dunnettreader + cartesian   22

Danton B. Sailor - Cudworth and Descartes (1962) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1962), pp. 133-140 -- followup to 1960 JHI article on Descartes and the Cambridge Platonists, which claims in focusing on John Smith, it misrepresents Cudworth on both theological and philosophical issues - Cudworth was enthusiastic re Cartesian natural philosophy, and embraced particular claims of Descartes that contradicted Hobbes’s views on corpuscularian transmission of motion that had implications for some of his theological oppositions to Hobbes
article  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  Descartes  Cudworth  Hobbes  Cambridge_Platonists  Cartesian  materialism  motion  bibliography  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuel Bezy, review - Pascale Gillot, L’esprit, figures classiques et contemporaines - Histoire du mind-body problem - La Vie des idées - 10 janvier 2008
Pascale Gillot, L’esprit, figures classiques et contemporaines, Paris, CNRS Editions, 2007, 315 p., 30 euros. -- Si l’esprit et le corps sont des substances séparées et distinctes, comment peuvent-ils agir l’un sur l’autre ? P. Gillot montre dans son ouvrage les différentes réponses que la philosophie de l’esprit a apportées au problème ainsi formulé par Descartes. Mais ces réponses parviennent difficilement, selon elle, à s’affranchir totalement du cartésianisme. -- L’ouvrage de Pascale Gillot peut se lire de deux manières, qui ne sont pas exclusives l’une de l’autre : il constitue à la fois une introduction à la philosophie de l’esprit et une mise en perspective de la philosophie de l’esprit contemporaine, telle qu’elle s’est développée aux Etats-Unis depuis le tournant cognitiviste. Pascale Gillot expose la construction du problème du corps et de l’esprit, puis elle met en évidence les rémanences de cette problématique de William James à Jaegwon Kim. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  20thC  21stC  mind  mind-body  cogito  Cartesian  Descartes  James_William  dualism  cognition  neuroscience  psychology  metaphysics  essence  substance  human_nature  analytical_philosophy  naturalism  reductionism  thinking_matter  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Lennon - Imagination and the Imaginary // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - July 2015
Kathleen Lennon’s new monograph joins a growing number of studies reclaiming the imagination from the dominance of a rationalist positivism.It marks the steps…
Instapaper  books  reviews  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Cartesian  Kant  Hume  imagination  self  phenomenology  Sartre  Merleau-Ponty  rationalist  perception  epistemology  creativity  positivism  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Caroline Jacot Grapa - Dans le vif du sujet - Diderot, corps et âme ( 2009) | Classiques Garnier - collection L'Europe des Lumières
Ce livre est un essai sur le style du matérialisme de Diderot, sa psychologie, sa métaphysique et sur les figures de l'intériorité des Lumières. La langue de l'intériorité, apanage de la spiritualité, se retrempe au contact sensible des métaphores de l'époque. Elles donnent accès à un savoir nouveau de la vie corporelle. L'actualité de cet essai tient au dialogue qu'il engage avec la phénoménologie et les neurosciences. -- This work is an essay on the style of Diderot's materialism, his psychology and his metaphysics. Its modern pertinence stems from the dialogue established with phenomenology and neurosciences. -- ISBN 978-2-8124-0046-9 -- 504 pages -- looks extremely interesting -- tracking reception of British empiricism, debates over various Cartesian proposals for dealing with animals, and the new directions taken both in life sciences and psychology and the metaphysics of materialism -- downloaded TOC as pdf to Note
books  find  amazon.fr  libraries  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  natural_philosophy  18thC  France  Diderot  d'Alembert  d'Holbach  Cartesian  Locke  Newton  Newtonian  Encyclopédie  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Vitalism  psychology  thinking_matter  anatomy  physiology  scientific_method  organism  subject  subjectivity  phenomenology  neuroscience  materialism  metaphysics  mind  mind-body  soul  human_nature  metaphor  French_language  French_lit  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Randal Samstag - Sorabji’s Self | Notes from my library
These days we tend to think that Descartes invented the mind/body “problem”, but actually, the notion that the mind, self or soul exists and is an independent entity from the body goes back at least to Augustine, who first maintained that this independent soul couldn’t possibly be mistaken about the existence of itself. In his book, Self, Richard Sorabji maintains that the argument probably goes back further, to Plotinus. Sorabji mostly traces the roots of this argument in Western thinking back to the pre-classical through Hellenistic period of Greek philosophy: (..) But he doesn’t stop there. There is good discussion of Parfit’s Reasons and Persons. He even gives a brief survey of Indian philosophy (..)for a continuation of this story one really needs to follow the path of Sorabji’s University of London and Oxford student Jonardon Garneri in his books The Concealed Art of the Soul and the more recent book of the same name as Sorabji’s, Self. Of which more later. Sorabji’s answer to the question of the self? He is no Cartesian. But he resists the formidable attacks of the Materialists. He is an embodied self man: “By a ‘person’ I mean someone who has psychological states and does things, by a ‘thinker’ someone who has thoughts. This having and doing can be summed up by saying that a person owns psychological states and actions. He or she also owns a body and bodily characteristics. A person is not just a stream of experiences and actions, but the owner of experiences and actions . . .” I find his argument generally convincing, but the finer details of the story are better developed (I think) in his student’s book of the same name.
books  reviews  kindle  intellectual_history  self  soul  mind  mind-body  ancient_philosophy  Hellenism  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Cartesian  Hobbes 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 8 (Some Thoughts Concerning Education, Posthumous Works [Malebranche, Miracles, Life of 1st Earl of Shaftesbury], Familiar Letters) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
SOME THOUGHTS CONCERNING EDUCATION. *--* POSTHUMOUS WORKS OF JOHN LOCKE, Esq. [OF THE CONDUCT OF THE UNDERSTANDING. - in Vol 2 of this edition] - AN EXAMINATION OF P. MALEBRANCHE’S OPINION OF SEEING ALL THINGS IN GOD. -- A DISCOURSE OF MIRACLES. -- MEMOIRS RELATING TO THE LIFE OF ANTHONY First Earl of Shaftesbury. *--* SOME FAMILIAR LETTERS BETWEEN Mr. LOCKE, AND SEVERAL OF HIS FRIENDS. [Principally between Locke and Molyneux. Also Leibniz's comments on the Essay] -- downloaded mobi to Note
books  etexts  downloaded  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Locke  epistemology  education  mind-body  perception  ideas-theories  Malebranche  Cartesian  Leibniz  Molyneux  Ireland  Locke-religion  miracles  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Whigs  Exclusion_Crisis  Charles_II 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lennon, Thomas M., Stainton, Robert J. (Eds.) 2008 The Achilles of Rationalist Psychology
Downloaded Introduction pdf to Note -- Series: Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind, Vol. 7 -- newly written papers addressing each of the main contributors to the discussion of the Achilles. Despite the historical importance and intrinsic interest of the argument, very little has been written about it. *--* Contents. *--* Did Plato Articulate the Achilles Argument?. *-- Aristotle on the Unity of Consciousness. *-- The Neoplatonic Achilles. *-- The Unity of the Soul and Contrary Appetites in Medieval Philosophy. *-- Hume, Spinoza and the Achilles Inference. *-- Locke and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Reverse Achilles in Locke. *-- Cudworth and Bayle: An Odd Couple?. *-- The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke Collins Correspondence. *-- Leibniz’s ‘Achilles’. *-- Hume’s Reply to the Achilles Argument. *-- Kant and Mendelssohn on the Implications of the ‘I Think’. *-- Kant on the Achilles Argument. *-- William James and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Binding Problem: Achilles in the 21st Century.
books  intellectual_history  mind  mind-body  consciousness  perception  thinking_matter  materialism  soul  immortality  substance  Plato  Neoplatonism  Aristotle  Aquinas  Duns_Scotus  Ockham  Augustine  Descartes  Spinoza  Malebranche  Cartesian  Bayle  Locke  Clarke  Collins_Anthony  Leibniz  Hume  Kant  Mendelssohn  Fichte  cognition  neuroscience  psychology  natural_philosophy  metaphysics  rationalist  James_William  history_of_science  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Heyd - From a Rationalist Theology to Cartesian Voluntarism: David Derodon and Jean-Robert Chouet | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1979), pp. 527-542
Shift from proto Leibniz determinism to extreme Voluntarism - 1660 and later in Geneva - Chouet introduced Cartesian mechanism to French Reformed - a perspective on the relationship between theology and 17thC mechanical philosophy -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  religious_history  science-and-religion  17thC  Geneva  Calvinist  rational_religion  God-attributes  determinism  voluntarism  laws_of_nature  Descartes  Cartesian  mechanism  natural_philosophy  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview with Lisa Downing - Early Mod philosophy » 3:AM Magazine - May 2014
Lisa Downing is the philosopher who thinks all the time about the early modern philosophers of Europe, especially 17th and 18th century philosophy, about how philosophical analysis and historical exactitude compliment each other, on adding to the canonical philosophers of the period, on why Malebranch is the closest to re-entry, and Robert Boyle, on Descartes vs Newton, on avoiding anachronism, on the dynamism of the period, on primary and secondary qualities, on resisting the idea that historical views have to be relevant, on Berkeley, on tensions in Locke, on women philosophers of the time and on rejecting the occult. This one is kick-ass! Yo!
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Descartes  Cartesian  Malebranche  Locke  Boyle  Berkeley  Newton  Clarke  Leibniz  Hobbes  mind-body  causation  God-attributes  Providence  mechanism  substance  metaphysics  Aristotelian  qualia  perception  natural_philosophy  free_will  Scientific_Revolution  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Nancy Kendrick, review - Mary Astell, Jacqueline Broad (ed.), The Christian Religion, as Professed by a Daughter of the Church of England // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
This first complete modern edition of Mary Astell's "most profound and significant scholarly achievement" is a much needed and welcome addition to Astell studies, and more generally, to the study of early modern philosophy. -- Follows 2nd edition published in 1717 (1st 1705). -- Drawing on her study of Astell in Women Philosophers of the 17thC (Cambridge, 2002), Broad [discusses] the Cartesianism that empowered Astell and other early modern women to assert themselves as intellectuals capable of engaging in philosophical discourse, and she explores the feminist message of Astell's work in 3 ways. First she examines the instructive purposes of The Christian Religion for its female readers with respect to the development of their reason and virtue and the control of their passions. -- Second, Broad emphasizes Astell's rejection of the implicit sexism of the works critiqued in The Christian Religion, including Locke's The Reasonableness of Christianity, which claimed that because women are incapable of grasping difficult concepts, they must be brought to religious understanding through plain and straight-forward commands. Third, Broad shows that some anti-Lockean positions advanced by the High-Church, Tory-sympathizing Astell are consistent with her feminist aims, despite appearances to the contrary. -- Broad does not, however, give much attention to the ... consequences of the maturation of her views to the feminist message of the text. In addition to advice-giving and instructive purposes, The Christian Religion addresses one of her long-standing philosophical preoccupations -- the metaphysical underpinnings of human relations. Astell's metaphysics was driven by her Platonism, which provided the solution to a concern... about the nature and possibility of friendship. In The Christian Religion, her views about friendship are expanded and developed in ways that highlight her interest in female-female, rather than female-male, social bonds. -- The review is a rich discussion of development of Astell's on reconciling friendship, love of God and the universal benevolence demanded by the Gospels.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_politics  Astell  feminism  Cartesian  Neoplatonism  theology  High_Church  Tories  1690s  1700s  1710s  Locke  Locke-religion  sexism  friendship  love  benevolence  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Val Dusek - Bruno Latour, An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // March 2014
The strongest chapter is the one concerning technology. This is an area Latour worked on extensively much earlier. Actor network theory started with technology. Latourcriticizes the identification of technological objects with beings of reproduction (natural objects). He makes use of the need for technological artifacts to be continually maintained and improved. "Sociotechnical systems" designates the heterogeneity of technology, but there is no realm of technology as such. Technology becomes invisible as soon as it is functioning successfully. He plays on Heraclitus with "Technology likes to hide." The language of form fitted to function is, according to Latour, as misleading as the correspondence between thought and things in reference. During a breakdown the extreme heterogeneity is most manifest. Latour identifies technology not with the artifacts but with the activity of technologizing. Technology is properly referred to not with a noun, but with an adjective or an adverb, and less commonly a verb. Technology is not an object, but the gaps of alterity in the network of tinkering. -- A problem for philosophies that make massive claims that our ordinary views are illusory is the explanation of why the illusion exists and persists. Latour as an anthropologist claims that moderns are no more different from non-moderns than any other group or culture is from another. However, it seems that neither Trobriand Islanders nor any other non-modern group have such illusory values and ideals impossible to live by as do the moderns. It would seem moderns really are different from peoples of other cultures for Latour, but not in the way in which moderns represent their own special nature in terms of the triumph of science and reason. Why the moderns are in this supposedly deplorable situation is never really explained.
books  reviews  kindle-available  21stC  modernity  anthropology  metaphysics  ontology  ontology-social  epistemology  mind  mind-body  perception  James_William  Whitehead  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology-process  sociology_of_religion  Cartesian  technology  science-and-religion  scientific_culture  Latour 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Harrison - Descartes on Animals | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 167 (Apr., 1992), pp. 219-227
Some support for Cottingham thesis that Descartes wasn't the monster toward animals that Cartesians like Malebranche were. Further bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  theology  moral_philosophy  natural_philosophy  17thC  Descartes  Cartesian  Malebranche  animals  reason  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rebecca M. Wilkin - Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2008), pp. 533-567
This essay examines the determination by Cartesians to explain the maternal imagination's alleged role in the formation of birthmarks and the changing notion of monstrosity. Cartesians saw the formation of birthmarks as a challenge through which to demonstrate the heuristic capacity of mechanism. Descartes claimed to be able to explain the transmission of a perception from the mother's imagination to the fetus' skin without having recourse to the little pictures postulated by his contemporaries. La Forge offered a detailed account stating that the failure to explain the maternal imagination's impressions would cast doubt on mechanism. Whereas both characterized the birthmark as a deformation or monstrosity in miniature, Malebranche attributed a role to the maternal imagination in fashioning family likenesses. However, he also charged the mother's imagination with the transmission of original sin. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  theology  science-and-religion  17thC  mechanism  reproduction  mothers  imagination  original_sin  monstrosity  Descartes  Malebranche  Cartesian  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Lamb - Imagination, Conjecture, and Disorder | Eighteenth-Century Studies -2011
Project MUSE - Jonathan Lamb. "Imagination, Conjecture, and Disorder." Eighteenth-Century Studies 45, no. 1 (2011): 53-69 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Imagination can put the world together or tear it apart, depending on how it works. Comparing the Cartesians and the empiricists of the eighteenth century, it is evident that the latter are more seriously invested in imagination than the former, partly because they rely on conjecture for the discovery of facts while the Cartesians use imagination to dispel the authority of sense impressions. Is it possible to suppose that when imagination becomes disordered, conjecture and factuality begin to be at odds? By using Northanger Abbey as a test case, the essay finds that there is a kind of fact-based empiricism (represented by Catherine Morland) that is hostile to conjecture but at the same time hospitable to romance. What are the implications of such a state of affairs for empirical truth and the probability of the novel?
article  Project_MUSE  lit_crit  epistemology  imagination  Cartesian  empiricism  18thC  19thC  Austen  novels  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert Alun Jones: Ambivalent Cartesians: Durkheim, Montesquieu, and Method (1994)
JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 100, No. 1 (Jul., 1994), pp. 1-39 -- Recent scholarship has emphasized Durkheim's early debt to German social science. Why, then, did Durkheim write his Latin thesis on Montesquieu, insisting that the latter had "laid down the principles of the new science"? The answer is twofold: first because Montesquieu himself was extremely ambivalent about the French Enlightenment's confident legacy of Cartesian reationalism and second because this made Montesquieu's The Spirit of the Laws the "perfect forge" within which Durkheim could explore his own ambivalence about the relative merits of French rationalism and German empiricism, and thus shape the tool-the comparative method-he applied in The Division of Labor in Society.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  18thC  19thC  Durkheim  Montesquieu  Cartesian  historicism  France  Germany  French_Enlightenment  social_sciences  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
[no title]
JSTOR: Revue d'Histoire littéraire de la France, 93e Année, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1993), pp. 702-716 -- Diderot issue from roundtable on Neveu de Rameau and Paradoxe sur le comédien downloaded pdf to Note -- Le Paradoxe sur le comédien de Diderot n'est pas une creatio ex nihilo. C'est une variation nouvelle sur un vieux topos de la doctrine rhétorique, Natura et Ars, Ingénium et Judicium, qui concerne l'orator en tant qu'actor aussi bien que l'interprétation du comédien. Diderot renouvelle le topos en introduisant, à la place de la traditionnelle conciliation entre natura et ars, ingenium et judicium, la distinction post-cartésienne moderne entre l'ego rationnel transcendantal et le moi subjectif, ce qui constitue une extension à l'art du comédien de la rhétorique rationaliste des Lumières. Mais la conception cicéronienne traditionnelle est encore bien vivante au XVII e siècle en France. Elle a été réaffirmée avec élégance par Rémond de Saint-Albine dans Le Comédien (1747), ouvrage qui a connu un long et vaste succès en Europe, et dont la doctrine peut être considérée comme l'équivalent "rocaille" de L'Art de l'acteur de Stanislavski. Cet article analyse le contenu de ce livre important et méconnu en opposition avec les théories de Diderot.
article  jstor  theater  actors  rhetoric  antiquity  Cicero  Quintillian  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Cartesian  self  sensibility  mind-body  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sylvain Menant: La rhétorique dans le Portatif [Dictionnaire Philosophique de Voltaire] (1995)
JSTOR: Revue d'Histoire littéraire de la France, 95e Année, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1995), pp. 177-186 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Contrairement à ce que laisse attendre son titre, le Dictionnaire philosophique portatif de Voltaire foisonne des figures les plus recherchées, empruntées à l'enseignement de la rhétorique tel qu'il était pratiqué dans les collèges de la Compagnie de Jésus dans la jeunesse de l'auteur. Cette rhétorique d'inspiration baroque reflète des conceptions précartésiennes; privilégiant l' élocution et les figures de pensée, fondée sur la variation, l'ornement, la surprise, elle vise moins à démontrer qu'à convaincre.
article  jstor  French_lit  rhetoric  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Voltaire  reading  audience  moral_philosophy  Cartesian  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Harold J. Cook - Body and Passions: Materialism and the Early Modern State | JSTOR: Osiris, 2nd Series, Vol. 17 (2002), pp. 25-48
A group of works written in the mid-seventeenth-century Netherlands shows many defenders of commerce and republicanism embracing some of the most unsettling tenets of the new and experimental philosophy. Their political arguments were based on a view consonant with Cartesianism, in which the body and its passions for the most part dominate reason, instead of the prevailing idea that reason could and should dominate the passions and through them the body. These arguments were in turn related to some of the new claims about the body that flowed from recent anatomical investigations, in a time and place comfortable with materialism. If ever there were a group of political theorists who grounded their views on contemporary science, this is it: Johann de Witt, the brothers De la Court, and Spinoza. They believed that the new philosophy showed it was unnatural and impoverishing to have a powerful head of state, natural and materially progressive to allow the self-interested pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness. --downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_science  political_history  17thC  Dutch  Cartesian  Spinoza  de_Witt  mind-body  emotions  materialism  mechanism  experimental_philosophy  medicine  political_economy  commerce-doux  republicanism  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey Burson: The Rise and Fall of Theological Enlightenment // Books // University of Notre Dame Press
Full title-- The Rise and Fall of Theological Enlightenment: Jean-Martin de Prades and Ideological Polarization in Eighteenth-Century France -- Book page with reviews and pdfs for TOC and Chapter 1 -- Downloaded pdfs to Note with markup of Chapter 1 -- Essential for philosophy and theology synthesis of Locke and Malebranche especially by Jesuits -- their influence during Regency and after Cardinal Fleury chased the Jansenists out of the Sorbonne after 1729. Growing radicalism of non theological Enlightenment and growing popularity of Jansenists and parlementaires plus tensions post War of Austrian Succession put temporary alliance of Jansenists, Jesuits, Sorbonne and court against Encyclopédie and effectively create the philosophes and anti-philosophes polarization.
books  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Catholics  theology  Jesuits  Jansenists  Fleury  Regency-France  Parlement  Locke  Malebranche  Cartesian  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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