dunnettreader + cambridge_school   48

Davide Panagia - A Theory of Aspects: Media Participation in Political Theory | Academia.edu
New Literary History (2014) - My aim in this essay is to elaborate a mode of political theorizing that is not beholden to the “how do you know?” question. Rather than focusing on epistemic arguments, I propose that people interested in studying political theory address the partiality of aspects that emerge when engaging works, and the participation of media in the creation of political concepts. Central to my elaborations is the aesthetic notion that there is no overarching rule that will determine how objects, peoples, and events relate to one another and stand out as relevant to political theory, and that there are no necessary qualifications for participation in political theorizing. The essay is comprised of three sections. The first engages three thinkers of the interpretive turn in political theory: Charles Taylor, Quentin Skinner, and James Tully. The second section assembles three images of thought drawn from three different expressions of three diverse thinkers: Roland Barthes, Stanley Cavell, and Jacques Derrida. In the third section I depart from the theoretical experimentation and interpretive work of the previous sections and redirect attention to the participation of media in political theorizing. I conclude the essay by suggesting that political theory is process of mediation between and amongst a diversity of elements that have no common measure. - Downloaded via MacMini - EF Mobile to File
political_philosophy  aspect_theory  political_culture  cultural_studies  'media  political_press  political_participation  mass_culture  cultural_critique  Cambridge_School  Taylor_Charles  Skinner  Cavell  Barthes  Derrida  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell, review essay - On historiography and theory confusion in Political Theory and its texts | JSTOR - The American Political Science Review (1986)
Reviewed Works: Texts in Context: Revisionist Methods for Studying the History of Political Theory by David Boucher; The Status and Appraisal of Classic Texts: An Essay on Political Theory, Its Inheritance, and the History of Ideas by Conal Condren
Review by: John G. Gunnell
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 80, No. 2 (Jun., 1986), pp. 631-639
behavioralism  intellectual_history  hermeneutics  political_philosophy  historiography  Skinner  contextualism  reviews  downloaded  books  social_theory  Cambridge_School  Pocock  article 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell - Interpretation and the History of Political Theory: Apology and Epistemology | JSTOR- The American Political Science Review (1982)
Interpretation and the History of Political Theory: Apology and Epistemology
John G. Gunnell
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 76, No. 2 (Jun., 1982), pp. 317-327 -- Recent challenges to traditional approaches and purposes for studying the history of political theory have raised questions about its constitution as both a subject matter and subfield of political science. Methodological arguments advocating what is characterized as a more truly historical mode of inquiry for understanding political ideas and recovering textual meaning have become increasingly popular. The relationship of these hermeneutical claims about historicity, such as that advanced by Quentin Skinner, to the actual practice of interpretation is problematical. Such claims are more a defense of a certain norm of historical investigation than a method of interpretation, and the implications of this norm for the reconstitution of the history of political theory require careful consideration. -- interesting collection of references re hermeneutics debates- Not just Anglo but eg Gadamer -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
hermeneutics  Cambridge_School  political_philosophy  jstor  Skinner  political_discourse  political_science  intellectual_history  article  Gadamer  historiography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Quentin Skinner - On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply to My Critics -- in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 127-146 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-moral_basis  Cambridge_School  Skinner  speech-act  contingency  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  genealogy-method  liberty  liberty-positive  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Nadia Urbinati - Sismonde de Sismondi and Republicanism after the French Revolution | JSTOR Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
Republicanism after the French Revolution: The Case of Sismonde de Sismondi -- in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 95-109 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  18thC  19thC  French_Revolution  constitutions  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  English_constitution  classicism  Roman_Republic  democracy  ancient_Greece  Sismondi  contextualism  Cambridge_School  Skinner  Burke  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Bryan Garsten - Liberalism and the Rhetorical Vision of Politics | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 83-93 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-moral_basis  Cambridge_School  Skinner  speech-act  contingency  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Melissa Lane - Doing Our Own Thinking for Ourselves: On Quentin Skinner's Genealogical Turn on JSTOR
Doing Our Own Thinking for Ourselves: On Quentin Skinner's Genealogical Turn - in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 71-82 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  Cambridge_School  Skinner  history-and-social_sciences  political_philosophy  political_discourse  language-politics  language-history  speech-act  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  genealogy-method  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
ADRIAN BLAU - UNCERTAINTY AND THE HISTORY OF IDEAS | JSTOR - History and Theory (Oct 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 358-372 -- Intellectual historians often make empirical claims, but can never know for certain if these claims are right. Uncertainty is thus inevitable for intellectual historians. But accepting uncertainty is not enough: we should also act on it, by trying to reduce and report it. We can reduce uncertainty by amassing valid data from different sources to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of competing explanations, rather than trying to "prove" an empirical claim by looking for evidence that fits it. Then we should report our degree of certainty in our claims. When we answer empirical questions in intellectual history, we are not telling our readers what happened: we are telling them how strong we think our evidence is—a crucial shift of emphasis. For intellectual historians, then, uncertainty is subjective, as discussed by Keynes and Collingwood; the paper thus explores three differences between subjective and objective uncertainty. Having outlined the theoretical basis of uncertainty, the paper then offers examples from actual research: Noel Malcolm's work shows how to reduce and report uncertainty about composition, and David Wootton's work shows how to reduce and report uncertainty about beliefs. -- VERY Anti Straussian based on extensive bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  intellectual_history-distorted  philosophy_of_history  hermeneutics  hermeneutics_of_suspicion  Strauss  Straussians  epistemology-history  evidence  coherence  uncertainty  Keynes  Keynes-uncertainty  Collingwood  objectivity  positivism  post-foundational  Cambridge_School  author_intention  reception  audience  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Dorothy Ross - Pocock’s Machiavellian Moment (1975) and Mine | s-usih.org - Nov 2015
Classics Series J.G.A. Pocock’s Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition (1975) When asked about a classic work… nice look at the ripple effects on both historiography of US political culture and intellectual history methods -- downloaded as pdf to Note
reviews  books  bookshelf  Pocock  civic_humanism  republicanism  US_history  US_politics  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  historiography  Cambridge_School  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  liberalism-republicanism_debates  downloaded  from instapaper
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Review - Skinner and Pocock in Context: Early Modern Political Thought Today | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 48, No. 1 (Feb., 2009), pp. 113-121
Reviewed works: (1) Rethinking the Foundations of Modern Political Thought by Annabel Brett; James Tully; Holly Hamilton-Bleakley; (2) The Political Imagination in History: Essays concerning J. G. A. Pocock by D. N. DeLuna; Perry Anderson; Glenn Burgess -- the fairly lengthy essay is unsigned except "Wesleyan University", the journal's home -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  kindle  intellectual_history  historiography  Cambridge_School  Skinner  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Ian Ward - Helping the Dead Speak: Leo Strauss, Quentin Skinner and the Arts of Interpretation in Political Thought | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 235-255
In the wake of the "hermeneutical turn" two approaches to textual interpretation have come to wield considerable disciplinary influence in North American political theory circles: those of Leo Strauss and Quentin Skinner. Their respective approaches to texts in the history of political thought are generally regarded as competitor endeavors; indeed, the view that these approaches are downright antithetical enjoys the status of a disciplinary commonplace. I interrogate this commonplace and attempt to clarify what exactly is at stake in the differences between these two thinkers' interpretative approaches. Such efforts are repaid, I believe, by a more nuanced methodological self-awareness that discloses a more cooperative, and less antagonistic, view of the relationship between the two thinkers' hermeneutical understandings. -- check bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  Skinner  Strauss  Cambridge_School  Straussians  hermeneutics  Gadamer  concepts  concepts-change  meaning  philosophy_of_language  rhetoric  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan Cromartie - Harringtonian Virtue: Harrington, Machiavelli, and the Method of the Moment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 987-1009
This article presents a reinterpretation of James Harrington's writings. It takes issue with J. G. A. Pocock's reading, which treats him as importing into England a Machiavellian `language of political thought'. This reading is the basis of Pocock's stress on the republicanism of eighteenth-century opposition values. Harrington's writings were in fact a most implausible channel for such ideas. His outlook owed much to Stoicism. Unlike the Florentine, he admired the contemplative life; was sympathetic to commerce; and was relaxed about the threat of `corruption' (a concept that he did not understand). These views can be associated with his apparent aims: the preservation of a national church with a salaried but politically impotent clergy; and the restoration of the royalist gentry to a leading role in English politics. Pocock's hypothesis is shown to be conditioned by his method; its weaknesses reflect some difficulties inherent in the notion of `languages of thought'. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Harrington  landed_interest  Machiavelli  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  commerce  common_good  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  Stoicism  gentry  Royalists  mixed_government  English_constitution  politics-and-theory  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  corruption  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Armitage, ed. - British Political Thought History Literature And Theory 1500-1800 | History of ideas | Cambridge University Press
Downloaded introduction pdf to Note -- The history of British political thought has been one of the most fertile fields of Anglo-American historical writing in the last half-century. David Armitage brings together an interdisciplinary and international team of authors to consider the impact of this scholarship on the study of early modern British history, English literature, and political theory. Leading historians survey the impact of the history of political thought on the 'new' histories of Britain and Ireland; eminent literary scholars offer novel critical methods attentive to literary form, genre, and language; and distinguished political theorists treat the relationship of history and theory in studies of rights and privacy. The outstanding examples of critical practice collected here will encourage the emergence of fresh research on the historical, critical, and theoretical study of the English-speaking world in the period around 1500–1800. This volume celebrates the contribution of the Folger Institute to British studies over many years. -- ebook Adobe not kindle
books  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  English_lit  political_culture  16thC  17thC  18thC  Cambridge_School  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Ireland  Scotland  1707_Union  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Shaking the Foundations: A Reply to My Critics | David Armitage
Armitage, David. In Press. “Shaking the Foundations: A Reply to My Critics”. Contemporary Political Theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  historiography  intellectual_history  Cambridge_School  international_system  global_history  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Leo Catana - Lovejoy's Readings of Bruno: Or How Nineteenth-century History of Philosophy was "Transformed" into the History of Ideas | Scribd copy
Leo Catana, Lovejoy's Readings of Bruno: Or How Nineteenth-century History of Philosophy was "Transformed" into the History of Ideas -- From: Journal of the History of Ideas, Volume 71, Number 1, January 2010
article  intellectual_history  historiography-19thC  Cambridge_School  Lovejoy  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Anglophone Historicism: From Modernist Method to Post-analytic Philosophy [eScholarship] (2009)
Original Citation:
Mark Bevir, “Anglophone Historicism: From Modernist Method to Post-analytic Philosophy”, Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (2009), 211-224

Keywords:
Historicism, Modernism, Postanalytic Philosophy, Quentin Skinner
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  historiography  20thC  historicism  Modernism  positivism  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  concepts  meaning  Skinner  Cambridge_School  contextualism  postanalytic_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
John M. Warner and John T. Scott - Sin City: Augustine and Machiavelli's Reordering of Rome | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 73, No. 3 (JULY 2011), pp. 857-871
We examine Machiavelli's critical appropriation of Augustine's analysis of Rome's decline and fall in order to understand his own interpretation of Rome and the lessons it offers for a successful republic. If Machiavelli's departure from Augustine is obvious, as seen for example in his exculpation of Romulus for the fratricide Augustine condemns, equally illuminating is what Machiavelli borrows from him. For Augustine, Romulus' fratricide discloses the limits of pagan virtue and politics and reveals that the civic republican view of an early virtuous republic is nostalgic if not impossible. Machiavelli agrees with Augustine about the character of Rome, yet embraces the ambitious and acquisitive politics Augustine rebuffs. Machiavelli not only excuses Romulus' fratricide in "ordering" Rome, but makes it the archetypal act that must be repeated through "reordering" to sustain the state against the perennial problem of corruption. We thereby address two of the primary issues in Machiavelli scholarship—the character of his republicanism and the nature and extent of his innovation with regard to his ancient sources—and suggest that the "civic republican" or "neo-Roman" interpretation of Machiavelli is incorrect in its conclusions concerning his republicanism as well as his relationship to his ancient sources. -- paywall Cambridge journals -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Renaissance  Machiavelli  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Livy  Augustine  pagans  civic_virtue  neo-Roman  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Strauss  Skinner  Pocock  Cambridge_School  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael S. Roth - Narrative as Enclosure: The Contextual Histories of H. Stuart Hughes | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 51, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1990), pp. 505-515
Hughes works on European intellectual_history had been reissued. Contrast of Hughes with Lovejoy and with the contextual approach after the linguistic turn, as well as with the increasingly hegemonic "cultural_history" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  20thC  Lovejoy  Cambridge_School  linguistic_turn  cultural_history  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John P. McCormick - Machiavelli against Republicanism: On the Cambridge School's "Guicciardinian Moments" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 5 (Oct., 2003), pp. 615-643
Scholars loosely affiliated with the "Cambridge School" (e.g., Pocock, Skinner, Viroli, and Pettit) accentuate rule of law, common good, class equilibrium, and non-domination in Machiavelli's political thought and republicanism generally but underestimate the Florentine's preference for class conflict and ignore his insistence on elite accountability. The author argues that they obscure the extent to which Machiavelli is an anti-elitist critic of the republican tradition, which they fail to disclose was predominantly oligarchic. The prescriptive lessons these scholars draw from republicanism for contemporary politics reinforce rather than reform the "senatorial," electorally based, and socioeconomically agnostic republican model (devised by Machiavelli's aristocratic interlocutor, Guicciardini, and refined by Montesquieu and Madison) that permits common citizens to acclaim but not determine government policies. Cambridge School textual interpretations and practical proposals have little connection with Machiavelli's "tribunate," class-specific model of popular government elaborated in The Discourses, one that relies on extra-electoral accountability techniques and embraces deliberative popular assemblies.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography  16thC  21stC  Machiavelli  republicanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  oligarchy  elites  populism  public_opinion  popular_politics  political_participation  neo-Roman  class_conflict  accountability  tribune  Guiccidarini  Cambridge_School  rule_of_law  common_good  non-domination  liberty  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Branko Mitrović: Intentionalism, Intentionality, and Reporting Beliefs | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Oct., 2009), pp. 180-198
Downloaded pdf to Note -- The dominant view of twentieth-century analytic philosophy has been that all thinking is always in a language, that languages are vehicles of thought. The same view has been widespread in continental philosophy as well. In recent decades, however, the opposite view—that languages serve merely to express language-independent thought-contents or propositions—has been more widely accepted. The debate has a direct equivalent in the philosophy of history: when historians report the beliefs of historical figures, do they report the sentences or propositions that these historical figures believed to be true or false? In this paper I argue in favor of the latter, intentionalist, view. My arguments center mostly on the problems with translation that are likely to arise when a historian reports the beliefs of historical figures who expressed them in a language other than the one in which the historian is writing. In discussing these problems the paper presents an application of John Searle's theory of intentionality to the philosophy of history.
paper  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  translation  concepts  intentionality  philosophy_of_language  mind  bibliography  Cambridge_School  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Newman, review - Nuttall, Jenni. The Creation of Lancastrian Kingship: Literature, Language and Politics in Late Medieval England | The Medieval Review June 2009
Nuttall, Jenni. The Creation of Lancastrian Kingship: Literature, Language and Politics in Late Medieval England. Cambridge Series in Medieval Literature. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. 187. $90.00. ISBN: 9780521874960.

Reviewed by:

University of Toronto This book provides a convincing account of how the Lancastrian literature offers not only another facet to the period's politics, but, circulating "side-by-side" with official and semi-official, "participates in the process of commentary, engaging closely with the Crown's own rhetoric" (127). Rather than bracket or dissolve the distinction between literary and non-literary texts, Nuttall puts them into conversation with one another. In this way, she reveals continuities between these different discourses, but and throws into relief the nuanced and layered qualities of Lancastrian literature which allow it to address differing messages to multiple readers. In this way, her book offers both a fresh and convincing take on Lancastrian political history and its rich, sustained readings of the period's literary texts restore their political valences without reducing them to partisan tokens.
books  reviews  kindle-available  14thC  15thC  British_history  British_politics  English_lit  intellectual_history  political_culture  monarchy  politics-and-literature  Cambridge_School  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
J. T. Peacey: Nibbling at "Leviathan": Politics and Theory in England in the 1650s (1998)
JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 2 (1998), pp. 241-257 -- corrects or elaborates Skinner assumptions re writers who picked up some Hobbesian elements after Leviathan published -- difficulty establishing intentions and reception for "context"
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  Britain  Interregnum  Hobbes  political_press  Cambridge_School  historiography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Duncan S. A. Bell -- Language, Legitimacy, and the Project of Critique (2002)
JSTOR: Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, Vol. 27, No. 3 (July-Sept. 2002), pp. 327-350 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  IR  Cambridge_School  language-politics  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Rafael Major: The Cambridge School and Leo Strauss: Texts and Context of American Political Science (2005)
JSTOR: Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 58, No. 3 (Sep., 2005), pp. 477-485 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- a Straussian accuses the Cambridge School of executing a takeover of US political science while cutting out Leo in all round obfuscating bad faith -- pass the popcorn
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Cambridge_School  Strauss  social_sciences-post-WWII  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Quentin Skinner - On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply to My Critics (2012)
Project MUSE - Journal of the History of Ideas Volume 73, Number 1, January 2012 pp. 127-146 | 10.1353/jhi.2012.0010 -- A symposium, held at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in October 2009, marked the fortieth anniversary of the publication of Quentin Skinner's essay "Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas." Four scholars, Melissa Lane, Bryan Garsten, Nadia Urbinati, and Philip Pettit, presented appraisals of Skinner's work. In his "Reply to My Critics" Skinner addresses the papers of each of the four scholars.
article  paywall  Project_MUSE  intellectual_history  historiography  Cambridge_School  17thC  Hobbes  liberty  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay by: John E. Toews - Intellectual History after the Linguistic Turn: The Autonomy of Meaning and the Irreducibility of Experience (1987)
Heavily cited, see jstor info page - downloaded pdf to Note -- JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 92, No. 4 (Oct., 1987), pp. 879-907 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- Worlds Apart: The Market and the Theater in Anglo-American Thought, 1550-1750 by Jean-Christophe Agnew; --**-- In the American Province: Studies in the History and Historiography of Ideas by David A. Hollinger;  --**-- Marxism and Totality: The Adventures of a Concept from Lukacs to Habermas by Martin Jay;  --**-- Munich and Theatrical Modernism: Politics, Playwriting and Performance, 1890-1914 by Peter Jelavich;  --**-- Modern European Intellectual History: Reappraisals and New Perspectives by Dominick LaCapra; --**-- Steven L. Kaplan;  --**-- Rethinking Intellectual History: Texts, Contexts, Language by Dominick LaCapra;  --**-- History and Criticism by Dominick LaCapra; --**-- Prophets of Extremity: Nietzsche, Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida by Allan Megill;  --**-- Virtue, Commerce and History: Essays on Political Thought and History, Chiefly in the Eighteenth Century by J. G. A. Pocock;  --**-- Foucault, Marxismm and History: Mode of Production versus Mode of Information by Mark Poster;  --**-- Philosophy in History by Richard Rorty; J. B. Schneewind; Quentin Skinner;  --**-- The Return of Grand Theory in the Human Sciences by Quentin Skinner
books  bookshelf  historiography  intellectual_history  cultural_history  anthropology  language  social_sciences-post-WWII  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
B. W. Young, review essay - Enlightenment Political Thought and the Cambridge School (2009)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 52, No. 1 (Mar., 2009), pp. 235-251 -- paywall 24-hours $5.99 Cambridge Journals url http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X08007383 -- Works reviewed: --**-- John Locke, Toleration and Early Enlightenment Culture: Religious Intolerance and Arguments Religious Toleration in Early Modern and 'Early Enlightenment' Europe by John Marshall;  --**-- The Case for the Enlightenment: Scotland and Naples, 1680-1760 by John Robertson;  --**-- Jealousy of Trade: International Competition and Nation-State in Historical Perspective by Istvan Hont; --**--  The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Political Thought by Mark Goldie; Robert Wokler
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  paywall  find  intellectual_history  historiography  Cambridge_School  17thC  18thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_economy  Britain  Italy  France  Germany  Dutch  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  religious_history  religious_culture  church_history  tolerance  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Emile Perreau-Saussine: Quentin Skinner in Context (2007)
JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 69, No. 1 (Winter, 2007), pp. 106-122 -- downloaded pdf to Note As Quentin Skinner argues, political thinkers are best read in historical context. But in what context do Skinner's own interpretations of the history of political thought belong? This essay places his denunciation of grand narratives in the context of the decline of Whig interpretations of history and presents his Republicanism as a substitute source of legitimacy in the wake of the collapse of the British Empire and of the loss of social influence of Christianity. This essay also argues that Skinner's inquiries cannot be understood solely in the light of their historical context. His historical work is linked with his republican philosophy. The relation between his concept of liberty and his contextualism shows the dependence of his contextualist methodology on specific philosophical commitments.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Cambridge_School  historiography  historiography-Whig  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Gad Prudovsky: Can we Ascribe to Past Thinkers Concepts They had no Linguistic Means to Express? (1997)
JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 36, No. 1 (Feb., 1997), pp. 15-31 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This article takes a clear-cut case in which a historian (Alexander Koyré) ascribes to a writer (Galileo) a concept ("inertial mass") which neither the writer nor his contemporaries had the linguistic means to express. On the face of it the case may seem a violation of a basic methodological maxim in historiography: "avoid anachronistic ascriptions!" The aim of the article is to show that Koyré's ascription, and others of its kind, are legitimate; and that the methodological maxim should not be given the strict reading which some writers recommend. More specifically, the conceptual repertoire of historical figures need not be reconstructed solely in terms of the social and linguistic conventions of their time and place.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  methodology  language  concepts  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  Cambridge_School  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
C Knight: Unit-ideas unleashed: a reinterpretation and reassessment of Lovejovian methodology in the history of ideas (2012) - Enlighten
Knight, C. (2012) Unit-ideas unleashed: a reinterpretation and reassessment of Lovejovian methodology in the history of ideas. Journal of the Philosophy of History, 6 (2). pp. 195-217 -- pdf from philpapers -- This article argues for an unconventional interpretation of Arthur O. Lovejoy’s distinctive approach to method in the history of ideas. It is maintained that the value of the central concept of the ‘unit-idea’ has been misunderstood by friends and foes alike. The commonality of unit-ideas at different times and places is often defined in terms of familial resemblance. But such an approach must necessarily define unit-ideas as being something other than the smallest conceptual unit. It is therefore in tension with Lovejoy’s methodological prescription and, more importantly, disregards a potentially important aspect of intellectual history – the smaller conceptual units themselves. In response to this, an alternative interpretation of unit-ideas as ‘elemental’ – as the smallest identifiable conceptual components – is put forward. Unlike the familial resemblance approach, the elemental approach can provide a plausible explanation for changes in ideas. These are construed as being either the creation of new unit-ideas, the disappearance of existing ones, or alterations in the groups of unit-ideas that compose idea-complexes. The focus on the movement of unit-ideas and idea-complexes through history can also be sensitive to contextual issues, carefully distinguishing the different meanings that single words may have, in much the way that both Lovejoy and his influential critic Quentin Skinner suggest.
article  intellectual_history  historiography  Lovejoy  Cambridge_School  concepts  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Leo Catana: Lovejoy's Readings of Bruno: Or How Nineteenth-century History of Philosophy was "Transformed" into the History of Ideas
Project MUSE - Leo Catana. "Lovejoy's Readings of Bruno: Or How Nineteenth-century History of Philosophy was "Transformed" into the History of Ideas." Journal of the History of Ideas71.1 (2010): 91-112. Project MUSE. Web. 28 Aug. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>.....Available as html and pdf. Arthur O. Lovejoy made rather grand methodological statements about the nature of history of ideas in his Great Chain of Being (1936). These statements were, it is argued, rhetorical declarations, intended to produce the conviction in the minds of his readers that history of ideas was distinct from history of philosophy and thus deserved institutional independence; they were not adequate descriptions of the method actually practiced. Instead, Lovejoy's historiographical practice can be contextualized within nineteenth-century general histories of philosophy. His studies on Giordano Bruno, dating from 1904 and 1936 respectively, illustrate this historiographical continuity.
article  Project_MUSE  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Bruno  Spinoza  Bayle  Neoplatonism  metaphysics  eclecticism  Lovejoy  concepts  EF-add  historiography  Cambridge_School  18thC  Germany  Renaissance 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
John Patrick Diggins: Arthur O. Lovejoy and the Challenge of Intellectual History (2006)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 181-208.....Heavy on anti pragmatism and anti modernism. ?...Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  20thC  intellectual_history  historiography  pragmatism  Lovejoy  Cambridge_School  Dewey  James_William  concepts  culture  culture_wars  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen: Making Sense of Conceptual Change (2008)
JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 47, No. 3 (Oct., 2008), pp. 351-372.....Downloaded pdf to Note. ?... Arthur Lovejoy's history of unit-ideas and the history of concepts are often criticized for being historically insensitive forms of history-writing. Critics claim that one cannot find invariable ideas or concepts in several contexts or times in history without resorting to some distortion. One popular reaction is to reject the history of ideas and concepts altogether, and take linguistic entities as the main theoretical units. Another reaction is to try to make ideas or concepts context-sensitive and to see their histories as dynamic processes of transformation. The main argument in this paper is that we cannot abandon ideas or concepts as theoretical notions if we want to write an intelligible history of thought. They are needed for the categorization and classification of thinking, and in communication with contemporaries. Further, the criterion needed to subsume historical concepts under a general concept cannot be determined merely on the basis of their family resemblances, which allows variation without an end, since talk of the same concepts implies that they share something in common. I suggest that a concept in history should be seen to be composed of two components: the core of a concept and the margin of a concept. On the basis of this, we can develop a vocabulary for talking about conceptual changes. The main idea is that conceptual continuity requires the stability of the core of the concept, but not necessarily that of the margin, which is something that enables a description of context-specific features. If the core changes, we ought to see it as a conceptual replacement.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  concepts  Lovejoy  Cambridge_School  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
BRANKO MITROVIĆ - ATTRIBUTION OF CONCEPTS AND PROBLEMS WITH ANACHRONISM | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Oct 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 303-327 -- Many long-standing debates about anachronistic concept-attributions derive from an essentialist understanding of concepts that is often difficult to sustain for metaphysical or epistemological reasons. The intentionalist alternative to essentialism elaborated in this article successfully clarifies and avoids many standard problems with anachronism. -- very interesting bibliography covering post WWII analytic philosophy of social sciences, epistemology, and debates over "meaning" - concepts, intentionality conceptual change etc after logical positivism was dead -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  epistemology-history  historiography  analytical_philosophy  concepts  concepts-change  intentionality  intentionality-collective  Cambridge_School  belief  downloaded 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir: The Errors of Linguistic Contextualism (1992)
JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Oct., 1992), pp. 276-298.....Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Lloyd S. Kramer: Intellectual History and Reality: The Search for Connections (1986)
JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 13, No. 2/3 (Summer-Fall 1986), pp. 517-545.....Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  social_history  social_theory  intellectual_history  Cambridge_School  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
B.W. Young, review essay: ENLIGHTENMENT POLITICAL THOUGHT AND THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL | Historical Journal (2009)
B. W. YOUNG (2009). ENLIGHTENMENT POLITICAL THOUGHT AND THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL. The Historical Journal, 52, pp 235-251. doi:10.1017/S0018246X08007383. ?....
--- John Locke, toleration and early Enlightenment culture: religious intolerance and arguments for religious toleration in early modern and ‘early Enlightenment’ Europe. By John Marshall. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

--- The case for the Enlightenment: Scotland and Naples, 1680–1760. By John Robertson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

--- Jealousy of trade: international competition and nation-state in historical perspective. By Istvan Hont. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006.

--- The Cambridge history of eighteenth-century political thought. Edited by Mark Goldie and Robert Wokler. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
article  books  reviews  historiography  Cambridge_School  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  political_philosophy  political_economy  intellectual_history  political_culture  paywall  find  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

'media  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1707_Union  Absolutism  accountability  American_colonies  American_Revolution  anachronism  analytical_philosophy  ancient_constitution  ancient_Greece  Anglo-Saxons  anthropology  article  aspect_theory  audience  Augustine  author_intention  Barthes  Bayle  behavioralism  belief  bibliography  Bodin  books  bookshelf  Britain  British_Empire  British_history  British_politics  Bruno  Burke  Calvinist  Cambridge_School  Cavell  church_history  Church_of_England  city_states  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  classicism  class_conflict  coherence  Collingwood  commerce  common_good  common_law  concepts  concepts-change  constitutions  contextualism  contingency  corruption  cultural_critique  cultural_history  cultural_studies  culture  culture_wars  democracy  Derrida  Dewey  divine_right  downloaded  Dutch  Early_Republic  eclecticism  EF-add  elites  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  English_lit  Enlightenment  epistemology  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  eScholarship  etexts  evidence  feudalism  find  fortune  France  free_will  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Gadamer  genealogy-method  gentry  Germany  global_history  Gothic_constitution  grace  Guiccidarini  Harrington  hermeneutics  hermeneutics_of_suspicion  historians-and-politics  historical_change  historicism  historiography  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  history-and-social_sciences  history_of_science  Hobbes  House_of_Commons  humanism  human_nature  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  intentionality  intentionality-collective  international_system  Interregnum  IR  Ireland  Italy  James_William  jstor  Keynes  Keynes-uncertainty  kindle  kindle-available  Koselleck  landed_interest  language  language-history  language-politics  legal_history  legal_system  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberty  liberty-positive  linguistic_turn  links  Livy  Lovejoy  Machiavelli  mass_culture  meaning  metaphysics  methodology  mind  mixed_government  Modernism  monarchy  neo-Roman  Neoplatonism  non-domination  Norman_Conquest  objectivity  oligarchy  ontology  ontology-social  pagans  paper  paywall  Pettit  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_science  Pocock  political_culture  political_discourse  political_economy  political_history  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  political_science  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  politics-and-theory  politiques  popular_politics  populism  positivism  post-foundational  postanalytic_philosophy  postmodern  pragmatism  Project_MUSE  public_opinion  reception  Reformation  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_history  religious_wars  Renaissance  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  resistance_theory  reviews  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-political  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Royalists  rule_of_law  scholarship  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Sismondi  Skinner  social_history  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_theory  speech-act  Spinoza  Stoicism  Strauss  Straussians  Taylor_Charles  tolerance  translation  tribune  uncertainty  US_history  US_politics  website 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: