dunnettreader + english_constitution   67

Nadia Urbinati - Sismonde de Sismondi and Republicanism after the French Revolution | JSTOR Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
Republicanism after the French Revolution: The Case of Sismonde de Sismondi -- in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 95-109 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  18thC  19thC  French_Revolution  constitutions  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  English_constitution  classicism  Roman_Republic  democracy  ancient_Greece  Sismondi  contextualism  Cambridge_School  Skinner  Burke  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Alex Massie - What do they know of Britain who only England (or Scotland) know?
A long, long time ago, in the fading years of the last century, I was one half of a debating team that, representing Trinity College Dublin’s Philosophical…
Instapaper  UK_politics  UK_Government  English_constitution  Scotland  Scottish_politics  British_history  British_politics  political_culture  1707_Union  Tories  Labour  SNP  local_politics  Ireland  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Donald E., Jr. Wilkes - Habeas Corpus Proceedings in the High Court of Parliament in the Reign of James I, 1603-1625 - 54 Am. J. Legal Hist. 200 (2014). :: SSRN
University of Georgia Law School -- This Article focuses on the parliamentary habeas corpus proceedings that occurred in the reign of James I (and)corrects several misunderstandings relating to the history of the writ of habeas corpus in England and to the history of the English Parliament (which in the 17thC commonly was referred to as the High Court of Parliament). Part I concerns the historical background and context -- What was the parliamentary privilege of freedom from arrest, the violation of which could lead to the granting of habeas corpus relief by the House of Lords or the House of Commons? What was the civil arrest system in effect in 17thC England which made it likely that from time to time the parliamentary privilege from arrest would be violated and the parliamentary habeas remedy thereupon invoked? What other remedies were available to deal with infringements of the parliamentary arrest privilege? And what were the contours of the parliamentary habeas corpus remedy itself, which appears not to have been successfully invoked prior to the reign of James I? Parts II and III conclusively demonstrate that in the reign of James I the High Court of Parliament at times functioned as the High Habeas Court of Parliament. Part II habeas corpus proceedings in the House of Lords and Part III in the House of Commons during the reign. The Article concludes with a detailed discussion of the three major changes this work mandates in our understanding of English legal history

Number of Pages in PDF File: 66

Keywords: habeas corpus, legal history, England, Parliament, House of Commons, House of Lords, High Court of Parliament, King James I,
paper  SSRN  legal_history  English_constitution  17thC  British_history  British_politics  James_I  Parliament  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  judiciary  criminal_justice  prerogative  Parliamentarians  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Clive Holmes, review - (1) Joel Samaha, Law and Order in Historical Perspective: The Case of Elizabethan Essex and (2) A. Hassell Smith, County and Court: Government and Politics in Norfolk, 1558-1603 | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 49, No. 3
Very useful discussion of the very different tales told re administrative efficiency of local government and judiciary in Elizabethan Norfolk and Essex. Particularly noteworthy was the factionalism that emerged after the fall of the Duke of Norfolk when Norfolk gentry fought for the various powers and control of patronage that had been monopolized by the Duke. The disappearance of the top status figure removed a key organizing part of the structure of ranks and status recognition, producing what sounds like a free-for-all vicious competition. Of course factions tried to develop court connections they could exploit. In addition to contributing local conflicts to central court confkicts, the central-local links also worked the other way. The Elizabethan government, frustrated by the variability and often poor quality of implementation by locals of central policies and concerns, including for security and defense, resorted to delegating particular matters to narrower groups than the overall county structures - e,.g. militia commissions and even letters patent. This selectivity would feed local factional competition. But the disputes fed back into conflicts at the central level in the latter part of Elizabeth's reign even Parliamentary constitutional debates challenging the prerogative to circumvent local government structures.
books  reviews  16thC  Elizabethan  British_history  British_politics  local_government  English_constitution  central_government  centralization  prerogative  judiciary  status  patronage  criminal_justice  bureaucracy  rationalization-institutions  state-building  faction  political_culture  elites  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Glenn Burgess, The Politics of the Ancient Constitution: An Introduction to English Political Thought, 1603-1642 | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 100, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 516-517
Helpful discussion of where Burgess fits within historiography debates, both with respect to the legal and political issues of the ancient constitution, (dominated by Pocock) and the broader "causes of the English Civil War" revisionism, anti revisionism, post revisionism etc. Burgess analyzes 3 different discourses each for a different sphere (e.g. king-in-parliament, prerogative, taxation and judicial review spoke the language of law and ancient constitution whereas religious sphere was a discourse of obedience). Major increase in tensions when a sphere (e.g. religious) deployed language from another sphere (e, g. divines advocating taxation in sermons). and juduc Main criticism by Hirst is Burgess significantly reduces the importance of Coke. On the positive side, Burgess explains the nearly universal consensus re significance of the ancient constitution, the common law and role of the judiciary and most of the monarch's prerogative powers. Hirst says Burgess has provided a framework for the consensus that gives a coherent foundation for distinctive key figures like Bacon and Selden. That serves to highlight where constructive ambiguity maintained consensus, where fault lines were hidden, where and how major conflicts emerged and a logic of the dynamics of how conflicts played out. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  find  amazon.com  17thC  British_history  British_politics  legal_history  ancient_constitution  English_constitution  common_law  judiciary  judicial_review  prerogative  Absolutism  divine_right  mixed_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  counselors  religion-established  Act_of_Supremacy  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_I-personal_rule  political_discourse  Bacon  Selden  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Ethan H. Shagan, review - Derek Hirst, England in Conflict, 1603-1660: Kingdom, Community, Commonwealth | JSTOR: Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2001), pp. 378-379
High marks for thoroughly updated successful textbook - focuses on high politics and sorts out the 3 kingdoms, antecedents to political and constitutional tensions from the 1620s, patterns of political alignments not capable of simplifying by "party", very well-written narrative -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  James_I  Charles_I  English_constitution  Charles_I-personal_rule 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell (Yale ed., 2 vols) and The Poems of Andrew Marvell (Nigel Smith ed.) | JSTOR: Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Winter, 2004), pp. 697-700
Review of (1) The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell, eds, Annabel Patterson; Martin Dzelzainis, Nicholas von Maltzahn, N. H. Keeble and (2) The Poems of Andrew Marvell, ed. Nigel Smith -- the poetry volume is dinged for not fully reflecting new work on Marvell, not surprisingly since Hirst with Zwicker have led the way on repositioning Marvell's biography (ambiguous sexuality, fraught relationships with families and the constantly shifting system of patronage, and childhood abuse) to see both his politics and poetry dufferently, The more substantive critique of the 2 volume prose works is Patterson hauling Marvell and her co-editors into a "liberal avant la lettre" frame where Marvell generally doesn't belong. Par for Patterson who wants to claim all good things in 17thC and 18thC English_lit to liberalism and "Whig culture" -- 3 pgs, didn't download
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674 (2004) | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 111, No. 4 (October 2006), p. 1247
Derek Hirst, Washington University in St. Louis -- Reviewed work(s): Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 2004. Pp. xii, 370. $49.50. -- mixed review. -- he thinks she's on to a major way of looking how various metaphors were deployed and evolved in 17, with her readings of Hobbes and Milton 1st rate. She gets some facts and cites wrong when she strays out of her lane (cavalier not in the 17thC sense). But more damning is her lack of sufficient familiarity with Elizabethan and French discourses of romance, passions and bodies politic. Short -- didn't download
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  literary_history  17thC  Hobbes  Milton  British_history  British_politics  English_lit  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  English_constitution  republicanism  social_contract  emotions  passions  human_nature  moral_psychology  obligation  reciprocity  trust  interest-discourse 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Joad Raymond - Framing Libery: Marvell's "First Anniversary" and the Instrument of Government | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 313-350
1st Anniversary has been treated as the middle poem in a triptych of Marvell's poems on Cromwell. What Marvell's doing in this poem has been the subject of an extreme variety of interpretations, and the structure criticized as fragmented or reflecting the awkwardness of Marvell's political commitments in an environment in flux, the demands of propaganda, or panageric tainted by patronage. Raymond sees the poem as focused not on Cromwell but on the 1st anniversary of the Instrument of Government. The positions of Cromwell in the poem represent tensions between the logic of the Instrument to shape governmental action and political behavior and conflict vs the outsized person of Cromwell, whose manner of governing and leadership both made the success of the Instrument more likely yet threatened the core logic of the Instrument. He extensively tracks the specific debates in 1654, including ephemeral publications of propaganda and controversy, arguing that one reason later readers don't follow Marvell's structure and argument is that, beyond failing to understand the subject is the constitution, Marvell is engaging in specific contemporary arguments and the language in which they were then framed, which are unfamiliar to later readers. He looks at positions that would later become identified with The Good Old Cause and Commonwealthmen, and Harringtinian republicanism. Interesting bibliography Raymond in recent books has been specializing in the development and changes in 17thC print culture(s) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Interregnum  Restoration  publishing  propaganda  pamphlets  politics-and-literature  political_press  Marvell  Cromwell  government-forms  English_constitution  Harrington  Nedham  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark S. Weiner - Imagining the Rule of Law in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Liberal Society and the Dialectic of the Clan | Academia.edu
In this essay, I provide a historical and theoretical framework for understanding the imaginative relation between the liberal rule of law and the kin-based form of socio-legal organization I call ‘the rule of the clan’ – a classic example of law created ‘from below’. I believe that a culturalist disciplinary perspective reveals that the modern liberal state and its more centralized rule of law always stand in an ironic, dialectical relation to the rule of the clan as a legal form. Liberal society nurtures itself through an anti-liberal utopian imaginary. This article provides an intellectual history backdrop for theorizing that dialectical relationship by examining two contrasting ways in which 19thC British intellectuals imagined the rule of law. Following the work of Charles Taylor and, more specifically in the legal field, Paul Kahn, my goal is to depict a social imaginary of modern liberalism that has been neglected within contemporary liberal theory – and, in doing so, provide a way to appreciate the cultural foundations of liberal legality. The article considers the stories that nineteenth-century British intellectuals told about the relation between the rule of law and the rule of the clan as a way to think about the rule of law today. It thus tacks between three different shores: the world of legal pluralism (the rule of the clan), the world of 19thC British analysis of the rule of the clan and the contemporary relation between culture and modern liberal society. Keywords: clan, rule of law, Albert Venn Dicey, Walter Scott, legal memory
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  19thC  British_history  British_politics  memory-group  rule_of_law  clans  kinship  liberalism  modernity  Scott_Sir_Walter  English_constitution  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
CAROLYN POLIZZOTTO -- WHAT REALLY HAPPENED AT THE WHITEHALL DEBATES? A NEW SOURCE (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 33-51. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
CAROLYN POLIZZOTTO - The University of Western Australia -- A variant transcription of one of the Whitehall Debates has been identified among the Clarke papers. Located in volume 16 of the Worcester MSS, it records the latter part of the longest debate, on 14 December 1648, concerning the Second Agreement of the People. The fair copy of this debate by army secretary William Clarke (in volume 65 of the Worcester MSS) was previously believed to be the only surviving record. The new source provides additional text, clarifies obscure passages, and is generally easier to understand. Historians now have the advantage of another account of the meeting, which reveals its importance more fully. Although the Levellers’ Agreement was never to be implemented, the Whitehall Debates took place between Pride's Purge and the trial and execution of Charles I. The variant therefore sheds new light on the thinking of the army command and its advisers both religious and lay at this time of unprecedented constitutional crisis. It also provides the first documentary evidence that the army debates at Putney (1647) and Whitehall (1648–9) were not recorded by Clarke alone, but by a team of at least three secretaries. -* For their invaluable advice in the preparation of this article, I would like to express my gratitude to Dr Clive Holmes and Prof. Ian Gentles. Dr Joanna Parker, Librarian, Worcester College, Oxford, and the staff of the Scholars’ Centre in the University of Western Australia Library, especially Azra Tulic
article  paywall  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Levellers  New_Model_Army  English_constitution  religious_history  godly_persons  Puritans  Independents  radicals  primary_sources  manuscripts  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Isaiah Berlin's Neglect of Enlightenment Constitutionalism (2014) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-12 -- One of the most important achievements of the Enlightenment is what I shall call Enlightenment constitutionalism. It transformed our political thinking out of all recognition; it left, as its legacy, not just the repudiation of monarchy and nobility in France in the 1790s but the unprecedented achievement of the framing, ratification, and establishment of the Constitution of the United States. It comprised the work of Diderot, Kant, Locke, Madison, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Sieyes, and Voltaire. It established the idea of a constitution as an intricate mechanism designed to house the untidiness and pluralism of human politics. Yet Isaiah Berlin, supposedly one of our greatest interpreters of the Enlightenment, said almost nothing about it. The paper develops this claim and it speculates as to why this might be so. Certainly one result of Berlin's sidelining of Enlightenment constitutionalism is to lend spurious credibility to his well-known claim that Enlightenment social design was perfectionist, monastic, and potentially totalitarian. By ignoring Enlightenment constitutionalism, Berlin implicitly directed us away from precisely the body of work that might have refuted this view of Enlightenment social design. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  British_history  British_politics  English_constitution  French_Enlightenment  American_colonies  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  Enlightenment_Project  Berlin_Isaiah  rationalist  perfectibility  progress  Montesquieu  Founders  Madison  US_constitution  bill_of_rights  Glorious_Revolution  constitutionalism  government-forms  Sieyes  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  Absolutism  institutions  institutional_change  representative_institutions  tyranny  limited_monarchy  limited_government  rule_of_law  Diderot  Voltaire  Locke-2_Treatises  Kant  historical_sociology  social_sciences  social_process  pluralism  conflict  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England in Four Books, vol. 1 of 2 ( Books 1 & 2) (1893 ed with selected notes from prior editors) - Online Library of Liberty
Sir William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England in Four Books. Notes selected from the editions of Archibold, Christian, Coleridge, Chitty, Stewart, Kerr, and others, Barron Field’s Analysis, and Additional Notes, and a Life of the Author by George Sharswood. In Two Volumes. (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Co., 1893). Vol. 1 – Books I & II. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2140> -- A two volume edition of the classic work on English law by Blackstone. This edition is interesting because it includes the commentaries of at least 5 previous editors of Blackstone’s work along with additional notes by Sharswood, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Vol. 1 contains the Introduction to the Study of the Laws of England, Book I Of the Rights of Persons, and Book II The Rights of Things. -- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 1 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 1. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/871> -- Vol. 1 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including in vol. 1 his “Historical Sketch of Liberty and Equality”, an essay on Herbert Spencer, and essays on aspects of medieval law -- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  common_law  medieval_history  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  feudalism  English_constitution  property  contracts  torts  judiciary  Spencer_Herbert  Victorian  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Albert Venn Dicey, Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution (LF ed. 1982, Roger E. Michener ed) - Online Library of Liberty
Albert Venn Dicey, Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution, ed. Roger E. Michener (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1982). 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1714> -- Liberty Fund’s edition of Dicey’s most famous work on English constitutional law in which he defended the idea of the sovereignty of parliament under an independent judiciary and the rule of law. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  political_philosophy  English_constitution  Parliamentary_supremacy  judicial_review  rule_of_law  constitutionalism  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Separation of Powers or Division of Power? (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-20 - April 24, 2012 -- The rationale of the separation of powers is often elided with the rationale of checks and balances and with the rationale of the dispersal of power generally in a constitutional system. This paper however focuses resolutely on the functional sepaartion of powers in what MJC Vile called its "pure form". Rexeamining the theories of Locke, Montesquieu, and Madison, the paper seeks to recover (amidst all their tautologies and evasions) a genuine case in favor of this principle. The paper argues that the rationale of the separation of powers is closely related to that of the rule of law: it is partly a matter of the distinct integrity of each of the separated institutions (courts, legislature, and administration). But above all, it is a matter of articulated governance (as contrasted with compressed undifferentiated exercises of power). -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 34 -- Keywords: constitutionalism, constitutions, courts, legislature, Madison, Montesquieu, rule of law, separation of powers -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_system  legal_history  English_constitution  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  government-forms  mixed_government  judiciary  judicial_review  legislature  executive  sovereignty  Locke-2_Treatises  Montesquieu  Madison  constitutionalism  limited_monarchy  limited_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  rule_of_law  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d [1681] - Online Library of Liberty
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d: Being Observations on a late treatise and divers other miscellanies, published under the name of Sir Robert Filmer Baronet. In which the falseness of those opinions that would make monarchy Jure Divino are laid open: and the true Principles of Government and Property (especially in our Kingdom) asserted. By a Lover of Truth and of his Country (London: Richard Janeway, 1681). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2168> -- Tyrrell was a friend and supporter of John Locke who also joined in the battle against the ideas in support of the divine right of kings expressed in the work of Sir Robert Filmer. There is much in this book about the power of the husband over his wife and servants and to what extent these powers are applicable to a monarch who claims similar rights over his subjects. -- html version available for kindle or as pdf
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  Whigs  English_constitution  government-forms  Tyrrell  Filmer  divine_right  limited_monarchy  authority  patriarchy  family  property  liberty  Absolutism  Locke  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Selected Writings of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard, vol. III of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 3. 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/913> -- Vol. 3 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains Coke’s speech in Parliament (inlcuding the Petiton of Right), a number of official acts related to Coke’s career, and other matters. -- also extensive bibliography, including on people and events, relevant to Coke’s career and thought -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Coke  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  Anglo-Saxons  ancient_constitution  common_law  English_constitution  Parliament  monarchy  judiciary  Absolutism  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Petition_of_Right  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Selected Writings of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard, Vol. 2 of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 2. 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/912> -- Vol. 2 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains Coke’s Speech at Norwich, excerpts from the small treatises, and excerpts from the 4 parts of the Institutes. - includes Coke on Littleton, topics such as heresy and treason -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  Coke  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  common_law  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Parliament  monarchy  judiciary  lawyers  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
David Womersley, ed. - Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century (2006) - Online Library of Liberty
David Womersely, Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century, edited and with an Introduction by David Womersley (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1727> -- This volume is a collection of essays which examines some of the central themes and ideologies central to the formation of the United States including Edmund Burke’s theories on property rights and government, the influence of Jamaica on the American colonies, the relations between religious and legal understandings of the concept of liberty, the economic understanding of the Founders, the conflicting viewpoints between moral sense theory and the idea of natural rights in the founding period, the divisions in thought among the revolutionaries regarding the nature of liberty and the manner in which liberty was to be preserved, and the disparity in Madison’s political thought from the 1780s to the 1790s. -- authors include Jack Greene, David Wootton, Gordon Wood. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  West_Indies  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  colonialism  British_Empire  Anglo-American  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  property  property_rights  liberty  liberalism-republicanism_debates  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  natural_law  human_nature  Founders  Parliamentary_supremacy  Patriot_King  Burke  Madison  Hume  Scottish_Enlightenment  commerce  luxury  commerce-doux  corruption  tyranny  Absolutism  US_constitution  American_Revolution  UK_government-colonies  partisanship  common_good  common_law  Whigs  democracy  political_participation  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  government-forms  mixed_government  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, ed. Blair Worden - Online Library of Liberty
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, edited and with an Introduction by Blair Worden (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2011). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2449> -- This edition brings back into print, after two and a half centuries, the pioneering work of English republicanism, Marchamont Nedham’s The Excellencie of a Free-State, which was written in the wake of the execution of King Charles I. First published in 1656, and compiled from previously written editorials in the parliamentarian newsbook Mercurius Politicus, The Excellencie of a Free-State addressed a dilemma in English politics, namely, what kind of government should the Commonwealth adopt? One possibility was to revert to the ancient constitution and create a Cromwellian monarchy. The alternative was the creation of parliamentary sovereignty, in which there would be a “due and orderly succession of supreme authority in the hands of the people’s representatives.” Nedham was convinced that only the latter would “best secure the liberties and freedoms of the people from the encroachments and usurpations of tyranny.” -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Lamp of Experience - Online Library of Liberty
Trevor Colbourn, The Lamp of Experience: Whig History and the Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/674> -- In a landmark work, a leading scholar of the eighteenth century examines the ways in which an understanding of the nature of history, seen as as a continual struggle between liberty and virtue on one hand and arbitrary power and corruption on the other, influenced the thinking of the founding fathers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Founders  English_constitution  history_of_England  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
A Historical Sketch of Liberty and Equality (LF ed.) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, A Historical Sketch of Liberty and Equality, as Ideals of English Political Philosophy from the Time of Hobbes to the Time of Coleridge (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/870 -- In 1875, at only twenty-five years of age, Maitland, in pursuit of a fellowship in Cambridge University, submitted a this remarkable work. He went on to become one of greatest legal historians of his time. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  English_constitution  British_history  British_politics  Maitland  legal_history  legal_culture  liberty  equality  liberalism  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  French_Revolution  Hobbes  Coleridge  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean Louis De Lolme, The Constitution of England; Or, an Account of the English Government, ed. David Lieberman - Online Library of Liberty
Jean Louis De Lolme, The Constitution of England; Or, an Account of the English Government, edited and with an Introduction by David Lieberman (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2089> -- The Constitution of England is one of the most distinguished eighteenth-century treatises on English political liberty. In the vein of Charles Louis Montesquieu’s Spirit of the Laws (1748) and William Blackstone’s Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765–1769), De Lolme’s account of the English system of government exercised an extensive influence on political debate in Britain, on constitutional design in the United States during the Founding era, and on the growth of liberal political thought throughout the nineteenth century. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  British_history  British_politics  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Anglo-American  legal_history  legal_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe [1861] trans. Andrew R. Scoble, ed. Aurelian Craiutu - Online Library of Liberty
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, trans. Andrew R. Scoble, Introduction and notes by Aurelian Craiutu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/878> -- Guizot reflects on the principles, goals, and institutions of representative government in Europe from the fifth to the reign of the Tudors in England. In Part 1 he examines such topics as the “true” principles of representative government, the origin and consequences of the sovereignty of the people, and analyzes the architecture of the English Constitutional monarchy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  political_history  representative_institutions  constitutionalism  ancient_constitution  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Gothic_constitution  Goths  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Charlemagne  Papacy  canon_law  monarchy  nobility  Parliament  Parlement  estates  feudalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Germany  British_history  English_constitution  14thC  15thC  16thC  Anglo-French  Norman_Conquest  War_of_Roses  Hundred_Years_War  sovereignty  consent  popular_politics  political_participation  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
M.J.C. Vile, Constitutionalism and the Separation of Powers (2nd ed.) - Online Library of Liberty
M.J.C. Vile, Constitutionalism and the Separation of Powers (2nd ed.) (Indianapolis, Liberty Fund 1998). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/677> -- Arguably no political principle has been more central than the separation of powers to the evolution of constitutional governance in Western democracies. In the definitive work on the subject, M. J. C. Vile traces the history of the doctrine from its rise during the English Civil War, through its development in the eighteenth century – when it was indispensable to the founders of the American republic – through subsequent political thought and constitution-making in Britain, France, and the United States. The author concludes with an examination of criticisms of the doctrine by both behavioralists and centralizers – and with “A Model of a Theory of Constitutionalism.” The new Liberty Fund second edition includes the entirety of the original 1967 text published by Oxford, a major epilogue entitled “The Separation of Powers and the Administrative State,” and a bibliography. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  political_philosophy  political_history  constitutionalism  government-forms  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  American_colonies  American_Revolution  US_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  Patriot_King  judiciary  rule_of_law  French_Revolution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Third_Republic  Napoleonic_Empire  Directoire  Fifth_Republic  administrative_agencies  executive  legislation  liberalism-republicanism_debates  federalism  Founders  Federalist  Bolingbroke  Montesquieu  patronage  corruption  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern [1947] - Online Library of Liberty
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2145> -- Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern explores the very roots of liberty by examining the development of modern constitutionalism from its ancient and medieval origins. Derived from a series of lectures delivered by Charles Howard McIlwain at Cornell University in the 1938–39 academic year, these lectures provide a useful introduction to the development of modern constitutional forms. -- Introduction states the "problem" beginning with Bolingbroke's definition of the Septennial Act and Whig abandonment of Revolution Principles, and Burke, Paine, arbitrary government and written constitutions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  government-forms  constitutionalism  English_constitution  US_constitution  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  legal_system  legal_history  legal_theory  judiciary  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  Absolutism  representative_institutions  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  medieval_history  feudalism  monarchy  limited_monarchy  resistance_theory  social_contract  public_opinion  political_participation  reform-political  reform-legal  Bolingbroke  Revolution_Principles  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Burke  Paine  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Adams, Revolutionary Writings, ed. C. Bradley Thompson - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Revolutionary Writings of John Adams, Selected and with a Foreword by C. Bradley Thompson (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/592> -- This volume contains the principal shorter writings in which Adams addresses the prospect of revolution and the form of government proper to the new United States. There are pieces on the nature of the British Constitution and the meaning of rights, sovereignty, representation, and obligation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  Adams_John  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_history  British_politics  English_constitution  US_constitution  American_colonies  US_politics  American_Revolution  citizenship  natural_rights  civil_liberties  sovereignty  representation  representative_institutions  obligation  authority  legitimacy  Early_Republic  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 4 (Novanglus, Thoughts on Government, Defence of the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 4. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2102> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 4 contains Novanglus [history of the American colonies and their relations with Britain from 1754 to 1774], Thoughts on Government, and Defence of the Constitutions [descriptions of modern and ancient republics (categorized as democratic, aristocratic and, some ancient, as monarchic), and writings on the history and theories of forms of government by ancient and modern historians and philosophers. Lists Dr Swift as well as Hume -must have read 4 Last Years. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Adams_John  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  government-forms  historians-and-politics  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  Swift  Hume  American_colonies  American_Revolution  George_III  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  English_constitution  UK_government-colonies  British_Empire  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 6 (Defence of the Constitutions Vol. III cont’d, Davila, Essays on the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 6. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2104> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 6 contains (Defence of the Constitutions Vol. III cont’d, Davila, Essays on the Constitution. The last continued part of the Defence of the Constitutions deals with Marchmont Nedham and writings on the commonwealth. Davila is the history of the 16thC French Wars_of_Religion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  political_history  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  English_constitution  US_constitution  state_government  federalism  commonwealth  historiography  France  Wars_of_Religion  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  French_Revolution  Terror  Directoire  Napoleon  Napoleonic_Wars  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  centralization  central_government  local_government  parties  partisanship  faction  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, ed. Ellis Sandoz, - Online Library of Liberty
Ellis Sandoz, The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, edited and with an Introduction by Ellis Sandoz (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2180> -- This is a critical collection of essays on the origin and nature of the idea of liberty. The authors explore the development of English ideas of liberty and the relationship those ideas hold to modern conceptions of rule of law. The essays address early medieval developments, encompassing such seminal issues as the common-law mind of the sixteenth century under the Tudor monarchs, the struggle for power and authority between the Stuart kings and Parliament in the seventeenth century, and the role of the ancient constitution in the momentous legal and constitutional debate that occurred between the Glorious Revolution and the American Declaration of Independence. Authors -- Corinne Comstock Weston - John Phillip Reid - Paul Christianson - Christopher W. Brooks - James Clarke Holt - Editor: Ellis Sandoz -- a lot of historiography discussion of legal history, politics and political philosophy - interesting to see their take on Pocock - original publication date 1993, so bibliography will be a bit dated and the articles won't reflect all the waves of revisionism but important place to start -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  legal_history  legal_theory  political_philosophy  Anglo-American  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Hanoverian_Succession  common_law  lawyers  judiciary  rule_of_law  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  government-forms  mixed_government  Absolutism  republicanism  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  citizens  legitimacy  authority  resistance_theory  Patriot_King  civil_liberties  civic_humanism  liberty  taxes  property  petitions  Petition_of_Right  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  franchise  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government [1803], eds. Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith - Online Library of Liberty
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government, From the Settlement of the Saxons in Britain to the Revolution in 1688, in four volumes, edited by Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith, introduction by Mark Salber Philips (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1886> -- An Historical View of the English Government consists of three parts, concerned with the most substantive revolutions in English government and manners: from the Saxon settlement to the Norman Conquest, from the Norman Conquest to the accession of James I, and from James I to the Glorious Revolution. Through these three phases Millar traces the development of the “great outlines of the English constitution”—the history of institutions of English liberty from Saxon antiquity to the revolution settlement of 1689. Millar demonstrates serious concern for the maintenance of liberties achieved through revolution and maintains that the manners of a commercial nation, while particularly suited to personal and political liberty, are not such as to secure liberty forever.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  historiography-Whig  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  ancient_constitution  English_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  commerce  liberty  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  monarchy  civil_liberties  civilizing_process  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Association of American Law Schools, Select Essays in Anglo-American Legal History, 3 vols. (1907-09) - Online Library of Liberty
Committee of the Association of American Law Schools, Select Essays in Anglo-American Legal History, by various authors, compiled and edited by a committee of the Association of American Law Schools, in three volumes (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1907-09). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2080> -- A massive three volume collection of essays by leading American and English legal experts which surveys the entire body of Anglo-American law.
books  etexts  legal_history  legal_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_system  lawyers  judiciary  legislation  constitutionalism  US_constitution  US_legal_system  English_constitution  common_law  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (2003) Vol. I of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 1. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/911> -- Vol. 1 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains a long introduction by the editor and 13 parts of the Reports. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works and Life of Walter Bagehot, vol. 5 (Historical & Financial Essays; The English Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
A UNIVERSAL MONEY. (1869.) Deals with international exchange, seignorage etc-- *-- HENRY CRABB ROBINSON.1 (1869.) *--* BAD LAWYERS OR GOOD? (1870.) *--* THE EARL OF CLARENDON. (1870.) *--* MR. GROTE. (1870?) *--* ON THE EMOTION OF CONVICTION. (1871.) *--* MR. LOWE AS CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER. (1871.) **--**--**--**-- THE ENGLISH CONSTITUTION. (2nd edition)
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  historiography-17thC  historiography-19thC  historicism  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  political_philosophy  constitutionalism  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  public_finance  sovereign_debt  Clarendon_1st_Earl  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  UK_Government  Bagehot  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert M. Calhoon, review - Craig Yirush. Settlers, Liberty, and Empire: The Roots of Early American Political Theory, 1675-1775 | H-Net Reviews - (May, 2012
Complex enthusiastic review - Calhoon 2009 book on "moderate" mid century - This attractively written, venturesome book is going to start several academic conversations because Yirush makes several intelligent, counterintuitive choices. At 277 pages, this is not a BIG book, not big like J. G. A. Pocock’s The Machiavellian Moment but big like, say, volume 2 of Barbarism and Religion, Pocock’s revisionist study of 18thC political culture in Scotland. Settlers, Liberty, and Empire could easily have been a hundred pages longer, much to the book’s benefit. When Yirush recommends to his readers Lee Ward, The Politics of Liberty in England and Revolutionary America [bookshelf], he already knows that a longer book on the roots of early American political thought would complement and overlap Ward’s magisterial study. The stark conciseness and precision of his book sends a signal more pointed than a conventional preface or introduction. Indeed, the first five pages of his introduction (on Massachusetts colonial agent Jasper Maudit) is an artful prologue in disguise. Teachers should schedule one class session for those five pages alone. Another hundred pages would have allowed Yirush to deal not just with identity in settler political thought, which he does with brio, but also with character--that older neo-Whig historical preoccupation that came alive in the 1950s in the scholarship of Edmund S. Morgan, Bernard Bailyn, Jack P. Greene, and Douglass Adair that Yirush knows well and has employed with implicit effect. In eighteenth-century usage, character meant both personal integrity and also reputation and credible public self-presentation. Choosing his battles thoughtfully, Yirush chose to subordinate character to identity. Reversing those priorities remains a road less travelled
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Sarah Mortimer, review - Charles W. A. Prior. A Confusion of Tongues: Britain's Wars of Reformation, 1625-1642 | H-Net Reviews - Sept 2012
His aim is to challenge interpretations of the civil war that prioritize one element of the English mixture and instead that religion, political thought, and law cannot be separated. ...he claims that it was the very confusion and instability that this mixture created, rather than deep ideological divisions, that led to the civil wars. ... “driven by a complex struggle to define the meaning” of the key religious and political texts. Prior argues that we have concentrated too much on the doctrinal divisions... we need to broaden our perspective to include issues of law, ecclesiology, and church history. Prior provides case studies demonstrating the interaction between these subjects. --...issue of religious conformity, which drew together questions of spiritual and temporal obedience; ...the ensuing debate fostered the creation of rival narratives of English religious history. These narratives are then examined in more detail ....the disputes over ceremonies in worship -- the role played by these different versions of history. The Scots had their own, self-conscious, history of ecclesiastical liberty which could be deployed against Charles; and the events of the late 1630s served to link in Scottish minds liberty and purity of doctrine. ....Charles’s position in Dec 1640, when the canons were condemned by the Commons, was weak. Prior’s focus, though, is resolutely on arguments rather than events, and the debate over the canons is, for him, ...an intensification of positions that had been current since at least 1604. .... the tension between the powers of the Crown and bishops, and the institutions of law and Parliament. ....further constitutional questions generated a plurality of narratives, exacerbating the problem. -- the efforts of two men to overcome this tension: Thomas Aston insisted that episcopacy was part of the English constitution, but Henry Parker refused to accept the legitimacy of custom and precedent. Instead he developed a more complicated argument, which, at root, linked authority to the consent of the governed. ?...neither of these attempted solutions worked, and the continuing instability led to war.
books  reviews  historiography  revisionism  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  legal_history  English_Civil_War  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  Arminian  Presbyterians  common_law  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  historians-and-religion  historians-and-politics  historiography-17thC  historians-and-state  episcopacy  precedent  custom  legitimacy  consent  social_contract  monarchy  divine_right  apostolic_succession  authority  hierarchy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan Cromartie - Harringtonian Virtue: Harrington, Machiavelli, and the Method of the Moment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 987-1009
This article presents a reinterpretation of James Harrington's writings. It takes issue with J. G. A. Pocock's reading, which treats him as importing into England a Machiavellian `language of political thought'. This reading is the basis of Pocock's stress on the republicanism of eighteenth-century opposition values. Harrington's writings were in fact a most implausible channel for such ideas. His outlook owed much to Stoicism. Unlike the Florentine, he admired the contemplative life; was sympathetic to commerce; and was relaxed about the threat of `corruption' (a concept that he did not understand). These views can be associated with his apparent aims: the preservation of a national church with a salaried but politically impotent clergy; and the restoration of the royalist gentry to a leading role in English politics. Pocock's hypothesis is shown to be conditioned by his method; its weaknesses reflect some difficulties inherent in the notion of `languages of thought'. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Harrington  landed_interest  Machiavelli  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  commerce  common_good  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  Stoicism  gentry  Royalists  mixed_government  English_constitution  politics-and-theory  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  corruption  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Simon Targett - Government and Ideology during the Age of Whig Supremacy: The Political Argument of Sir Robert Walpole's Newspaper Propagandists | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Jun., 1994), pp. 289-317
Contrary to received historical wisdom, Sir Robert Walpole, the pragmatist par excellence, was diverted by political ideas. Thus he invested time and an unprecedented amount of money in political newspapers. This article investigates the primary pro-government newspapers and, as well as identifying the leading circle of political writers sponsored by Walpole, addresses the varied and complex arguments that appeared in their `leading essay' each week for twenty years. After identifying some common but misleading historical representations of Walpolean political thought, the article examines the treatment of three broad philosophical questions - human nature, the origin, nature and extent of government, and political morality - so demonstrating that Walpole's spokesmen were not narrowly pragmatic. Subsequently, the article focuses upon the careful pro-government response to the common charges that Walpole corrupted the political system and betrayed traditional whig values. In doing so, the article highlights the skills of some underrated eighteenth-century political writers and, more importantly, emphasizes the union of government and ideology in Walpolean political thinking. -- very useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  mixed_government  English_constitution  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  partisanship  elections  franchise  political_culture  corruption  government_officials  governing_class  political_economy  political_press  Walpole  Hervey  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Tories  Craftsman  Bolingbroke  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Cressy - Revolutionary England 1640-1642 | JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 181 (Nov., 2003), pp. 35-71
Both an historiographical review of the revisionism debates on the English Civil War and n elaboration of Cressy views that inform his work on the 17thC -- Sees decline and rise of Charles I position linked to explosion of revolutions in every category of English society - not only political and religious - and Parliamentarians failure to manage or bring under control. Civil War when governing class, long anxious re social change, took different sides in what to be done. The conflict continued to play out the next 2 decades. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  change-social  social_history  cultural_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  religious_history  religious_culture  church_history  politics-and-religion  monarchy  Absolutism  mixed_government  middle_class  lower_orders  public_sphere  public_opinion  local_government  godly_persons  Laudian  Church_of_England  Puritans  Presbyterians  City_politics  merchants  mercantilism  Protestant_International  anti-Catholic  elite_culture  landed_interest  gentry  court_culture  courtiers  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  James_I  Charles_I  downloaded  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Petitions and the "Invention" of Public Opinion in the English Revolution | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 101, No. 6 (May, 1996), pp. 1497-1555
Current accounts of the capitalist and Protestant origins of the democratic public sphere are inconsistent and speculative. This empirical account explains the transition in political communication from norms of secrecy to appeals to public opinion. Popular communicative change in the English Revolution anticipated, in practice, the democratic theory of the public sphere when printing transformed a traditional instrument of communication-the petition. Petitions had medieval origins and traditions that upheld norms of secrecy and privilege in political communication. Economic and technical properties of printing-namely, heightened commercialism and the capacity to reproduce texts-demolished these norms by changing the scope and content of communication by petition. This practical innovation appears in all factions in the revolution. But among radical groups, the political use of printed petitions led to novel theories and to democratic speculation on constitutional provisions that would ensure the authority of public opinion in politics. This analysis contradicts key assumptions on communicative change that fuel pessimistic assessments of the modern public sphere in post-modernism and critical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  public_sphere  social_process  change-social  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  mixed_government  public_opinion  democracy  arcana_imperii  political_culture  social_order  printing  print_culture  communication  political_press  political_participation  petitions  radicals  commonwealth  Levellers  postmodern  critical_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Your Evening Jemmy (against legislative encroachment on freedom of speech) - Esquire
Hence, in the United States the great and essential rights of the people are secured against legislative as well as against executive ambition. They are secured, not by laws paramount to prerogative, but by constitutions paramount to laws. This security of the freedom of the press requires that it should be exempt not only from previous restraint by the Executive, as in Great Britain, but from legislative restraint also; and this exemption, to be effectual, must be an exemption not only from the previous inspection of licensers, but from the subsequent penalty of laws. -- James Madison, Report On The Virginia Resolutions, 1800
English_constitution  US_constitution  civil_liberties  political_press  free_speech  prerogative  Madison  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Franklin A. Kalinowski - David Hume on the Philosophic Underpinnings of Interest Group Politics | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 25, No. 3 (Spring, 1993), pp. 355-374
This article explores Hume's theory of passion and interest, which for him were simply two sides of the same philosophical phenomenon. The significant distinction, the author argues, is that between the violent passions, embodied in short-range private interests, and the calm passions, reflected in long-range public interests. The goal of politics for Hume is then to construct a system in which the calm passions and public interests could be achieved in a society wherein all individuals exercise violent passions by seeking their self interests. The author assesses the implications of this view of Hume for the analysis of the thought of James Madison. -- see Vermeule who disagrees -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  self-interest  ambition  interest_groups  US_constitution  Madison  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Vermeule - Hume's Second-Best Constitutionalism | JSTOR: The University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 70, No. 1 (Winter, 2003), pp. 421-437
Hume is wrongly remembered for the "knavery principle" of constitutional design - but he thought Britain's mixed constitution was flawed but could work with modifications as second best -- not perfect but more achievable and workable. It's his introduction of the second best for which he should be remembered. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  constitutionalism  18thC  British_history  British_politics  mixed_government  self-interest  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  checks-and-balances  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Tom Bingham reviews ‘Habeas Corpus’ by Paul Halliday · LRB 7 October 2010
Habeas Corpus: From England to Empire by Paul Halliday Harvard, 502 pp, £29.95, March 2010, ISBN 978 0 674 04901 7 -- The third striking feature is a sombre one: in times of perceived emergency, when the security of the people is trumpeted as the highest political imperative, personal freedom, and with it the remedy of habeas corpus, are the first casualties. But over the 300-year period studied by Halliday the writ earned the eulogistic epithets applied to it: he calculates that more than 11,000 detainees applied for relief, of whom more than half (53 per cent) were released.
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  legal_history  legal_system  Parliament  Glorious_Revolution  civil_liberties  judiciary  separation-of-powers  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Katherine O'Donnell: The Image of a Relationship in Blood: Párliament na mBan and Burke's Jacobite Politics (2000)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr, Vol. 15 (2000), pp. 98-119 -- This article discusses the politics and culture of the elite Gaelic Catholics of North Cork, the position of Edmund Burke's family within this milieu, and Burke's own place within this embattled enclave It proposes that one fruitful way of interpreting Burke's work is to hear in his voice the modulations of the genres and conventions of Irish poetic and literary composition as practised in eighteenth-century Gaelic Ireland, a literature disseminated through private manuscripts and by public performance A comparison is made between the passages in Burke's speeches which realise, or idealise, the British constitution and an Irish Jacobite text, Párliament na mBan, composed in Co Cork It will demonstrate the strong affinity in terms of the depiction of key political concepts between the Gaelic Jacobite text and the famous Burkean passages In viewing the Glorious Revolution as a reformation Burke not only makes an ingenious reconciliation between a Whig and Jacobite position he also encapsulates the position that he managed to maintain throughout his political and intellectual life a modus operandi embodied in the suggestive final line of Párliament na mBan, a man always "loyal to his king" and yet who never "yields to his king"
article  jstor  18thC  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  British_politics  Ireland  Catholics-Ireland  Jacobites  Gaelic  Burke  Glorious_Revolution  allegiance  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Abraham D. Kriegel: Liberty and Whiggery in Early Nineteenth-Century England (1980)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Jun., 1980), pp. 253-278 -- by end of 18thC Whigs had won the battle over defining that ambiguous event, the Glorious Revolution, and had claimed the uncontested mantle of champions of liberty. And in this sense Bolingbroke's claim of the Revolution belonging to both Whigs and Tories, regardless of what theory was used to jusify was indeed out Whigging the Whhigs. But "liberty" had some suspect origins (noble and corporate privileges) by early 19thC and very ambiguous applications, especially in connection with that other ambiguous term property. Some good stuff on particular 17thC and 18thC moments in evolution of political language.
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_politics  political_history  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  language-politics  Whigs  Grey_Lord  Fox_Charles_James  Reform_Act_1832  elections  suffrage  aristocracy  elites  landowners  landed_interest  liberty  property  commerce  middle_class  civil_liberties  constituencies  corruption  hierarchy  deference  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Thomas Poole: Back to the Future? Unearthing the Theory of Common Law Constitutionalism(2003)
JSTOR: Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 23, No. 3 (Autumn, 2003), pp. 435-454 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This article charts the rise of a new, and increasingly influential, theory of public law: common law constitutionalism. The theory can best be seen as a response to a 'crisis' within contemporary public law thought produced by an array of different pressures: Thatcherite reformation of the state; the growing prominence (and potential politicization) of judicial review; constitutionalization of the EU; and trends towards globalization. The core of argument underlying the theory is elucidated by means of an analysis of the work of a number of leading public law scholars. The essence of the theory is the reconfiguration of public law as a species of constitutional politics centred on the common law court. The theory constitutes, it is suggested, an attempt to turn inwards, in the face of change, towards the familiar form of the common law, reinvigorated as a burgeoning site of normativity.
article  jstor  legal_history  commercial_law  constitutionalism  bibliography  common_law  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Mark Goldie - Subjects and Sovereigns: The Grand Controversy over Legal Sovereignty in Stuart England by C. C. Weston; J. R. Greenberg (1983)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 26, No. 4 (Dec., 1983), pp. 1029-1030 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- nice little essay on what goes wrong when try to map Left-Right assumptions re political theory since antiquity onto 17thC English religious politics -- the players in fact don't wind up where the authors put them, ignoring the discrepancies
books  reviews  political_history  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  dissenters  Whigs  Tories  Absolutism  tolerance  political_culture  religious_culture  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Parliament  sovereignty  Locke  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Marvell  Erastianism  ecclesiology  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: John W. Yolton - Julian H. Franklin: John Locke and the Theory of Sovereignty: Mixed Monarchy and the Right of Resistance in the Political Thought of the English Revolution (1981)
JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 9, No. 2 (May, 1981), pp. 266-268 - less re Locke himself - mostly about Lawson's Politica and how Locke used Lawson's popular sovereignty to solve the conceptual problem of resistance in a mixed constitution
books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  17thC  Locke  Filmer  Exclusion_Crisis  resistance_theory  sovereignty  mixed_government  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Lee Ward: Montesquieu on Federalism and Anglo-Gothic Constitutionalism (2007)
JSTOR: Publius, Vol. 37, No. 4 (Fall, 2007), pp. 551-577 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The common perception that Montesquieu is not a major theorist of federalism is due both to the peripheral nature of his account of confederate republics and his praise of the unitary British Constitution in the "Spirit of the Laws." This study challenges this view by arguing that, despite his endorsement of the separation of powers, Montesquieu had serious reservations about England's highly centralized system of parliamentary sovereignty. Moreover, his most significant reflections on federalism were not contained in his brief treatment of confederate republics, but rather in his lengthy consideration of Gothic constitutionalism. I conclude that Montesquieu's complex constitutional theory involves two distinct dimensions including both the separation of powers exemplified in England and the federal principles in the decentralized Gothic system of medieval France.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  France  French_Enlightenment  British_politics  Montesquieu  Bolingbroke  separation-of-powers  federalism  Parliament  Gothic_constitution  medieval_history  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sharon Krause: The Spirit of Separate Powers in Montesquieu (2000)
JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 62, No. 2 (Spring, 2000), pp. 231-265 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Montesquieu's theory of separate powers is elaborated in a discussion of the constitution of England in Book XI, chapter 6 of The Spirit of the Laws, which is by far the most discussed section of that work. Many commentators have interpreted the English system straightforwardly as Montesquieu's ideal regime. But while he greatly admires the legal separation of powers in the English constitution, he worries that the spirit of "extreme" liberty among the English could undercut the constitutional separation of powers that protects their liberty. Montesquieu's ambivalence thus raises questions as to what sort of "spirit" a regime must have to sustain a constitution of separate powers and so to preserve individual liberty. His reservations about England are important for understanding his philosophy of liberalism and have broad significance for any polity that seeks to protect individual liberty through a constitution of separate powers.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  France  French_Enlightenment  Montesquieu  constitutions  separation-of-powers  judiciary  Parlement  French_government  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  despotism  downloaded  EF-add  liberty  political_culture  civil_liberties  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Robin Douglass - Montesquieu and Modern Republicanism - 2012 - Political Studies - Wiley Online Library
Douglass, R. (2012), Montesquieu and Modern Republicanism. Political Studies, 60: 703–719. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9248.2011.00932.x -- In this article I explore Montesquieu's discussion of republics and the constitution of England in order to question the extent to which he should be accorded a central place in a tradition of modern republicanism. This involves challenging Paul Rahe's recent thesis that Montesquieu thought both that monarchy was not at all suited to modernity and that England was a republic all along. By stressing the importance of honour and ambition I argue that the liberty that Montesquieu thought exemplified in the English constitution was, in large part, secured by its monarchical principle. Moreover, by eschewing the relevance of political virtue for modern commercial societies, Montesquieu set his own proposals out in opposition to the prevalent French republican discourse of his time; thus it is highly problematic to view him as having proposed a republic for the moderns. The article also serves to disentangle Montesquieu's understanding of political liberty from his analysis of republics in order to refute the idea that he provides support for a distinctively republican conception of liberty as non-domination. This undermines the republican critique of liberalism set forth by Philip Pettit, which is further challenged by considering the affinities between Montesquieu's and Constant's conceptions of liberty. Many commentators have argued that Montesquieu repudiated classical republicanism, yet on the reading advanced in this article it is equally problematic to view him as a modern republican.
article  Wiley  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  21stC  Montesquieu  republicanism  civic_virtue  commerce  monarchy  honor  find  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sean Elliott: Contending for liberty : principle and party in Montesquieu, Hume, and Burke (2010 thesis)
University of St Andrews -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This thesis explores the political reformation of “faction” in the political thought of Montesquieu, David Hume, and Edmund Burke, three thinkers whose works span what Pierre Manent calls “an exquisite moment of liberalism.” It examines the transformation of faction from one based largely on class to one based largely on political function and argues that as the political emphasis of “party” overtook that of class, a disconnect in constitutional theory appeared between the principles formerly associated with class, such as honor, and the principles now associated with parties. This disconnect is examined by focusing on the interrelated concepts of political principle, or that which motivates and regulates men, and faction, itself divided into two types, principled and singular. This thesis further considers the role of political principle to faction in each thinker’s thought in order to demonstrate how limited domestic political conflict could sustain itself via a party system. Each thinker recognized that limited political conflict did not weaken the state but rather strengthened it, if engendered by “principled faction” cognizant of a nominal sovereign. Accordingly, it is argued that a similar understanding of “principled faction,” though focused largely on aristocratic ideas of prejudice, self-interest, and inequality, better promoted political liberty within the state and contributed to a greater acceptance of party in political thought.
thesis  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  18thC  Britain  France  British_politics  faction  parties  Montesquieu  Hume  Burke  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe: Rebranding Rule: 1660-1720 | Kindle Store
In the climactic part of his three-book series exploring the importance of public image in the Tudor and Stuart monarchies, Kevin Sharpe employs a remarkable interdisciplinary approach that draws on literary studies and art history as well as political, cultural, and social history to show how this preoccupation with public representation met the challenge of dealing with the aftermath of Cromwell's interregnum and Charles II's restoration, and how the irrevocably changed cultural landscape was navigated by the sometimes astute yet equally fallible Stuart monarchs and their successors.
books  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  religious_history  monarchy  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_I  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  aristocracy  Parliament  political_economy  political_culture  art_history  English_lit  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  colonialism  IR  EF-add  English_constitution 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
Julia Crick: "Pristina Libertas": Liberty and the Anglo-Saxons Revisited (2004)
JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 14 (2004), pp. 47-71
The association between liberty and the Anglo-Saxons has been rendered mythical by later retellings, both in the Middle Ages and afterwards. This later history notwithstanding, it is argued here that liberty occupied a significant place in the early English documentary record. Originally part of the cultural and linguistic inheritance from late antiquity, the notion of liberty was deployed by English churchmen in defence of monastic freedom from the eighth century onwards, creating an archival legacy which was rewritten and imitated in later centuries, becoming fixed in institutional memory as fiscal and legal freedoms bestowed on the populations of monasteries and towns by pre-Conquest kings.

Downloaded pdf to Note
jstor  article  British_history  legal_history  Norman_Conquest  Medieval  liberty  downloaded  EF-add  bibliography  English_constitution 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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