Baffler - Sept 2017
What if I told you that revolutions happen when people lose their fear? What if I told you that protest is broken, that the next revolutionary moment won’t…
US_politics  left-wing  mass_culture  popular_politics  populism  social_movements  Evernote  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Academe on the Auction Block | David V. Johnson - The Baffler - Sept 2017
At the April 2016 meeting of the Association of Private Enterprise Education hosted at Las Vegas’s Bally’s Casino, an official from the Charles Koch Foundation…
Evernote  education-higher  state_government  university  university-funding  fundraising  donors-right-wing  donors-left-wing  philanthropy  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Lords of Misrule | Matt Stoller - The Baffler - Sept 2017
In 1937, future Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson gave a toast at the New York State Bar Association on the civic responsibilities of the legal profession.…
Evernote  legal_culture  corporate_law  legal_system  US_politics  US_legal_system  US_government  white-collar_crime  criminal_justice  DOJ  fraud  financial_crisis  financial_regulation  SEC  antitrust  Obama_administration  accountability  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
The Crypto-Keepers | Yasha Levine
It’s 7:30 p.m. on a Monday in June at an undisclosed location somewhere in northern Europe. I’m sitting in a private dining room in an upscale hotel, talking to…
Evernote  military-intel-industrial_complex  democracy_promotion  State_Dept  intelligence_agencies  social_media  cybersecurity  privacy  investment-government  R&D  propaganda  cryptography  free_speech  leaks  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Understanding the Surge in Commercial Real Estate Lending - Economic Brief, August 2017 | Richmond FRB
HELEN FESSENDEN AND CATHERINE MUETHING
U.S. banks have increased their commercial real estate (CRE) lending significantly in the past five years. Economists and regulators note that some positive factors are driving this trend, but they also see potential risks. Analysts at the Richmond Fed have found that some banks could be especially vulnerable if economic conditions deteriorate. These include institutions that are in certain major urban areas and have high concentrations of CRE loans, rapid CRE loan growth, and heavy reliance on "noncore" (or illiquid) funding. But the analysts also conclude that, overall, banks' CRE exposures do not appear to be as elevated as they were before the Great Recession.
commercial_real_estate  liquidity  risk_management  credit_booms  leverage  mortgages  financial_regulation  real_estate  Great_Recession  business_cycles  financial_crisis  Evernote  banking 
august 2017 by dunnettreader
Trade Agreements as Vectors for the Nagoya Protocol's Implementation | Centre for International Governance Innovation - 2017
A growing number of trade agreements include provisions related to access to genetic resources and the sharing of the benefits that arise out of their utilization. This paper maps the distribution and the diversity of these provisions. It identifies
 a great variety of provisions regarding sovereignty over genetic resources, the protection of traditional knowledge, prior informed consent, the disclosure of origin in patent applications and conditions for bioprospecting activities. It also finds that some recent trade agreements provide specific measures designed to facilitate the implementation of access and benefit-sharing (ABS) provisions, including measures related to technical assistance, transparency and dispute settlements. Thus,
 it appears that trade negotiations can become
 vectors for the implementation of ABS obligations stemming from the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Nagoya Protocol on Access
 to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization.
 The integration of ABS commitments into trade agreements, however, varies greatly, depending
 on the countries involved. While Latin American countries have played a pioneering role, Canada and the United States still lag behind. The most exemplary ABS standards are not yet widely used, perhaps because they remain little known. These provisions deserve greater attention and should be integrated more widely into international trade agreements.
trade-agreements  genetic_resources  bioprospecting  genetics  IP  paper  Evernote  downloaded  sovereignty  biodiversity  biology  pharma 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Adrian Moore interview with Richard Marshall - Modern Metaphysics - the Analytic/Continental Mix - 3AM - June 2017
Interview by Richard Marshall. ‘ Many contemporary scientists would still need persuading that it was anything other than a pointless exercise—perhaps because…
Evernote  metaphysics  Deleuze  Husserl  Heidegger  Derrida  Spinoza  Hegel  Nietzsche  Bergson  continental_philosophy  from instapaper
june 2017 by dunnettreader
P Aghion, C Hepburn, A Teytelboym, D Zenghelis - Path dependence, innovation and the economics of climate change (Policy Report 2014) | Grantham Research Institute on climate change and the environment
Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and ESRC Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy at London School of Economics and Political Science.
The authors of the report – Professor Philippe Aghion (Harvard University), Professor Cameron Hepburn (University of Oxford), Dr Alexander Teytelboym (University of Oxford) and Dimitri Zenghelis (LSE)Innovation is required to transform our fossil-fuelled economy into a clean, low-carbon economy. But economic models of climate change have overlooked the role of innovation. By taking innovation fully into account, a whole new set of policy conclusions are drawn. This report finds that the longer governments wait to promote clean energy innovation, the greater the eventual cost to the environment and the economy. Increased public support for clean innovation should therefore be a priority. Government policies to promote low-carbon innovation may only need to be in place for a limited time because, once a low-carbon pathway has been kick-started, the economy will become ‘locked-in’ to that low-carbon pathway with no further intervention needed. -- downloaded via Air - added to Evernote
paper  downloaded  Evernote  climate  Innovation  green_economy  green_finance  path-dependence  technology  innovation-government-supported  infrastructure  renewables  economic_growth  economic_sociology  economic_policy  energy  energy-markets 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Édouard Mehl, -La philosophie au tribunal de la théologie ? Sur la dédicace des Méditations de Descartes à la Faculté de Théologie de la Sorbonne (2013)
Édouard Mehl, « La philosophie au tribunal de la théologie ? », Revue des sciences religieuses [En ligne], 87/4 | 2013, mis en ligne le 30 mars 2016, consulté le 24 septembre 2016. URL : http://rsr.revues.org/3102 ; DOI : 10.4000/rsr.3102 -- Descartes a soumis ses Meditationes de Prima Philosophia (1641) à l’examen de la Faculté de Théologie de la Sorbonne. Cette démarche peut surprendre, car la philosophie revendique ouvertement la séparation des domaines, et, dans le contexte de l’affaire Galilée, on s’interroge même sur la compétence des théologiens dans les matières de pure philosophie. La Sorbonne n’ayant pas, que l’on sache, donné suite à la demande cartésienne, on se tourne ici vers la censure romaine des œuvres de Descartes. L’article met en évidence un paradoxe : alors que le Saint Office n’a pas le moins du monde inquiété des auteurs de sensibilité averroïste, comme Zabarella, qui n’admettent que des preuves « faibles » de l’existence de Dieu (preuves de surcroît fondées sur le sable de la physique aristotélicienne), il n’a pas hésité à censurer la preuve métaphysique, originale, de l’existence de Dieu par son idée (Méditation III). C’est dire que si la théologie, tant réformée que romaine, et la philosophie cartésienne n’ont pas fait bon ménage, c’est sans doute plus par un malentendu quant au sens de ce que Descartes appelle l’ « idée naturelle de Dieu », que pour des raisons objectivement fondées dans le corps même de cette philosophie première. -- via Academia.edu - Downloaded via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
article  downloaded  Academia.edu  Evernote  intellectual_history  religious_history  17thC  science-and-religion  Descartes  Sorbonne 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Tag PDFs that Need OCR - EagleFiler AppleScripts - EagleFiler
When importing from a scanner, you might not have run your OCR program before importing the scanned document into EagleFiler. This script looks at the records that you’ve selected and tags any PDF files that have not yet been run through OCR, so that you can do so, e.g. using the OCR With PDFpen script
Mac  scripts  OCR  apps  tips  Evernote 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Forum - Samuel Moyn's "Christian human rights" - overview page | The Immanent Frame
In 2010, Samuel Moyn published The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History, which offered an alternative historical explanation for the origins of human rights. He rejected narratives that viewed human rights as a long-term historical product of the Judeo-Christian tradition, The French Revolution, or Enlightenment rationalism, arguing that human rights as it is now understood began to emerge only during the 1970s. Prior to this, according to Moyn, rights were connected to the nation-state and had nothing to do with an international standard of morality or justice. In addressing critiques of The Last Utopia, Moyn has given considerable attention to the relationship between human rights and religion, conceding that there is, undoubtedly, a relationship between Christianity—Catholicism in particular—and human rights, but arguing that the “death of Christian Europe” by the 1960s “forced a complete reinvention of the meaning of human rights embedded in European identity both formally and really since the war”. Contributors offer their thoughts on Moyn’s article “Personalism, Community, and the Origins of Human Rights,” which became a central focus (see excerpt) in his forthcoming book, Christian Human Rights (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015). Contributors also respond to “Christian Human Rights,” the introductory essay written for this series. -- downloaded pdfs but their footnotes and links don't work, so collected them in Evernote them
books  intellectual_history  narrative-contested  bad_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  church_history  moral_philosophy  theology  human_rights  natural_rights  medieval_philosophy  Europe-Medieval  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  French_Revolution  IR  Europe  20thC  WWI  WWII  entre_deux_guerres  post-Cold_War  post-colonial  nation-state  genocide  Holocaust  UN  international_law  natural_law  law_of_nations  law_of_the_sea  justice  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  equality  liberty  Christendom  Judeo-Christian  links  Evernote 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Ada Palmer - Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 3 (July 2012), pp. 395-416
In the Renaissance, Epicureanism and other heterodox scientific theories were strongly associated with heresy and atheism, and frequently condemned. Yet, when Lucretius’s Epicurean poem De Rerum Natura reappeared in 1417, these associations did not prevent the poem’s broad circulation. A survey of marginalia in Lucretius manuscripts reveals a characteristic humanist reading agenda, focused on philology and moral philosophy, which facilitated the circulation of such heterodox texts among an audience still largely indifferent to their radical content. Notes in later sixteenth century print copies reveal a transformation in reading methods, and an audience more receptive to heterodox science. Article is on Project MUSE - the jstor archive is open through 2011, closed for 2012, and has no later volumes. The jstor page for articles from 2012 has the advantage of the full set of footnotes. I've copied the footnotes to Evernote. -- update, I've downloaded it to Note
article  jstor  bibliography  intellectual_history  Lucretius  Epicurean  heterodoxy  atheism  15thC  16thC  Renaissance  humanism  philology  moral_philosophy  reading  reader_response  readership  atomism  determinism  cosmology  Scientific_Revolution  cultural_change  cultural_transmission  circulation-ideas  Evernote  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Menzie Chin - The Dollar’s Recent Rise in Perspective | Econbrowser Jan 2015
"My own personal worries revolve around emerging markets. As noted (e.g., [3]), and appreciating dollar implies a deterioration in emerging market firm balance sheets when there are large amounts of dollar debt. Fixed or semi-fixed exchange rates will mitigate this effect if sustainable; otherwise, pernicious feedback loops are going to be established. I particularly worry about the dollar appreciation in conjunction with increasing yields in the US. Rising US yields would likely pull financial capital from emerging markets, with particularly negative effects on growth..." -- Saved to Evernote for charts especially for impact of 1980s strong dollar
global_economy  FX  US_economy  dollar  emerging_markets  sovereign_debt  interest_rates  economic_growth  capital_flows  financial_crisis  central_banks  Fed  QE  contagion  international_political_economy  competitiveness  trade  balance_of_payments  capital_markets  commodities  asset_prices  spreads  20thC  post-WWII  Evernote 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Mike Konczal, review essay - Selling Fast: Public Goods, Profits, and State Legitimacy | Boston Review - November 10, 2014
Nicholas R. Parrillo, Against the Profit Motive: The Salary Revolution in American Government, 1780–1940, Yale University Press, $55 (paper) -- Dana Goldstein, The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, Doubleday, $26.95 (cloth) -- Radley Balko, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces, PublicAffairs, $17.99 (paper) -- Adam Smith was not the first, but he was certainly one of the most eloquent defenders of justice delivered according to the profit motive (..)since courts could charge fees for conducting a trial, each court would endeavor, “by superior dispatch and impartiality, to draw to itself as many causes as it could.” Competition meant a judge would try “to give, in his own court, the speediest and most effectual remedy which the law would admit, for every sort of injustice.” Left unsaid is what this system does to those who can’t afford to pay up. Our government is being remade in this mold—the mold of a business. The past thirty years have seen massive, outright privatization of government services. Meanwhile the logic of business, competition, and the profit motive has been introduced into what remains. But for those with a long enough historical memory, this is nothing new. Through the first half of our country’s history, public officials were paid according to the profit motive, and it was only through the failures of that system that a fragile accountability was put into place during the Progressive Era. One of the key sources of this accountability was the establishment of salaries for public officials who previously had been paid on commission.
books  reviews  kindle-available  US_government  US_society  governance  legitimacy  accountability  inequality  justice  privatization  US_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  competition  profit  Gilded_Age  Progressive_Era  civil_society  civil_liberties  US_constitution  Evernote  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Dunham, review - W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 22, 2014
This volume is a hugely important contribution to scholarship on 19thC philosophy. ...for many important aspects of British philosophy in the 19thC the scholarship is almost non-existent. As Mander notes in the introduction, when we hear "19thC philosophy", we are more likely to think of 'the great systems of continental thought'. This volume shows that the British tradition boasts a remarkably rich and varied range of philosophical resources, and that it deserves the level of scholarship that the British traditions of the 17thC and 18thC are beginning to enjoy. In a review of another recent volume on 19thC philosophy Frederick Beiser argued that 'No period ... stands in more need of an original historian than 19thC philosophy. The standard tropes and figures do no justice to its depths, riches, and powers'. One of this present volume's greatest virtues is that it answers Beiser's plea as well as offering an impressive number of very original contributions.... It does an outstanding job of introducing a wide range of philosophical figures and ideas that will be unknown... It also includes excellent contributions on well-known philosophers and orientates the reader to the secondary literature.... The... volume provides a clear and comprehensive picture of how 19thC philosophy was practised and understood during the period. -- The Handbook has 6 parts: (1) Logic and Scientific Method; (2) Metaphysics; (3) Science and Philosophy; (4) Ethical, Social, and Political Thought; (5) Religious Philosophy; and, (6) The Practice of Philosophy. As Mander states, these classifications come from our contemporary perspective, and we should not expect the work of 19thC philosophers to neatly fit within them. Nonetheless, the individual authors [present] the aspects of a philosopher or school.. that fits within these categories while ... making clear how these aspects fit within a larger philosophical perspective ....
books  reviews  amazon.com  find  intellectual_history  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Common_Sense  German_Idealism  British_Idealism  Kant  Hegelian  Mill  Sidgwick  Marx  Newman_JH  metaphysics  epistemology  empiricism  mind  perception  ideas-theories  idealism-transcendental  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  social_theory  Coleridge  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  science-and-religion  scientific_method  Darwinism  evolution  evolution-as-model  evolutionary_biology  evolution-social  Spencer_Herbert  political_philosophy  intelligentsia  elite_culture  professionalization  university  Evernote 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Coppola Comment: Debt hysteria - September 30, 2014
The global debt glut described in the Geneva 16 report, and the global saving glut described by Bernanke, are the same thing. The authors note that growth has been slowing in developed countries since 1980. Indeed it has - and during that time capital ownership and indebtedness have been increasing in tandem, as we might expect since they are opposite sides of the same coin. The report cites numerous analyses that show high debt levels - public AND private - tending to impede growth as resources that could have been turned to productive investment are spent on debt service. Secular stagnation is as much a consequence of over-indebtedness as it is of excess capital. -- When the private sector is highly indebted, saving can take the form of paying off debt. If the government runs a surplus, therefore, it impedes deleveraging in the private sector, and may even force some sectors (typically the poor) to increase debt. Reducing the sovereign debt not only reduces saving in the private sector, it comes at the price of continued and possibly rising indebtedness. The report rightly notes that transferring debt from the private to the public sector, as the US has done, isn't deleveraging. But transferring it back again isn't deleveraging either. And as transferring it back again is likely only to be possible with extensive sovereign guarantees (the UK's Help to Buy, for example), whose debt is it really, anyway? Reports such as this, that look on debt as a problem and ignore the associated savings, fail to address the real issue. The fact is that households, corporations and governments like to have savings and are terrified of loss. Writing down the debt in which people invest their savings means that people must lose their savings. THIS is the real "shock, horror". This is what people fear when they worry about a catastrophic debt default. This is what the world went to great lengths to prevent in 2008. The problem is not the debt, it is the savings.
global_imbalance  global_economy  international_political_economy  international_finance  savings  investment  institutional_investors  debt  debt-restructuring  debtors  credit  creditors  equity  equity-corporate  sovereign_debt  default  risk  risk-systemic  inflation  austerity  economic_growth  stagnation  OECD_economies  emerging_markets  banking  capital_markets  capital_adequacy  government_finance  leverage  deleverage  property_rights  pensions  interest_rates  Evernote 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jason M. Wirth, Seattle University, review - Dalia Nassar (ed.), The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy (OUP 2014) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 23, 2014
Dalia Nassar's assemblage of engaging and significant essays on some of the resurgent philosophers of early German romanticism emphasizes their contemporary philosophical relevance. "For it is a specifically philosophical revival, motivated by philosophical questions". Nassar demarcates this relevance into four general kinds. In the first part of the book, consisting of a fascinating debate between two of the heaviest hitters in this revival, Manfred Frank and Frederick Beiser, the question revolves around the very identity of early German philosophical romanticism. What counts as a work of this kind? What makes these works significantly different from works by practitioners of German idealism? Or can the two areas be so clearly distinguished? The next three sections are less global in their ambitions, but all of them touch on important facets of this period's enduring philosophical provocation. The second section features essays on the question of culture, language, sociability, and education, while the third turns to matters aesthetic, and the fourth and concluding section takes up the question of science.
books  reviews  find  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  German_Idealism  Romanticism  Kant  Hegel  Schelling  Schleiermacher  Fichte  Novalis  Hölderin  metaphysics  epistemology  mind  nature  aesthetics  culture  cultural_history  subjectivity  Absolute  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_science  hermeneutics  history_of_science  sociability  education  bildung  Evernote 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Meeker, review - Frederick F. Schmitt, Hume's Epistemology in the Treatise (OUP) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 09, 2014
This scholarly and philosophically rich treatment of Hume's epistemology furnishes a clear and comprehensive reading of Hume as a reliabilist about justified belief that is reminiscent of Alvin Goldman's naturalistic epistemology. One might worry that this is simply an anachronistic attempt to impose contemporary categories on Hume. One need not entertain such worries. ...he carefully connects Hume's concepts to contemporary ones and considerable attention relating Hume's views to Descartes, Malebranche, Newton and especially Locke. The book contains four major "divisions", and preceding the first division is a crucial chapter detailing the epistemological framework for this study -- In the first division, Schmitt notes that epistemologists from Plato's time have distinguished between knowledge and probability/belief/opinion - they have differed, though, on how to understand causal inferences in terms of this dichotomy. For Schmitt, although Hume mostly follows Locke's way of drawing the knowledge/probability distinction, Hume departs from Locke in wresting causal inferences from the domain of knowledge and placing them in the category of probability. According to Schmitt, Hume confronts this problem by arguing that knowledge and proofs produced by causal inferences are both types of justified belief because they are both forms of reliable belief. So there is no great gap between the epistemic status of knowledge and causal inferences. -- I hope that by now it is clear that the naturalistic, reliabilist epistemology that he attributes to Hume stands in stark contrast to the sceptical reading of Hume, according to which beliefs lack epistemic justification. -- copied full review to Evernote - put in Millican Treatise notebook
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Hume  epistemology  Descartes  Malebranche  Newton  Locke  Goldman_Alvin  scepticism  causation  epistemology-naturalism  inference  demonstration  fallibility  Evernote 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The 10 best New Yorker articles on health care - Vox - July 2014
The New Yorker has recently made its post-2007 archives open to the non-subscribing public for the next several months. (Some pieces published before 2007 are available, as well.) My colleagues Libby Nelson and Brandon Ambrosino have put together collections of the magazine's best education and religion writing, and I am shamelessly cribbing their idea for the health care beat. -- selected articles to Evernote
US_society  health_care  medicine  poverty  neuroscience  public_health  public_policy  welfare  Evernote 
july 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Absolute  Academia.edu  accountability  aesthetics  AI  alienation  amazon.com  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  antiquaries  antiquity-source_of_narratives  antitrust  apps  article  asset_prices  atheism  atomism  austerity  Bacon  bad_history  balance_of_payments  banking  Bergson  Biblical_criticism  bibliography  bildung  biodiversity  biology  bioprospecting  books  British_history  British_Idealism  business_cycles  Calvinist  capital_adequacy  capital_flows  capital_markets  causation  central_banks  China-economy  Chinese_history  Christendom  church_history  Church_of_England  Cicero  circulation-ideas  civil_liberties  civil_society  climate  climate-adaptation  climate-policy  Coleridge  commercial_real_estate  commodities  Common_Sense  community  competition  competitiveness  Congress  constitutional_law  contagion  continental_philosophy  corporate_citizenship  corporate_law  corporate_personhood  corruption  cosmology  credit  creditors  credit_booms  criminalization_of_politics  criminal_justice  cryptography  cultural_change  cultural_history  cultural_transmission  culture  cybersecurity  Darwinism  debt  debt-restructuring  debtors  default  Deleuze  deleverage  democracy  democracy_promotion  demonstration  Derrida  Descartes  determinism  dogmatism  DOJ  dollar  donors-left-wing  donors-right-wing  downloaded  Dutch  Early_Christian  ecclesiology  economic_geography  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_policy  economic_sociology  education  education-higher  EF-add  elections  elite_culture  Elizabeth  emerging_markets  empiricism  energy  energy-markets  energy-transition  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-ongoing  Enlightenment_Project  entre_deux_guerres  Epicurean  epistemology  epistemology-naturalism  equality  equity  equity-corporate  Europe  Europe-Medieval  Eusebius  Evernote  evolution  evolution-as-model  evolution-social  evolutionary_biology  existentialism  fallibility  Fed  federalism  Fichte  financial_crisis  financial_regulation  find  firms-structure  firms-theory  fiscal_policy  Foxe-Book_of_Martyrs  Frankfurt_School  fraud  free_speech  free_will  French_Revolution  fundraising  FX  genetics  genetic_resources  genocide  German_Idealism  German_philosophy  gerrymandering  Gilded_Age  global_economy  global_imbalance  Goldman_Alvin  GOP  governance  government_finance  Great_Recession  green_economy  green_finance  health_care  Hegel  Hegel-philosophy_of_right  Hegelian  Heidegger  hermeneutics  heterodoxy  hierarchy  historians-and-religion  historians-and-state  historiography  historiography-Renaissance  history_of_book  history_of_England  history_of_science  Holinshed_Chronicles  Holocaust  humanism  human_capital  human_rights  Hume  Husserl  Hölderin  idealism-transcendental  ideas-theories  immanence  incentives-distortions  individualism  indulgences  Industrial_Revolution  industry_clusters  industry_concentration  inequality  inference  inflation  infrastructure  Innovation  innovation-government-supported  innovation-government_policy  institutional_investors  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  intelligence_agencies  intelligentsia  interest_rates  international_crimes  international_finance  international_law  international_political_economy  interview  investment  investment-government  IP  IR  Israel  jstor  Judeo-Christian  jurisprudence  justice  Kant  kindle-available  labor_history  Labor_markets  labor_share  labor_standards  law_of_nations  law_of_the_sea  leaks  left-wing  legal_culture  legal_system  legitimacy  leverage  liberalism-public_reason  liberty  links  liquidity  Locke  Lucretius  Luddites  Mac  Malebranche  martyrs  Marx  mass_culture  materialism  medicine  medieval_philosophy  metaphysics  microeconomics  MidEast_peace_process  military-industrial_complex  military-intel-industrial_complex  Mill  mind  monetary_policy  monopolies  monopsony  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  More_Sir_Thomas  mortgages  multipliers  narrative-contested  nation-state  natural_law  natural_philosophy  natural_rights  nature  neuroscience  Newman_JH  Newton  Nietzsche  Novalis  nshed  Obama_administration  objectivity  OCR  OECD_economies  organizations  Palestinians  Papacy  paper  partisanship  path-dependence  pensions  perception  persecution  pharma  philanthropy  philology  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  political-theology  political_culture  political_participation  political_philosophy  politicians-crimes  politics-and-religion  popular_politics  populism  post-Cold_War  post-colonial  post-WWII  poverty  priestcraft  priesthood  priests-authority  printing  print_culture  privacy  privatization  professionalization  profit  Progressive_Era  propaganda  property_rights  Protestants  public_health  public_interest  public_policy  purgatory  QE  R&D  readership  reader_response  reading  real_estate  reason  reason-passions  Reformation  religious_belief  religious_history  religious_practices  Renaissance  renewables  reviews  rhetoric-writing  risk  risk-systemic  risk_management  Romanticism  sacraments  savings  scepticism  Schelling  Schleiermacher  science-and-religion  scientific_method  Scientific_Revolution  Scottish_Enlightenment  SCOTUS  scripts  SEC  Sidgwick  singularity  skills  sociability  social_insurance  social_media  social_movements  social_theory  sola_scriptura  Sorbonne  sovereignty  sovereign_debt  Spencer_Herbert  Spinoza  spreads  SSRN  stagnation  standards-sustainability  state-roles  State_Dept  state_government  state_legislatures  subjectivity  tax_cuts  techno-libertarian  technology  theology  tips  tolerance  trade  trade-agreements  transcendence  transubstantiation  Trump  Trump-foreign_policy  Trump-Russia  Trump_administration  UN  unemployment  unions  university  university-funding  US_constitution  US_economy  US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_history  US_legal_system  US_military  US_politics  US_society  utopian  wages  welfare  white-collar_crime  WWI  WWII 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: