dunnettreader + christianity   42

Robert A. Markus - Gregory the Great and his World (1997) | Cambridge University Press
The book is a study of Gregory the Great, the pope who sent Augustine (of Canterbury) and his fellow missionaries to convert the heathen English to Christianity (597). Markus gives a full account of Gregory's life and work, his thought and spirituality, within the setting of the world at the end of the sixth century. At a time of catastrophic change in Europe, Gregory's work as pope stands on the threshold of medieval Western Europe. The book deals with every aspect of his pontificate, providing a major contribution to the study of late antique society. -- No modern equivalent in any language -- Takes into account advance in historical scholarship over the 90 years since Dudden, and modern perspectives in the study of Late Antiquity -- Downloaded frontmatter (incl maps), excerpt, index via Air to DBOX -- added to Evernote
books  biography  6thC  intellectual_history  religious_history  medieval_history  Gregory_the_Great  theology  Papacy  Christianity  Christendom  Byzantine_Empire  Roman_Empire  Lombards  Italy  Church_history  missionaries  religious_culture  religious_lit  barbarians  Visigoths  North_Africa  heresy 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus The End of Ancient Christianity (1990) |Cambridge University Press
Highly recommended by Patrick Boucheron -- This study is concerned with one, central historical problem: the nature of the changes that transformed the intellectual and spiritual horizons of the Christian world from its establishment in the fourth century to the end of the sixth. Why, for example, were the assumptions, attitudes and traditions of Gregory the Great so markedly different from those of Augustine? The End of Ancient Christianity examines how Christians, who had formerly constituted a threatened and beleaguered minority, came to define their identity in a changed context of religious respectability in which their faith had become a source of privilege, prestige and power. Professor Markus reassesses the cult of the martyrs and the creation of schemes of sacred time and sacred space, and analyzes the appeal of asceticism and its impact on the Church at large. These changes form part of a fundamental transition, perhaps best described as the shift from "Ancient" toward "Medieval" forms of Christianity; from an older and more diverse secular culture towards a religious culture with a firm Biblical basis. -- Downloaded TOC, Preface & excerpt via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
books  downloaded  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Christianity  Roman_Empire  Late_Antiquity  Early_Christian  paganism  secularization  Roman_religion  pluralism  eschatology  Augustine  Gregory_the_Great  Church_history  Papacy  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Margins and Metropolis: Authority across the Byzantine Empire. (eBook, Paperback and Hardcover 2016) - Princeton University Press
1st volume of 2 covering her 40 year career - This volume explores the political, cultural, and ecclesiastical forces that linked the metropolis of Byzantium to the margins of its far-flung empire. Focusing on the provincial region of Hellas and Peloponnesos in central and southern Greece, Judith Herrin shows how the prestige of Constantinople was reflected in the military, civilian, and ecclesiastical officials sent out to govern the provinces. She evokes the ideology and culture of the center by examining different aspects of the imperial court, including diplomacy, ceremony, intellectual life, and relations with the church. Particular topics treat the transmission of mathematical manuscripts, the burning of offensive material, and the church's role in distributing philanthropy.

Herrin contrasts life in the capital with provincial life, tracing the adaptation of a largely rural population to rule by Constantinople from the early medieval period onward. The letters of Michael Choniates, archbishop of Athens from 1182 to 1205, offer a detailed account of how this highly educated cleric coped with life in an imperial backwater, and demonstrate a synthesis of ancient Greek culture and medieval Christianity that was characteristic of the Byzantine elite.

This collection of essays spans the entirety of Herrin's influential career and draws together a significant body of scholarship on problems of empire. It features a general introduction, two previously unpublished essays, and a concise introduction to each essay that describes how it came to be written and how it fits into her broader analysis of the unusual brilliance and longevity of Byzantium.

Judith Herrin is the Constantine Leventis Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s College London. She is the author of Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire, Women in Purple: Rulers of Medieval Byzantium, and The Formation of Christendom (all Princeton). -- downloaded Introduction to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  Byzantium  medieval_history  empires  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_culture  empires-governance  Islam  Islamic_civilization  ancient_Greece  Christianity  Christendom  elite_culture  urban_elites  rural  center-periphery  Orthodox_Christianity  Roman_Catholicism  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  manuscripts  iconoclasm  philanthropy  intelligentsia  church_history  theology  Islam-expansion  Christianity-Islam_conflict 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Akeel Bilgrami, ed. - Beyond the Secular West (2016) | Columbia University Press
What is the character of secularism in countries that were not pervaded by Christianity, such as China, India, and the nations of the Middle East? To what extent is the secular an imposition of colonial rule? How does secularism comport with local religious cultures in Africa, and how does it work with local forms of power and governance in Latin America? Has modern secularism evolved organically, or is it even necessary, and has it always meant progress? A vital extension of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age, in which he exhaustively chronicled the emergence of secularism in Latin Christendom, this anthology applies Taylor's findings to secularism's global migration. (...) What began as a modern reaction to—as well as a stubborn extension of—Latin Christendom has become a complex export shaped by the world's religious and political systems. Brilliantly alternating between intellectual and methodological approaches, this volume fosters a greater engagement with the phenomenon across disciplines.
Preface, by Akeel Bilgrami
1. Can Secularism Travel?, by Charles Taylor
2. The Sufi and the State, by Souleymane Bachir Diagne
3. The Individual and Collective Self-Liberation Model of Ustadh Mahmoud Mohamed Taha, by Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
4. Creating Democratically Friendly Twin Tolerations Outside of Latin Christendom: Tunisia, by Alfred Stepan
5. Secularism and the Mexican Revolution, by Claudio Lomnitz
6. Is Confucianism Secular?, by Peter van der Veer
7. Disenchantment Deferred, by Sudipta Kaviraj
8. An Ancient Indian Secular Age?, by Rajeev Bhargava
9. Gandhi's Radicalism: An Interpretation, by Akeel Bilgrami
10. A Secular Age Outside Latin Christendom: Charles Taylor Responds
books  kindle-available  secularization  modernity  modernization  Islam  tolerance  liberalism  decolonization  secularism  universalism  MENA  Tunisia  Mexico  India  ancient_India  Gandhi  Sufis  Confucianism  connected_history  Taylor_Charles  Christianity  Christendom 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
The Gnostic Society Library and the Nag Hammadi Library - Introduction to Gnosticism
An Introduction to Gnosticism and The Nag Hammadi Library -- site has huge collection of etexts from Nag Hammadi, apocryphal gospels, background materials on Gnosticism through the ages - video lectures, some free (especially by the Bishop of the Gnostic Ecclesia, sort of weekly sermons) and for $, collections of lectures e.g. the Divine Feminine, the Arthurian and Grail cycle. Big emphasis on Jungian psychology, symbols etc. New Age reaching or getting in touch with the divine spark in each person - and developing, fulfillment etc. The etexts have explanatory materials that link to legitimate scholarship
evil  Jungian  bibliography  religious_history  monotheism  theology  imago_dei  mysticism  cosmology  church_history  Biblical_criticism  website  Kabbalah  archaeology  Christology  Biblical_authority  Early_Christian  manuscripts  Biblical_exegesis  late_antiquity  intellectual_history  heterodoxy  Biblical_allusion  Christianity  theodicy  gnostic  etexts 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn - Religious freedom between truth and tactic « The Immanent Frame - March 2012
In the last issue of First Things, a self-described coalition of “Catholics and Evangelicals together” defends religious freedom. The coalition includes a number of notable Americans, like Charles Colson and George Weigel, with endorsements from the archbishops of Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia, along with many others. According to the statement, the situation is unexpectedly urgent. After the fall of the Soviet Union, “throughout the world, a new era of religious freedom seemed at hand.” But, now it is blatantly clear that the scourge of intolerance—especially secularist intolerance—persists. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_politics  2010s  religious_culture  freedom_of_conscience  Catholics-and-politics  Evangelical  culture_wars  persecution  Vatican_II  Papacy  Protestants  Religious_Right  public_sphere  public_opinion  public_policy  Tocqueville  politics-and-religion  Christian_Right  Christianity  Christianity-Islam_conflict  secularism  liberalism-public_reason  liberalism  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn - The First Historian of Human Rights (2011) | JSTOR - The American Historical Review
Vol. 116, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 58-79 -- Revisiting Ritter's story of the invention of human rights—as perverse as it was pioneering—affords critical distance from what has become a central historiographical fashion. It is precisely because his narrative constructs the past of human rights for so unfamiliar a project that Ritter provides a more vivid reminder of how easy it still is to devise a field with the goal of crafting a usable past for new imperatives. The deep past out of which human rights are supposed to have sprung provides rich but manipulable material for such enterprises. Ritter's first history is also a salutary reminder of the meanings that the concept of human rights accreted in the postwar era, when they transcended the nation‐state and began to be called in English by their current name. The 1940s, when Ritter wrote, are often forced to play the role of precursor in contemporary narratives—as a kind of failed early version of the post–Cold War 1990s, when human rights as a movement and a framework became visible enough to motivate historians to work on them. Given the Universal Declaration, the chronological focus on the 1940s is understandable. But Ritter provides an inadvertent warning against omitting the conservative and religious sources of human rights in that era, and therefore interpreting it anachronistically. His case powerfully buttresses emerging skepticism about the whole notion of rooting contemporary human rights in the 1940s, let alone earlier, given more recent transformations in the very meaning of the concept, and the unprecedented explosion of a movement based on them. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  Cold_War  IR-realism  IR  religious_history  Christianity  Christian_Democracy  human_rights  anti-capitalism  anti-materialism  communitarian  anti-individualism  international_law  usable_past  historiography-postWWII  United_Nations  post-war_reconstruction  Germany  Europe  theology  rights-legal  conservatism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Hugh McLeod, Werner Ustorf, eds. - The Decline of Christendom in Western Europe, 1750–2000 (2003) | Cambridge University Press
EDITORS: Hugh McLeod, University of Birmingham and Werner Ustorf, University of Birmingham -- 1. Introduction, Hugh McLeod *--* 2. The secularisation decade: what the 1960s have done to the study of religious history, Callum G. Brown *--* 3. Christendom in decline: the Swedish case, Eva M. Hamberg *--* 4. New Christianity: indifference and diffused spirituality, Yves Lambert *--* 5. Established churches and the growth of religious pluralism: a case study of Christianisation and secularisation in England since 1700, David Hempton *--* 6. Catholicism in Ireland, Sheridan Gilley *--* 7. Long-term religious developments in the Netherlands, c. 1750–2000, Peter Van Rooden *--* 8. The potency of 'Christendom': The example of the 'Darmstädter Wort' (1947), Martin Greschat. *--* 9. The dechristianisation of death in modern France, Thomas Kselman *--* 10. The impact of technology on Catholicism in France (1850–1950), Michel Lagrée *--* 11. Semantic structures of religious change in modern Germany, Lucian Hölscher *--* 12. Master-narratives of long-term religious change, Jeffery Cox *--* 13. A missiological postscript Werner Ustorf.
books  kindle-available  religious_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  British_history  Christianity  Christendom  religious_culture  religious_belief  religion-established  Europe  Europe-19thC  Enlightenment  secularization  Catholics-English  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  pluralism  Germany  France  anticlerical  spirituality 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Garry Wills - Augustine's "Confessions" - The “great sinner” myth « The Immanent Frame - March 21 2011
Excerpted from Augustine’s Confessions: A Biography, published by Princeton University Press © 2011. Posted by permission. Come to the launch of Princeton University Press’s “Lives of Great Religious Books” series on Thursday, March 24, in New York City, hosted by the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU and the SSRC Program on Religion and the Public Sphere.—ed. -- popular version of Augustine as a sex hound, and that he had an obsession with chastity that had pernicious effects on readers through the centuries doesn't match a review of his writings on sin, etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder "Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  Augustine  original_sin  depravity  Biblical_exegesis  theology  Catholic-doctrine  Christianity  sexuality  chastity  celibacy  sex-religious_attitudes  guilt  spirituality  prayers  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - The last crusade - Eurozine - Nov 2011
Original in The New Humanist June 2011 -- The claim that Christianity provides the bedrock of Western culture might serve the interests of extremists, but it is a betrayal of a far more complex history. In the warped mind of Anders Breivik, his murderous rampages in Oslo and Utoya earlier this year were the first shots in a war in defence of Christian Europe. Not a religious war but a cultural one, to defend what Breivik called Europe's "cultural, social, identity and moral platform". Few but the most psychopathic can have any sympathy for Breivik's homicidal frenzy. Yet the idea that Christianity provides the foundations of Western civilisation, and of its political ideals and ethical values, and that Christian Europe is under threat, from Islam on the one side and "cultural Marxists" on the other, finds a widespread hearing. The erosion of Christianity, in this narrative, will lead inevitably to the erosion of Western civilisation and to the end of modern, liberal democracy. -- useful roundup of the pundits and publishers churning out these claims -- downloaded pdf to Note
Europe  cultural_history  identity_politics  collective_memory  cultural_authority  grand_narrative  culture_wars  Christianity  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Christendom  bad_history  narrative-contested  morality-Christian  morality-divine_command  relativism  modernity  anti-secularization  post-secular  rights-legal  rights-political  human_rights  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  right-wing  Judeo-Christian  secular_humanism  anti-humanism  religious_history  religious_culture  Islamic_civilization  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Stoicism  New_Testament  Augustine  original_sin  memory-cultural  memory-group  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - The Witness of Literature: A Genealogical Sketch | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Intro is afternoon spent at Christian writing conference with his friend the author Frederick Buechner, being constantly interrupted by readers -- almost all of them told the same story: Your writing has meant everything to my Christian faith. I don’t think I could be a Christian without your books.!Throughout that afternoon—rising to greet strangers, then sitting down and striving to remain inconspicuous as they poured out their hearts—I couldn’t help reflecting on the sheer oddity of the situation. These were people, by and large, who knew the Bible, who attended church, who had the benefits of Christian community. Yet they testified, almost to a person, that Christian belief would have been impossible for them without the mediation of the stories told by Frederick Buechner. I know literary history fairly well, especially where it intersects with Christian thought and practice, and it seemed to me that such radical dependence on literary experience would have been virtually impossible even a century earlier. But I also knew that Buechner’s role was anything but unique, that other readers would offer the same testimony to the fiction of Walker Percy or Flannery O’Connor or C.S. Lewis. How did such a state of affairs come about? How did literary writers come to be seen by many as the best custodians and advocates of Christian faith? It is a question with a curious and convoluted genealogy, one worth teasing out. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_lit  reading  fiction  spirituality  Christianity  theology  literary_history  English_lit  faith  religious_experience  identity  subjectivity  self-examination  self-development  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Karl Giberson (part 2 of 2) creating Adam, again and again - Peter Enns - June 2015
Today’s post is the second of two by Karl Giberson and is adapted from his newly published Saving the Original Sinner: How Christians Have Used the Bible’s… -- not clear whether they take up the first shock to the historical Adam centuries before Darwinism - discovery of the New World, and then moves toward scientific racism that debated whether humans were single or multiple species - and during same period, geology pushing back age of the earth far beyond an historically plausible frame for the literalist reading of Genesis
Instapaper  books  religious_history  Christianity  theology  change-intellectual  change-religious  creation  Adam  original_sin  theodicy  Bible-as-history  Early_Christian  Augustine  evolution  evolutionary_biology  cosmology  death  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_authority  science-and-religion  Darwinism  Fall  Genesis  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Enns - Jesus’s crucifixion: not exactly a selling point in the ancient world - June 2015
If you’re living in the Mediterranean world of the 1st century and you want to promote your religion, a “crucified god” is not your headline. Yet that is…
Instapaper  Early_Christian  Christianity  theology  religious_culture  religious_belief  gods-antiquity  Roman_Empire  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Patrick Wallace Hughes - Antidotes to Deism: A reception history of Thomas Paine's "The Age of Reason", 1794--1809 (2013 dissertation) | ProQuest Gradworks
Hughes, Patrick Wallace, Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, 2013, 362 pages; 3573259 - Adviser: Paula M. Kane -- In the Anglo-American world of the late 1790s, Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason was not well received, and his volumes of Deistic theology were characterized as extremely dangerous. Over 70 replies to The Age of Reason appeared in Britain and the US. It was widely criticized in the periodical literature, and it garnered Paine the reputation as a champion of irreligion. This dissertation is a study of the rhetoric of refutation, and I focus on the replies to The Age of Reason that were published during Paine's lifetime (d. 1809). To effectively refute The Age of Reason, Paine's respondents had to contend not only with his Deistic arguments, but also with his international reputation, his style of writing, and his intended audience. I argue that much of the driving force behind the controversy over The Age of Reason stems from the concern that it was geared towards the “uneducated masses” or the “lower orders.” (..) For Paine's critics, when the masses abandon their Christianity for Deism, bloody anarchy is the inevitable result, as proven by the horrors of the French Revolution. (..) Drawing on Habermas's theories of the bourgeois public sphere, I focus on how respondents to The Age of Reason reveal not only their concerns and anxieties over the book, but also what their assumptions about authorial legitimacy and expectations about qualified reading audiences say about late 18thC print culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  Paine  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  Deism  natural_religion  Christianity  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  publishing  pamphlets  journalism  lower_orders  public_opinion  public_sphere  print_culture  hierarchy  mass_culture  anarchy  readership  social_order  public_disorder  Radical_Enlightenment  masses-fear_of  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Pluralism and consensus in the modern Western world vs Brad Gregory's "The Unintended Reformation" attack on "hyperpluralism" « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2013
Gregory's "hyperpluralism" is MacIntyre-eque - there's no longer a shared notion of the summum bonnum. This anti-modernity can't tell the difference between liberal pluralism and the bogeyman of relativism. Peterson's response is one of the better since it accepts the basic frame of the need for some shared values -- "the structuring principles [for political and social life] of modern Western societies are not arbitrary assertions but rather principles that are connected with one another, interwoven with historical developments and representative of human life and ideals." He shows 8 points of "soft consensus" and ..."While it would be possible to claim that these points are not... what Gregory calls the “Life Questions,” [they] rest upon basic values that have correlations with views of the person and conceptions of the good." -- "The entire Western world has agreed (1) to live with a modern democratic political order, (2) to enforce concepts of unalienable human rights, (3) to uphold the rule of law, and (4) to secure the separation of powers. (...) the high view of the individual, and thus the high view of that individual’s opinion, is presumed [...and is also a] 5th point. (...) There are many other values which follow from the high view of the individual (...) they presume the value of freedom.. [which is both...] a presupposition of 3 and 4 and a 6th point. (...) The law is a concrete representation of the norms and regulations that are held to be not only equitable, just, and good, but also reasonable. The importance of reason and rational justification therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the rule of law, but also as [a] 7th point. (...) [The] idea of the separation of powers (...) [presumes] cooperation in the formal execution of power, administration, and management. A high regard for cooperation therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the separation of powers, but also as an 8th point. The most effective cooperation [depends] upon general agreements regarding shared goals and a basic goodwill between the cooperating parties."
21stC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  declinism  Thomism-21stC  modernity  intellectual_history  Reformation  common_good  Christendom  Christianity  theocracy  politics-and-religion  liberalism  rule_of_law  separation-of-powers  civil_liberties  human_rights  liberty  liberty-negative  liberalism-public_reason  liberty-positive  welfare_state  MacIntyre  Counter-Reformation  pluralism  relativism  good  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Recommended Reading Lists | A Common Word Between Us and You
More often than not, one’s understanding of a religion comes from sources which are either prejudiced or which do not have an authentic understanding of the religion. To really understand a religion, one must be able to view it as its adherents do. One should be able to enter the particular world-view of the religion and see through its eyes. This will enable us to understand the particular values, attitudes and behaviors that the particular religion recommends for its followers. It is in this light that a number of prominent Muslim and Christian scholars have kindly compiled recommended reading lists. Some of the reading lists have been compiled according to levels, others according to categories, while others remain as one list. It is hoped these lists will serve as a guide, lighting the way to a better understanding of each others Tradition. **--** Muslim Scholars -- Prof. Seyyed Hossein Nasr. -- Sheikh Ali Goma’a. -- Prof. Timothy Winter -- Dr. Joseph Lumbard. **--** Christian Scholars -- Dr. Mirolslav Volf -- Reverend William Sachs -- Dr Nicholas Adams -- Roland Schatz -- downloaded pdfs to Note
comparative_religion  religious_history  religious_culture  theology  Christianity  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islam-Greek_philosophy  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, The History of Freedom and Other Essays, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907). - Online Library of Liberty
Acton never completed his projected History of Liberty. We do have however several collections of his writings such as this one which contains 2 chapters from this planned history – on liberty in antiquity and Christianity – and many book reviews where one can piece together Acton’s approach to the writing of such a history. This volume consists of articles reprinted from the following journals: The Quarterly Review, The English Historical Review, The Nineteenth Century, The Rambler, The Home and Foreign Review, The North British Review, The Bridgnorth Journal. *--* CHRONICLE. *-* INTRODUCTION. *-* I: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN ANTIQUITY. *-* II: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN CHRISTIANITY. *-* III: SIR ERSKINE MAY’S DEMOCRACY IN EUROPE. *-* IV: THE MASSACRE OF ST. BARTHOLOMEW. *-* V: THE PROTESTANT THEORY OF PERSECUTION *-* VI: POLITICAL THOUGHTS ON THE CHURCH. *-* VII: INTRODUCTION TO L. A. BURD’S EDITION OF IL PRINCIPE BY MACHIAVELLI. *-* VIII: MR. GOLDWIN SMITH’S IRISH HISTORY. *-* IX: NATIONALITY. *-* X: DÖLLINGER ON THE TEMPORAL POWER. *-* XI: DÖLLINGER’S HISTORICAL WORK. *-* XII: CARDINAL WISEMAN AND THE HOME AND FOREIGN REVIEW. *'* XIII: CONFLICTS WITH ROME. *-* XIV: THE VATICAN COUNCIL. *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES. By Henry Charles Lea. *-* XVI: THE AMERICAN COMMONWEALTH. By James Bryce. *-* XVII: HISTORICAL PHILOSOPHY IN FRANCE AND FRENCH BELGIUM AND SWITZERLAND. By Robert Flint. -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  liberty  Christianity  Christendom  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  democracy  Reformation  persecution  Counter-Reformation  Inquisition  Wars_of_Religion  Bartholomew_Day_massacre  Huguenots  Protestants  national_ID  nationalism  Machiavelli  historiography-19thC  US_constitution  US_government  US_politics 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - Unknowable Truths and Omniscience: A Reply to Kvanvig | JSTOR: Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 61, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 553-566
The various attribute debates in analytical_philosophy tend to be piecemeal. They also often smuggle in positions on heavily debated issues such as free_will. Helpful pulling apart various threads of theism debates on attributes, determinism and theodicy -- didn't download
article  jstor  theology  Christianity  God-attributes  free_will  theodicy  cosmology  determinism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - The Passibility of God | JSTOR: Religious Studies, Vol. 25, No. 2 (Jun., 1989), pp. 217-224
Responding to a recent book defending the thesis of the impassibility of God (eternally unchanging etc - reflecting the Platonic prejudice against change) he argues that the God of Christian theism must suffer, for theological and moral reasons. -- didn't download
article  jstor  theology  Christianity  Christology  soteriology  God-attributes  change-metaphysics  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Charles Taliaferro - Richard Swinburne, Providence and the Problem of Evil | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 197 (Oct., 1999), pp. 562-564
Swinburne, unlike Plantinga etc, admits there's enough of what we would term evil to require a theodicy from any Christian theologian or philosophers of religion more generally -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  find  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  theodicy  God-existence  God-attributes  creative_destruction  creation  agnosticism  theism  Christianity  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Fred Clark - Conversion to what? Conversion from what? The unanswered questions of ‘Great Commission Baptists’ | Slacktavist June 2014
-- if you’re not familiar with evangelicalese, you may not immediately recognize “Great Commission” [distinct from Great Commandment] has little to do with the actual content of Jesus’ actual words in Matthew. Jesus charges his disciples to do four things: Go, make disciples, baptize, teach. Funny thing, though, is that this isn’t what white evangelicals usually mean ... What “Great Commission” almost always means, instead, is convert — evangelize, proselytize, saved the unsaved, rescue sinners from Hell. Here is Dockery discussing the Great Commission imperative for the SBC: "Many of us across SBC life have not recognized well the rapidly changing cultural context in which we now find ourselves, perhaps best typified by the Pew study on 'the rise of the Nones.' Secondly, I think, we are all probably unaware of the incipient universalism that dominates the thoughts of many in our congregations. The combination of these two factors means that the reality of the lostness of those all around us has somehow disappeared from our thinking and thus the urgency of Great Commission efforts has taken a backseat." -- Dockery makes this clear when he warns against an “incipient universalism” that undermines the “urgency” of conversionism. Such urgency, “courage and faithfulness” can only exist, he argues, if we truly appreciate “the reality of the lostness of those all around us.” In a word, Hell. This is what he means by “the gospel” — being saved from Hell. This is what people must be converted from and what people must be converted to: to not going to Hell. Dockery cannot imagine any reason that a universalist would find the Great Commission compelling. If no one is really in peril of being eternally “lost” to everlasting torture in Hell, then why should we bother following these final instructions from Jesus?
21stC  religious_culture  US_society  Evangelical  hell  salvation  conservatism  religion-fundamentalism  Christianity 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Dale Van Kley, review essay, Where the Rot Started? - Brad S. Gregory, The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society - | Books and Culture
Excellent essay -- Gregory places almost all blame on the Protestants for the disunity of Christendom, marginalization of religious institutions and thought, and horrors of modern age, including moral relativism and global warming. Like Gillespie, puzzling stress on Dun Scotus ("univocal being") and William of Ockham (nominalism) for (enabling? producing?) a cosmos in which scientific inquiry could dispense with God. Gregory omits a number of factors on the Catholic side (beyond the Lutheran Reformation itself that the Papacy might have handled via reforms instead of confrontation and denial of fallibility). Van Kley's list of factors (especially French) that Gregory omits -- (1) splits in Catholicism throughout middle ages, e.g. frequent appearance of latent heresies if reformers couldn't get a new order founded; (2) Papal alliance with secular rulers to stamp out conciliar movement and reinforce papal infallibility - made compromise with Luther etc impossible and still inhibits any meaningful ecumenism; (3) Counter-Reformation shift from assessing theological grounds of specific doctrines to asserting absolute unchallengable authority based on external marks (as defined by Catholics) of the true church - a style of argument that wasn't going to survive sola scriptura, new science, Enlightenment etc; (4) Papal overreaction that stamped out Gallican and liberal Catholicism, which in turn stimulated anticlericalism and anti-regime sentiments from both left and right, thereby reducing the flexibility of the Ancien Regime to address social and economic problems or reform institutions; (5) a counter-revolutionary anti-intellectual unholy alliance between Papacy and Jansénistes that produced the uncompromising radicalism of laïcité. And that's not all Van Kley covers.
books  reviews  kindle-available  historiography  religious_history  church_history  intellectual_history  theology  ecclesiology  Christianity  Reformation  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Catholics  Papacy  Protestants  modernity  relativism  science-and-religion  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Jansenists  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  counter-revolution  politics-and-religion  secularization  secularism  heterodoxy  heresy  Gallican  Absolutism  liberalism  self  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  natural_law  nominalism  Duns_Scotus  medieval_philosophy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Milliner, review essay - Lenten Reading - Ephraim Radner, A Brutal Unity: The Spiritual Politics of the Christian Church | Books and Culture 2013
Radner, a Protestant, [argues] that something in our modern world has gone wrong. However, he places the blame less on an elusive pattern of secularization (Taylor) or on Protestant fragmentation (Gregory) than on the much wider phenomenon of Christian disunity... Christian disunity is what gave birth to—or rather, miscarried—the liberal democratic state. These are massive claims, and Radner marshals the erudition... A Brutal Unity is ..an "eristology," which Radner defines as "the study of hostility in its disordering forms and forces." -- Radner [opens with a] polemic against Wm Cavanaugh's The Myth of Religious Violence, [which] unjustifiably absolves Christians from their share in the violence of the liberal state. ...the nations as we know them arose from the inability of Christians to refrain from mutual murder. Radner marches his readers deep into the Rwandan genocide and the Holocaust.... "[Nazi death squads] were Protestants and Catholics both." To suggest otherwise—whether to exonerate Pope Pius XII or to overemphasize the role of Bonhoeffer—is to succumb to "hallucinogenic fantasy." "The dead bodies, as it were, are already gathered by the time churches admit to complicity in their murder." Radner explores Catholic and Protestant .. attempts to deny the reality of Christian disunity by carving out an inviolable space of "the Church as such"... The saving of the church from her own sins by concocting an invisible or elusive sanctity is, admittedly, a traditional theological move, but... were this approach employed Christologically, it would be plainly Gnostic. - Radner [makes] the villain of his story Ephiphanius of Salamis (d. 403), who listed heresies and distanced the church from her enemies, especially the Jews. ?..inaugurated the "Epiphanian paradigm" and its program of exclusionary violence...the church's "brutal unity." Providentialism and proceduralism are the [church's] blinders... The former is the notion that God was somehow at work in church councils, however violent; the latter is the idea that somehow bureaucratic decisions and parliamentary process betray the hand of God. We should, Radner believes, trust neither.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  church_history  Christianity  theology  intellectual_history  Early_Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Christendom  Church_Fathers  church_councils  Reformation  Papacy  violence  genocide  Holocaust  Protestants  Catholics  modernity  religious_wars  nation-state  liberalism  ecclesiology  Augustine  Providence  heterodoxy  Judaism  gnostic  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Philip Jenkins: Jesus Wars: How Four Patriarchs, Three Queens, and Two Emperors Decided What Christians Would Believe for the Next 1,500 Years | Amazon.com: Kindle Store
Book List starred review - The fifth-century Christian church faced a doctrinal issue, now largely forgotten, that precipitated intramural Christian savagery unparalleled until the 11-centuries-later Thirty Years’ War. The bone of contention was the nature of Jesus Christ. That he wasn’t a mere man was indisputable. But was he a human-divine cross-breed, so to speak, or was he purely divine and his human body an illusion? Neither was accepted, but the conclusion of the council of Chalcedon in 451 that he was fully divine and fully human—that is, said dissidents, of two natures—incensed those who held he was of one nature, entirely divine. The fight broke out well before Chalcedon, entailing the death-from-assault of the patriarch of Constantinople during the 449 council of Ephesus, thereafter disowned as the “Gangster Synod.” Chalcedon eventually triumphed, but not until well after 250 years of intermittent violence in which monks behaved like the Waffen SS. Jenkins condenses centuries of church and imperial strife with admirable clarity despite the continuous blizzard of historical names and ecclesiastical terms the narrative entails. He suggests that this era, not the later Dark and Middle Ages, is the most violent (un-Christian?) in Christian history and that it may have lessons for the present and future conflict between Christians and Muslims over the nature of God. --Ray Olson
books  kindle-available  religious_history  church_history  Christianity  5thC  late_antiquity  Christology  theology  ecclesiology  Church_Fathers  church_councils  violence  religious_wars  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop - CHRISTIANITY AND LIBERALISM | Pandaemonium Jan 2014
Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop -- ‘The characteristic of historical writing in recent centuries’, Siedentop observes, ‘is an inclination to minimize the moral and intellectual distance between the modern and the ancient world, while at the same time maximizing the moral and intellectual distance between modern Europe and the middle ages.’ I am not sure that it makes much sense to talk about a ‘characteristic of historical writing’ that stretches over ‘centuries’. This is particularly so given that one the characteristics of recent historiography has been the opposite: the tendency to blur the distinction between the Middle Ages and modernity. Inventing the Individual is very much part of this revisionist trend. The trouble is, in revising the previous approach Siedentop now makes the ancient world too alien and modernity not distinctive enough. -- at least it's a counter to the mournful Thomist condemnation of liberal individualism by MacIntyre, Taylor et al.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  political_culture  political_philosophy  Christianity  liberalism  equality  free_will  original_sin  hierarchy  authority  individualism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Torstein Theodor Tollefsen - Activity and Participation in Late Antique and Early Christian Thought (2012) - Oxford University Press
Focuses on the ancient background of an important topic in modern Orthodox spirituality, the concept of divine energies and how created beings may participate in these -- Activity and Participation in Late Antique and Early Christian Thought is an investigation into two basic concepts of ancient pagan and Christian thought. The study examines how activity in Christian thought is connected with the topic of participation: for the lower levels of being to participate in the higher means to receive the divine activity into their own ontological constitution. Torstein Theodor Tollefsen sets a detailed discussion of the work of church fathers Gregory of Nyssa, Dionysius the Areopagite, Maximus the Confessor, and Gregory Palamas in the context of earlier trends in Aristotelian and Neoplatonist philosophy. His concern is to highlight how the Church Fathers thought energeia (i.e. activity or energy) is manifested as divine activity in the eternal constitution of the Trinity, the creation of the cosmos, the Incarnation of Christ, and in salvation understood as deification.
books  theology  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Aristotelian  Trinity  creation  cosmology  Christology  salvation  Christianity  Orthodox_Christianity 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel H. Williams - Ambrose of Milan and the End of the Arian-Nicene Conflicts (1995) - Oxford University Press
This is a new and provocative study re-evaluating the history of the struggle between orthodoxy and heresy in the early church. Dr Williams argues that the traditional picture of Nicene ascendancy in the western church from 350 - 381 is substantially misleading, and in particular that the conventional portrait of Ambrose of Milan as one who rapidly and easily overpowered his "Arian" opponents is a fictional product derived from idealized accounts of the fifth century. Sources illustrating the struggle between the orthodox pro-Nicenes and "Arians" or Homoians, in the fourth century reveal that Latin "Arianism" was not the lifeless and theologically alien system that historians of the last century would have us believe. Dr Williams shows that the majority of churches in the West had little practical use for the Nicene creed until the end of the 350s - over twenty five years after it was first issued under Constantine - and that the ultimate triumph of the Nicene faith was not as inevitable as it has been assumed. Ambrose himself was seriously harrassed by sustained attacks from "Arians" in Milan for the first decade of his episcopate, and his early career demonstrates the severity of the religious conflict which embroiled the western churches,especially in North Italy. Only after an intense and uncertain decade did Ambrose finally prevail in Milan once the Nicene form of faith was embraced by the Roman empire through imperial legislation and "Arianism" was outlawed as heresy. This is an innovative and challenging book full of illumination new insights on the social, political, and theological entanglements ofthe early church.
books  theology  Early_Christian  4thC  5thC  Italy  heterodoxy  Christianity  creeds  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Hans Blumenberg: Former Reflections Enduring Doubt - Waggish (2009)
Very interesting discussion of Augustine, the medieval attempt to overcome Gnosticism which fails (nominalism and Luther put burden of evil on God) - modernity avoids theodicy dilemma by placing emphasis on man striving to overcome in this world rather than withdraw and place hope in salvation. In effect, "presume not God to scan, the proper study of mankind is man" -- The Legitimacy of the Modern Age covers a lot of ground, but one of the central theses, and the one that bears little resemblance to most prior theories of history, is this one: "The modern age is the second overcoming of Gnosticism. A presupposition of this thesis is that the first overcoming of Gnosticism, at the beginning of the Middle Ages, was unsuccessful. A further implication is that the medieval period, as a meaningful structure spanning centuries, had its beginning in the conflict with late-antique and early-Christian Gnosticism and that the unity of its systematic intention can be understood as deriving from the task of subduing its Gnostic opponent."
Christianity  Early_Christian  gnostic  Augustine  medieval_philosophy  Aquinas  nominalism  theology  theodicy  Pope  Essay_on_Man  modernity  progress  conservatism  Blumenberg  Schmitt  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall review - Erich Auerbach, Time, History and Literature » 3:AM Magazine
Erich Auerbach, Time, History, and Literature, Princeton University Press 2013 - blurb -- "Time, History, and Literature presents a wide selection of Auerbach’s essays, many of which are little known outside the German-speaking world. Of the 20 essays culled for this volume from the full length of his career, 12 have never appeared in English before, and one is being published for the first time. Foregrounded in this major new collection are Auerbach’s complex relationship to the Judaeo-Christian tradition, his philosophy of time and history, and his theory of human ethics and responsible action. Auerbach effectively charts out the difficult discovery, in the wake of Christianity, of the sensuous, the earthly, and the human and social worlds. A number of the essays reflect Auerbach’s responses to an increasingly hostile National Socialist environment. These writings offer a challenging model of intellectual engagement, one that remains as compelling today as it was in Auerbach’s own time.” -- James I. Porter is professor of classics and comparative literature at the University of California, Irvine. His books include Nietzsche and the Philology of the Future and The Origins of Aesthetic Thought in Ancient Greece. Jane O. Newman is professor of comparative literature at the University of California, Irvine. Her books include The Intervention of Philology and Benjamin’s Library.’ They’ve put together a terrific book.
books  reviews  amazon.com  intellectual_history  philology  historicism  historiography  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  Vico  Hegel  20thC  Germany  entre_deux_guerres  bildung  Judaism  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  Christianity  Early_Christian  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Epicureanism in Renaissance Moral and Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 53, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1992), pp. 573-583
Short but looks helpful - compares Lorenzo Valla attack on Aristotelian virtue ethics and Scholastics Christian Aristotelian hybrid with far more extensive engagement by Gassendi with Epicureanism. But both contributed to Christianity incorporating some notions of pleasure into sin and salvation. -- not much bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  theology  15thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Italy  France  Gassendi  Epicurean  virtue_ethics  Aristotelian  sin  salvation  pleasure  hedonistic  Christianity  materialism  corpuscular  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Hattem - The “War on Christmas” in Early America « The Junto Dec 2013
And so the first English dissenters who settled New England in the early seventeenth century were, like their brethren back home, decidedly anti-Christmas. Puritans were keenly aware of the holiday’s pagan origins, as Increase Mather wrote in A Testimony against Several Prophane and Superstitious Customs, Now Practiced by Some in New England: [3] (fascinating quote from Increase Mather). .... Even after the Revolution, the Congress was known to meet on Christmas Day, if they were in session. Throughout the nineteenth century, as well, there are numerous reports from all over the United States attesting to the lack Christmas observance, particularly by various Protestant and German Pietist sects.
religious_history  religious_culture  legal_history  British_history  British_politics  American_colonies  US_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  21stC  Puritans  Pietist  Interregnum  Reformation  Christianity  right-wing  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - BEYOND THE SACRED | Pandaemonium January 2012
Blasphemy, and the sacred, in other words, are not simply about theology and religion, but also about politics and power. We can see the way that blasphemy and the sacred have helped speak to social and political power if we look at the history of blasphemy in Britain.
British_history  17thC  20thC  legal_history  religious_history  Christianity  Church_of_England  secularism  cosmopolitanism  multiculturalism  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Brenna Moore - Beyond the Catholic-Protestant divide - review of Brad Gregory’s The Unintended Reformation « The Immanent Frame - Nov 2013
Gregory seems to think if Europe had avoided theological split all would have been well,maybe even avoid modernity and its evils - ignores Catholic relations with other religions and Christianity entanglement with colonialism and economic imperialism -- Also ignores important 20thC European Catholic rethinking of relations with others, support for eg human rights etc that Gregory disparages, ignoring Catholic links -- quote: With this twentieth-century European Catholic scholarly tradition as a backdrop, it appears all the more remarkable that Gregory did not follow its lead in thinking through the role of Christianity’s relationship to non-Christian religions in the making of modernity. Modern civilization, including secularization and consumerism, is incomprehensible when defined as a debate between Protestants and Catholics alone. Christians’ encounters with religious others shaped their own self-understanding in the early modern period and beyond, and the interactions between religiously diverse people must be central to any genealogy of our present. These encounters—sometimes violent, sometimes deeply humane—between Catholics and Jews, between missionaries and those they met on the frontier, between the orientalists and their archives, have to be at the center (or at least included somewhere!) of any analysis of the Christian roots of contemporary global capitalism and consumerism. Maritain and his cohort faced this head-on. José Casanova and Saba Mahmood have leveled similar critiques at Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age. In short, it is impossible to understand the historical trajectory of Christianity without understanding its contact with non-Christian others. Why does Gregory, like Taylor, bracket all of this? Had he not, what difference might it have made for the conclusions of The Unintended Reformation?

John W. O’Malley’s work has shown that few areas of sixteenth-century Catholicism were more significant than the intense upheavals caused by the missionary activity that began with the Portuguese and Spanish conquests and explorations and lasted through the seventeenth century. Catholics, he argues, were not always as fixated on Protestant reforms as we tend to assume (hence his preference for the label “early modern Catholicism” rather than “the Counter-Reformation”).
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  intellectual_history  modernity  Christianity  Catholics  Reformation  16thC  17thC  20thC  comparative_religion  Judaism  colonialism  Spanish_Empire  Netherlands  tolerance  Counter-Reformation  Islam  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter E. Gordon - The Unintended Reformation (review series): Has modernity failed? « The Immanent Frame Sept 2013
[Brad Gregory's] His real concern, on my reading, is that modernity cannot survive if it refuses the meta-ethical ideal that once served as the organizing principle for medieval Christianity. But what philosophical or historical arguments could convince us that this ideal was special? And why should we not continue to believe that our own modern ideals only need to be realized with greater fidelity? Here we confront a certain asymmetry in the way Gregory writes about the various “failures” of distinctive ethical schemes: He seems to think that the modern alternatives have all failed because of their intrinsic defects, whereas the Christian ideal failed only because we failed to measure up to its demands. In the one case the failure points to a basic flaw in the metaphysical scheme itself; in the other case the failure was merely one of execution.
books  kindle-available  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  Medieval  Christianity  Catholics  Reformation  modernity  secularism  liberalism  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
David Nirenberg's Anti-Judaism, Reviewed: Anthony Grafton - Imaginary Jews: The strange history of antisemitism in Western culture | New Republic Oct 2013
For David Nirenberg—whose Anti-Judaism is one of the saddest stories, and one of the most learned, I have ever read—Jewel, and Jerome and Augustine are typical figures from an enormous tapestry. From antiquity to more recent times, an endless series of writers and thinkers have crafted versions and visions of Jews and Judaism that are as ugly and frightening as they are effective.
books  reviews  religious_history  religious_culture  Early_Christian  medieval_history  16thC  17thC  Judaism  Christianity  Old_Testament  Augustine  theology  chosen_people  hermeneutics  New_Testament  Biblical_criticism  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
The state of religion in China [series] « The Immanent Frame
Series of posts - starts October 2013

October 1st, 2013
Opiate of the masses with Chinese characteristics
posted by Thomas DuBois

October 4th, 2013
The Communist Party and the future of religion in China
posted by André Laliberté

October 8th, 2013
The “good” and the “bad” Muslims of China
posted by Yuting Wang

October 10th, 2013
Secular belief, religious belonging
posted by Richard Madsen
China  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Islam  Buddhism  Confuscianism  Christianity  securitization  secularism  modernization  Communist_Party  sociology_of_religion  community  identity  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader

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