dunnettreader + calvinist   35

Daniel Vidal - La secte contre le prophétisme: les Multipliants de Montpellier (1719-1723) | JSTOR - Annales (1982)
Daniel Vidal, Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales, 37e Année, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 1982), pp. 801-825 -- The Multipliants were a sect that appeared in Montpellier at the turn of the 18th century. Because this was the same Calvinist territory that had witnessed the upsurge of prophétisme back in 1685, the Multipliants were for a long time regarded as the heirs to the inspirés of the Bas-Languedoc and the Cévennes. A careful analysis of the sect's archives, however, invalidates that assumption of continuity. From a description of certain sociological features of the sect, from a study of the spatial configuration of its places of worship, from an examination of the symbolic values assigned to objects, a distinctive social amalgam emerges. The Multipliants can in no way be reduced to a mere replica of the previous inspired movement. On the contrary, they constitute a tenacious attempt to put an end to prophetist preaching. One can therefore classify the sect, alongside the apparatus of the Reformation, as an institution dedicated to the reestablishment of order at any price in a religious terrain devastated by zealots. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  religious_history  17thC  18thC  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  1720s  France  fanatics  sectarianism  Huguenots  Calvinist  Cévannes  apocalyptic  millennarian  Edict_of_Nantes  Revocation_of_Edict_of_Nantes  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Michael Seidler, review essay - Religion, Populism, and Patriarchy: Political Authority from Luther to Pufendorf | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 103, No. 3 (Apr., 1993), pp. 551-569
Review of volumes in Cambridge University Press series of history of political thought classic texts (Skinner, Tuck et al series editors) -- Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority by Martin Luther; John Calvin; Harro Hopfl; *--* The Radical Reformation by Michael G. Baylor; *--* Political Writings by Francisco de Vitoria; Anthony Pagden; Jeremy Lawrance; *--* Patriarcha and Other Writings by Robert Filmer; Johann P. Sommerville; *--* On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law by Samuel Pufendorf; James Tully; Michael Silverthorne -- lengthy essay that discusses the works themselves and the political-theology issues emerging in the aftermath of the Reformation across the 16thC and 17thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  politics-and-religion  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvin  Calvinist  Absolutism  divine_right  divine_command  office  ecclesiology  religion-established  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_wars  scholastics  Filmer  Pufendorf  natural_law  Holy_Roman_Empire  Germany  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  secularization  Erastianism  resistance_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Diarmaid MacCulloch - Putting the English Reformation on the Map: The Prothero Lecture | JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 15 (2005), pp. 75-95
The essay examines how the international Protestant identity of the English Church came to be in tension with the later assertion of sacramentalist or Catholic values within it. It chronicles how the Reformation in England came to align not with Lutheranism but with Reformed Protestantism, and compares Henry VIII's reforms with contemporary Reformations in mainland Europe seeking a 'middle way'. Edward VI's Church is contrasted with the temperature perceptible in Elizabeth I's religious settlement - which nevertheless asserted Protestant values with no concessions to Catholicism. The anomalous role of the cathedrals in England is identified as a major source of the English Church's later deviation from mainstream European Reformed Protestantism, which itself produced attempts to recreate a Reformed Church in the English north American colonies. -- tackles branch of Anglican historiography that buries the Protestant Reformation aspects of the Church of England especially the 16thC -- didn't download
article  jstor  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvinist  Tudor  Henry_VIII  Edward_VI  Elizabeth  theology  ecclesiology  via_media  Catholics-England  liturgy  sacraments  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Mawdesley, review - Leif Dixon, Practical Predestinarians in England, c. 1590-1640 ( 2013) | Reviews in History - IHR
Mr James Mawdesley, University of Sheffield --- Preaching before James I early in his reign, Anthony Maxey told the King that predestination ‘containeth the whole summe of our religion’ (p. 1). The 17th article of the Church of England’s doctrinal statement, the Thirty-Nine Articles, had been statutory since 1571, and outlined a belief in predestination. In this interesting book, Leif Dixon is keen that the historian leaves their modern assumptions at the door of historical investigation. The idea of predestination is one which leaves many people today feeling theologically cold, and it has become fair game to presume that those who attended Church of England services at the turn of the 16th and 17th centuries probably felt the same, especially given that their parish minister probably not only believed in the doctrine, but actively preached it too, at least in some form. (1) Dixon, though, does not believe this, and boldly proclaims in his introduction that rather than predestinarian beliefs resulting in a generation of spiritually anxious English parishioners, the doctrine and its promotion actually had much potential for providing spiritual comfort (p. 7). Indeed, the Jacobean preacher Richard Crakanthorp told a congregation at St. Mary’s church in Oxford that predestination was ‘the chiefest comfort which can enter into the heart of a mortall man’ (p. 2).
books  reviews  16thC  17thC  British_history  religious_history  Calvinist  predestination  Church_of_England  Thirty-Nine_Articles  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  godly_persons  Arminian  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"Trinitarian Thought in the Early Modern Era" by Ulrich Lehner in The Oxford Handbook of the Trinity (2011)
Ulrich Lehner, Marquette University -- Published version. "Trinitarian Thought in the Early Modern Era" in The Oxford Handbook of the Trinity. Eds. Gilles Emery, and Matthew Levering. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2011: 240-253. DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199557813.001.0001. Copyright © 2011 Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Used with permission. -- This article explores Catholic and Protestant Trinitarian theology from 1550 to 1770. It discusses various issues, from the mystical visions of Ignatius of Loyola to the Augustinian approach of Jonathan Edwards. It considers the growing variety of eclectic views and the influence of anti-Trinitarian thinkers, beginning with Michael Servetus and Faustus Socinus. It also highlights the rise of confessionalism and anti-Trinitarianism and the explosion of mystical theology during this period. -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  theology  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  16thC  17thC  18thC  Trinity  anti-Trinitarian  heterodoxy  Jesuits  Augustinian  Edwards_Jonathan  Socinians  confessionalization  mysticism  Calvinist  Christology  soteriology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
books  etexts  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  historiography  revisionism  Reformation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Church_of_England  Puritans  witchcraft  religious_culture  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religious_wars  Calvinist  Arminian  English_constitution  monarchy  Parliament  Aristotelian  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  theology  moral_philosophy  human_nature  historiography-17thC  scepticism  colonialism  Scotland  James_I  Charles_I  Thirty_Years_War  France  Germany  Spain  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Christian Thomasius, Essays on Church, State, and Politics, eds. & trans. Ian Hunter, Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert - Online Library of Liberty
Christian Thomasius, Essays on Church, State, and Politics, edited, translated, and with an Introduction by Ian Hunter, Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1926> -- The essays selected here for translation derive largely from Thomasius’s work on Staatskirchenrecht, or the political jurisprudence of church law. These works, originating as disputations, theses, and pamphlets, were direct interventions in the unresolved issue of the political role of religion in Brandenburg-Prussia, a state in which a Calvinist dynasty ruled over a largely Lutheran population and nobility as well as a significant Catholic minority. In mandating limited religious toleration within the German states, the provisions of the Peace of Westphalia (1648) also provided the rulers of Brandenburg-Prussia with a way of keeping the powerful Lutheran church in check by guaranteeing a degree of religious freedom to non-Lutherans and thereby detaching the state from the most powerful territorial church. Thomasius’s writings on church-state relations, many of them critical of the civil claims made by Lutheran theologians, are a direct response to this state of affairs. At the same time, owing to the depth of intellectual resources at his disposal, these works constitute a major contribution to the broader discussion of the relation between the religious and political spheres. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Germany  Prussia  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  Lutherans  Calvinist  Catholics  confessionalization  religion-established  politics-and-religion  church_courts  tolerance  religious_culture  political_culture  Westphalia  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Nathaniel Culverwell, An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature [1646], ed. Robert A. Greene and Hugh MacCallum - Online Library of Liberty
Nathaniel Culverwell, An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature, ed. Robert A. Greene and Hugh MacCallum, foreword by Robert A. Greene (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/900> -- An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature is a concerted effort to find a middle way between the two extremes that dominated the religious dispute of the English civil war in the seventeenth century. At one extreme end of the spectrum was the antinomian assertion that the elect were redeemed by God’s free grace and thereby free from ordinary moral obligations. At the other end of the spectrum was the Arminian rejection of predestination and assertion that Christ died for all, not just for the elect. Faced with the violence of these disputes, Nathaniel Culverwell attempted a moderate defense of reason and natural law, arguing, in the words of Robert Greene, that “reason and faith are distinct lights, yet they are not opposed; they are complementary and harmonious. Reason is the image of God in man, and to deny right reason is to deny our relation to God.” -- Culverwell clearly intended to respond to Francis Bacon’s call for “a temperate and careful treatise … which as a kind of divine logic, should lay down proper precepts touching the use of human reason in theology.” -- Although, unlike the Cambridge Platonists, he quotes or refers to Bacon’s writings frequently enough to indicate considerable knowledge and approval of the Baconian gospel, the spirit of the Discourse is basically at odds with Bacon’s plan for man’s intellectual progress. In his emphasis upon scholastic psychology and his indebtedness to Aristotle, Aquinas, and Suarez, as well as in his flourishing rhetoric and richly metaphorical style, Culverwell does not forward the Great Instauration.
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  theology  natural_law  English_Civil_War  Cambridge_Platonists  Calvinist  antinomian  Presbyterians  Arminian  reason  revelation  faith  religious_belief  Aristotelian  Aquinas  Suarez  Bacon  moral_psychology  obligation  religious_culture  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law [c 1750, tran 1763], trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. Peter Korkman - Online Library of Liberty
Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui, The Principles of Natural and Politic Law, trans. Thomas Nugent, ed. and with an Introduction by Peter Korkman (Indianpolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1717> -- The basis of this version of The Principles of Natural and Politic Law is Thomas Nugent’s 1763 English translation, which became a standard textbook at Cambridge and at many premier American colleges, including Princeton, Harvard, and the University of Pennsylvania. The first scholarly work on Burlamaqui was written by an American, M. Ray Forrest Harvey, who in 1937 argued that Burlamaqui was well known among America’s Founding Fathers and that his writings exerted considerable influence on the American constitutional system. In his introduction, Nugent said of Burlamaqui: “His singular beauty consists in the alliance he so carefully points out between ethics and jurisprudence, religion and politics, after the example of Plato and Tully, and the other illustrious masters of antiquity.”
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  intellectual_history  natural_law  political_philosophy  human_nature  moral_psychology  obligation  sovereignty  Geneva  Calvinist  natural_rights  mixed_government  aristocracy-natural  elites  bourgeoisie  democracy  authority  legitimacy  civil_liberties  civil_religion  happiness  rationalist  Grotius  Pufendorf  Barbeyrac  Leibniz  Rousseau  governing_class  government-forms  governance  state-building  state-of-nature  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, The Divine Feudal Law: Or, Covenants with Mankind, Represented, trans. Theophilus Dorrington (1703), ed. Simone Zurbruchen - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, The Divine Feudal Law: Or, Covenants with Mankind, Represented, trans. Theophilus Dorrington, ed. with an Introduction by Simone Zurbruchen (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/10/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/177> -- The Divine Feudal Law sets forth Pufendorf’s basis for the reunion of the Lutheran and Calvinist confessions. This attempt to seek a “conciliation” between the confessions complements the concept of toleration discussed in Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion in Reference to Civil Society. In both works Pufendorf examines the proper way to secure the peaceful coexistence of different confessions in a state. -- Published posthumously in 1695 - likely that timing of translation part of ecumenical impulse within Protestantism, reinforcing the goal of the War of the Spanish Succession as protection of the Protestant Interest opposed to Louis XIV, despite being allied not only with German (Lutheran) members of the Holy Roman Empire but with the Catholic Emperor himself -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  Pufendorf  Lutherans  Calvinist  ecumenical  Christendom  Protestants  Protestant_International  anti-Catholic  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Nine_Years_War  tolerance  theology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Lectures on Modern History (1921 reprint 1907) - Google Books
Editors - with Introduction, John Neville Figgis, Reginald Vere Laurence -- Contents -- Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History *--* LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY *--* Beginning of the Modern State *--* The New World *--* The Renaissance *--* Luther *--* The CounterReformation *--* Calvin and Henry VIII *--* The Puritan Revolution *--* The Rise of the Whigs *--* The English Revolution *--* Lewis XIV *--* The War of the Spanish Succession *--* The Hanoverian Settlement *--* Peter the Great and the Rise of Prussia *--* Frederic the Great *--* Philip II Mary Stuart and Elizabeth *--* The Huguenots and the League *--* Henry the Fourth and Richelieu *--* The Thirty Years War *--* The American Revolution *--* Letter to Contributors to the Cambridge Modern History *--* Notes to Inaugural Lecture -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_history  nation-state  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Wars_of_Religion  Thirty_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  colonialism  American_Revolution  Louis_XIV  Henry_VIII  Lutherans  Calvinist  Peter_the_Great  Frederick_the_Great  Elizabeth  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  Spanish_Empire  Huguenots  Renaissance  Puritans  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. A. Prior - Ecclesiology and Political Thought in England, 1580-c. 1630 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 4 (Dec., 2005), pp. 855-884
This article examines the ways in which debates on ecclesiology in the Church of England served as a venue for the examination of political precept. It argues in particular that polemical sources - whether sermons, pamphlets, or longer works - reveal that discussion of conformity, the nature of the church, and its doctrine and discipline led to a broader examination of law, sovereignty, parliament, and the political costs of religious discord. Underlying the dispute was a fundamental tension over civil and sacred authority, and the relationship between politics - the realm of human custom and history - and doctrine - the realm of the divine and immemorial. The article offers a number of revisions to current discussions of the history of political thought, while pointing to the importance of religious discourse for our understanding of the political tensions that existed in the years prior to the English civil war. -- extensive bibliography across political and religious history and political thought, theology and ecclesiology -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_lit  ecclesiology  Laudian  Calvinist  Puritans  godly_persons  theocracy  Erastianism  political_philosophy  political_press  political_culture  politics-and-religion  divine_right  monarchy  commonwealth  authority  legitimacy  sovereignty  Parliament  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David R. Como - Predestination and Political Conflict in Laud's London | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 46, No. 2 (Jun., 2003), pp. 263-294
This article examines the policy pursued by William Laud during his tenure as bishop of London, focusing specifically on the way in which he enforced the various royal edicts against discussion of predestination. It is argued that Laud enforced Charles I's decrees in an unbalanced manner, attacking Calvinists while apparently leaving their anti-Calvinist opponents untouched. It is likewise argued, however, that this strategy was accomplished not through a policy of overt judicial persecution, but through a more subtle regime of quiet threat and harassment. Such a policy was necessary because, at least in London, the question of predestination had by 1629 become a serious and explosive issue, one that was inextricably linked in the minds of many observers to more explicitly 'secular' matters of government and policy. In the process of examining Laud's strategy, the article seeks to untangle the question of why both the Caroline authorities and their enemies saw the seemingly scholastic question of predestination as a matter of such crucial political significance. Ultimately, the article helps to revise our understanding of the political atmosphere that prevailed in England at the outset of the personal rule, while likewise contributing to a deeper understanding of the political breakdown that led to civil war and revolution in the 1640s. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  predestination  Calvinist  Arminian  Laud  Laudian  Puritans  godly_persons  London  City_politics  ecclesiology  clergy  Charles_I  politics-and-religion  political_culture  popular_politics  Absolutism  ritual  sacraments  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Dewey D. Wallace, Jr., historiographical review - Via Media? A Paradigm Shift | JSTOR: Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2003), pp. 2-21
Very useful - he was working in the same stream as Tyacke before publication of Anti-Calvinists. Follows subsequent work that's developed the approach of the Elizabethan church as Reformed with a hankering for bits of Kutheranism. Notes the parallels in tensions between established Erastian church and the hotter sort who wanted to push a second Reformation, following the Reformed scholasticim and the more extreme version of Calvinism post Calvin. Notes different versions of where the via media develooed (the anti Puritan divines connected with James I court, the Oxford Movement? ) - Wallace seems to think it's a Restoration phenomenon, when Hooker is "canonized", and later groups like the Oxford Movement reinforced the claim that the Church of England had pursued the via media, at least by Elizabeth, as a means of marginalizing the evangelical stream. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  religious_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  Reformation  Church_of_England  Calvinist  Lutherans  Arminian  via_media  Laudian  Elizabeth  clergy  godly_persons  Puritans  predestination  Erastianism  politics-and-religion  parish  local_politics  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  High_Church  dissenters  anti-Catholic  popery  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Religion and the Rise of Liberal-Democratic Ideology in 17th-Century England | JSTOR: American Sociological Review, Vol. 54, No. 2 (Apr., 1989), pp. 163-179
In classical and contemporary sociology, key elements of liberal-democratic ideology are seen as secular extensions of Protestant ideas. This case study provides a different analysis that emphasizes the problem of religious conflict and radicalism in early liberal-democratic ideology. Proponents of the new ideology rejected key tenets of their Puritan heritage, adopting deistic beliefs that legitimated pluralism and tolerance and opposed the older Puritan ideal of godly politics. Building on recent work in the sociology of culture, the paper outlines an analytic strategy for explaining change in ideological systems. Ideological change emerges out of the interaction of contextual pressures and intellectual precedents, as a collective response by ideological innovators to problems of authority. The analysis in this study shows how historical events can form an episodic context which structures this problem of authority. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historical_sociology  historical_change  change-intellectual  political_philosophy  ideology  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Puritans  godly_persons  Deism  theocracy  Calvinist  pluralism  tolerance  Socinians  liberalism  democracy  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael P. Winship - Algernon Sidney's Calvinist Republicanism | Journal of British Studies - Cambridge Journals Online
Michael P. Winship (2010). Algernon Sidney's Calvinist Republicanism. The Journal of British Studies, 49, pp 753-773. doi:10.1086/654914. -- the religious beliefs of Harrington, Milton and Henry Vane have all been studied intensely but Sidney's beliefs haven't received much attention -- jstor but still behind paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  politics-and-religion  17thC  Sidney  republicanism  Exclusion_Crisis  Calvinist  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Heyd - From a Rationalist Theology to Cartesian Voluntarism: David Derodon and Jean-Robert Chouet | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1979), pp. 527-542
Shift from proto Leibniz determinism to extreme Voluntarism - 1660 and later in Geneva - Chouet introduced Cartesian mechanism to French Reformed - a perspective on the relationship between theology and 17thC mechanical philosophy -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  religious_history  science-and-religion  17thC  Geneva  Calvinist  rational_religion  God-attributes  determinism  voluntarism  laws_of_nature  Descartes  Cartesian  mechanism  natural_philosophy  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Middle Knowledge [Molinism] - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
** Assumptions
** Scientia Media
** Objections to Middle Knowledge
** Rejection of Libertarian Freedom
** Libertarian Responses
** The Truth of Counterfactuals of Creaturely Freedom
** Objections to the Principle of Conditional Excluded Middle
** Molinist Responses
** Molinism and Determinism
** The Grounding Objection
** Molinist Responses
** The Usefulness of Middle Knowledge
** Viciously Circular
** Not True Soon Enough
** Molinist Responses
theology  theodicy  philosophy_of_religion  logic  modal_logic  God-attributes  free_will  Providence  Calvinist  Jesuits  Counter-Reformation  Genesis  creation_ex_nilho  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
William Lane Craig - Molinism vs. Calvinism | Reasonable Faith
Detailed explanation of where he differs with Reformed theologians, though both see themselves as generally following Westminster Confession
theology  theodicy  God-attributes  Providence  salvation  free_will  evil  Calvinist  Kirk  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Kristen Irwin, review - Nicholas Wolterstorff, The Mighty and the Almighty: An Essay in Political Theology // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
The Mighty and the Almighty takes on the task of theorizing a political theology for the Christian. [T]his book originated in his 1998 Stone Lectures at Princeton... [and] retains both the advantages and the disadvantages of its original lecture format: astonishingly clear and accessible, but a relatively light sketch ...Despite the specifically Christian orientation of his project, Wolterstorff asks for the attention of the nonreligious: "In a participatory democracy such as ours, it's important that we each be open with and open to our fellow citizens concerning the deep sources of how we think about political issues". -- Though political theology is not nearly so popular as in the days of Augustine or Calvin -- two of Wolterstorff's foils -- Wolterstorff argues that it's overdue for careful contemporary consideration.-- a substantive account of the relationship between political authority and divine authority. -- The most innovative part of the book is Wolterstorff's use of the above distinction to offer a rereading of Romans 13... Rather than counseling universal submission to civil authorities, Wolterstorff argues, Paul is counseling submission to civil authorities insofar as they are executing "the God-assigned task of government to curb injustice. . . . to protect the rights of the public". Government clearly has the positional authority to issue whatever directives it deems appropriate to its citizens, but insofar as its directives violate justice or the rights of the public, government forfeits its performance-authority. The corollary is that "the directives that the government issues to the public for the purpose of curbing injustice are binding". -- In other words, the political authority of the state as the institution responsible for "protecting members of the public from being wronged by their fellows" can be derived both from natural rights, and from divine authority.
books  reviews  kindle-available  political_philosophy  political-theology  liberalism  liberalism-public_reason  authority  obligation  natural_rights  Early_Christian  Paul  Augustine  Calvinist  resistance_theory  passive_obedience  justice  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Dunthorne - Britain and the Dutch Revolt 1560-1700 (2013) :: Cambridge University Press
Hardback and ebook - not yet pbk -- England's response to the Revolt of the Netherlands (1568–1648) has been studied hitherto mainly in terms of government policy, yet the Dutch struggle with Habsburg Spain affected a much wider community than just the English political elite. It attracted attention across Britain and drew not just statesmen and diplomats but also soldiers, merchants, religious refugees, journalists, travellers and students into the conflict. Hugh Dunthorne draws on pamphlet literature to reveal how British contemporaries viewed the progress of their near neighbours' rebellion, and assesses the lasting impact which the Revolt and the rise of the Dutch Republic had on Britain's domestic history. The book explores affinities between the Dutch Revolt and the British civil wars of the seventeenth century - the first major challenges to royal authority in modern times - showing how much Britain's changing commercial, religious and political culture owed to the country's involvement with events across the North Sea. --

** Reveals the wide-ranging impact of the Dutch Revolt on Britain's political, religious and commercial culture
** Connects the Dutch Revolt and Britain's seventeenth-century civil wars
** Places early modern Dutch and British history in international context
books  find  kindle-available  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Navy  Dutch  Spain  Dutch_Revolt  Thirty_Years_War  Protestant_International  English_Civil_War  diplomatic_history  military_history  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  economic_culture  political_culture  religious_culture  Calvinist  Absolutism  public_opinion  political_participation  political_press  politics-and-religion  William_III  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  exiles  pamphlets  travel  Europe-Early_Modern  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Brody Miller - "Proper Subjects for Public Inquiry": The First Unitarian Controversy and the Transformation of Federalist Print Culture | JSTOR: Early American Literature, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2008), pp. 101-135
Lots of primary and secondary references - continues debate against seeing Jeffersonians as innovative in using press to expand public sphere and speak for common man but Federakists as reactive and manipulative for similar activity that in fact did more for wider public participation and voice -- episode also sets pattern for triumph of non-sectarian, Trinitarian, evangelical, bible and tract version of Christianity as public sphere religion -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  religious_history  public_sphere  18thC  19thC  Early_Republic  New_England  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  civic_virtue  public_opinion  political_participation  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  republicanism  publishing  deference  consensus  anti-Trinitarian  Unitarian  Calvinist  Evangelical  religion-established  clergy  education-higher  Federalist  Jeffersonians  political_press  community  elites  elite_culture  cultural_critique  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Benjamin Milner - Francis Bacon: The Theological Foundations of Valerius Terminus | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 58, No. 2 (Apr., 1997), pp. 245-264
Why Bacon thought he needed theological foundations to his advancement of learning and natural philosophy program & why he never finished or published that work. Bibliography has a lot of antiquity and 17thC scepticism or atheism as well as Calvinist and Puritan stuff -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  science-and-religion  history_of_science  17thC  Bacon  atheism_panic  scepticism  Calvinist  Puritans  curiosity  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
PETER MARSHALL - JOHN CALVIN AND THE ENGLISH CATHOLICS, c. 1565-1640 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 53, No. 4 (DECEMBER 2010), pp. 849-870
This article examines the assessments of John Calvin's life, character, and influence to be found in the polemical writings of English Catholics in the Elizabethan and early Stuart periods. It demonstrates the centrality of Calvin to Catholic claims about the character and history of the established church, and the extent to which Catholic writings propagated a vibrant 'black legend' of Calvin's egotism and sexual depravity, drawing heavily not only on the writings of the French Calvinist-turned-Catholic Jerome Bolsee, but also on those of German Lutherans. The article also explores how, over time, Catholic writers increasingly identified some common ground with anti-puritans and anti-Calvinists within the English church, and how claims about the seditious character of Calvin, and by extension Calvinism, were used to articulate the contrasting 'loyalty' of Catholics and their right to occupy a place within the English polity. -- big bibliography - paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  religious_history  church_history  Reformation  Church_of_England  Catholics-England  Calvinist  anti-Calvinists  Lutherans  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  religion-established  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan J. Edwards - Calvin and Hobbes: Trinity, Authority, and Community | JSTOR: Philosophy & Rhetoric, Vol. 42, No. 2 (2009), pp. 115-133
Responding to current attempts to see various positions Hobbes advocates within a broader metaphysical system. Doesn't think Hobbes's version of the Trinity contra Calvinism solves the problem Hobbes is trying to address. Looks like it has a good bibliography
article  jstor  paywall  politics-and-religion  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  Calvinist  Trinity  anti-Trinitarian  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Leo F. Solt - The New Model Army in England, Ireland and Scotland, 1645-1653 by Ian Gentles (1993)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 98, No. 3 (Jun., 1993), pp. 868-869 -- a revision of Kishlanky's revisionist account --brings religion back in
books  reviews  17thC  British_history  British_politics  military_history  English_Civil_War  religious_history  religious_culture  Calvinist  Interregnum  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Thomas Maissen: Why Did the Swiss Miss the Machiavellian Moment? History, Myth, Imperial and Constitutional Law in the Early Modern Swiss Confederation | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Maissen, Thomas. “Why Did the Swiss Miss the Machiavellian Moment? History, Myth, Imperial and Constitutional Law in the Early Modern Swiss Confederation.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/74. -- in "Limits of Atlantic Republican Tradition" -- downloaded pdf to Note-- Didn’t the Swiss share the need that stimulated contemporary Dutch authors like the brothers de la Court, who discovered the Florentine republic as a model in order to conceive and legitimatize republican government against the house of Orange? Both federations originated in a revolt against the Habsburgs; both achieved formal independence from the Holy Roman Empire in 1648, through the Peace of Westphalia; and in spite of important Catholic minorities, both were bastions of the Reformed Church considered already then and even more by twentieth-century researchers to be a hotbed of republicanism. But Zwingli and Calvin were not republicans. What mattered for them was having the right faith, not a precise political constitution. 
article  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  republicanism  Swiss  Calvinist  militia  mercenaires  Machiavelli  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Savoy  city_states  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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