dunnettreader + china   83

Michael NYLAN - La naissance du classicisme en Chine - presentation for Conférence invitée by 'anne Cheng for 2008-08 year
Professeur, université de Californie, Berkeley (États-Unis) -- Cours et travaux du Collège de France. Annuaire 109e année, Collège de France, Paris, mars 2010, p. 1051-1055. ISBN 978-
e-cite - Michael NYLAN, « La naissance du classicisme en Chine », L’annuaire du Collège de France [En ligne], 109 | 2010, mis en ligne le , consulté le 02 septembre 2016. URL : http://annuaire-cdf.revues.org/405
lecture  ancient_history  China  ancient_China  Chinese_lit  Chinese_classicism  Chinese_thought  Confuciusism  downloaded 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Philip Ball, The Water Kingdom: A Secret History of China – review - The Guardian - August 2016
Tourists watch floodwaters gushing out of the Xiaolangdi dam during a sand-washing operation of the Yellow river in Jiyuan, China, 2010.Photograph: Miao… Useless review the only thing mentioned is "thorough" - since the reviewer was only interested in China's history of millenia dominated by water politics, one assumes that if Ball had made a hash of it, the faults would have been mentioned - and since Ball is an excellent writer of non-fiction, the assumption is the book must be pretty good
Instapaper  books  kindle-available  Chinese_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Confucianism  Daoism  Asian_philosophy  China-governance  political_culture  political_economy  ancient_history  Chinese_politics  China  water  infrastructure  agriculture  economic_sociology  economic_history  social_order  hierarchy  institutions  institutional_capacity  transport  rivers  environment  pollution  industrialization  from instapaper
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Menzie Chin - Thinking about The Great Leap Forward - April 2016
When Technocrats Are Pushed Aside Nearly 56 years ago, with the beginning of the second Five-Year Plan, Chairman Mao called for a “Great Leap Forward”. The…
Instapaper  China  Chinese_history  China-governance  China-economy  Cultural_Revolution  20thC  post-WWII  industrialization  agriculture  from instapaper
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Willem Thorbecke - “Exports, Exchange Rates, and the Return on China’s Investments” - Econbrowser - May 2016
Today, we’re fortunate to have Willem Thorbecke , Senior Fellow at Japan’s Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI) as a guest contributor. The…
Instapaper  China  China-economy  industrialization  global_imbalance  economic_growth  supply_chains  exports  trade-policy  trade  global_economy  FX  from instapaper
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Evan Osnos - The Cost of the Cultural Revolution - re J Gewirtz book on Western help in recovery - The New Yorker - May 2016
This fall, Harvard University Press will publish a new history, “Unlikely Partners: Chinese Reformers, Western Economists, and the Making of Global China,” by Julian Gewirtz, a doctoral student at Oxford. The book tells the little-known story of how Chinese intellectuals and leaders, facing a ruined economy at the end of the Cultural Revolution, sought the help of foreign economists to rebuild. Between 1976 and 1993, in a series of exchanges, conferences, and collaborations, Western intellectuals sought not to change China but to help it change itself, and they made indispensible contributions to China’s rise as a global economic power. “China’s rulers were in charge of this process—they sought out Western ideas and did not copy them indiscriminately. But they were open to Western influence and were profoundly influenced,” Gewirtz told me. “This history should not be forgotten. And, at a moment when China’s economy and society may be teetering, a return to this openness and partnership with the West—rather than the turn toward intellectual isolation and international distrustfulness that seems to be under way—is the best means of avoiding disaster.”
books  Chinese_history  China-economy  China  China-international_relations  China-governance  20thC 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Harl - The Barbarian Empires of the Steppes | The Great Courses
36 lectures - list price $320
- the video version is a must in order to follow the names of groups, locations and movements
A few bothered by mispronunciation and a lot of ahs - but most reviewers very enthusiastic - and replaying lectures to get all the info. Counters a few complaints that it's too superficial, or that it pays too much attention to the sedentary civilizations that were affected - the last complaint seems to miss the very purpose of the course.
Byzantium  Eastern_Europe  military_history  Central_Asia  empires  government-forms  medieval_history  military_tactics  Egypt  Persia  ancient_Rome  nomadic_invasions  cultural_history  Ghengis_Khan  trade  video  Eurasia  Roman_Empire  government-revenues  Ottomans  Iraq  Chinese_history  Black_Sea  Islamic_civilization  Atilla_the_Hun  ancient_history  India  Iran  China  late_antiquity  Sufis  Mamluks  cultural_exchange  military_technology  Golden_Horde  Turcic_tribes  Han_China  MENA  religious_history  Mongols  Tamerlane  Caliphate  courses  Buddhism  cultural_transmission  trade-policy  empires-tributary  barbarians  steppes 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Sylvie Taussig - La pluralité des mondes au miroir de l'Europe et de la Chine : pluralisme politique et pluralisme religieux dans un monde globalisé (2014) - Cairn.info
Cet article porte sur les processus de sécularisation, et notamment sur l’avènement du pluralisme religieux et politique et sur le rapport entre monothéisme et pluralisme. Il redonne sa place à un moment souvent ignoré de cette histoire complexe : les échanges fructueux quoique aveugles, ressemblant souvent à un jeu de dupes à somme nulle, entre l’Europe – et particulièrement la France – et la Chine au xviie siècle. L’incompatibilité qui semble se découvrir, dans cette histoire en miroir, concerne le monothéisme et le pluralisme politique. Et, dans notre univers globalisé, il s’agit de gérer la multiplicité des cultures et des religions dans des entités nationales unitaires. - behind a 3-year rolling paywall -- she specializes in 17thC - may be of interest for the Querelle des rites
article  Jesuits  globalization  intellectual_history  pluralism  human_nature  religious_culture  religious_belief  monotheism  China  missionaries  17thC  religious_history  comparative_religion  multiculturalism  universalism  paywall 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Lu Ming - Myths and Realities of China’s Urbanization | Paulson Institute - August 2015
as a direct result of these deeply held beliefs, Beijing has relied on administrative controls, not market mechanisms, to direct China’s urbanization process (...) has yielded some major deficiencies in China’s overall urbanization policy. (..) Beijing has imposed tight hukou controls on the country’s biggest cities, thus restricting their ability to grow. Second, the Chinese government has relied excessively on administrative power to accelerate urbanization in China’s central and western regions, even though people are, in fact, moving largely to the country’s coastal areas. Third, Beijing has encouraged the development of small and medium sized cities, but these are usually scattered far away from regional economic centers. Lu’s memo proposes several adjustments aimed at mitigating the distorted economic effects of the policies that have flowed from these misunderstandings. Five specific areas of China’s current urbanization policy require changes, says Lu. These are: (1) China’s hukou system; (2) the way that China allocates construction land quotas; (3) China’s fiscal transfer payment system; (4) the use of economic growth and tax revenue targets in the evaluation and promotion system for officials and cadres; and (5) the use of planning tools in metropolitan areas and urban cores. Lu makes a number of policy recommendations in each of these five areas, arguing that only in this way can China effectively respond to the challenges that have bedeviled urbanization in other countries. -- didn't download
paper  China  China-economy  China-governance  urbanization  urban_development  safety_net  land_use_planning  local_government  fiscal_policy  incentives-distortions 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Barry Allen, "Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition" (Harvard University Press, 2015)
Barry Allen's new book carefully considers the problem of knowledge in a range of Chinese philosophical discourses, creating a stimulating cross-disciplinary dialogue that's as much of a pleasure to read as it will be to teach with. Taking on the work of Confucians, Daoists, military theorists, Chan Buddhists, Neo-Confucian philosophers, and others, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition (Harvard University Press, 2015) looks at the common threads and important differences in the ways that scholars have attempted to conceptualize and articulate what it is to be a knowing being in the world. Some of the major themes that recur throughout the work include the nature of non-action and emptiness, the relationship between knowledge and scholarship, the possibility of Chinese epistemologies and empiricisms, and the importance of artifice. Allen pays special attention to the ways that these scholars relate knowledge to a fluid conception of "things" that can be "completed" or "vanished into" by the knower, and to their understanding of things as parts of a collective economy of human and non-human relationships. The book does an excellent job of maintaining its focus on Chinese texts and contexts while making use of comparative cases from Anglophone and European-language philosophy that brings Chinese scholars into conversation with Nietzsche, Latour, Deleuze and Guattari, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, and beyond - 1 hour interview
books  interview  audio  intellectual_history  Chinese_philosophy  China  Chinese_history  Asian_philosophy  epistemology  Buddhism  Confucianism  empiricism  epistemology-social  ontology  human_nature  human-non-human_relations  military_theory  military_history  Neo-Confucian  Nietzsche  Deleuze  Aristotle  Machiavelli  Plato  Latour  consciousness  perception 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz - Residential real estate in China: the delicate balance of supply and demand — Money, Banking and Financial Markets - April 2015
Some observers believe that demand for housing in China is price-insensitive for cultural reasons. Among other things, housing is viewed as a “status good” for those wishing to get married. Another favorable factor is the preparedness of Chinese policymakers to intervene and support housing markets should they soften. Then there is the possibility that central bank policy will be adjusted in a manner designed to further support real estate lending. Yet, there remain grounds for skepticism. The role of big-city home ownership as a status good in Japan did not prevent the massive and destructive land and housing price boom and bust in the 1980s. And, government actions to support China’s housing prices will be fighting an uphill battle if private expectations of capital gains weaken. Not only that, but the day may come when China sees the need to implement a tax on property, if only to provide a better underpinning for municipal finances. This would almost surely drive prices down quickly. Finally, the government’s other objectives of liberalizing the financial system (as a step toward internationalizing the renminbi) and increasing housing supply to meet the needs of a migrating population may prove incompatible with supporting high house price-to-rent ratios. -- really fine update on what's been happening in urbanization, local governments, policies re financial sector liberalization, GNP and personal income growth (and slow down) etc -- copied to Pocket
China  China-economy  financial_system  housing  asset_prices  bubbles  urbanization  economic_growth  financial_regulation  financial_sector_development  financial_stability  banking  NBFI  shadow_banking  regulation-enforcement  tax_reform  taxes  local_government  infrastructure  wages  economic_culture  municipal_finance  Pocket 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Emilie Frenkiel - Interview with David A. Bell, Choosing Confucianism: Departing from the Liberal Framework | Sept 2012 - Books & ideas
Tags : liberalism | confucianisme | China -- Recounting his itinerary from research on Communitarianism to the adoption of Confucian values, political philosopher Daniel A. Bell advocates thinking of cities as representing different social values in the modern world. He also sees meritocracy, which is valued in China nowadays as a potential remedy to the flaws of democratic systems. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  liberalism  liberal_democracy  liberalism-republicanism_debates  communitarian  Confucianism  meritocracy  modernity  modernity-emergence  urbanism  pluralism  values  China  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Ma Yuge and Joel Sandhu - Making Sense of China and India’s Low-Carbon Pathways | Global Policy Journal 16th September 2014
China and India’s low-carbon development is crucial for global sustainability and domestic welfare. However, embedded political and economic obstacles have prevented a smooth and effective transition towards a low-carbon future in the two emerging countries. This article analyzes China and India’s energy efficiency policies as a lens into this question. We argue that the existing energy efficiency and broader low-carbon development pathways – India’s market-oriented approach and China’s target-driven paradigm – are not sufficient to address the challenges. Policymakers should reflect on and fix the shortcomings of the current pathways by paying close attention to the various forms of maneuvers of low-carbon policies in the given political and economic environments in China and India. -- part of Global Policy "Juxtaposition" program re comparative work on China and India -- didn't download paper
paper  IR  global_governance  environment  climate  energy  China  India  development  green_economy  local_government  central_government 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic: Can Black Death explain the Industrial Revolution? | globalinequality - Jan 11 2015
re presentation by a young scholar at Santa Fe suggesting that Why England (and Dutch) due to higher wages in Northern Europe post Black Death in contrast with South where non market repression or property arrangements were able to push adjustment costs inti agricultural workers without impact on wage rates. Milanovic compares with other theoretical approaches ie Pomerantz, Acemoglu & Robinson, Robert Allen etc. Link to 2007 paper by Pamuk Milanovic thinks may be 1st work to seriously look at differential impact of Black Death on northern & southern Europe as distinct from the common story if Western vs Central and Eastern Europe.
economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  Black_Death  North-Weingast  landowners  demography  economic_sociology  labor  agriculture  wages  productivity  colonialism  medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  institutional_economics  capital  capitalism  China  Japan  ancient_Rome  slavery  bibliography 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
James Hamilton - Demand factors in the collapse of oil prices | Econbrowser Jan 2015
update of his analysis from a month ago - still sees c. 40% of price declines across commodities from slowing hlobal economy with exception of US
global_economy  US_economy  Eurozone  China  oil_price  economic_growth  energy  consumer_demand  commodities 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Ron Harris - (pdf) The Institutional Dynamics of Early Modern Eurasian Trade: The Commenda and the Corporation
The focus of this article is on legal-economic institutions that organized early- modern Eurasian trade. It identifies two such institutions that had divergent dispersion patterns, the corporation and the commenda. The corporation ended up as a uniquely European institution that did not migrate until the era of European colonization. The commenda that originated in Arabia migrated all the way to Western Europe and to China. The article explains their divergent dispersion based on differences in their institutional and geographical environments and on dynamic factors. It claims that institutional analysis errs when it ignores migration of institutions. It provides building blocks for the modeling of institutional migration. -- via Dick Langlois at organizationsandmarkets.com presented at Nov 2014 conference put together by Business History program at Harvard Business School, on the History of Law and Business Enterprise -- downloaded to iPhone
paper  downloaded  economic_history  institutional_economics  legal_history  medieval_history  firms-structure  firms-theory  trade  colonialism  Europe-Early_Modern  China  India  MENA  Islamic_law  business_practices  risk_management  economic_culture  cultural_influence  trade-cultural_transmission  corporate_law  business_history  comparative_economics  Eurasia  business  organizations 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Finally Some Good News About Clean Energy Investment | Mother Jones Jan 2015
After 3 year investment decline - BNEF produces quarterly reports that track how much money governments and the private sector are pouring into wind, solar, biofuels and other green energy projects. In 2014, the United States enjoyed its biggest investments since 2012, but it was China that once again drove the numbers. China's clean energy spending shot up 32 percent to a record $89.5 billion, cementing its place as the world's top market for green investment
energy  investment  China  climate 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Krugmam blog - Recent History in One Chart (Branko Milanovic global inequality trends) | NYTimes.com Jan 2015
A number of people have been putting up candidates for chart of the year. For me, the big chart of 2014 wasn’t actually from 2014 — it was from earlier work (pdf) by Branko Milanovic, which I somehow didn’t see until a few months ago. It shows income growth since 1988 by percentiles of the world income distribution (as opposed to national distributions): {chart} What you see is the surge by the global elite (the top 0.1, 0.01, etc. would be doing even better than his top 1), plus the dramatic rise of many but not all people in emerging markets. In between is what Branko suggests corresponds to the US lower-middle class, but what I’d say corresponds to advanced-country working classes in general, at least if you add post-2008 data with the effects of austerity. I’d call it the valley of despond, and I think it’s going to be a crucial factor in developments over the next few years.
economic_history  post-Cold_War  globalization  20thC  21stC  economic_growth  inequality  labor  wages  middle_class  OECD_economies  emerging_markets  LDCs  capital  profit  plutocracy  China  India  political_economy  poverty  stagnation  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Danielle Rajendram - India’s new Asia-Pacific strategy: Modi acts East | Lowy Institute for International Policy - 18 December 2014
Key Findings - (1) India’s Look East Policy has shaped its engagement with the Asia-Pacific for over two decades, and, in recent years, has been driven by an external balancing strategy against China’s influence in the Indian Ocean, as well as India’s desire for a greater global role. * (2) The BJP’s overwhelming electoral mandate will provide Prime Minister Modi with the opportunity to transform India into a serious strategic player in East and Southeast Asia. Announced shift from "Look East" to "Act East". * (3) The Modi Government will pursue a greater role in the Asia-Pacific in line with India’s growing economic and strategic interests, based on practical partnerships with Japan, Vietnam, Australia, and ASEAN.
IR  India  South_Asia  Asia_Pacific  East_Asia  China  Japan  Australia  ASEAN  maritime_issues  economic_reform  balance_of_power  alliances  Indian_Ocean  Vietnam  global_governance  regional_blocs 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
The Reformation in Global Perspective
Abstract Concepts and methods introduced by the “new world history” present important opportunities to contextualize the European Reformation in transregional frames of reference. A global approach allows historians to situate the Reformation more fully within the orbit of people, ideas, and cultural goods that interacted with one another across the early modern world. A number of historians who study missionary encounters, especially those of Jesuits, have already initiated global methodologies in analyzing the Reformation overseas. Other scholars have pointed to ways in which an engagement with the wider world influenced European societies. These works indicate the rich possibilities for looking at the Reformation with new eyes. In assessing this scholarship, this article discusses the prospects and challenges for adopting global perspectives in the study of the Reformation.
religious_history  missionaries  cultural_history  latin  america  article  16thc  east  asia  historiography  china  reformation  catholics  africa  colonialism  world  history  counter-reformation  17thc  north  protestants  india  mena  paywall  cross-border 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Xi’s Reform Gambit by Andrew Sheng and Xiao Geng - Project Syndicate - Dec 2014
Xi’s reforms, like Deng’s, reflect the absence of alternative. - Only by addressing these weaknesses and shifting to an innovation-based, environmentally sustainable growth model can the country continue to prosper – and ultimately achieve high-income status. The difference between the two reform efforts is that Xi must also address the shortcomings of Deng’s work. Deng mistakenly believed that the state, which retained its central role in the economy, would be able to use new market-generated resources to correct the short-run inequalities created by his reforms. But the bureaucracy and its privileged networks benefited most, and a second, non-market source of inequality – endemic official corruption – became entrenched. That is why Xi’s anti-corruption campaign was a critical precursor to reform.
China  economic_growth  economic_reform  legal_reform  rule_if_law  corruption  bureaucracy  SOEs  financial_system  climate 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Bellah - The renouncers « The Immanent Frame - August 2008
This post is a condensed version of a keynote delivered at a conference "The Axial Age and its Consequences for Subsequent History and the Present" sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation in cooperation with Robert Bellah and Hans Joas. -- After discussing Habermas' theory of a legitimation crisis in the axial civilizations and the critique - political, moral and religious - of the key axial age figures whom he calls "the renouncers" -- The great utopias served for the renouncers as stark contrasts to the actual world, and their vision of that other world could be called “theory” in Plato’s sense. But the very distance they felt from the world to which they returned made possible another kind of “theory,” another kind of seeing—that is, a distant, critical view of the actual world in which they lived. The renouncer sees the world with new eyes: as Plato says of the ones who have returned to the cave, they see the shadows for what they are, not naively as do those who have never left. One could say that the ideological illusion is gone. Once disengaged vision becomes possible then theory can take another turn: it can abandon any moral stance at all and look simply at what will be useful, what can make the powerful and exploitative even more so. -- The axial age gave us “theory” in two senses, and neither of them has been unproblematic ever since. The great utopian visions have motivated some of the noblest achievements of mankind; they have also motivated some of the worst actions of human beings. Theory in the sense of disengaged knowing, inquiry for the sake of understanding, with or without moral evaluation, has brought its own kind of astounding achievements but also given humans the power to destroy their environment and themselves. Both kinds of theoria have criticized but also justified the class society that first came into conscious view in the axial age. They have provided the intellectual tools for efforts to reform and efforts to repress. It is a great heritage. ... It has given us the great tool of criticism. How will we use it? -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
sociology_of_religion  intellectual_history  religious_history  axial_age  cultural_critique  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Buddhism  Old_Testament  prophets  China  India  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Confuscianism  ancient_religions  Chinese_history  Plato  Plato-Republic  Aristotle  phronesis  utopian  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicolas Véron - Chart: Alibaba IPO underlines rise of Chinese private sector | Bruegel.org - September 2014
Looks at Chinese companies in FT global top companies -- The chart suggests three observations. First, with about two-thirds of the total, the PRC’s government retains a firm control of the “commanding heights” of Chinese business, as has been plain since the massive IPOs of state-owned enterprises in the mid-2000s. Second, however, this measure suggests a continuous erosion of state control for the past half-decade, as new entrants such as Tencent and Alibaba gain ground – and as private firms in Hong Kong and Macao have also comparatively recovered somewhat from their low point of the late 2000s. Third, and for the first time with Alibaba’s addition to the mix, large private-sector companies from the mainland collectively weigh as much as their peers from Hong Kong and Macao when measured by aggregate value. As always in China, one must keep in mind that the distinction between public and private sector remains somewhat fuzzy. Ultimate ownership of private-sector firms is often unclear, and the Communist Party of China retains ways to influence the strategy and behaviour of many nominally private-sector companies. Nevertheless, the gradual rise of private-sector companies as compared with the state-owned giants is too continuous to be ignored. Alibaba’s IPO is likely to be remembered as the symbolic moment of this momentous transformation of the Chinese corporate landscape.
China  SOEs  capital_markets  private_enterprise  development 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Guonan Ma - Tweaking China’s loan-deposit ratio rule | Bruegel.org - 3 September 2014
Article highlights the need to revamp the country’s outdated banking regulatory framework ahead of full interest rate liberalisation -- In the wake of the latest easing of Chinese monetary policy, the CBRC, China’s banking regulator, has recently modified a few details of how it calculates the bank loan/deposit ratio, which is currently capped at 75 percent by the country’s banking law. This move, in combination with an easier monetary policy stance, aims to ease the tight Chinese financial conditions, allocate more credit to Chinese agriculture and SMEs, and adapt China to its rapidly changing financial landscape. The newly announced changes to the computation formula of the loan/deposit ratio fall into three categories, all in an apparent attempt to make the 75% cap less of a constraint on bank lending. -- comments on perverse incentives for big banks lending to large enterprises (probably continued issues around reducing state-owned enterprises)
China  banking  NBFI  shadow_banking  SMEs  financial_regulation  concentration-industry  competition-financial_sector  financial_sector_development 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Joshua Aizenman, Yin-Wong Cheung , Hiro Ito International reserves before and after the Global Crisis: Is there no end to hoarding? | vox 13 September 2014
CIn the aftermath of the global financial crisis new patterns of reserve hoarding have emerged. This column identifies structural changes in international reserve accumulation. Emerging markets with higher savings rates tend to use higher buffers of reserves, partially accounting for the higher levels of reserves in east Asia compared to Latin America. While there is no end in sight for reserve hoarding, some of the newly identified factors may mitigate eventual reserve accumulation.
international_political_economy  international_monetary_system  balance_of_payments  FX  financial_crisis  Great_Recession  emerging_markets  central_banks  China 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Thorstensen, Fernandes Marçal, Ferraz - WTO x PTAs -- Where to Negotiate Trade and Currency :: SSRN June 16, 2014
Vera Thorstensen - São Paulo School of Economics (EESP) at Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) -- Emerson Fernandes Marçal - Sao Paulo School of Economics - FGV; Mackenzie Presbyterian University -- Lucas Ferraz - Sao Paulo School of Economics-FGV. -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/09. *--* The negotiations of mega agreements between the US and the Pacific countries (TPP) and between the US and the EU (TTIP) are raising the attention of experts on international trade law and economics. TPP and TTIP are proclaimed to be the designers of the rules for the XXI Century. Old trade instruments such as tariffs are said to be no more important for TTIP because tariffs are negligible among those partners but significant to for TPP. Another relevant agreement in negotiation is between the EU and Mercosul, where tariffs are the most important issue in discussion. The main purpose of this paper is to shows that tariff are important for all these agreements, not because of its nominal value, but because the impacts of exchange rate misalignments on tariffs are so significant that all concessions can be distorted by overvalued and by devaluated currencies. The article is divided into six sections: the first gives an introduction to the issue; the second explains the methodologies used to determine exchange rate misalignments and also presents some results for Brazil, US and China; the third summarizes the methodology applied to calculate the impacts of exchange rate misalignments on the level of tariff protection through an exercise of “misalignment tariffication” and examines the effects of exchange rate variations on tariffs and their consequences for the multilateral trading system; the fourth creates a methodology to estimate exchange rates against a basket of currencies (a virtual currency of the World) and a proposal to deal with persistent and significant misalignments related to trade rules. The fifth presents some estimates for the main PTAs. The conclusions are present in the last section. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  trade-agreements  tariffs  FX  global_imbalance  US_foreign_policy  China  Brazil  EU  Latin_America  South-South_economics  emerging_markets  capital_flows  international_monetary_system  FX-misalignment  prices  costs  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Matias Vernengo NAKED KEYNESIANISM: Manufacturing matters - Jan 2013
Chart of distribution of manufacturing capacity over the centuries pre and post Industrial Revolution from Robert Allen -- Note that the West, narrowly defined as England the rest of Western Europe, what was to become the US and Russia (called for the whole period USSR) had a share of less than 20% in 1750, it had expanded to more than 80% on the eve of WW-I. If you add Australia, Canada and Latin America (which are all in Rest of the World, but are what Maddison would call Western offshoots), the numbers are even larger. Most of the changes were associated to the squeeze of China. And most of the recent changes are associated with expansion of China and East Asia (which includes Japan). We have not gone full circle, by the way. In other words, the process of development (or indutrialization in the center) went hand in hand with the process of underdevelopment (deindustrialization) in the periphery, and old lesson from a little book by Osvaldo Sunkel which is still worth reading. [1972 study of Latin American development and underdevelopment from 1750, tracking exports, FDI etc]
economic_history  economic_theory  economic_growth  development  emerging_markets  Latin_America  Great_Divergence  China  India  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  manufacturing  exports  British_history  capitalism  18thC  19thC 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Matias Vernengo - NAKED KEYNESIANISM: Institutions, what institutions? - September 2014
Nice breakdown of theorists of causes of development and underdevelopment and problems of trying to catch up -- So if you believe most heterodox economists institutions are relevant, but not primarily those associated to the supply side; the ones linked to the demand side, in Keynesian fashion are more important than the mainstream admits. Poor countries that arrive late to the process of capitalist development cannot expand demand without limits since the imports of intermediary and capital goods cause recurrent balance of payments crises. The institutions that allow for the expansion of demand, including those that allow for higher wages to expand consumption and to avoid the external constraints, are and have been central to growth and development. The role of the State in creating and promoting the expansion of domestic markets, in the funding of research and development, and in reducing the barriers to balance of payments constraints, both by guarantying access to external markets (sometimes militarily, like in the Opium Wars) and reducing foreign access to domestic ones was crucial in the process of capitalist development. In this view, for example, what China did not have that England did, was not lack of secure property rights and the rule of law, but a rising bourgeoisie (capitalists) that had to compete to provide for a growing domestic market that had acquired a new taste (and hence explained expanding demand) for a set of new goods, like cotton goods from India, or china (porcelain) from… well China, as emphasized by economic historian Maxine Berg among others (for the role of consumption in the Industrial Revolution go here). Or simply put, China did not have a capitalist mode of production (for the concept of mode of production and capitalism go here). Again, I argued that Robert Allen’s view according to which high wages and cheap energy forced British producers to innovate to save labor, leading to technological innovation and growth, and the absence of those conditions in China led to stagnation is limited since it presupposes that firms adopt more productive technologies even without growing demand. -- see links
economic_history  economic_theory  economic_growth  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  development  emerging_markets  Latin_America  Great_Divergence  demand  consumer_demand  British_history  China  institutional_economics  institutional_change  institution-building  institutions  supply-side  demand-side  cultural_history  economic_culture  political_culture  industrialization  Industrial_Revolution  international_political_economy  international_monetary_system  balance_of_payments  state-building  rent-seeking  rentiers  commodities  links 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jose Rabasa, Masayuki Sato, Edoardo Tortarolo, Daniel Woolf - The Oxford History of Historical Writing: Volume 3: 1400-1800 : : Amazon.com:
Volume III of The Oxford History of Historical Writing contains essays by leading scholars on the writing of history globally during the early modern era, from 1400 to 1800. The volume proceeds in geographic order from east to west, beginning in Asia and ending in the Americas. It aims at once to provide a selective but authoritative survey of the field and, where opportunity allows, to provoke cross-cultural comparisons. This is the third of five volumes in a series that explores representations of the past from the beginning of writing to the present day, and from all over the world. -- only hdbk
books  amazon.com  find  libraries  historiography  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Renaissance  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historians-and-state  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  China  India  Ottomans  Italy  Germany  France  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  philosophes  philosophy_of_history  philology  antiquaries  evidence  scepticism 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Bing Yan - China’s Actions to cut Carbon Emissions | Lindau Blog August 2014
China’s next 5 year plan is very ambitious re reducing carbon intensity of production and urban pollution and energy consumption - blog post fairly upbeat re China being able to use technologies and new methods for planning and monitoring policy outcomes, and what the Chinese are able to accomplish will make all the difference between manageable and catastrophic globally -- What makes a methodology stand out is its orientation towards actions. After all, having a transparent, accurate carbon counting method is only the first step toward any climate change solution. For example, a methodology that I would recommend for China is called Bilan Carbone, developed by the French inter-ministerial department Agence De l’Environnement et de la Maitrise de l’Energie (Environment and Energy Management Agency). It has an integrated process for setting reduction targets, through which reduction actions can be directly derived from emission calculations. Best practices for implementation from various cities and regions are available online and learning can be easily shared among city governors. On the practical side, there is an additional tool called Territorial Climate and Energy Plan, which can link Carbon Balance with policy enforcement
China  environment  climate  energy  urban_politics  industrialization 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Gareth Evans explores the potential risks stemming from Japan's international muscle-flexing. - Project Syndicate - July 2014
Highlights love-in between Abe and Abbott and new "special relation" -- looks more dangerous re exacerbating young Chinese nationalists than the modest constitutional changes being proposed. Good links
East_Asia  Asia  Asia_Pacific  Japan  Australia  China  international_system  alliances  US_foreign_policy 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Unctad report - FDI into developing economies forecast to stall | FT. com June 2014
China set to become net exporter of FDI. Multinationals "reshoring" some employment and bringing back some of the $3T+ stashed overseas. Post Euro crisis FDI into Europe to pick up
global_economy  FDI  emerging_markets  OECD_economies  Eurozone  China  investment  tax_havens  off-shoring 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Pettis - Economic consequences of income inequality - March 2014
Back to basics and the undercinsumption model that shows why it's necessary to save capitalism from itself -- I will again quote Mariner Eccles, from his 1933 testimony to Congress, in which he was himself quoting with approval an unidentified economist, probably William Trufant Foster. In his testimony he said:

It is utterly impossible, as this country has demonstrated again and again, for the rich to save as much as they have been trying to save, and save anything that is worth saving. They can save idle factories and useless railroad coaches; they can save empty office buildings and closed banks; they can save paper evidences of foreign loans; but as a class they cannot save anything that is worth saving, above and beyond the amount that is made profitable by the increase of consumer buying.

It is for the interests of the well-to-do – to protect them from the results of their own folly – that we should take from them a sufficient amount of their surplus to enable consumers to consume and business to operate at a profit. This is not “soaking the rich”; it is saving the rich. Incidentally, it is the only way to assure them the serenity and security which they do not have at the present moment.
Great_Recession  Great_Depression  economic_history  economic_theory  savings  investment  consumer_demand  unemployment  global_economy  international_political_economy  trade-policy  trade-theory  Eurozone  China  Germany  inequality  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric Reinders - The Iconoclasm of Obeisance: Protestant Images of Chinese Religion and the Catholic Church | JSTOR: Numen, Vol. 44, Fasc. 3 (Sep., 1997), pp. 296-322
Western studies of Buddhism emphasize doctrine and meditation, but almost completely ignore devotional practice. Yet, obeisance to Buddha is the primary religious practice of the majority of Asian Buddhists. To account for this disparity, I explore the history of Protestant attitudes towards bowing. In English and German anti-Catholic polemics (and Catholic responses), Chinese and Catholic obeisance are conflated, the lowness of their prostrations emphasized, in contrast to the erectness of Protestant posture in worship. I survey two important encyclopedias of religion (Hastings' of 1914 and Eliade's of 1987), and the work of one of the founders of Sociology, Herbert Spencer, to show the persistance of these perspectives on obeisance. Eighteenth and nineteenth-century Protestants worked to challenge the Jesuit representation of China as enlightened and originally monotheistic. Chinese religiosity was depicted as passive, lazy, infantile, and mindless, lacking any coherent doctrinal system. At times, the Protestant narrative of Christian history (from original pure community to institutional degeneration into idolatry) was superimposed on Chinese history. Obeisance itself was taken as sufficient proof of idolatry, the deceptive "holy mummeries" of Chinese/Catholic ritual. These tensions came to a head when King George III of England sent Lord Macartney to have an audience with Emperor Qianlong of China, and Macartney refused to bow. A brief analysis of this well-documented mission reveals the confluence of religious, political, bodily, and gender dimensions. Recent treatments of that mission have missed the Protestant/Catholic dimensions of the issue. Finally I suggest possible extentions of the theoretical concerns of this paper. -- didn't download
article  jstor  religious_history  religious_culture  18thC  19thC  China  Jesuits  anti-Catholic  Buddhism  ritual  idolatry  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little - Understanding Society: Making institutions Dec 2013
Looks at range of institutional work (Thelen, Pierson etc) - mostly praise for recent work that's a comparative combination of historical sociology, political science, political economy, with implications for work in Tilly's tradition of fiscal-military_state -- Wenkai HE's Paths toward the Modern Fiscal State: England, Japan, and China is a timely and interesting contribution. HE undertakes a comparative study of the emergence of what he calls the "modern fiscal state" in Britain, China, and Japan. He has undertaken to learn enough about these three cases in detail to be able to tell a reasonably detailed story of the emergence of this set of state tax and revenue institutions in the three settings, and he is thereby poised to consider some important institutional-causal questions about the innovations he observes. The book is a "cross-over" work, with political science methods and historical research content. The book combines new institutionalism, comparative historical sociology, and first-rate historical scholarship to make a compelling historical argument.. .... One thing that I particularly appreciate about HE's work is his ability to combine structure and agency into a single coherent analysis and explanation.
books  kindle-available  reviews  social_theory  historical_sociology  fiscal-military_state  political_economy  political_culture  institutions  bureaucracy  taxes  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  James_I  China  Japan  modernization  nation-state  governance  government_officials  governmentality  economic_history  Great_Divergence  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Chase: Firearms: A Global History to 1700: 9780521722407: Amazon.com: Books
Kenneth Chase traces the history of firearms from their invention in China in the 1100s to the 1700s, when European firearms had become clearly superior. In Firearms, Chase asks why it was the Europeans who perfected firearms, not the Chinese, and answers this question by looking at how firearms were used throughout the world. Early firearms were restricted to infantry and siege warfare, limiting their use outside of Europe and Japan. Steppe and desert nomads imposed a different style of warfare on the Middle East, India, and China--a style incompatible with firearms. By the time that better firearms allowed these regions to turn the tables on the nomads, Japan's self-imposed isolation left Europe with no rival in firearms design, production, or use, with lasting consequences.
books  military_history  economic_history  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Asia  China  India  Ottomans  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  Great_Divergence 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Rob Farley - Offshore Engagement: The Right U.S. Strategy for Asia | The Diplomat Nov 2013
Consequently, it may make more sense to work out a middle path between forward “deep engagement” and offshore balancing. Offshore engagement retains forward operating capability and emphasizes beneficial multilateralism, both to its own ends and in support of broader strategic interests. However, it remains essentially defensive, oriented around preventing the regional dominance of peer competitors rather than primacy in the management of global political affairs. Like offshore balancing, it attempts to take advantage of quasi-natural balancing behavior by threatened local partners, but it also appreciates that partnerships require work, and don’t develop overnight
IR_theory  balance_of_power  IR-realism  US_foreign_policy  China  Asia  alliances  diplomacy  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
The state of religion in China [series] « The Immanent Frame
Series of posts - starts October 2013

October 1st, 2013
Opiate of the masses with Chinese characteristics
posted by Thomas DuBois

October 4th, 2013
The Communist Party and the future of religion in China
posted by André Laliberté

October 8th, 2013
The “good” and the “bad” Muslims of China
posted by Yuting Wang

October 10th, 2013
Secular belief, religious belonging
posted by Richard Madsen
China  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Islam  Buddhism  Confuscianism  Christianity  securitization  secularism  modernization  Communist_Party  sociology_of_religion  community  identity  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Wei Zhu: What is religion in China? A brief history « The Immanent Frame Oct 2013
The complex and ever-changing relationship between the Chinese state and the nation’s religions stretches back thousands of years. While the state never struggled with religious leaders for power, it governed an embedded religiosity in the population, one best described as diffused, non-exclusive, and pluralistic. As a companion to The Immanent Frame’s newly launched series of essays on the state of religion in China, this piece embarks on a brief historical survey, outlining the wide variety of beliefs and practices that religion in China encapsulates, and paying particular attention to the events and philosophies that have shaped the policies of the atheist People’s Republic of China.

Recent years have seen religiosity on the rise at home across all religious traditions, coinciding with politico-religious unrest in places such as Xinjiang and Tibet, as well as issues with superstitious xiejiao (邪教, “evil cults”) such as Falun Gong. This has not gone unnoticed by Chinese leaders like Hu Jintao (former General Secretary/President of China) and Wang Zuoan (current director of SARA), who recognize the role that religion plays in building a “prosperous society” but also its potential for “unrest and antagonism.” With massive domestic socioeconomic changes taking place, as well as China’s growing influence on the global stage, the pressure is on the state—whose policies on religion are arguably still reminiscent of those a hundred years ago—to engage with religion in new and constructive ways.
China  religious_history  religious_culture  ancient_religions  politics-and-religion  19thC  20thC  21stC  Marxism  atheism  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Carlin Romano: Dao Rising: Chinese Philosophy Lifts Off in America - The Chronicle Review Sept 2013
Chinese philosophy's so-called "legitimacy" problem. Classical Chinese philosophy, as in the work of Confucius and Mencius, often operates through storytelling, homily, and aphorism. Philosophers who insist that their discipline demands rigorous argument occasionally suggest that Chinese philosophy is better understood as "wisdom literature" or under some alternate rubric.

Philosophy is supposed to be the most universalizable mode of human thinking," says Tu, citing instances of close-mindedness he witnessed at Harvard, "but it became very, very parochial. Whereas religion, which began with a particular spiritual tradition, opened up. So the Christians love to talk with everybody, and the analytic philosophers, their religion is so parochial, they end up suffering from fundamentalism—a closed particularism."

Several speakers at the ISCP session on methodology in comparative philosophy between East and West criticized the default inclination of earlier scholars to ritually evaluate Chinese philosophy by Western standards. Any sense that Chinese philosophy ought to be judged by the standards of American analytic epistemology, with disdain toward more humanistic, practical concerns of philosophy—such as how one should live one's life—came in for withering criticism.
philosophy  China  analytical_philosophy  humanism  humanities  Confucius 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert Brenner and Christopher Isett: England's Divergence from China's Yangzi Delta: Property Relations, Microeconomics, and Patterns of Development (2002)
JSTOR: The Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 61, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 609-662 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- a Marxian attack on Pomeranz moving the Divergence to the 19thC and assigning imperialism access to resources, especially slave economies, for difference
article  jstor  Great_Divergence  economic_history  economic_growth  social_history  social_theory  historical_sociology  property  imperialism  American_colonies  Early_Republic  US_economy  Atlantic  British_Empire  India  China  slavery  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Stephen Broadberry and Bishnupriya Gupta: The Early Modern Great Divergence: Wages, Prices and Economic Development in Europe and Asia, 1500-1800 (2006)
JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 59, No. 1 (Feb., 2006), pp. 2-31 -- Contrary to the claims of Pomeranz, Parthasarathi, and other 'world historians', the prosperous parts of Asia between 1500 and 1800 look similar to the stagnating southern, central, and eastern parts of Europe rather than the developing north-western parts. In the advanced parts of India and China, grain wages were comparable to those in north-western Europe, but silver wages, which conferred purchasing power over tradable goods and services, were substantially lower. The high silver wages of north-western Europe were not simply a monetary phenomenon, but reflected high productivity in the tradable sector. The 'great divergence' between Europe and Asia was already well underway before 1800. -- I think Robert Allen uses some of this price and wage data for his theory re why capital technology took off faster in Britain when combined with energy resources
article  jstor  Great_Divergence  economic_history  economic_growth  prices  wages  Britain  Europe-Early_Modern  China  India  Asia  17thC  18thC  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Pomeranz: (response to P Huang) Beyond the East-West Binary: Resituating Development Paths in the Eighteenth-Century World (2002)
JSTOR: The Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 61, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 539-590 -- Great Divergence debates - this one between Huang and Pomeranz -- Huang original article titled " Development or Involution in Eighteenth-Century Britain and China?"
article  jstor  Great_Divergence  economic_history  historical_sociology  historiography  China  Europe-Early_Modern  Britain  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay by: Philip C. C. Huang - The Great Divergence: China, Europe, and the Making of the Modern World Economy by Kenneth Pomeranz (2002)
JSTOR: The Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 61, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 501-538 -- Great Divergence debates - this one between Huang and Pomeranz with follow up by Pomeranz - see response article - this article titled " Development or Involution in Eighteenth-Century Britain and China?"
article  jstor  Great_Divergence  economic_history  historical_sociology  historiography  China  Europe-Early_Modern  Britain  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
R. Bin Wong: Early Modern Economic History in the Long Run - Returning to the Early Modern World from the Postmodern One (2004)
JSTOR: Science & Society, Vol. 68, No. 1 (Spring, 2004), pp. 80-90 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- starts with big picture historiography questions re change, causation, directions or patterns in history -- are master narratives dead or worth trying to at least inquire then becomes another response to Duschene
article  jstor  historiography  postmodern  Great_Divergence  social_sciences-post-WWII  economic_history  social_history  political_economy  social_theory  historical_sociology  Britain  China  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Ricardo Duchesne: The Post-Malthusian World Began in Western Europe in the Eighteenth Century: A Reply to Goldstone and Wong (2003)
JSTOR: Science & Society, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 195-205 -- Symposium on Eurocentrism, Sinocentrism, and World History in which Wong and Goldstone attack Duchsene for his critical review of Gunter Frank in which D. maintained Britain had broken through Malthusian limit in 18thC so rejected Wong and Goldstone comparison with China in 18thC as if they were at same point and that 19thC takeoff was contingent that it happened only in England. Symposium includes paper by Wong, Goldstone and response by Duchsene. Recent historiography helpful, though most of debate precedes Pomerantz.
article  jstor  economic_history  historical_sociology  Great_Divergence  China  Europe-Early_Modern  Britain  American_colonies  colonialism  empires  historiography  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone: Europe Vs. Asia: Missing Data and Misconceptions (2003)
JSTOR: Science & Society, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 184-195 -- Symposium on Eurocentrism, Sinocentrism, and World History in which Wong and Goldstone attack Duchsene for his critical review of Gunter Frank in which D. maintained Britain had broken through Malthusian limit in 18thC so rejected Wong and Goldstone comparison with China in 18thC as if they were at same point and that 19thC takeoff was contingent that it happened only in England. Symposium includes paper by Wong, Goldstone and response by Duchsene. Recent historiography helpful, though most of debate precedes Pomeranz.
article  jstor  economic_history  historical_sociology  Great_Divergence  China  Europe-Early_Modern  Britain  historiography  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
R. Bin Wong: Beyond Sinocentrism and Eurocentrism (2003)
JSTOR: Science & Society, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 173-184 - introduction to Symposium on Eurocentrism, Sinocentrism, and World History in which Wong and Goldstone attack Duchsene for his critical review of Gunter Frank in which D. maintained Britain had broken through Malthusian limit in 18thC so rejected Wong and Goldstone comparison with China in 18thC as if they were at same point and that 19thC takeoff was contingent that it happened only in England. Symposium includes paper by Wong, Goldstone and response by Duchsene. Recent historiography helpful, though most of debate precedes Pomerantz.
article  jstor  Great_Divergence  historiography  bibliography  economic_history  historical_sociology  China  Europe-Early_Modern  Britain  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
China's Big Banks Must Face Some Nasty Truths- The Economist | Business Insider Sept 2013
Good overview of probable NPLs, rise of shadow banking, shift from negative value added SOEs toward consumption. Is another round of Asset Management Companies far behind?
China  political_economy  banking  financial_system  financial_regulation 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong : Where Was China?: Why the Twentieth-Century Was Not a Chinese Century:
A Deleted Scene from My "Slouching Towards Utopia?: The Economic History of the Twentieth Century" Ms.
Great_Divergence  China  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Franco Venturi: Oriental Despotism (1963)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 24, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1963), pp. 133-142 -- Venturi extends the tale told by Koebnerbeyond Montesquieu and Voltaire to the Physiocrats who tried to use it in a positive fashion that didn't take, and then works by French and English travelers with long experience in the purported Oriental despotic empires. They tried to disprove the exaggerated and false notions of political despotism. The debates further focused on property rights, and how close an analogy to feudalism was appropriate. The discussion continued into 19thC especially re British Empire relations with areas that came under imperial control. But the Oriental despotism meme now seems eternal myth that will not die.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography  Ottomans  China  India  imperialism  despotism  property_rights  liberty  feudalism  slavery  17thC  18thC  19thC  France  British_Empire  Montesquieu  Hobbes  Voltaire  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
R. Koebner: JSTOR: Despot and Despotism: Vicissitudes of a Political Term (1951)
JSTOR: Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, Vol. 14, No. 3/4 (1951), pp. 275-302 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Voltaire was very displeased with how Montesquieu popularized the neologism which first made its appearance in 17thC France and was adopted by the secret Bougainvilliers, Fenelon, Saint Simon opponents of Louis XIV. The paper then traces despot related usage starting with Plato and Aristotle through Church Fathers and Renaissance.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  etymology  philology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Early_Christian  Medieval  Renaissance  Papacy  monarchy  Absolutism  Ottomans  China  France  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Louis_XIV  enlightened_absolutism  Hobbes  Bayle  Fenelon  Bougainvilliers  Saint_Simon  Voltaire  Montesquieu  liberty  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Religion in the Age of Enlightenment - Vol 4, 2013 - Jeffrey D. Burson , Buddhism as Caricature: China and the Legitimation of Natural Religion in the Enlightenment 
Url for journal home page and TOC for Vol 4 which includes Burson article - since Burson writing on French Catholic Enlightenment, especially Jesuits until mid 18thC, hopefully his article will pick up repercussions of querelle des rites and how Voltaire used; maybe cover Toland as well? Also check out article on Basnage and Dictionnaire universel as well as intriguing " John G. Rudy, The Empty Link: Zen Meditative Harmonics and Intimations of Enlightenment in Pope’s Essay on Man and Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice" . -- Journal description -- Religion in the Age of Enlightenment (RAE) publishes scholarly examinations of (1) religion and religious attitudes and practices during the age of Enlightenment; (2) the impact of the Enlightenment on religion, religious thought, and religious experience; and (3) the ways religion informed Enlightenment ideas and values, from a range of disciplinary perspectives, including, but not limited to, history, theology, literature, philosophy, the social and physical sciences, economics, and the law.While the Enlightenment generally refers to an eighteenth-century philosophical and cultural movement that swept through Western Europe, the editors welcome studies that encompass the seventeenth-century intellectual movements that gave rise to the ideals of the Enlightenment—e.g., materialism, skepticism, rationalism, and empiricism—as well as studies that consider later manifestations of Enlightenment ideas and values during the early nineteenth century. The editors likewise welcome studies of non-Western religious topics and issues in light of Enlightenment attitudes. In addition to publishing original research in these areas, RAE includes reviews of books that explore topics relevant to the thematic scope of the annual.
journal  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  religious_history  religious_culture  theology  church_history  materialism  scepticism  reason  empiricism  human_nature  moral_philosophy  find  Voltaire  Jesuits  China  orientalism  natural_law  natural_religion  Deism  Toland  Pope  Essay_on_Man  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Chinn, Eichengreen and Ito: "A Forensic Analysis of Global Imbalances" | Econbrowser: August 2013
Just published in Oxford Economic Papers - downloaded working paper pdf to Note. ?..
We investigate whether the determinants of current account balances changed in the run-up to the 2009 financial crisis. Although changes in the budget balance appear to be an important factor for advanced current account deficit countries such as the USA, the effect of the ‘saving glut variables’, that is financial development and openness and legal development, has been relatively stable for emerging market countries, suggesting that those factors cannot explain the bulk of current account movements in recent years. We also find a structural break in current account behavior in 2006–8, in emerging market economies in particular, and attribute the anomalous behavior of precrisis current account balances to financial exuberance as opposed to the nature of the fiscal and monetary policy stance. Our projections suggest that absent drastic policy changes, the imbalances of the USA and China are unlikely to disappear.
21stC  global_system  FX  global_imbalance  US_economy  trade  China  emerging_markets  capital_markets  capital_flows  Great_Recession  financial_crisis  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert Brenner: What is Good for Goldman Sachs is Good for America - The Origins of the Present Crisis [eScholarship] October 2009
Robert Brenner outlines the long-term causes of the present economic crisis. Rather than understanding the current downturn as merely a function of financial incompetence and miscalculation, he demonstrates that the US economy and that of the G7 has been slower growth in most of the major indices with each passing business cycle since the 1970s. In the last two cycles, asset bubbles inclined US consumers to take on more debt in order to spend and achieve limited GDP growth. Brenner outlines in detail how and why the financial sector played a key role in the creation and inflation of debt bubbles with new financial instruments. The implications for the US and the global economy are also outlined including the US current account deficit, trade imbalances, the rise of China and the East Asian economies as well as declining investment in the real economy and overcapacity in manufacturing worldwide.

Downloaded pdf to Note
economic_history  financialization  international_finance  international_political_economy  capitalism  investment  profit  Labor_markets  Great_Recession  banking  FX  competition  bubbles  financial_crisis  emerging_markets  China  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Long Live China’s Boom by Justin Yifu Lin - Project Syndicate August 2013
In theory, any developing country that can harness its latecomer’s advantage to achieve technological and industrial upgrading can grow faster than developed countries. How much faster is an empirical question. According to the Growth Commission led by Nobel laureate Michael Spence, 13 economies took full advantage of their latecomer status after World War II and achieved annual GDP growth rates of 7% or higher – at least twice as high as developed countries’ growth rates – for 25 years or longer..... To realize its potential growth as a latecomer, China needs, above all, to deepen its market-oriented reforms, address various structural problems, and develop its economy according to its comparative advantages.
China  economic_history  economic_growth  development  economic_reform  technology 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
China’s End of Exuberance by Michael Spence - Project Syndicate July 2013
Analysts and investors have at least two related concerns. One is that, facing declining growth, policymakers will resort to excess investment or leverage (or both), creating instability. The other is that they will resort to neither, and that no alternative growth engines will have been started, leading to an extended slowdown with unpredictable political consequences at home In short, many investors are nervous because China’s future growth story is unclear to them. It is certainly less clear than the previous story, which cannot be retold.
China  investment  consumers  macroeconomics  development  economic_growth  institutional_investors 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Zhang Monan: Chinese Reform Goes Local - Project Syndicate August 2013
Indeed, while China’s overall capital stock is by no means small, capital-structure and maturity mismatches have led to the accumulation of massive volumes of non-performing assets, undermining China’s economic stability and financial efficiency. In order to create the stability needed to reach the next stage of economic development, China must shift its focus from sustaining high GDP growth toward revitalizing its capital stock.

If China’s leaders are genuinely committed to revitalizing the capital stock, they must begin with fiscal and financial decentralization. Such an approach would promote efficiency, stability, innovation, and dynamism at the local level – exactly what China needs to support its progress toward advanced-economy status.
economic_growth  capital  investment  SOEs  banking  China  development  local_government  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
All the shale boom are belong to US | FT Alphaville 6-27-13
Report that's pessimistic re other parts of world getting in on shale boom
Response that the report is too pessimistic. The real bottleneck isn't drilling rigs or micro organization of sector in US that other countries will have difficulty emulating. It's lack of experienced engineers, geologists and operators, but with China graduating 100s of 1000s of engineers and the scale of opportunities, the ROW will get over this bottleneck within a decade.
US_economy  international_political_economy  China  energy  climate 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
Jamil Anderlini: Chinese industry: Ambitions in excess - FT.com June 2013
Overcapacity fuelled by subsidies threatens the world’s second-biggest economy
China  economic_growth  investment 
june 2013 by dunnettreader
Fitch says China credit bubble unprecedented in modern world history - Telegraph
While the non-performing loan rate of the banks may look benign at just 1pc, this has become irrelevant as trusts, wealth-management funds, offshore vehicles and other forms of irregular lending make up over half of all new credit.

Fitch warned that wealth products worth $2 trillion of lending are in reality a "hidden second balance sheet" for banks, allowing them to circumvent loan curbs and dodge efforts by regulators to halt the excesses.This niche is the epicentre of risk. Half the loans must be rolled over every three months, and another 25pc in less than six months.
China  bubbles  banking  shadow_banking  institutional_investors  financial_regulation 
june 2013 by dunnettreader
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