dunnettreader + church_of_ireland   2

JAMES LIVESEY, Review Essay - BERKELEY, IRELAND AND 18thC INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (Dec 2014) | Modern Intellectual History - Cambridge Journals Online
Department of History, School of Humanities, University of Dundee -- Books reviewed: (1) Marc A. Hight ed., The Correspondence of George Berkeley (Cambridge University Press, 2013), (2) Scott Breuninger , Recovering Bishop Berkeley: Virtue and Society in the Anglo-Irish Context (Palgrave, 2010), (3) Daniel Carey and Christopher J. Finlay , eds., The Empire of Credit: The Financial Revolution and the British Atlantic World, 1688–1815 (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 2011) -- 18thC Irish intellectual history has enjoyed a revival in recent years. New scholarly resources, such as the Hoppen edition of the papers of the Dublin Philosophical Society and the recently published Berkeley correspondence, have been fundamental to that revival. Since 1986 the journal Eighteenth-Century Ireland: Iris an dá chultúr has sponsored a complex conversation on the meaning and legacy of the 18thC in Irish history. Work in the journal and beyond deploying “New British” and Atlantic histories, as well as continuing attention to Europe, has helped to enrich scholarly understanding of the environments in which Irish people thought and acted. The challenge facing historians of Ireland has been to find categories of analysis that could comprehend religious division and acknowledge the centrality of the confessional state without reducing all Irish experience to sectarian conflict. Clearly the thought of the Irish Catholic community could not be approached without an understanding of the life of the Continental Catholic Church. Archivium Hibernicum has been collecting and publishing the traces of that history for a hundred years and new digital resources such as the Irish in Europe database have extended that work in new directions. The Atlantic and “New British” contexts have been more proximately important for the Protestant intellectual tradition. -- paywall
articles  books  reviews  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  Catholics-Ireland  Berkeley  Anglo-Irish_constitution  British_politics  reform-social  reformation_of_manners  virtue_ethics  civic_virtue  Protestant_Ascendancy  Whigs-oligarchy  Church_of_England  Church_of_Ireland  patronage  networks-political  networks-social  networks-information  fiscal-military_state  public_finance  taxes  credit  financial_innovation  financial_sector_development  economic_history  political_economy  politics-and-religion  politics-and-money 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Bodies and Interests: Toleration and the Political Imagination in the Later 17thC | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 401-426
Religious fragmentation threatened the notion of a unitary body politic, and conservative Anglicans in the Restoration exploited the organic figure to excoriate dissenters. While scriptural patterns drew the godly too to that trope, its ecclesiastical implications often left them parsing uncomfortably as they urged concessions. In this article Derek Hirst argues that they were largely rescued from such parsing by the new discourse of “interest.” When the promise of trade was taking the court by storm, Independents and Presbyterians had much to gain in re-imagining the polity more pluralistically in terms of interest; Locke too was part of this process. But though the general drift is clear, partisan circumstance could occasion surprising cross-currents, in England and Ireland alike. -- Keywords body politic, religious toleration, John Owen, discourse of “interest”, John Locke -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-religion  economic_history  political_economy  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  dissenters  High_Church  merchants  trade  Restoration  tolerance  political_philosophy  political_order  political_nation  interest-discourse  body_politic  Locke  Locke-religion  court_culture  colonialism  tariffs  Presbyterians  Independents  Ireland  Church_of_England  Anglican  Church_of_Ireland  Ulster  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader

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