dunnettreader + craftsman   3

Kristine Haugen - Imagined Universities: Public Insult and the Terrae Filius in Early Modern Oxford (2000) | Academia.edu
Abstract: The 17th-century University of Oxford was plagued by an extremely insulting Latin commencement speaker known as the terrae filius, or "son of the earth." The speakers were routinely expelled from the university, while manuscript copies proliferated -- a few speeches were even owned by John Locke. How did such a custom arise, what were the social effects of the filius' speeches, and what forces surrounded the filius' eventual suppression? It's argued that in the heyday of the filius, his insults actually served a sort of rhetoric of the rotten apple: the observed transgressions of the few were held up against an imagined and far more virtuous, decorous, and pious Oxford. Meanwhile, the filius himself might be understood in terms of two long-established university social types -- the disputant and the tour guide.
More Info: History of Universities 16,2 (2000): 1-31 -- Publication Date: Jan 1, 2000 -- Publication Name: HISTORY OF UNIVERSITIES-OXFORD-
Research Interests: Rhetoric, Sociology of Knowledge, 17th-Century Studies, History of Universities, Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature, 18th Century British Literature, 17th Century British (Literature), University of Oxford, and Academic Satire
article  Academia.edu  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  British_history  university  Oxford  education-higher  satire  English_lit  rhetoric  sociology_of_knowledge  identity-institutions  downloaded  institution-building  intellectual_history  status  cultural_critique  cultural_capital  Amhurst  Craftsman  Bolingbroke  Bourdieu 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Simon Targett - Government and Ideology during the Age of Whig Supremacy: The Political Argument of Sir Robert Walpole's Newspaper Propagandists | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Jun., 1994), pp. 289-317
Contrary to received historical wisdom, Sir Robert Walpole, the pragmatist par excellence, was diverted by political ideas. Thus he invested time and an unprecedented amount of money in political newspapers. This article investigates the primary pro-government newspapers and, as well as identifying the leading circle of political writers sponsored by Walpole, addresses the varied and complex arguments that appeared in their `leading essay' each week for twenty years. After identifying some common but misleading historical representations of Walpolean political thought, the article examines the treatment of three broad philosophical questions - human nature, the origin, nature and extent of government, and political morality - so demonstrating that Walpole's spokesmen were not narrowly pragmatic. Subsequently, the article focuses upon the careful pro-government response to the common charges that Walpole corrupted the political system and betrayed traditional whig values. In doing so, the article highlights the skills of some underrated eighteenth-century political writers and, more importantly, emphasizes the union of government and ideology in Walpolean political thinking. -- very useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  mixed_government  English_constitution  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  partisanship  elections  franchise  political_culture  corruption  government_officials  governing_class  political_economy  political_press  Walpole  Hervey  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Tories  Craftsman  Bolingbroke  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
JENNIFER BATT - From the Field to the Coffeehouse: Changing Representations of Stephen Duck | JSTOR: Criticism, Vol. 47, No. 4 (FALL 2005), pp. 451-470
Vol. 47, No. 4, Special Issue: Learning to Read in the Long Revolution: New Work on Laboring-Class Poets, Aesthetics, and Politics (FALL 2005) -- covers 2 presentations of Duck, both awkward in their own way - 1. Joseph Spence who thought Duck was an extraordinary individual, and supported his transformation to poet patronized by Queen Caroline, but presents him in his laboring milieu in agriculture Wiltshire 2. Grub-Street Journal report of an encounter with Duck in a Richmond coffeehouse after Queen Caroline had granted him a small house in Richmond - the paper was opposition and often mocked the patronage choices of the court - presenting Duck as a (undeserving? ) fish out of water -- see bibliography of political and literary journals, especially opposition, in 1730s including the Craftsman -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  1730s  English_lit  poetry  elite_culture  print_culture  patronage  Queen_Caroline  political_press  literary_journals  Craftsman  opposition  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  high_culture  lower_orders  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader

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