dunnettreader + europe-early_modern   122

BBC Radio 4 - Germany: Memories of a Nation, Reichstag
Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, explores 600 years of Germany's complex and often challenging history using objects, art, landmarks and literature.
audio  entre_deux_guerres  15thC  German_unification  design  Reformation  20thC  18thC  19thC  Holy_Roman_Empire  Nazis  art_history  Modernism  Weimar  16thC  Bismarck  Europe-Early_Modern  social_history  medieval_history  cultural_history  Germany  post-WWII  17thC 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey Edward Green - Rawls and the Forgotten Figure of the Most Advantaged: In Defense of Reasonable Envy toward the Superrich (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
politics-and-money  political_participation  inequality-wealth  regulatory_capture  political_philosophy  political_culture  tax_havens  Early_Republic  inequality  estate_tax  intellectual_history  inheritance  republicanism  Plato-Republic  elites-political_influence  Jefferson  Harrington  crony_capitalism  Europe-Early_Modern  fairness  article  Aristotle  social_capital  social_theory  Rawls  social_democracy  Machiavelli  Plato  inequality-opportunity  jstor  bibliography  ancient_Rome  regulation  justice  liberalism  egalitarian  regulatory_avoidance  interest_groups  legitimacy  deliberative_democracy  political_history  class_conflict  downloaded  education-elites  social_order  elites-self-destructive  Roman_Republic  ancient_Greece  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Karaman
Theoretical work on taxation and state-building borrows heavily from early modern European experience. While a number of European states increased centralized tax revenues during this period, for others revenues stagnated or even declined and these variations have motivated alternative arguments for the determinants of fiscal and state capacity. This study reviews the arguments concerning the three determinants that have received most attention, namely warfare, economic structure, and political regime, and tests them by making use of a new and comprehensive tax revenue dataset. Our main finding is that these three determinants worked in interaction with each other. Specifically, when under pressure of war, it was representative regimes in more urbanized-commercial economies and authoritarian regimes in more rural-agrarian economies that tended to better aggregate domestic interests towards state-building. - Downloaded via iphone
tax_collection  taxes  state-building  nation-state  urban_politics  competition-interstate  political_culture  political_participation  agriculture-surplus  Absolutism  government_finance  fiscal-military_state  agriculture  Europe-Early_Modern  economic_history  article  bibliography  political_sociology  central_government  19thC  financial_instiutions  downloaded  18thC  15thC  urban_elites  military_history  political_economy  17thC  governing_class  constitutional_regime  local_government  fiscal_policy  16thC  government-forms  jstor  Crown_finance  financial_system 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
(URL is a pff) Greg Clark & Neil Cummins - Surnames and Social Mobility, Human Nature (2015)
Surnames and Social Mobility
Gregory Clark1 Neil Cummins2
To what extent do parental characteristics explain child social outcomes? Typically, parent-child correlations in socioeconomic measures are in the range 0.2-0.6. Surname evidence suggests, however, that the intergenerational correlation of overall status is much higher. This paper shows, using educational status in England 1170-2012 as an example, that the true underlying correlation of social status is in the range 0.75-0.85. Social status is more strongly inherited even than height. This correlation is constant over centuries, suggesting an underlying social physics surprisingly immune to government intervention. Social mobility in England in 2012 is little greater than in pre-industrial times. Surname evidence in other countries suggests similarly slow underlying mobility rates.
KEYWORDS: Social Mobility, intergenerational correlation, status inheritance
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
status  Europe-Early_Modern  article  downloaded  surnames  statistics  17thC  British_history  16thC  mobility  Industrial_Revolution  19thC  inheritance  demography  21stC  20thC  18thC  medieval_history 
february 2017 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong - link to WP - Robert Allen (2004): Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe
Robert Allen (2004): Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe: "At the end of the middle ages, the urban, manufacturing core of Europe was on the Mediterranean with an important offshoot in Flanders... -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
improvement  development  urbanization  social_history  Europe-Early_Modern  paper  economic_history  inequality  poverty  progress  downloaded  trade  economic_growth 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Peter Solar - Poor Relief and English Economic Development before the Industrial Revolution (1995) | Economic History Review on JSTOR
The English system of poor relief helped to shape the country's distinctive pre-industrial economy. English relief, when set against continental experience, stands out as uniform and comprehensive in coverage; as reliant on local property taxation for funding; and as generous and reliable in benefits. The insurance provided by relief underpinned the growth of a mobile wage-labour force and facilitated changes inland tenure and use. The fiscal impact of relief expenditure gave taxpayers incentives to put labourers to work and to keep local demographic and economic development in balance.
agriculture-productivity  Labor_markets  economic_history  welfare  Industrial_Revolution  local_government  downloaded  jstor  agriculture  18thC  British_history  17thC  Poor_Laws  article  Europe-Early_Modern  19thC  demography  unemployment 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Roger Chartier's emeritus pages - Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - Collège de France
Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - links to his courses and seminars while he held the chair, and location for subsequent work especially the Débats d'histoire discussions - once a month starting in December 2015 - during the school year (i.e. through May) with announced intention to restart this school year. Joined for several by Patrick Boucheron who arrived (Dec 2015) as Chartier's regular appointment came to an end.
cultural_authority  Roman_Catholicism  Counter-Reformation  lit_crit  French_Enlightenment  religious_history  Europe-Early_Modern  podcast  intellectual_history  postmodern  cultural_capital  critical_theory  history_of_science  cultural_change  connected_history  historiography  theater  circulation-ideas  history_of_book  translation  microhistory  authority  interview  courses  classicism  Renaissance  website  literary_history  global_history  cultural_history  audio  Foucault  video  lecture 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - Serfdom in Eastern Europe after the Revisions (2013), in S. Cavaciocchi (ed.), Serfdom and Slavery in the European Economy 11th-18th Centuries
Serfdom in Eastern Europe after the Revisions, in S. Cavaciocchi (ed.), Serfdom and Slavery in the European Economy 11th- 18th Centuries, Firenze, Firenze University Press, 2014, II, pp. 677-88. - Multi-day conference - pdf of the paper contains schedule and Table of Contents - Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
wages  social_order  legal_system  agriculture-surplus  downloaded  Eastern_Europe  labor  jurisdiction  elite_culture  prices  agriculture  nobility  Black_Death  agriculture-productivity  landowners  medieval_history  property_rights  peasants  Europe-Early_Modern  Western_Europe  conference  serfs  agriculture-markets  dispute_resolution  rural  economic_history  access_to_courts  feudalism  contract_law  Labor_markets  tenants  social_history  improvement  food  chapter  political_economy 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Folgerpedia - Folger Shakespeare Library
Founded on 9 July 2014, Folgerpedia is the Folger Shakespeare Library's collaboratively-edited, search-based encyclopedia of all things "Folger." Content of the articles has been contributed by various departments within the institution, as well as Folger readers and other scholars. The articles address each topic as it relates to the Folger and the Folger collection. There is a variety of article types that can be found on Folgerpedia, including: lists; how tos; and encyclopedic entries concerning items in the collection, Shakespeare's works and characters, and his works in performance.

To read more about Folgerpedia, check out the Folger research blog, The Collation.
Reformation  Tudor  stagecraft  printing  political_culture  Italian_lit  English-language  English_lit  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_culture  Shakespeare  James_I  theater  Renaissance  digital_humanities  history_of_book  intellectual_history  British_history  publishing  plays  website  literary_language  cultural_history  actors  London  event  playwrights  Latin_lit  politics-and-literature  Elizabeth 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Scriber eds. -Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation (1996) | Cambridge University Press
This volume offers a re-interpretation of the role of tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation. It questions the traditional notion of a progressive development towards greater religious toleration from the beginning of the sixteenth century onwards. Instead, it places incidents of religious tolerance and intolerance in their specific social and political contexts. Fifteen leading scholars offer a comprehensive interpretation of this subject, covering all the regions of Europe that were directly affected by the Reformation in the crucial period between 1500, when northern humanism had begun to make an impact, and 1648, the end of the Thirty Years War. In this way, Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation provides a dramatically different view of how religious toleration and conflict developed in early modern Europe. - excerpt is TOC and full Intro including ftnts - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Lutherans  persecution  politiques  social_movements  Huguenots  Erastianism  church_history  Europe-Early_Modern  change-social  Calvinism  religious_wars  heresy  Kirk  religion-established  books  legitimacy  Thirty_Years_War  networks-religious  Papacy  iconoclasm  Counter-Reformation  16thC  Church-and-State  anti-Calvinists  religious_history  godly_persons  Church_of_England  social_order  politico-theology  Wars_of_Religion  Socinians  downloaded  Arminians  religious_belief  Inquisition  religious_culture  17thC  religious_lit  Thirty-Nine_Articles  Reformation  tolerance  Puritans  heterodoxy 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Steven Shapin - How Foods Tasted in the Early Modern Period and How They Taste Now (2012) | School of Advanced Study, University of London
Speaker(s):
Professor Steven Shapin, ST Lee Visiting Professorial Fellow, 2011/12, Franklin L. Ford Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University
Event date:
Tuesday 22 May 2012
School of Advanced Study, University of London
sensation  Europe-Early_Modern  Addison  intellectual_history  Locke-Essay  video  consumer_revolution  lecture  perception  food  botany  medicine  physiology  cultural_history  taste  humours 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Sylvie Taussig - Déclin et progrès chez Blumenberg (2011) - Cairn.info
La question du sens de l’histoire est un leitmotiv de la pensée moderne. La cosmologie issue de la révolution copernicienne a remis en cause la vision chrétienne qui posait de la Parousie au terme de l’histoire. Que des philosophies de l’histoire totalisantes aient pris le relais constitue une part de la sécularisation. Hans Blumenberg affirme la dimension indépassable de l’historicité tout en s’opposant aux tentatives de conférer un sens global à cette condition d’historicité de l’existence. Les Temps modernes, débarrassée des interminables discussions sur le progrès ou le déclin, sont légitimes. La sécularisation est ce processus dans lequel les ruines de l’âge ancien hantent la pensée moderne et l’aveuglent sur les enjeux de sa nouveauté – la mise à nu de sa contingence existentielle et du rôle humanisant de la culture
evolution-as-model  declinism  evolution-social  Blumenberg  progress  anti-modernity  secularization  secularism  modernity  historicism  Counter-Enlightenment  politico-theology  article  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Monetary history - rural finance in northwest Europe from c 1400 | Real-World Economics Review Blog
a) Since at least 1400 rural lending and borrowing was at least in some regions common and tied to the life cycle of households and families, which (though…
Instapaper  economic_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  financial_innovation  rural  Netherlands  agriculture  family  inheritance  marriage  households  collateral  banking  from instapaper
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Fate in Justus Lipsius’s De Constantia and Physiologia Stoicorum (2014) | Academia.edu
Publication: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Oct 2014 In his De Constantia of 1584, Justus Lipsius examines the Stoic theory of fate, distancing himself from it by outlining four key points at which it should be modified. The modified theory is often presented as a distinctly Christianized form of Stoicism. Later, in his Physiologia Stoicorum of 1604, Lipsius revisits the Stoic theory, this time offering a more sympathetic reading, with the four modifications forgotten. It is widely assumed that Lipsius’s position shifted between these two works, perhaps due to a better grasp of the Stoic position by the time of the later work. I argue that in fact there is no great distance between the two accounts and that both find only one point of difficulty with the Stoic theory, a point that Lipsius himself presents in both works as merely a matter of expression. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Neostoicism, Justus Lipsius, and Stoic Tradition -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Stoicism  fate  Providence  free_will  determinism  Justus_Lipsius  Seneca  moral_philosophy  Neostoicism  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Table of contents - John Sellars, ed. - The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Feb 2016) | Academia.edu
Introduction | Stoicism in Rome | Stoicism in Early Christianity | Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism | Augustine’s Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions | Boethius and Stoicism | Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury | Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages | The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance | Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance | Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought | Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism | Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature | Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy | Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought | Spinoza and Stoicism | Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence | The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment | Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment | Kant and Stoic Ethics | Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy | Stoicism and Romantic Literature | Stoicism in Victorian Culture | Stoicism in America | Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics | Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy | The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy
books  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  Seneca  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Abelard  John_of_Salisbury  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  Erasmus  Reformation  Calvin  Justus_Lipsius  Neostoicism  philosophy-as-way-of-life  psychology  self  self-examination  self-knowledge  self-development  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Spinoza  Leibniz  fate  determinism  Providence  free_will  freedom  French_Enlightenment  Epicurean  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kant-ethics  German_Idealism  German_scholars  neo-Kantian  Romanticism  literary_history  analytical_philosophy  psychoanalysis  phenomenology 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Guido Alfani, Wouter Ryckbosch - Income inequality in pre-industrial Europe | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal 06 November 2015
Thomas Piketty and others have prompted renewed interest in understanding long-term patterns of inequality. This column presents evidence from pre-industrial Europe. Inequality rose even during the success stories of early modern Europe, but it can hardly have been the sole requisite for growth. In both economic history and today’s economic theory, the idea of a universal trade-off between growth and inequality needs to be replaced by stronger attention to social processes and institutional developments. -- brief but extensive lit review of how thinking of economic historians has been evolving -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_history  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  economic_growth  inequality  capital_formation  new_institutionalism  institutional_economics  political_economy  state-building  nation-state  human_capital  urbanization  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  consumer_revolution  consumer_demand  wages  growth-equity_tradeoff  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Bourke and Raymond Geuss, eds. - Political Judgement: Essays for John Dunn (2009) | Cambridge University Press
From Plato to Max Weber, the attempt to understand political judgement took the form of a struggle to define the relationship between politics and morals. (...) explores a series of related problems in philosophy and political thought, raising fundamental questions about democracy, trust, the nature of statesmanship, and the relations between historical and political judgement. (...) reconsiders some classic debates in political theory – about equality, authority, responsibility and ideology – Introduction **--** Part I. The Character of Political Judgement: *-* 1. What is political judgement? Raymond Geuss *-* 2. Sticky judgement and the role of rhetoric Victoria McGeer and Philip Pettit *-* 3. Theory and practice: the revolution in political judgement Richard Bourke **--** Part II. Trust, Judgement and Consent: *-* 4. On trusting the judgement of our rulers Quentin Skinner *-* 5. Adam Smith's history of law and government as political theory Istvan Hont *-* 6. Marxism in translation: critical reflections on Indian radical thought Sudipta Kaviraj **--** Part III. Rationality and Judgement: *-* 7. Pericles' unreason Geoffrey Hawthorn
8. Accounting for human actions: individual agency and political judgement in Montaigne's Essais Biancamaria Fontana *-* 9. Nehru's judgement Sunil Khilnani **--** Part IV. Democracy and Modern Political Judgement: *-* 10. Democracy, equality and redistribution Adam Przeworski *-* 11. Democracy and terrorism Richard Tuck -- excerpt from Intro downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  political_culture  ancient_Greece  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  18thC  Montaigne  Smith  agency  decision_theory  democracy  equality  redistribution  political_participation  public_opinion  rhetoric-political  Marxism  India  colonialism  post-colonial  terrorism  legitimacy  authority  moral_philosophy  responsibility  accountability  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Werner Plumpe - The hour of the expert - economic expertise over 4 centuries - Eurozine - October 2012
What constitutes economic expertise? Looking at how European politics has answered this question over the last four centuries, Werner Plumpe argues that, at any given time, economic expertise is judged according to its coincidence with the conjuncture. -- Original in German -- Translation by Samuel Willcocks -- First published in Merkur 9-10/2012 (German version); Eurozine (English version) -- quite amusing, but nice overview that isn't excessively Anglo oriented
economic_history  economic_theory  expertise  sociology_of_knowledge  social_sciences  positivism  social_sciences-post-WWII  macroeconomics  economic_models  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  grand_narrative  narrative-contested  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_policy  capitalism  capitalism-varieties  capitalism-systemic_crisis  laisser-faire  cameralism  government-roles  business_cycles  business-and-politics  Keynesianism  neoclassical_economics  Austrian_economics  liberalism-19thC  finance_capital  bank_runs  financial_crisis  regulation  Marxism  public_enterprise  public_goods  infrastructure  market_fundamentalism  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Krzysztof Pomian - European identity: Historical fact and political problem - Eurozine - August 2009 (original 2007)
An historian can define European identity descriptively, as Krzysztof Pomian demonstrates in a tour of European culture since the first millennium before Christ. But the real controversy lies elsewhere, in the political question: what of the European past is worth preserving? (..) What are we ready to abandon, and what are we attached to so strongly that under no circumstances will we allow ourselves be deprived of? To what extent must the future be patterned according to our expectations, rooted in the past, and to what extent are we ready to leave the shaping of it to forces we do not control, and which seem to be causing a growing estrangement from our familiar ideas about how that future should look? These questions, in many different forms, (..) must be addressed not to historians but to politicians, and in the last instance to the European citizenry, which as ultimate decision-maker must provide an answer. European identity is a historical fact. More and more, it is also becoming a political problem. -- Original in Dutch -- First published in L. Ornstein and L. Breemer (eds.), Paleis Europa. Grote denkers over Europa, as "De Europese identiteit : een historisch feit en een politiek problem", De Bezige Bij: Amsterdam 2007, 29-54 (Dutch version); Transit 37 (2009) (German version). -- downloaded pdf to Note
Europe  grand_narrative  collective_memory  identity  identity_politics  identity-multiple  national_ID  memory-cultural  cultural_history  Europe-exceptionalism  European_integration  EU  EU_governance  political_culture  nation-state  national_tale  national_origins  Roman_Empire  church_history  Christendom  Judeo-Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Eurozine - Where is the power? - Wojciech Przybylski, Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz A conversation with Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz - July 2015
Original in Polish -- Translation by Aleksandra Malecka
First published in Res Publica, Nowa 30 (2015) -- In Europe all political thought is imperialist, says Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz. This means that politics as we know it today incorporates the experience of imperial politics from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century, when the foundations of what we call "the political" were forged. -- downloaded pdf to Note
geopolitics  Europe  Europe-Early_Modern  empires  state-building  nation-state  national_interest  EU  EU_governance  imperial-soft  Germany  Germany-Eurozone  Russia  Russian_foreign_policy  Poland  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  empire-and_business  globalization  sovereignty  hierarchy  authority  public_policy  policymaking  public_opinion  political_culture  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Olivier Christin - Le lent triomphe du nombre: Les progrès de la décision majoritaire à l’époque moderne | La Vie des idées - 11 mai 2012
L’Ancien Régime est généralement considéré comme une période de recul des libertés et d’oubli des systèmes représentatifs. Pourtant, des défis politiques et religieux nouveaux ont conduit à d’importants ajustements dans la mise en œuvre concrète de la décision majoritaire. Pour Olivier Christin, l’apport de l’époque moderne à la formation des pratiques de la décision politique qui seront celles de la révolution démocratique doit donc être réévalué. French version downloaded pdf to Note
political_history  political_culture  political_participation  democracy  majoritarian  minorities  Ancien_régime  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  Roman_law  canon_law  Europe-Early_Modern  church_history  rights-political  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
David Millon - The Ideology of Jury Autonomy in the Early Common Law :: SSRN - Nov 2000
Washington & Lee Public Law Research Paper No. 00-5 -- This article looks closely at the substantial discretion exercised by the premodern English jury. Through the sixteenth century, jurors enjoyed broad autonomy with respect to fact-finding. For much of the medieval period they came to court already knowledgeable about the facts of a case and rendered their verdicts on that basis. Even after they ceased to be self-informed and had to rely instead on evidence presented in court, jurors continued to exercise their fact-finding authority with substantial independence from judicial control and review. The premodern jury also had significant autonomy regarding what we would call questions of law, an aspect of jury discretion that has received little attention from historians. In this article I look closely at the evidence bearing on both facets of jury autonomy, including trial records, accounts of trial proceedings, and legislation relating to the jury. In addition, I attempt to shed some light on the ideological assumptions that justified the early common law's commitment to jury autonomy, a commitment that is hard to understand in light of the modern rule of law idea. -- PDF File: 44. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_history  British_history  medieval_history  16thC  common_law  trials  juries  evidence  epistemology-social  Europe-Early_Modern  legal_culture  legal_validity  legitimacy  civic_virtue  citizenship  local_government  public_goods  commonwealth  governance-participation  status  cities-governance  persona  judgment-independence  autonomy  authority  elites  clientelism  duties  duties-civic  community  rule_of_law  fairness  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Ius Gentium: A Defense of Gentili's Equation of the Law of Nations and the Law of Nature :: SSRN November 2008
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 08-34 -- The relation between the law of nature and the law of nations (ius gnetium) remains unclear. This paper examines Gentili's apparent equation of the two, and it considers more generally how abstract natural law reasoning might be improved by the sort of empirical/comparative law reasoning (as we would call it) that thinkers like Gentili, Grotius and others engaged in when they tried to determine what natural law teaches us about the regulation of war. -- Pages in PDF File: 17 -- Keywords: Gentili, ius gentium, law of nations, laws of war, moral reasoning, natural law, positive law -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  Roman_law  natural_law  international_law  positivism-legal  positive_law  moral_philosophy  comparative_law  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Grotius  gentility  law_of_the_sea  law_of_nations  ius_gentium  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Hoffman, P.T.: Why Did Europe Conquer the World? (eBook and Hardcover).
Between 1492 and 1914, Europeans conquered 84% of the globe. But why did Europe rise to the top, when for centuries the Chinese, Japanese, Ottomans, and South Asians were far more advanced? Why didn’t these powers establish global dominance? ...distinguished economic historian Hoffman demonstrates that conventional explanations— eg geography, epidemic disease, and the Industrial Revolution—fail to provide answers. Arguing instead for the pivotal role of economic and political history, Hoffman shows that if variables had been at all different, Europe would not have achieved critical military innovations, and another power could have become master of the world. In vivid detail, he sheds light on the two millennia of economic, political, and historical changes that set European states on a distinctive path of development and military rivalry. Compared to their counterparts in China, Japan, South Asia, and the Middle East, European leaders—whether chiefs, lords, kings, emperors, or prime ministers—had radically different incentives, which drove them to make war. These incentives, which Hoffman explores using an economic model of political costs and financial resources, resulted in astonishingly rapid growth in Europe’s military sector from the Middle Ages on, and produced an insurmountable lead in gunpowder technology. The consequences determined which states established colonial empires or ran the slave trade, and even which economies were the first to industrialize. -- Professor of Business Economics and professor of history at CalTech. His books include Growth in a Traditional Society (PUP), Surviving Large Losses, and Priceless Markets. -- ebook and pbk not yet released --text 200 pgs, data, mideks in appendices ~35 pgs -- downloaded 1st chapter excerpt
books  kindle-available  Great_Divergence  economic_history  political_history  political_culture  military_history  technology  gunpowder  colonialism  imperialism  Europe  Europe-exceptionalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  incentives  wars-causes  war  Innovation  technology-adoption  historical_sociology  historical_change  balance_of_power  path-dependency  Tilly  Mann_Michael  state-building  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Justin E.H. Smith - Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy (2015) | Princeton University Press
People have always been xenophobic, but an explicit philosophical and scientific view of human racial difference only began to emerge during the modern period. Why and how did this happen? Surveying a range of philosophical and natural-scientific texts, dating from the Spanish Renaissance to the German Enlightenment, (Smith) charts the evolution of the modern concept of race and shows that natural philosophy, particularly efforts to taxonomize and to order nature, played a crucial role. Smith demonstrates how the denial of moral equality between Europeans and non-Europeans resulted from converging philosophical and scientific developments, including a declining belief in human nature’s universality and the rise of biological classification. The racial typing of human beings grew from the need to understand humanity within an all-encompassing system of nature, alongside plants, minerals, primates, and other animals. While racial difference as seen through science did not arise in order to justify the enslavement of people, it became a rationalization and buttress for the practices of trans-Atlantic slavery. From the work of François Bernier to Leibniz, Kant, and others, Smith delves into philosophy’s part in the legacy and damages of modern racism. -- Smith is university professor of the history and philosophy of science at the Université Paris Diderot—Paris VII. ...author of Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life (PUP), coeditor and cotranslator of The Leibniz-Stahl Controversy -- downloaded introduction to Note -- only hdbk, will be in ebook
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  racism  racialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  exploration  Spanish_Empire  Spain  Renaissance  natural_philosophy  biology  taxonomies  Latin_America  West_Indies  North_America  Native_Americans  indigenous_peoples  slavery  West_Africa  Africa  African_trade  life_sciences  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  French_Enlightenment  Leibniz  Kant  anatomy  Adam  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  science-public  science_of_man 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
L'Europe des Lumières - Classiques Garnier - collection directors Michel Delon, Jacques Berchtold et Christophe Martin
De ce qu'on appelle la crise de la conscience européenne à la Révolution française, la littérature et la pensée ont pour espace une Europe, souvent francophone, éprise d'idées nouvelles et d'expérimentations formelles. La collection rend compte de recherches qui sollicitent des disciplines et des méthodes diverses pour mieux connaître et comprendre la vie intellectuelle, scientifique, artistique et littéraire du XVIIIe siècle, ainsi que l'histoire des idées et des représentations. -- From what has been designated as a "crisis of conscience" to the Revolution, literature and thought play in a European space, often French-speaking, entranced by new ideas and formal experiments. The collection covers research which calls on a variety of disciplines and methods in order to better know and understand the intellectual, scientific, artistic and literary life of the 18th century, as well as the history of ideas and representations.
books  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  art_history  literary_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  philosophes  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  publishing 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Joseph Adelson, review essay - What Caused Capitalism? | Foreign Affairs - May 2015
Once upon a time, smart people thought the world was flat. As globalization took off, economists pointed to spreading market forces that… Includes new Cambridge History of Capitalism, Mokyr Enlightened Economy, Acemoglu and Robinson Why Nations Fail, and Beckert Empire of Cotton -- contrasts tales that are, in broad brush, optimistic and internalist re origins (especially Mokyr) vs pessimistic and externalist (especially Cotton) -- copied to Instapaper
books  reviews  bookshelf  economic_history  capitalism  Great_Divergence  ancient_history  global_economy  global_history  global_system  Europe-Early_Modern  city_states  Italy  Spain  France  British_history  India  US_history  colonialism  imperialism  empires  institutional_economics  technology  development  Scientific_Revolution  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  industrial_policy  US_Civil_War  slavery  property  property_rights  mercantilism  mercantilism-violence  Instapaper  markets  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_growth  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Tim Neff, review - Andrew Pettegree, The Invention of News: How the World Came to Know About Itself | Public Books — April 2015
How did we go from that to the news as we now know it, broadcast across the globe and in cycles measured in milliseconds? Pettegree, a professor of modern history at the University of St. Andrews, in Scotland, finds answers by linking the emergence of news as a mass commodity to Western Europe’s development of communications networks between the 15th and 18th centuries. This network perspective decenters news as a singular object. Instead, what we get is a richly detailed history that shows the invention of news as a messy cultural process, with abrupt turns and setbacks. Major advances in information networks were quickly followed by retreats. Printers would reinvent news, only to fold a year or two later. When newspapers first appeared, a mass readership had to learn how to read brief accounts that provided much less context than the narrative histories with which they were familiar. Pettegree’s history of news suggests that crisis has shadowed journalism from the start. The Invention of News divides the earliest stirrings of modern news into three epochs, starting with the 15th and early 16th centuries, when the printing press spurred the transition from largely private news networks to the earliest forms of public news industries. Next, in the 16th and early 17th centuries, improved communications networks enabled the news to spread faster and to more people at less cost. Finally, in the 17th and 18th centuries, advertising expanded circulations, and Enlightenment ideals brought an empirical approach to news that led it to shed moral overtones.
books  reviews  kindle-available  cultural_history  cultural_change  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  news  newspapers  publishing  readership  journalism  communication  information  information-markets  Enlightenment  mass_culture  networks-information  public_sphere  disinformation  witchcraft  public_opinion  public_disorder 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Sarah Al-Matary - Interview with Jean Starobinski. Le suspens du sens | Nov 2012 - La Vie des idées
Mots-clés : image | critique | littérature | poésie | histoire des idées -- Interview transcript, video on the site, also an English translation -- Créer de la relation : telle est, depuis plus d’un demi-siècle, l’ambition de l’œuvre de Jean Starobinski. Œuvre généreuse et mouvante, construite à l’écoute de la vie, entre critique et clinique. La Vie des idées a rencontré ce citoyen du monde chez lui, à Genève, à l’occasion de la parution de trois ouvrages importants. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  lit_crit  literary_history  French_lit  poetry  essayist  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Morgan Kelly, Cormac Ó Gráda - The myth of Europe’s Little Ice Age | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal 28 March 2015
The Little Ice Age is generally seen as a major event in European history. Analysing a variety of recent weather reconstructions, this column finds that European weather appears constant from the Middle Ages until 1900, and that events like the freezing of the Thames and the disappearance of English vineyards have simpler explanations than changing climate. It appears instead that the European Little Ice Age is a statistical artefact, where the standard climatological practice of smoothing what turn out to be white noise data prior to analysis gives the spurious appearance of irregular oscillation – a Slutsky Effect.
climate  statistics  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Claire Masset, Orchards (2012 | Shire Publications
Some of Britain’s surviving orchards are almost six hundred years old, and whether laden with summer fruit or stripped bare by the winter are places of great beauty. Throughout history, they have played an important role in life both rural and urban, providing not just food and drink but also a haven for wildlife and a setting for age-old customs and social gatherings. But when did orchards first appear? What is wassailing and who did it? Why has England lost almost two-thirds of its orchards since 1950 – and what is being done about it today? This beautifully illustrated book reveals the engaging story and rich diversity of Britain’s apple, pear and cherry orchards. **--** Origins and Developments *-* Heyday and Decline. *-* Flora and Fauna. *-* Pastimes and Practices. *-* A Fruitful Future? *-* Further Reading. *-* Places to Visit. **--** Paperback; June 2012; 56 pages; ISBN: 9780747808381
books  Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  British_history  cultural_history  social_history  economic_history  agriculture  botany  leisure  Bolingbroke-family 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Piet Strydom - Discourse and Knowledge: The Making of Enlightenment Sociology, Liverpool University Press, 2000. | -00 Academia.edu
This book offers an original interpretation of the rise of sociology from a contemporary point of view that is both theoretically and historically informed. Rather than assuming the ‘dual revolution’ as watershed, it goes back behind the French Revolution and the industrial revolution in order to start from the more pervasive communication revolution. The central theme of the book is the currently topical one of the role played by discourse in the construction of knowledge. It is substantively developed through an investigation of a neglected period in the history of sociology. By closely analysing the contributions of such theorists as More, Hobbes, Vico, Montesquieu, Ferguson and Millar to the emergence of sociology in its original form, the argument follows the discursive construction of sociology in the context of the society-wide early modern practical discourse about violence and rights – what is here called the rights discourse. Parallels with the nineteenth- and twentieth-century discourse about poverty and justice and the contemporary discourse about risk and responsibility allow the author to reflect not only on the generation of knowledge through discourse, but also on the role that sociology itself plays in this process. The argument draws on the latest epistemological, theoretical and methodological advances. Constructivism is explored, Habermas and Foucault are creatively synthesised to arrive at a new formulation of the theory of discourse, and a finely elaborated frame and discourse analysis is applied – thus making a substantial contribution to the currently emerging cognitive sociology. The contemporary relevance of the analysis lies in its linking of early sociology’s critique of modern society to the need under current conditions of an open history, contingency and uncertainty for cultivating a culture of contradictions and a participatory politics of conflict, contestation and compromise. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  sociology  discourse  discourse-political_theory  discourse_ethics  cognition-social  public_sphere  violence  rights-legal  rights-political  sociology_of_knowledge  cultural_critique  Hobbes  Montesquieu  Scottish_Enlightenment  civil_society  civility-political  politeness  commerce-doux  conflict  political_participation  political_discourse  constructivism  Habermas  Foucault  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Liggio, Leonard P. "Richard Cantillon and the French Economists: Distinctive French Contributions to J.B. Say." - The Journal of Libertarian Studies ( 1985) | Mises Institute
Liggio, Leonard P. "Richard Cantillon and the French Economists: Distinctive French Contributions to J.B. Say." Journal of Libertarian Studies 7, No. 2 (1985): 295–304. Richard Cantillon's life and his Essai occurred at a time of transition in European political, economic and intellectual history. The late seventeenth century had experienced the crisis in European thought which paralleled the Scientific Revolution. Accompanying the scientific revolution was a revolution in economic thought. Criticisms of mercantilism began to lay the groundwork for the Economic Revolution of the eighteenth century. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Cantillon  Scientific_Revolution  social_theory  political_economy  IR_theory  mercantilism  economic_theory  economic_growth  methodology-quantitative  political_arithmetick  social_order  financial_system  banking  cross-border  capital_flows  capital_markets  sovereignty  sovereign_debt  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Kelley Vlahos - A Blackwater World Order | The American Conservative - Feb 2015
...a recent examination by Sean McFate, a former Army paratrooper who later served in Africa working for Dyncorp International and is now an associate professor at the National Defense University, suggests that the Pentagon’s dependence on contractors to help wage its wars has unleashed a new era of warfare in which a multitude of freshly founded private military companies are meeting the demand of an exploding global market for conflict. “Now that the United States has opened the Pandora’s Box of mercenarianism,” McFate writes in The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What they Mean for World Order, “private warriors of all stripes are coming out of the shadows to engage in for-profit warfare.” It is a menacing thought. McFate said this coincides with what he and others have called a current shift from global dominance by nation-state power to a “polycentric” environment in which state authority competes with transnational corporations, global governing bodies, non-governmental organizations (NGO’s), regional and ethnic interests, and terror organizations in the chess game of international relations. New access to professional private arms, McFate further argues, has cut into the traditional states’ monopoly on force, and hastened the dawn of this new era. McFate calls it neomedievalism, the “non-state-centric and multipolar world order characterized by overlapping authorities and allegiances.” States will not disappear, “but they will matter less than they did a century ago.” - copied to Pocket
books  global_system  global_governance  IR  IR_theory  military_history  Europe-Early_Modern  nation-state  transnational_elites  privatization  MNCs  NGOs  civil_wars  international_system  international_law  mercenaries  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Pentagon  Afghanistan  warfare-irregular  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  Pocket 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Harold Laski page - McMaster Economic History archive
Downloaded pdfs to iPhone if his 1917 study in theories of sovereignty and 1819 on evolution of authority and its locus in the modern state. Page also has hyml link to 1922 wirk on Marx and a list of biographies and studies of Laski's thought
books  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  Europe-Early_Modern  politics-and-religion  sovereignty  nation-state  bureaucracy  19thC  20thC  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  Marx  website  links 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Eva Botella-Ordinas & Domingo Centenero de Arce & Antonio Terrasa Lozano, « Une tradition hispanique de démocratie locale. Les cabildos abiertos du XVIe siècle à nos jours » | La Vie des idées - Oct 2011
« Occupe la place ! », scandent les Indignés. Selon trois historiens, ce recours aux assemblées locales s’ancre dans une tradition hispanique puissante et ancienne. Les formes locales de républicanisme participatif auraient persisté depuis le Moyen-âge, malgré les efforts constants pour les réduire. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_history  political_culture  Spain  Spanish_Empire  comparative_history  republicanism  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  social_history  social_order  local_government  local_politics  radicals  revolutions  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Europe-19thC  medieval_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
David Gentilcore, Review Article: Health in Europe 1500-1800 [ Peter Elmer, ed. of Open University essay collection and companion source book] | Reviews in History - Nov 2004
Dr David Gentilcore, University of Leicester -- (..) a chapter in the first volume on, say, the care and cure of mental illness provides us with a general introduction to and historical survey of the theme, as well as several case studies. (..) The documents alone are worth the price of the 2 books. Not only do they represent the first such collection of sources on early modern medicine, but their coverage is very broad indeed: from early-15thC Italian letters of medical advice to 18thC Parisian surgical instruction; from the published writings of a French midwife to the rules of an English voluntary hospital; from a treatise on the duties of the Christian physician during time of plague to a newspaper account of smallpox inoculation. Hitherto sources of this type have been available in a very few journals, (..) It is the first volume(..) which merits our attention, marking as it does the coming of age of the social and cultural history of medicine. It is the culmination of some 30 years of research that has transformed writing and teaching in the history of medicine. This has meant a shift away from the ‘great men’ focus towards attention to marginalised or neglected groups in society; away from an exclusive interest in medical practitioners towards the experiences of sufferers and patients; away from the allure of retro-diagnosis (that is, applying modern biomedical knowledge to the illnesses of the ‘rich and famous’ of the past) and towards how contemporaries understood disease in their own time; and away from a university- and hospital-centred account of medical knowledge and practice towards one influenced by notions of medical pluralism (the co-existence of alternative or complementary therapies and systems of belief). The essays in this book succeed in providing a cross-section of this research, addressing recent issues and debates in a thematic way. (..) without jettisoning the achievements of previous generations of scholarship. Thus the ‘ideas’ focus of the great men tradition, all too often seen as a worthy end in itself, is not abandoned here (as if the ideas themselves no longer mattered to our understanding of the past), but is re-configured as an exploration of how these ideas were transmitted and put into practice at different levels of society. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  medicine  cultural_history  social_history  intellectual_history  sources  disease  mental_health  professions  history_of_science  historiography  Innovation  religious_culture  science-and-religion  alchemy  anatomy  natural_history  biology  hospitals  public_health  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jennifer Bishop, review - Brodie Waddell, God, Duty and Community in English Economic Life, 1660-1720 (Boydell Press 2012) | Reviews in History - March 2014
For the majority of ordinary people in early modern England, the moral and the economic were closely aligned. Alongside material changes and a growing market ideology, traditional ideas about religion, duty, and community continued to influence economic relationships and practices well into the 18th century. This is the subject of Brodie Waddell’s new book, which sets out to explore the economic culture of later Stuart England. Focusing on concepts such as divine will, social duty, and communal ties, Waddell shows how these all have an underlying logic in common, combining to form a world view based on notions of reciprocity, hierarchy, mutuality, and order. His central contention is that these cultural ideas and moral codes did not decline in importance over the 17th century, as some historical narratives have suggested, but rather continued to shape and define the social and economic lives of ordinary people in later Stuart England. This in itself is not a new argument, and Waddell acknowledges that there are important existing studies of economic culture in early modern England. However, he suggests that previous scholarship has neglected several essential areas, and his book sets out to remedy these gaps. -- she doesn't think he's as original as he claims and makes some suggestions as to how different pieces might have been knit together a bit better, but generally positive -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  British_history  cultural_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  community  moral_sentiments  economic_culture  norms  norms-business  morality-conventional  morality-Christian  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hopper (lecture transcript) - Turncoats and Renegadoes in the English Civil Wars (2011) | National Army Museum (UK) - Lunchtime Lectures
Recorded on 22 September 2011 (transcript updated 2013) -- Dr Andrew Hopper, Lecturer in English Local History at the University of Leicester, discusses the practice of side changing and the role of treachery and traitors during the English Civil Wars -- gave the lecture a couple of weeks before he finished his Oxford University Press book of the same name -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  lecture  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Dr Elliot Vernon, review essay - Andrew Hopper, Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars | Reviews in History (Nov 2013)
Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars - Oxford University Press, 2012, hardback ISBN: 9780199575855; 272pp.; - paperback 2014 - as of Jan 2015 no ebook -- 1st rate review essay, and looks like fascinating book that will be useful for notions of "treason" and, during and after "regime change", factional abuse of legal process against their opponents by tarring them with turncoat accusations - not just revolutions (English_Civil_War, French_Revolution, Russian Revolution) but also Glorious Revolution, Hanoverian Succession -- see also Pinboard bookmark for the lecture Hopper gave on the topic in 2011 at the National Army Museum -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  find  buy  libraries  political_history  political_culture  legal_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Liam Brunt - Mechanical Innovation in the Industrial Revolution: The Case of Plough Design | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), pp. 444-477
Variations in levels of embodied technology generated variations in English plough prices in 1770. Using plough prices as a quality index, this article explains size and daily output of plough teams. It shows that variations in plough technology were due to technological change-not static optimization-and village plough technology was influenced by neighbouring villages. But technological advance was not constrained on the demand size: farmers purchased the best ploughs available. Rather, local supply of technology was the limiting factor. Technological change, urbanization, and information networks are rejected as explanations of local supply of technology. The key factor was market density. -- excellent bibliography on agrarian "revolution" in England and comparative -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  18thC  19thC  British_history  agriculture  agrarian_capitalism  technology  technology_transfer  technology-adoption  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
George Selgin - Steam, Hot Air, and Small Change: Matthew Boulton and the Reform of Britain's Coinage | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), pp. 478-509
This article challenges the claim that Great Britain solved its 'big problem of small change' (the problem of keeping decent low-denomination coins in circulation) by embracing Matthew Boulton's steam-based coining technology. Evidence from Great Britain's commercial token episode (1787-97) shows that a successful small change system depended, not on the motive power employed in coining, but on the quality and consistency of coin engravings and on having means for systematically withdrawing worn coins. The Tower Mint failed to solve Great Britain's small change problem, not because its equipment was old-fashioned, but because its policies and constitution were flawed. -- excellent bibliography -- challenges story in Sargeant and Velde "Big Problem of Small Change" - bookshelf -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  18thC  19thC  British_history  currency  commerce  Innovation  UK_Government  monetary_policy  gold_standard  Napoleonic_Wars  bookshelf  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
François Jarrige, « E. P. Thompson, une vie de combat » | La Vie des idées, 6 janvier 2015
Grand historien de la classe ouvrière anglaise, figure intellectuelle majeure des débats sur le marxisme dans les années 1960-1970, militant antinucléaire à l’origine d’une critique écologiste du capitalisme : tels furent les visages multiples d’Edward Palmer Thompson, dont l’œuvre continue d’imprégner en profondeur l’ensemble des sciences sociales. -- the French are (re)discovering Thompson and his particular version of a Marxian approach that was highly allergic to Theory. -- extensive footnotes -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  historians  historians-and-politics  historiography  historiography-postWWII  20thC  social_history  Europe-Early_Modern  British_history  British_politics  18thC  19thC  working_class  Thompson_EP  moral_economy  morality-conventional  norms  Industrial_Revolution  Marxist  social_theory  social_sciences  political_philosophy  Marxism  industrialization  Whigs-oligarchy  property_rights  capitalism  capitalism-systemic_crisis  environment  sustainability  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert C. Allen - Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR - The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003) , pp. 403-443
An econometric model of economic development is estimated with data from leading European countries between 1300 and 1800. The model explores the impact of population, enclosure, empire, representative government, technology, and literacy on urbanization, agricultural productivity, proto-industry, and the real wage. Simulations show that the main factors leading to economic success in north-western Europe were the growth of American and Asian commerce and, especially, the innovations underlying the export of the new draperies in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The enclosure of the open fields, representative government, and the spread of literacy did not play major roles. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  North-Weingast  agrarian_capitalism  literacy  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_Empire  Dutch  colonialism  trade  Asia  textiles  Innovation  agriculture  urbanization  wages  labor_history  manufacturing  productivity  export-led  Industrial_Revolution  proto-industry  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Ron Harris - (pdf) The Institutional Dynamics of Early Modern Eurasian Trade: The Commenda and the Corporation
The focus of this article is on legal-economic institutions that organized early- modern Eurasian trade. It identifies two such institutions that had divergent dispersion patterns, the corporation and the commenda. The corporation ended up as a uniquely European institution that did not migrate until the era of European colonization. The commenda that originated in Arabia migrated all the way to Western Europe and to China. The article explains their divergent dispersion based on differences in their institutional and geographical environments and on dynamic factors. It claims that institutional analysis errs when it ignores migration of institutions. It provides building blocks for the modeling of institutional migration. -- via Dick Langlois at organizationsandmarkets.com presented at Nov 2014 conference put together by Business History program at Harvard Business School, on the History of Law and Business Enterprise -- downloaded to iPhone
paper  downloaded  economic_history  institutional_economics  legal_history  medieval_history  firms-structure  firms-theory  trade  colonialism  Europe-Early_Modern  China  India  MENA  Islamic_law  business_practices  risk_management  economic_culture  cultural_influence  trade-cultural_transmission  corporate_law  business_history  comparative_economics  Eurasia  business  organizations 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Stacking the deck: Thomas Pfau’s strange history of the West « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Kahn continues her attack on anti-modernity readings of Renaissance, Reformation and Early Modern intellectual history to justify claims for the "necessity" of political theology, with emphasis on (Catholic Thomist) theology as the foundation and organizing thread. Pfau goes beyond the Schmitt readings of the illegitimacy of the post French Revolution secular political to deny post Ockham intellectual legitimacy to any theorist who follows Ockham's voluntarism -- while totally ignoring the social, political, cultural and religious changes. The result is a Hobbes as villain of the piece that conveniently ignores a century and a half of religious warfare. And as she notes, she neither recognizes herself in any of the roles in Pfau’s morality play, nor can she see where he even offers a place for contemporary secular women. Downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  theology  modernity  self  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Hobbes  secularism  political-theology  Reformation  Europe-Early_Modern  political_philosophy  religious_wars  religious_culture  religious_belief  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Talal Asad - Historical notes on the idea of secular criticism « The Immanent Frame - Jan 2008
I have tried to underline the very different understandings people have had of it in Western history, understandings that can’t be reduced to the simple distinction between secular criticism (freedom and reason) and religious criticism (intolerance and obscurantism). The practice of secular criticism is now a sign of the modern, of the modern subject’s relentless pursuit of truth and freedom, of his or her political agency. It has almost become a duty, closely connected to the right to free expression and communication. But every critical discourse has institutional conditions that define what it is, what it recognizes, what it aims at, what it is destroying – and why. Neither philosophical nor literary criticism can successfully claim to be the privileged site of reason. It matters whether the criticism/critique in question is conducted in the form of parody and satire, confession of sins, political auto-critique, professional criticism, or speech under analysis. One might say that if these are all possible instances of critique/criticism, then what we have here is a family concept for which it is not possible to provide a single theory because the practices that constitute them differ radically. And yet there is, perhaps, something distinctive after all about the historical concept of “critique” that Foucault wanted to identify, something other than the varieties of critical practice to which I have pointed: In some areas of our modern life, there is the insistent demand that reasons be given for almost everything. The relation to knowledge, to action, and to other persons, that results when this demand is taken as the foundation of all understanding, is perhaps what Foucault had in mind when he spoke of critique. “The critical attitude” is the essence of secular heroism. -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
critique  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  science-and-religion  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_method  Popper  Kant  Foucault  secularism  secular_humanism  concepts-change  Koselleck  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  epistemology-social  scientific_culture  political_culture  authority  genealogy-method  individualism  agency  Enlightenment-ongoing  Bayle  scepticism  Republic_of_Letters  disciplines  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions? (2012) Kindle Price:$17.60 - 840 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
Includes Scottish late transition from feudalism and a different angle on Scot and English historiography in 17thC re "feudal law", "ancient constitution", James I & VI etc than Pocock's version -- earlier books on 16thC-18thC Scotland look very interesting -- In this panoramic historical analysis, Davidson defends a renovated concept of bourgeois revolution. He shows how our globalized societies of the present are the result of a contested, turbulent history marked by often forceful revolutions directed against old social orders, from the Dutch Revolt to the English and American Civil Wars and beyond. -- Review *--* " What should our conception of a bourgeois revolution be, if it is to enlighten rather than to mislead ? Davidson’s instructive and provocative answer is given through a history both of a set of concepts and of those social settings in which they found application.His book is an impressive contribution both to the history of ideas and to political philosophy.” —ALASDAIR MACINTYRE. *--* “Davidson wends his way through the jagged terrain of a wide range of Marxist writings and debates to distill their lessons in what is unquestionably the most thorough discussion of the subject to date. If the paradox at the heart of the bourgeois revolutions was that the emergence of the modern bourgeois state had little to do with the agency of the bourgeoisie, then Davidson’s study is by far the most nuanced and illuminating discussion of this complex fact.” —JAIRUS BANAJI, Theory as History “[This] is a monumental work. ...easily the most comprehensive account yet of the ‘life and times’ of the concept of ‘bourgeois revolution.’ . . . He has also provided us with a refined set of theoretical tools for understanding the often complex interactions between political revolutions which overturn state institutions and social revolutions which involve a more thoroughgoing transformation of social relations.” —COLIN MOOERS, The Making of Bourgeois Europe
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Lectures on Modern History, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1906) - Online Library of Liberty
These are the lectures given by the great English classical liberal historian, Lord Acton, in the academic years 1899-1901 at Cambridge University. It is a survey of modern history from the rise of the modern nation state to the American Revolution. The book also contains his “Inaugural Lecture” of 1895. *---* INTRODUCTION LORD ACTON AS PROFESSOR *-* INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY *-* I: BEGINNING OF THE MODERN STATE. *-* II: THE NEW WORLD. *-* III: THE RENAISSANCE *-* IV: LUTHER. *-& V: THE COUNTER–REFORMATION. *-* VI: CALVIN AND HENRY VIII. *-* VII: PHILIP II., MARY STUART, AND ELIZABETH. *-* VIII: THE HUGUENOTS AND THE LEAGUE. *-* IX: HENRY THE FOURTH AND RICHELIEU. *-* X: THE THIRTY YEARS’ WAR. *-* XI: THE PURITAN REVOLUTION. *-* XII: THE RISE OF THE WHIGS. *-* XIII: THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION. *-* XIV: LEWIS THE FOURTEENTH. *-* XV: THE WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION. *-* XVI: THE HANOVERIAN SETTLEMENT. *-* XVII: PETER THE GREAT AND THE RISE OF PRUSSIA. *-* XVIII: FREDERIC THE GREAT. *-* XIX: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. *-* APPENDIX I. *-* APPENDIX II - NOTES TO THE INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY -- downloaded kindle version of html
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard J. Ross, Philip J. Stern - Reconstructing Early Modern Notions of Legal Pluralism in "Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500-1850", ed. Lauren Benton and Richard J. Ross (2013) :: SSRN
Richard J. Ross, U. of Illinois College of Law; U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept of History - Philip J. Stern, Duke History Dept -- Legal pluralism occurs when two or more legal orders exert control within a given territory or over a particular social group and yet are not part of a single hierarchical “system” under a coordinating authority. Most historical scholarship on legal pluralism concentrates on its shifting structures in local contexts and on its political and economic implications. By contrast, our essay probes historical actors’ uses of political and religious thought to justify or undermine plural legal regimes in the late 16thC through early 18thC. Historians of early modern political thought preoccupied with the rise of the modern state have lavished attention on ‘centralizing’ discourses, particularly theorists such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Pufendorf represented as champions of sovereignty. Against this tendency, we emphasize how ideological support for plural legal orders could be found in a wide range of intellectual projects. These ranged from debates over the right of resistance and the divine right of rulers, through historical work on the ancient Jewish commonwealth and theological disputes over which precepts “bound conscience,” and finally to writings on political economy and the place of family. -- The central ambition of our article is to provide an alternative historical genealogy for legal scholars of pluralism. Workaday legal pluralism did not struggle against a predominantly hostile intellectual climate. Many discourses supported pluralism. And the most emphatic theorists of a powerful singular sovereign were often responding to intellectual projects that valorized pluralism.
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history-distorted  legal_history  legal_system  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  nation-state  centralization  central_government  sovereignty  territory  pluralism-legal  pluralism  custom  customary_law  family  state-building  political_economy  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  law-and-religion  canon_law  church_history  church_courts  Bodin  Hobbes  Pufendorf  natural_law  colonialism  empires  commonwealth  Hebrew_commonwealth  resistance_theory  divine_right  monarchy  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  casuistry  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, by the Gale Group, Inc. | Answers.com
The history of Europe from the mid-15th century until the French Revolution. Includes notable events such as wars and revolutions as well as broader processes like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment; biographical information on leading figures; individual national histories; and meaningful developments in the arts, religion, politics, exploration and warfare.
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august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Oxford Companion to Military History, ed. Richard Holmes: | Answers.com
The Oxford Companion to Military History, edited by Richard Holmes, Oxford University Press -- A complete overview of military history from classical times to the present, The Oxford Companion to Military History is an essential guide to how the world has been shaped by conflict. Entries on key topics such as intelligence, propaganda, peacekeeping and women in the military, are included, with over 70 maps showing the course of famous battles and campaigns.
books  etexts  military_history  military  war  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  propaganda  maritime_history  IR 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
RANDOLPH C. HEAD -- DOCUMENTS, ARCHIVES, AND PROOF AROUND 1700 (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 909-930 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RANDOLPH C. HEAD - University of California, Riverside -- Jean Mabillon's De re diplomatica, whose importance for diplomatics and the philosophy of history is well recognized, also contributed to the seventeenth-century European debate over the relationship among documents, archives, and historical or juridical proof. This article juxtaposes early works on diplomatics by Mabillon, Daniel Papebroche, and Barthélémy Germon against German ius archivi theorists including Rutger Ruland and Ahasver Fritsch to reveal two incommensurate approaches that emerged around 1700 for assessing the authority of written records. Diplomatics concentrated on comparing the material and textual features of individual documents to authentic specimens in order to separate the genuine from the spurious, whereas the ius archivi emphasized the publica fides (public faith) that documents derived from their placement in an authentic sovereign's archive. Diplomatics' emergence as a separate auxiliary science of history encouraged the erasure of archivality from the primary conditions of documentary assessment for historians, however, while the ius archivi's privileging of institutional over material criteria for authority foreshadowed European state practice and the evolution of archivistics into the twentieth century. This article investigates these competing discourses of evidence and their implications from the perspective of early modern archival practices.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  historians  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  France  Germany  humanism  evidence  archives  manuscripts  Mabillon  Académie_des_Inscriptions  scepticism  Europe-Early_Modern  philosophy_of_history  authority  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
GABY MAHLBERG - "LES JUGES JUGEZ, SE JUSTIFIANTS" (1663) AND EDMUND LUDLOW‘S PROTESTANT NETWORK IN 17thC SWITZERLAND (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 369-396. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract -
GABY MAHLBERG - University of Northumbria -- This article aims to locate English republican thought and writing in a wider European context and to understand the personal connections that aided the distribution and reception of English republican ideas abroad. It does so through the case-study of a little-known pamphlet published by the English regicide Edmund Ludlow during his exile in Switzerland after the restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660. Les juges jugez, se justifiants (1663) was a French translation of the dying speeches and other miscellaneous texts of some of the English regicides, produced in Geneva and subsequently printed in Yverdon with the help of Ludlow's local Protestant network. Rather than propagating a secular republican ideology, Ludlow offered his work to a European Protestant audience in the language of Geneva, promoting a primarily religious cause in an attempt to make martyrs out of political activists. It is therefore to Ludlow's Protestant networks that we need to turn to find out more about the transmission of English republican ideas in francophone Europe and beyond. - * The author would like to thank Cesare Cuttica, J. C. Davis, Andrew McKenzie-McHarg, and the anonymous readers at the Historical Journal for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of this article.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Protestant_International  republicanism  political_philosophy  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  regicide  martyrs  Geneva  France  Dutch  Huguenots  networks  networks-religious  networks-political  diffusion  Bolingbroke-family  exiles  Republic_of_Letters  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
ALEXIS D. LITVINE, review essay - THE INDUSTRIOUS REVOLUTION, THE INDUSTRIOUSNESS DISCOURSE, AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN ECONOMIES (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 531-570. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
ALEXIS D. LITVINE - Trinity College, Cambridge -- The idea of industriousness has been an ever-recurring issue since Max Weber launched it as a putative explanation of the advent of economic modernity. The notion of ‘industrious revolution’ has provoked a renewed flourishing of publications focusing on this issue. Although most historians agree on the emergence of industriousness in seventeenth-century Europe, there is no consensus regarding the chronology, hence the real causes, of this mental and discursive shift. This article emphasizes the problematic role played by literary evidences in these social and cultural models of diffusion of new consumer values and desires. It then establishes the timing of the emergence of the ‘industriousness discourse’ using an original approach to diffusion based both on the quantitative analysis of very large corpora and a close reading of seventeenth-century economic pamphlets and educational literature. It concludes first that there was not one but several competing discourses on industriousness. It then identifies two crucial hinges which closely match the chronology proposed by Allen and Muldrew, but refutes that championed by de Vries and McCloskey. The industrious revolution as described by these authors would have happened both too late to fit its intellectual roots and too early to signal the beginning of a ‘consumer revolution’. -- * I am extremely grateful to Peter Mandler, Craig Muldrew, participants in the Early Modern Economic and Social History seminar, and two anonymous referees, for their comments on previous versions of this article. I am also indebted to Andrew Hardie, Jean-Baptiste Michel, and Paul Schaffner for allowing me to use their data and to Billy Janitsch, Andreas Vlachos, and Andrew Wilson for technical assistance.
article  paywall  find  historiography  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  economic_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  social_order  consumerism  Industrial_Revolution  industriousness  virtue  discourse  bourgeoisie  modernity-emergence  education  values  publishing  readership  Protestant_Ethic  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Colin Dickey, review - One Book Opens Another: On Lawrence Principe, “The Secrets of Alchemy” | The Los Angeles Review of Books - Nov 2012
Great review! -- more central: any study of alchemy reveals the stubborn fact that early modern thought was far more universalizing in its scope than our own age’s tendency to compartmentalize fields of knowledge, and approaching alchemy on its own terms means rethinking our own relationship to the intellectual past. Whereas we regard art, chemistry, religion, and philosophy as separate, discrete areas of study, the early moderns didn’t think like this. Alchemy blends together a variety of disciplines, methods, and philosophies, and any attempt to isolate its chemistry or its symbolism out from the rest is a willful misreading. As Principe stresses repeatedly, “premoderns tended to conceive of and visualize the world in multivalent terms, where each individual thing was connected to many others by webs of analogy and metaphor. This view stands in contrast to the modern tendency to compartmentalize and isolate things and ideas into separate disciplines.” The lasting value of a book like this one is its reminder that we misunderstand the past because we constantly look for ourselves in it.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  religious_history  natural_philosophy  alchemy  ancient_history  medieval_history  Islamic_civilization  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  19thC  20thC  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages 1881] trans. and ed. Frederic William Maitland ( 1900) - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> -- image scan -' translation by F.W. Maitland of part of vol. 3 of Das deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (1881) entitled “Die publicistischen Lehren des Mittelalters.” It is a short history of the evolution of modern political thought which emerged during the Middle Ages -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Europe-Early_Modern  historiography-19thC  Germany  historicism  legal_history  legal_theory  nation-state  authority  government-forms 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea (Hakluyt trans.) with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage - Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea, trans. Richard Hakluyt, with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2004). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/859> -- Grotius’s influential argument in favor of freedom of navigation, trade, and fishing in Richard Hakluyt’s translation. The book also contains William Welwod’s critque and Grotius’s reply to Welwod. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  international_political_economy  IR_theory  international_law  international_system  sovereignty  maritime_history  exploration  trade  trading_companies  colonialism  piracy  shipping  Dutch  British_history  British_Empire  fishing  free_trade  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe [1861] trans. Andrew R. Scoble, ed. Aurelian Craiutu - Online Library of Liberty
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, trans. Andrew R. Scoble, Introduction and notes by Aurelian Craiutu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/878> -- Guizot reflects on the principles, goals, and institutions of representative government in Europe from the fifth to the reign of the Tudors in England. In Part 1 he examines such topics as the “true” principles of representative government, the origin and consequences of the sovereignty of the people, and analyzes the architecture of the English Constitutional monarchy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  political_history  representative_institutions  constitutionalism  ancient_constitution  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Gothic_constitution  Goths  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Charlemagne  Papacy  canon_law  monarchy  nobility  Parliament  Parlement  estates  feudalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Germany  British_history  English_constitution  14thC  15thC  16thC  Anglo-French  Norman_Conquest  War_of_Roses  Hundred_Years_War  sovereignty  consent  popular_politics  political_participation  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Lectures on Modern History (1921 reprint 1907) - Google Books
Editors - with Introduction, John Neville Figgis, Reginald Vere Laurence -- Contents -- Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History *--* LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY *--* Beginning of the Modern State *--* The New World *--* The Renaissance *--* Luther *--* The CounterReformation *--* Calvin and Henry VIII *--* The Puritan Revolution *--* The Rise of the Whigs *--* The English Revolution *--* Lewis XIV *--* The War of the Spanish Succession *--* The Hanoverian Settlement *--* Peter the Great and the Rise of Prussia *--* Frederic the Great *--* Philip II Mary Stuart and Elizabeth *--* The Huguenots and the League *--* Henry the Fourth and Richelieu *--* The Thirty Years War *--* The American Revolution *--* Letter to Contributors to the Cambridge Modern History *--* Notes to Inaugural Lecture -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_history  nation-state  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Wars_of_Religion  Thirty_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  colonialism  American_Revolution  Louis_XIV  Henry_VIII  Lutherans  Calvinist  Peter_the_Great  Frederick_the_Great  Elizabeth  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  Spanish_Empire  Huguenots  Renaissance  Puritans  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Parkin & Timothy Stanton, eds. - Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment (2013) | - Oxford University Press
The early enlightenment has been seen as an epoch-making period, marking the beginnings of the transition from a 'religious' to an essentially 'secular' understanding of human relations and generating in the process new accounts of the relationship between religion and politics, in which toleration was a central idea. Leading scholars challenge that view and explore ways that important discussions of toleration were shaped by natural theology and natural law. Far from representing a shift to non-religious ways of thinking about the world, the essays reveal the extent to which early enlightenment discussions of toleration presupposed a world-view in which God-given natural law established the boundaries between church and state and provided the primary point of reference for understanding claims to religious freedom. -- 1. Religious Commitment and Secular Reason: Pufendorf on the Separation between Religion and Politics, Simone Zurbuchen *--* 2. Samuel Pufendorf and Religious Intolerance in the Early Enlightenment, Thomas Ahnert *--* 3. Natural law, Nonconformity and Toleration: Two Stages on Locke's Way, Timothy Stanton *--* 4. John Locke and Natural Law: Free Worship and Toleration, Ian Harris *--* 5. The Tolerationist Programmes of Thomasius and Locke, Ian Hunter *--* 6. Leibniz's Doctrine of Toleration: Philosophical, Theological, and Pragmatic Reasons, Maria Rosa Antognazza *--* 7. Toleration as Impartiality? Civil and Ecclesiastical Toleration in Jean Barbeyrac, Petter Korkman *--* 8. Natural Rights or Political Prudence? Francis Hutcheson on Toleration, Knud Haakonssen *--* Postface. The Grounds for Toleration and the Capacity to Tolerate, John Dunn -- only hdbk
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Milliner, review essay - Lenten Reading - Ephraim Radner, A Brutal Unity: The Spiritual Politics of the Christian Church | Books and Culture 2013
Radner, a Protestant, [argues] that something in our modern world has gone wrong. However, he places the blame less on an elusive pattern of secularization (Taylor) or on Protestant fragmentation (Gregory) than on the much wider phenomenon of Christian disunity... Christian disunity is what gave birth to—or rather, miscarried—the liberal democratic state. These are massive claims, and Radner marshals the erudition... A Brutal Unity is ..an "eristology," which Radner defines as "the study of hostility in its disordering forms and forces." -- Radner [opens with a] polemic against Wm Cavanaugh's The Myth of Religious Violence, [which] unjustifiably absolves Christians from their share in the violence of the liberal state. ...the nations as we know them arose from the inability of Christians to refrain from mutual murder. Radner marches his readers deep into the Rwandan genocide and the Holocaust.... "[Nazi death squads] were Protestants and Catholics both." To suggest otherwise—whether to exonerate Pope Pius XII or to overemphasize the role of Bonhoeffer—is to succumb to "hallucinogenic fantasy." "The dead bodies, as it were, are already gathered by the time churches admit to complicity in their murder." Radner explores Catholic and Protestant .. attempts to deny the reality of Christian disunity by carving out an inviolable space of "the Church as such"... The saving of the church from her own sins by concocting an invisible or elusive sanctity is, admittedly, a traditional theological move, but... were this approach employed Christologically, it would be plainly Gnostic. - Radner [makes] the villain of his story Ephiphanius of Salamis (d. 403), who listed heresies and distanced the church from her enemies, especially the Jews. ?..inaugurated the "Epiphanian paradigm" and its program of exclusionary violence...the church's "brutal unity." Providentialism and proceduralism are the [church's] blinders... The former is the notion that God was somehow at work in church councils, however violent; the latter is the idea that somehow bureaucratic decisions and parliamentary process betray the hand of God. We should, Radner believes, trust neither.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  church_history  Christianity  theology  intellectual_history  Early_Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Christendom  Church_Fathers  church_councils  Reformation  Papacy  violence  genocide  Holocaust  Protestants  Catholics  modernity  religious_wars  nation-state  liberalism  ecclesiology  Augustine  Providence  heterodoxy  Judaism  gnostic  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - globalinequality: Where I disagree and agree with Debraj Ray’s critique of Piketty’s Capital in the 21s Century - June 2014
Debraj’s error consists...in not realizing that normal capitalist relations of production (where capitalists tend to be rich) are forgotten when we look at economic laws in an abstract manner. Not doing that is precisely a great virtue of Piketty’s book. Surely, (a) if capital/labor proportions were the same across income distribution; (b) if, more extremely, capitalists were poor and workers rich; (c) if capital were state-owned, all of these contradictions would disappear. But none of (a)-(c) conditions holds in contemporary capitalism. So Piketty’s economic laws and contradictions of capitalism do exist. Where do I agree wit Debraj? That Kuznets curve cannot be easily dismissed. I am currently working on the idea that we are now witnessing the upswing of the 2nd Kuznets curve since the Industrial revolution. Moreover I believe this is not only the 2nd but perhaps 5th, 6th or 10th curve over the past 1000 years in the West. Does this agreement on Kuznets then, by itself, imply that my defense of Piketty’s mechanism cannot be right or consistent? Not at all. Piketty isolated the key features of capitalist inequality trends when they are left to themselves: the forces of divergence (inequality) will win. But there are also other forces: capital destruction, wars, confiscatory taxation, hyperinflation, pressure of trade unions, high taxation of capital, rising importance of labor and higher wages, that at different times go the other way, and, in a Kuznets-like fashion, drive inequality down. So, I believe, Piketty has beautifully uncovered the forces of divergence, mentioned some of the forces of convergence, but did not lay to rest the ghost of Kuznets inverted U shaped curve
books  reviews  economic_history  economic_theory  political_economy  Piketty  capitalism  wealth  labor  wages  Marx  macroeconomics  economic_growth  inequality  cliometrics  Kuznets_curve  savings  investment  profit  rentiers  consumers  Medieval  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel Pufendorf - Introduction to the History of the Principal Kingdoms and States of Europe - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, An Introduction to the History of the Principal Kingdoms and States of Europe. Translated by Jodocus Crull (1695). Edited and with an Introduction by Michael J. Seidler (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2013). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2594> -- What reviewers like Le Clerc, Rechenberg, Bayle, and (Henri) Basnage de Beauval appreciated about Pufendorf’s historical writing matched his own assessment of what mattered. Most important was the reliance on documentation and first-hand reports, rather than hearsay or speculation. As royal historiographer in Stockholm and Berlin, Pufendorf made thorough use of the archives to which he had privileged access. He also travelled in Europe to obtain source materials, and he attempted sometimes to obtain important records through personal connections—even from parties otherwise unlikely to provide them, such as the court of Rome. Indeed, Pufendorf’s principled reliance on archival materials—that is, his writing of “public” rather than “private” history—sometimes provoked complaints that he had revealed state secrets and led to censorship of certain works for this reason. Other commendations of Pufendorf’s historiographical method noted his avoidance of speculation about the motives of historical actors, and his self-limitation to what he took to be the implications of the documentary evidence. In Tacitean fashion (sine studio et ira: “without bias or malice,” Annals I.1)
etexts  Europe  Europe-Early_Modern  medieval_history  Renaissance  political_history  17thC  historiography-17thC  Pufendorf  evidence  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Spain  Italy  Germany  Sweden  Denmark  Dutch  Austria  Hungary  Poland  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Ends [Blumenberg on infinite progress] - Waggish (2008)
From Chapter 3 of The Legitimacy of the Modern Age -- Nevertheless the idea of infinite progress also has a safeguarding function for the actual individual and for each actual generation in history. If there were an immanent final goal of history, then those who believe they know it and claim to promote its attainment would be legitimized in using all the others who do not know it and cannot promote it as mere means. Infinite progress does make each present relative to its future, but at the same time it renders every absolute claim untenable. This idea of progress corresponds more than anything else to the only regulative principle that can make history humanly bearable, which is that all dealings must be so constituted that through them people do not become mere means.
intellectual_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  17thC  18thC  progress  philosophy_of_history  Blumenberg 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Marcy P. Lascano, review - Desmond M. Clarke (ed., tr.), The Equality of the Sexes: Three Feminist Texts of the Seventeenth Century // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // March 2014
This book brings together, for the first time, seventeenth century feminist texts by Marie le Jars de Gournay (1568-1645), Anna Maria van Schurman (1607-1678), and François Poulain de la Barre (1647-1723) that argue for such equality. Clarke has provided new translations from the original French and Latin texts and supplemented each primary text with additional shorter texts, excerpts, and letters that give insight into the main text. Clarke's introduction is quite substantial (at 53 pages, it is nearly a quarter of the book). It is also invaluable. He does an excellent job of setting the context of these debates, providing brief biographical sketches of the philosophers and very detailed analyses of the arguments found in the texts. -- Finally, the footnotes are quite extensive. Clarke has done an extraordinary job of tracking down references to rather obscure texts and figures, a task for which he acknowledges the help of numerous experts in related disciplines. He provides brief biographical information for those named in the text,... He also has provided an index and citations for further reading. -- The effects of various theological concerns, differences among Stoic, Scholastic, and Cartesian methodologies, and the influence of custom and prejudice all become much more salient when we see these texts as related, rather than reading each philosopher on his or her own.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  France  Germany  Europe-Early_Modern  feminism  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  education-women  women-intellectuals 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
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