dunnettreader + cambridge_platonists   13

John Sellars, review essay - Renaissance Philosophy (2012) | Academia.edu
Review article on Christopher C. Celenza, ed., Angelo Poliziano’s Lamia: Text, Translation, and Introductory Studies, and S. Clucas, P. J. Forshaw, V. Rees, eds, Laus Platonici Philosophi: Marsilio Ficino and His Influence, for British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/6 (2012), 1195-1204 -- Keywords: Renaissance Philosophy, Angelo Poliziano, and Marsilio Ficino -- complains that work on Early Modern tends to look at links to medieval and back to anciengs, ignoring Renaissance contributions for much of anything beyond translation (e.g. Ficino just regurgitating Neoplatonism) and these 2 volumes help to see both what was going on philosophically, that humanism wasn't just work on ancient texts, as well as links to Early Moderns. Didn't download
books  reviews  article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Renaissance  medieval_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  scholasticism  Aristotelian  Neoplatonism  humanism  Ficino  Poliziano  Cambridge_Platonists  More_Henry  identity  Locke-person 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Is God a Mindless Vegetable? Cudworth on Stoic Theology (2011) | Academia.edu
Intellectual History Review 21/2 (2011), 121-33 -- In the late sixteenth century a number of influential writers claimed Stoicism to be compatible with Christianity but by the mid eighteenth century, Stoicism had come to be associated with atheism. What happened during the course of the reception of Stoicism in the intervening period? While it remains unclear who was the first person to call the Stoics atheists, there is no doubt that the most philosophically sustained analysis of Stoic theology during this period is to be found in Ralph Cudworth's True Intellectual System of the Universe, published in 1678. Cudworth's aim in this work is to catalogue and then attack all existing forms of atheism and one of the four principal forms of atheism he identifies he calls ‘Stoical’. However, in Cudworth's complex taxonomy of different forms of theism and atheism, Stoicism appears twice, first as a form of atheism but also as a form of imperfect theism. The aim of this study is to examine Cudworth's claims about Stoic theology, assessing their fairness, but also placing them within the wider context of the early modern reception of Stoicism. -- Keywords: Atheism, Stoicism, Cambridge Platonism, and Ralph Cudworth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Stoicism  theology  atheism  determinism  God-existence  God-attributes  Cambridge_Platonists  Cudworth  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, Stoics Against Stoics in Cudworth's A Treatise of Freewill (2012) | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/5 (2012), 935-52 -- In his A Treatise of Freewill, Ralph Cudworth argues against Stoic determinism by drawing on what he takes to be other concepts found in Stoicism, notably the claim that some things are ‘up to us’ (ἐφ᾽ ἡμῖν) and that these things are the product of our choice (προαίρεσις). These concepts are central to the late Stoic Epictetus and it appears at first glance as if Cudworth is opposing late Stoic voluntarism against early Stoic determinism. This paper argues that in fact, despite his claim to be drawing on Stoic doctrine, Cudworth uses these terms with a meaning first articulated only later, by the Peripatetic commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Alexander of Aphrodisias, Cambridge Platonism, Epictetus, Freewill and Determinism, and Ralph Cudworth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  determinism  free_will  late_antiquity  Alexander_of_Aphrodisias  Cambridge_Platonists  Cudworth  17thC  18thC  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Danton B. Sailor - Cudworth and Descartes (1962) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1962), pp. 133-140 -- followup to 1960 JHI article on Descartes and the Cambridge Platonists, which claims in focusing on John Smith, it misrepresents Cudworth on both theological and philosophical issues - Cudworth was enthusiastic re Cartesian natural philosophy, and embraced particular claims of Descartes that contradicted Hobbes’s views on corpuscularian transmission of motion that had implications for some of his theological oppositions to Hobbes
article  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  Descartes  Cudworth  Hobbes  Cambridge_Platonists  Cartesian  materialism  motion  bibliography  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Cornelia Wilde - Seraphic Companions: The Friendship between Elizabeth Gauden and Simon Patrick | Early Modern Literary Studies (2014
Special Issue 22: Communities and Companionship in Early Modern Literature and Culture (2014) -- This essay explores the friendship between Simon Patrick, future bishop of Ely, and Elizabeth Gauden, one of his parishioners, as an example of Neo-Platonic, chaste, yet impassioned friendship, between the sexes: Based on a combination of Neo-Platonic metaphysics of love, Aristotelian notions of philia, and legitimised by the ideal of Christian charity, the friendship’s spiritual aim is the two ‘soul mates’’ mutual intellectual and emotional refinement in order to be united with the heavenly community and the divine. The ideal of their seraphic companionship is to be achieved through the every-day practice of their friendship, that is, in their actual meetings and through their correspondence (Cambridge University Library Add. MS 19). Patrick and Gauden act as friends by discussing questions of theological and philosophical import, by advising each other on matters spiritual and mundane, and by sharing in social and devotional practices. Through Patrick, the two friends are connected to a ‘this-worldly’ intellectual and religious community the philosophical and theological origins of which can be located within the most important school of 17thC Platonic philosophy, Cambridge Platonism. Patrick, too, counts as a Cambridge Platonists, whose theological views and emphasis on matters of practical divinity characterise him as a prominent figure of post-Restoration liberal Anglicanism. Patrick and Gauden are a virtually unknown example of the 17thC trend for intellectual friendships between men and women as Ruth Perry has identified it (1985). The friendship is presented as a form of sociability that offered women a dynamic role within the learned community and furthered their active religious participation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  religious_culture  17thC  Church_of_England  Restoration  Cambridge_Platonists  Patrick_Simon  correspondence  friendship  women-intellectuals  gender-and-religion  gender_relations  sociability  devotional_practices  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Nathaniel Culverwell, An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature [1646], ed. Robert A. Greene and Hugh MacCallum - Online Library of Liberty
Nathaniel Culverwell, An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature, ed. Robert A. Greene and Hugh MacCallum, foreword by Robert A. Greene (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/900> -- An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature is a concerted effort to find a middle way between the two extremes that dominated the religious dispute of the English civil war in the seventeenth century. At one extreme end of the spectrum was the antinomian assertion that the elect were redeemed by God’s free grace and thereby free from ordinary moral obligations. At the other end of the spectrum was the Arminian rejection of predestination and assertion that Christ died for all, not just for the elect. Faced with the violence of these disputes, Nathaniel Culverwell attempted a moderate defense of reason and natural law, arguing, in the words of Robert Greene, that “reason and faith are distinct lights, yet they are not opposed; they are complementary and harmonious. Reason is the image of God in man, and to deny right reason is to deny our relation to God.” -- Culverwell clearly intended to respond to Francis Bacon’s call for “a temperate and careful treatise … which as a kind of divine logic, should lay down proper precepts touching the use of human reason in theology.” -- Although, unlike the Cambridge Platonists, he quotes or refers to Bacon’s writings frequently enough to indicate considerable knowledge and approval of the Baconian gospel, the spirit of the Discourse is basically at odds with Bacon’s plan for man’s intellectual progress. In his emphasis upon scholastic psychology and his indebtedness to Aristotle, Aquinas, and Suarez, as well as in his flourishing rhetoric and richly metaphorical style, Culverwell does not forward the Great Instauration.
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  theology  natural_law  English_Civil_War  Cambridge_Platonists  Calvinist  antinomian  Presbyterians  Arminian  reason  revelation  faith  religious_belief  Aristotelian  Aquinas  Suarez  Bacon  moral_psychology  obligation  religious_culture  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Alfred Caldecott, Hugh Ross Mackintosh, eds. - Selections from the Literature of Theism (1904 - 472 pgs) - Google Books
Thomas Aquinas *--* Descartes *--* Spinoza *--* The Cambridge Platonists *--* Berkeley *--* Kant *--* Schleiermacher *--* Cousin *--* Comte *--* Mansel *--* Lotze *--* Martineau *--* Janet *--* Ritschl -- each author introduced by brief essay but more interesting intellectual framework of the editors comes out in their footnotes -- not exactly a companion to Caldecott history of British and American philosophy of religion, since his history covers a large number of thinkers and doesn't include Continental except as needed to explain the Anglo-American authors, but still useful for the intellectual framework of increasingly confident academic approach to philosophy of religion as distinct from theology -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_religion  17thC  18thC  19thC  Descartes  Spinoza  Spinozism  Cambridge_Platonists  Berkeley  Kant  Schleiermacher  Comte  German_Idealism  British_Idealism  Hegelian  hermeneutics  moral_philosophy  cosmology  materialism  mind-body  metaphysics  God-attributes  God-existence  realism  scepticism  intuitionism  sociology_of_religion  phenomenology  Fin-de-Siècle  modernity  Victorian  Edwardian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Alfred Caldecott - The Philosophy of Religion in England and America (1901) - Google Books
Downloaded pdf to Note -- interesting from standpoint of how he classifies the philosophical elements - e.g. lumps Bolingbroke with Berkeley and Butler, not with Deists or Hume - clearly doesn't see how similar Bolingbroke and Hume really were, unlike Warburton who grasped it; also doesn't sneer like Leslie Stephen -- a specimen of fin de siècle academic professionalization after the divinity training raison d'être and "vocation" of Anglo-American universities had evaporated
books  etexts  Google_Books  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_religion  British_history  US_history  reason  revelation  cosmology  God-attributes  God-existence  creation_ex_nilho  creation  scepticism  theism  Cambridge_Platonists  Locke-religion  Deism  rational_religion  natural_religion  materialism  mind-body  mind-theory_of  idealism-transcendental  subjectivism  Butler  Berkeley  Bolingbroke  theodicy  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  ecclesiology  Hegelian  British_Idealism  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  obligation  intuitionism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
A BOOK IN PROGRESS [PART 16]: MORALITY’S SUBJECTIVE TURN | Pandaemonium
the unravelling of morality in the 20thC, from the intuitionism of GE Moore to JL Mackie’s ‘error theory’ and moral nihilism. This extract begins with Moore and looks at how intuitionism gave way to emotivism. -- Like moral truths themselves, Prichard clearly saw his case as self-evident and intuitive. The idea of moral truths as intuitions harked back to the English Platonists of the 18thC. Prichard’s essay helped give those ideas new traction, launching the Cambridge Intuitionist school, that included WD Ross, EF Carritt, WHB Joseph and CD Broad. For each of the Intuitionists the good was self-evident. The trouble was that the goods that were self-evident were not the same to all of them. Since no empirical fact or rational argument could settle this debate, ..so the very notion of moral truth began to disintegrate. -- ‘Questions as to “values”’, Bertrand Russell wrote, ‘lie wholly outside the domain of knowledge.’ So arose ‘emotivism’, first sketched by AJ Ayer in his groundbreaking 1936 book Language, Truth and Logic -- Like Hume, Ayer insisted that when we talk of right and wrong we are not directly referring to things in the world but to our own attitudes towards these things. --The American philosopher Charles L Stevenson developed the emotivist argument, especially in his 1944 book Ethics and Language.-- GE Moore was no emotivist, nor thought that values were simply subjective. Yet the argument he set running in the Principia Ethica led inexorably to Stevenson’s emotivism. -- To suggest that slavery is a good would be more than simply ‘odd’. The trouble with emotivism is that it finds it difficult – nay, impossible – to capture this distinction.
intellectual_history  20thC  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  morality-conventional  analytical_philosophy  morality-objective  EF-add  metaethics  utilitarianism  obligation  Logical_Positivism  Cambridge_Platonists 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Treasures in Focus # 8 - Ralph Cudworth, 'The true intellectual system of the universe' (London, 1678) [Christ's College Library, C.18.13] | Treasures at Christ's College, Cambridge - July 2013
Vol 1 of projected 3 part work on liberty and necessity - blog post has images of frontispiece etc - Cudworth dedicated his mammoth work to Heneage, Lord Finch, who served as Lord Chancellor from 1675 to his death in 1682. The Finch family was a strong patron of Cudworth and his Neoplatonist colleagues. -- Interesting Cudworth sponsored by Tories and his daughter connected with radical Whigs like Locke -- Bolingbroke's family strikes again - when Bolingbroke citing Cudworth he's citing someone who would have been within his family's spheres in two directions
books  17thC  intellectual_history  British_history  Cudworth  Neoplatonism  Cambridge_Platonists  Bolingbroke-family  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Online guide to texts in early modern metaethics (Cole Mitchell)
This is an online guide to texts in early modern metaethics, organized by author in rough chronological order, and maintained by Cole Mitchell. I try to keep the focus on topics of metaethical interest: reason and the passions, the status of moral truths and their relation to God, the ‘why be moral?’ question, the relation between morality and self-interest, analogies between morality and other domains (geometry, law, aesthetics), teleology and human nature, etc.
This guide is still pretty rough and messy. Any feedback on this or similar projects would be much appreciated:
website  links  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  metaethics  human_nature  mind-body  reason-passions  natural_religion  rational_religion  Deism  Cambridge_Platonists  Descartes  Malebranche  Hobbes  Locke  Clarke  Leibniz  Butler  Berkeley  Warburton  Hume  Hume-ethics  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Academia.edu  Alexander_of_Aphrodisias  amazon.com  analytical_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  antinomian  Aquinas  Aristotelian  Arminian  article  atheism  Bacon  Berkeley  bibliography  Bolingbroke  Bolingbroke-family  books  British_history  British_Idealism  Butler  Calvinist  Cambridge_Platonists  Cartesian  Church_of_England  Clarke  comparative_anthropology  comparative_religion  Comte  correspondence  cosmology  creation  creation_ex_nilho  Cudworth  Deism  Descartes  determinism  devotional_practices  downloaded  ecclesiology  Edwardian  EF-add  English_Civil_War  Epictetus  epistemology  etexts  faith  Ficino  Fin-de-Siècle  find  free_will  friendship  gender-and-religion  gender_relations  German_Idealism  God-attributes  God-existence  Google_Books  Hegel  Hegelian  hermeneutics  Hobbes  humanism  human_nature  Hume  Hume-ethics  idealism  idealism-transcendental  identity  intellectual_history  intuitionism  jstor  Kant  Kierkegaard  late_antiquity  Leibniz  links  Locke  Locke-person  Locke-religion  Logical_Positivism  Malebranche  materialism  medieval_philosophy  metaethics  metaphysics  mind-body  mind-theory_of  modernity  monotheism  morality-conventional  morality-objective  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  More_Henry  motion  natural_law  natural_philosophy  natural_religion  Neoplatonism  Nietzsche  obligation  Pascal  Patrick_Simon  phenomenology  philosophy_of_religion  Poliziano  Presbyterians  rational_religion  realism  reason  reason-passions  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_history  Renaissance  Restoration  revelation  reviews  scepticism  Schleiermacher  scholasticism  science-and-religion  sociability  sociology_of_religion  Spinoza  Spinozism  Stoicism  Suarez  subjectivism  theism  theodicy  theology  US_history  utilitarianism  Victorian  Warburton  website  Wittgenstein  women-intellectuals 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: