dunnettreader + csr   28

Leo E. Strine - The Dangers of Denial: The Need for a Clear-Eyed Understanding of the Power and Accountability Structure Established by the Delaware Law :: SSRN Wake Forest Law Review, 2015, Forthcoming (March 20, 2015)
Supreme Court of Delaware; Harvard Law School; Penn Law School -- There is now a tendency among those who believe that corporations should be more socially responsible to pretend that corporate directors do not have an obligation under Delaware corporate law to make stockholder welfare the sole end of corporate governance within the limits of their legal discretion. These advocates of CSR contend that Delaware directors may subordinate stockholder welfare to other interests, such as those of the company’s workers or society generally. (..) But, the problem with that argument is that it is inconsistent with both judge-made common law of corporations in Delaware and the design of the Delaware General Corporation Law. More important, pretending that the nation’s leading corporate law is fundamentally different than it is runs contrary to the goal of ensuring that for-profit corporations behave lawfully, responsibly, and ethically. Lecturing others to do the right thing without acknowledging the rules that apply to their behavior and the power dynamics to which they are subject is not a responsible path to social progress. Rather, it provides an excuse to avoid tougher policy challenges, such as advocating for stronger externality regulation and encouraging institutional investors to exercise their power as stockholders responsibly. Those challenges must be confronted if we are to ensure that for-profit corporations are vehicles for responsible, sustainable, long-term wealth creation. -- PDF File: 43 -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_legal_system  US_politics  corporate_law  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  shareholder_value  profit_maximization  principal-agent  fiduciaries  law-and-economics  CSR  capital_as_power  duties-legal  duties-civic  duty_of_care  duty_of_loyalty  Delaware_law  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Lyman Johnson, David Millon - Corporate Law after Hobby Lobby :: SSRN (rev'd Jan 2015) THE BUSINESS LAWYER, Vol 70 - November 2014
Lyman Johnson, Washington and Lee University - School of Law; University of St. Thomas, St. Paul/Minneapolis, MN - School of Law -- David Millon
Washington and Lee University - School of Law -- We evaluate the U.S. Supreme Court's controversial decision in the Hobby Lobby case from the perspective of state corporate law. We argue that the Court is correct in holding that corporate law does not mandate that business corporations limit themselves to pursuit of profit. Rather, state law allows incorporation 'for any lawful purpose.' We elaborate on this important point and also explain what it means for a corporation to 'exercise religion.' In addition, we address the larger implications of the Court's analysis for an accurate understanding both of state law's essentially agnostic stance on the question of corporate purpose and also of the broad scope of managerial discretion. -- PDF File: 33 -- Keywords: Corporate purpose, Corporate personhood, Shareholder wealth maximization, Shareholder primacy, Corporate social responsibility -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  corporate_law  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  shareholders  freedom_of_conscience  SCOTUS  civil_liberties  corporate_control  corporate_personhood  limited_liability  corporations-closely-held  corporations  CSR  shareholder_value  shareholder_voting  profit_maximization  law-and-economics  labor_law  employee_benefits  power-asymmetric  capital_as_power  constitutional_law  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
David Millon - Radical Shareholder Primacy :: SSRN - Aug 2014
Washington and Lee University - School of Law -- University of St. Thomas Law Journal, Vol. 10:4 (2013) -- Washington & Lee Legal Studies Paper No. 2014-17 -- written for a symposium on the history of CSR, seeks to make sense of the surprising disagreement on the foundational legal question of corporate purpose: does the law require shareholder primacy or not? (..) disagreement is due to the unappreciated ambiguity in the shareholder primacy idea. (.. ) 2 models, the 'radical' and the 'traditional.' Radical shareholder primacy originated at Chicago in the later 1970s, (Daniel Fischel and Frank Easterbrook). [It asserts] that corporate management is the agent of the shareholders, charged with maximizing their wealth. There is no legal authority for this claim; Fischel drew it from the financial economists Michael Jensen and William Meckling, who used the agency idea in a non-legal sense. [The traditional model is] the idea that shareholders hold a privileged position within the corporation's governance structure, ... and (..) fiduciary duties as being owed to 'the corporation and its shareholders.' (..) shareholders enjoy primacy over (..) other stakeholders, although there is no maximization mandate and shareholders [have limited effective legal means] to insist that management privilege their interests. Nevertheless, this version of shareholder primacy is enshrined in the law, and, if the radical version's agency claim is laid to rest, there is no harm in acknowledging that fact. -- PDF File: 34 -- saved to briefcase
paper  SSRN  corporate_law  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  shareholder_value  profit_maximization  principal-agent  fiduciaries  law-and-economics  CSR  capital_as_power  status_quo_bias 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Bill Galston and Elaine Karmack - Overcoming corporate short-termism: Blackrock's chairman weighs in | Brookings Institution - April 2015
hen the head of the world’s largest investment fund raises fundamental questions about U.S. corporations, we should all pay attention.

In a letter earlier this week to the Fortune 500 CEOs, BlackRock Chairman Larry Fink criticized the short-term orientation that he believes shapes too much of today’s corporate behavior. “It concerns us,” he declared, that “in the wake of the financial crisis, many companies have shied away from investing in the future growth of their companies. Too many have cut capital expenditure and even increased debt to boost dividends and increase share buybacks.” And he concluded, “When done for the wrong reasons and at the expense of capital investment, [returning cash to shareholders] can jeopardize a company’s ability to generate sustainable long-term returns.”
institutional_investors  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  corporate_finance  CSR  short-termism  capital_markets  shareholder_value  capital_gains  investment  R&D  buybacks 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Perkins Miller, George Serafeim - Chief Sustainability Officers: Who Are They and What Do They Do? (revised September 2014) :: SSRN
Kathleen Perkins Miller, Miller Consultants -- George Serafeim, Harvard University - Harvard Business School *--* Chapter 8 in Leading Sustainable Change, Oxford University Press, 2014 *--* While a number of studies document that organizations go through numerous stages as they increase their commitment to sustainability over time, we know little about the role of the Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO) in this process. Using survey and interview data we analyze how a CSO’s authority and responsibilities differ across organizations that are in different stages of sustainability commitment. We document increasing organizational authority of the CSO as organizations increase their commitment to sustainability moving from Compliance to Efficiency and then to Innovation. However, we also document a decentralization of decision rights from the CSO to different functions, largely driven by sustainability strategies becoming more idiosyncratic at the Innovation stage. The study concludes with a discussion of practices that CSOs argue to accelerate the commitment of organizations to sustainability. -- Pages in PDF File: 22 -- Keywords: sustainability, organizational change, Chief Sustainability Officer, innovation, -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  SSRN  business_practices  business-norms  CSR  sustainability  firms-organization  firms-structure  Innovation  corporate_governance  accountability  institutional_change  institutional_capacity  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert G. Eccles, Jock Herron, George Serafeim - Reliable Sustainability Ratings: The Influence of Business Models on Information Intermediaries (revised October 2014) :: SSRN
ility Ratings: The Influence of Business Models on Information Intermediaries

Robert G. Eccles, Harvard Business School -- Jock Herron, Harvard University - School of Design -- George Serafeim, Harvard University - Harvard Business School -- Chapter in Routledge Handbook on Responsible Investing (Forthcoming) *--* A new generation of corporate reporting - integrated reporting - is emerging that will help investors and other key stakeholders such as employees, customers, suppliers, and NGOs develop a deeper and more comprehensive appreciation of corporate performance than what is currently provided by GAAP financial reporting. The purpose of this paper is to examine the optimal design of information intermediaries that can increase the impact of sustainability information on corporate conduct. Specifically, we focus on two issues: who pays for the information and which performance metrics should be included in assessing the sustainability performance of a company. -- Pages in PDF File: 28 -- Keywords: sustainability, ratings, corporate performance, rating agencies, conflicts of interest, integrated reporting, corporate social responsibility -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  SSRN  CSR  sustainability  accounting  disclosure  disclosure-integrated  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  business_practices  information-markets  information-intermediaries  rating_agencies  ratings  conflict_of_interest  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert G. Eccles, George Serafeim - Corporate and Integrated Reporting: A Functional Perspective (revised September 2014) :: SSRN
Robert G. Eccles, Harvard Business School -- George Serafeim, Harvard University - Harvard Business School *--* Chapter in Stewardship of the Future, edited by Ed Lawler, Sue Mohrman, and James O’Toole, Greenleaf, 2015. *--* In this paper, we present the two primary functions of corporate reporting (information and transformation) and why currently isolated financial and sustainability reporting are not likely to perform effectively those functions. We describe the concept of integrated reporting and why integrated reporting could be a superior mechanism to perform these functions. Moreover, we discuss, through a series of case studies, what constitutes an effective integrated report (Coca-Cola Hellenic Bottling Company) and the role of regulation in integrated reporting (Anglo-American). -- Pages in PDF File: 21 -- Keywords: corporate reporting, integrated reporting, information, investing, sustainability, accounting -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  CSR  sustainability  accounting  disclosure  disclosure-integrated  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  business_practices  information-markets  investors  risk_management  institutional_change  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
George Serafeim - The Role of the Corporation in Society: An Alternative View and Opportunities for Future Research b(revised June 2014) :: SSRN
Harvard University - Harvard Business School *--* A long-standing ideology in business education has been that a corporation is run for the sole interest of its shareholders. I present an alternative view where increasing concentration of economic activity and power in the world’s largest corporations, the Global 1000, has opened the way for managers to consider the interests of a broader set of stakeholders rather than only shareholders. Having documented that this alternative view better fits actual corporate conduct, I discuss opportunities for future research. Specifically, I call for research on the materiality of environmental and social issues for the future financial performance of corporations, the design of incentive and control systems to guide strategy execution, corporate reporting, and the role of investors in this new paradigm. -- Pages in PDF File: 27 -- Keywords: corporate performance, corporate size, sustainability, corporate social responsibility, accounting -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  global_economy  global_governance  international_political_economy  shareholder_value  shareholders  CSR  disclosure  accountability  accounting  institutional_economics  institutional_investors  incentives  institutional_change  long-term_orientation  business-and-politics  business-norms  business_practices  business_influence  sustainability  MNCs  firms-theory  firms-structure  firms-organization  power  power-concentration  concentration-industry  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Beiting Cheng, Ioannis Ioannou, George Serafeim - Corporate Social Responsibility and Access to Finance - May 19, 2011 | Strategic Management Journal, 35 (1): 1-23. :: SSRN
Beiting Cheng, Harvard University - Harvard Business School -- Ioannis Ioannou, London Business School -- George Serafeim, Harvard University - Harvard Business School **--** In this paper, we investigate whether superior performance on corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies leads to better access to finance. We hypothesize that better access to finance can be attributed to a) reduced agency costs due to enhanced stakeholder engagement and b) reduced informational asymmetry due to increased transparency. Using a large cross-section of firms, we find that firms with better CSR performance face significantly lower capital constraints. Moreover, we provide evidence that both of the hypothesized mechanisms, better stakeholder engagement and transparency around CSR performance, are important in reducing capital constraints. The results are further confirmed using several alternative measures of capital constraints, a paired analysis based on a ratings shock to CSR performance, an instrumental variables and also a simultaneous equations approach. Finally, we show that the relation is driven by both the social and the environmental dimension of CSR. -- Pages in PDF File: 43 -- Keywords: corporate social responsibility, sustainability, capital constraints, ESG (environmental, social, governance) performance -- didn't download
article  SSRN  business_practices  business-norms  corporate_finance  corporate_governance  shareholder_value  CSR  environment  sustainability  accounting  accountability  firms-theory  firms-structure  information-asymmetric  disclosure  finance-cost 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert G. Eccles, Ioannis Ioannou, George Serafeim - The Impact of Corporate Sustainability on Organizational Processes and Performance - November 23, 2011 :: SSRN - Management Science, Forthcoming
Robert G. Eccles, Harvard Business School -- Ioannis Ioannou, London Business School -- George Serafeim, Harvard University - Harvard Business School *--* We investigate the effect of a corporate culture of sustainability on multiple facets of corporate behavior and performance outcomes. Using a matched sample of 180 companies, we find that corporations that voluntarily adopted environmental and social policies many years ago – termed as High Sustainability companies – exhibit fundamentally different characteristics from a matched sample of firms that adopted almost none of these policies – termed as Low Sustainability companies. In particular, we find that the boards of directors of these companies are more likely to be responsible for sustainability and top executive incentives are more likely to be a function of sustainability metrics. Moreover, they are more likely to have organized procedures for stakeholder engagement, to be more long-term oriented, and to exhibit more measurement and disclosure of nonfinancial information. Finally, we provide evidence that High Sustainability companies significantly outperform their counterparts over the long-term, both in terms of stock market and accounting performance. The outperformance is stronger in sectors where the customers are individual consumers instead of companies, companies compete on the basis of brands and reputations, and products significantly depend upon extracting large amounts of natural resources. -- Keywords: sustainability, corporate social responsibility, culture, governance, disclosure, performance -- didn't download
paper  SSRN  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  corporate_finance  CSR  brands  reputation  incentives  sustainability  long-term_orientation  natural_resources  firms-theory  firms-structure  firms-organization  executive_compensation  business-norms  profit  disclosure 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones, Marco H.D. van Leeuwen, and Stephen Broadberry - The Future of Economic, Business, and Social History | Scandinavian Economic History Review 60, no. 3 (November, 2012): 225–253
3 leading scholars in the fields of business, economic, and social history review the current state of these disciplines and reflect on their future trajectory. Jones reviews the development of business history since its birth at HBS during the 1920s. He notes the discipline's unique record as a pioneer of the scholarly study of entrepreneurship, multinationals, and the relationship between strategy and structure in corporations, as well as its more recent accomplishments, including exploring new domains such as family business, networks and business groups, and retaining an open architecture and inter-disciplinary approach. Yet Jones also notes that the discipline has struggled to achieve a wider impact, in part because of methodological under-development. He discusses 3 alternative futures for the discipline. (1) which he rejects, is a continuing growth of research domains to create a diffuse "business history of everything." (2) is a re-integration with the sister discipline of economic history, which has strongly recovered from its near-extinction 2 decades ago through a renewed attention to globalization and the Great Divergence between the West and the Rest. (3) which he supports, is that business historians retain a distinct identity by building on their proud tradition of deep engagement with empirical evidence by raising the bar in methodology and focusing on big issues for which many scholars, practitioners and students seek answers. He identifies 4 such big issues related to debates on entrepreneurship, globalization, business and the natural environment, and the social and political responsibility of business.
article  economic_history  economic_sociology  business_history  business-and-politics  business-norms  business_practices  business-ethics  globalization  MNCs  methodology  environment  climate-adaptation  entrepreneurs  CSR  paywall 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones (HBS Working Papers 2013) - Debating the Responsibility of Capitalism in Historical and Global Perspective
This working paper examines the evolution of concepts of the responsibility of business in a historical and global perspective. It shows that from the nineteenth century American, European, Japanese, Indian and other business leaders discussed the responsibilities of business beyond making profits, although until recently such views have not been mainstream. There was also a wide variation concerning the nature of this responsibility. This paper argues that four factors drove such beliefs: spirituality; self-interest; fears of government intervention; and the belief that governments were incapable of addressing major social issues.

Keywords: Rachel Carson; Sustainability; Local Food; Operations Management; Supply Chain; Business And Society; Business Ethics; Business History; Corporate Philanthropy; Corporate Social Responsibility; Corporate Social Responsibility And Impact; Environmentalism; Environmental Entrepreneurship; Environmental And Social Sustainability; Ethics; Globalization; History; Religion; Consumer Products Industry; Chemical Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; Energy Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Forest Products Industry; Green Technology Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Asia; Europe; Latin America; Middle East; North and Central America; Africa
paper  downloaded  economic_history  business_history  imperialism  US  British_Empire  France  Germany  Japan  Spain  Dutch  Latin_America  Ottoman_Empire  India  18thC  19thC  20thC  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  business  busisness-ethics  business-and-politics  common_good  communitarian  environment  labor  patriarchy  paternalism  labor_standards  regulation  product_safety  inequality  comparative_economics  capital_as_power  capitalism  CSR  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_sociology  self-interest  ideology 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Leo Strine, Chief Justice of the Delaware Supreme Court - Delaware Benefit Corporations: Making It Easier for Directors To “Do The Right Thing” in Harvard Business Law Review — The Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regul
Pdf of a recently published an article in the Harvard Business Law Review. -- Abstract - Some scholars(..) argue that managers should “do the right thing,” while ignoring that in the current corporate accountability structure, stockholders are the only constituency given any enforceable rights, and thus are the only one with substantial influence over managers. Few (..real proposals) that would give corporate managers more ability and greater incentives to consider the interests of other constituencies. This Article posits that benefit corporation (bencorps) statutes have the potential to change the accountability structure within which managers operate. Certain provisions (..) can create a meaningful shift in the balance of power that will in fact give corporate managers more ability to and impose upon them an enforceable duty to “do the right thing.” But (..) important questions must be answered to determine whether (bencorp) statutes will have the durable, systemic effect desired. (1) the initial wave of entrepreneurs who form (bencorps) must demonstrate a genuine commitment to (..CSR) to preserve the credibility of the movement. (2) (..) socially responsible investment funds must be willing to vote their long-term consciences instead of cashing in for short-term gains. To that end, it is crucial that (bencorps) show that doing things “the right way” will be profitable in the long run. (3) (bencorpos) must pass the “going public” test. Finally, subsidiaries that are governed as (bencorps) must honor their commitments and grow successfully, if the movement is to grow to scale. - downloaded pdf to Note
article  US_legal_system  corporate_law  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  corporate_ownership  corporate_control  principal-agent  management  CSR  institutional_investors  investment-socially_responsible  stakeholders  investment  accountability  benefit_corporations  public_interest  common_good  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Brayden G King and Nicholas A. Pearce - The Contentiousness of Markets: Politics, Social Movements, and Institutional Change in Markets | JSTOR: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 36 (2010), pp. 249-267
While much of economic sociology focuses on the stabilizing aspects of markets, the social movement perspective emphasizes the role that contentiousness plays in bringing institutional change and innovation to markets. Markets are inherently political, both because of their ties to the regulatory functions of the state and because markets are contested by actors who are dissatisfied with market outcomes and who use the market as a platform for social change. Research in this area focuses on the pathways to market change pursued by social movements, including direct challenges to corporations, the institutionalization of systems of private regulation, and the creation of new market categories through institutional entrepreneurship. Much contentiousness, while initially disruptive, works within the market system by producing innovation and restraining capitalism from destroying the resources it depends on for survival. -- still paywall -- 155 references-- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  social_theory  political_sociology  economic_sociology  markets-structure  markets_in_everything  Innovation  social_movements  conflict  political_economy  regulation  capitalism  environment  institutional_change  social_process  change-social  CSR  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  self-regulation  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
theAIRnet.org - Home
The Academic-Industry Research Network – theAIRnet – is a private, 501(c)(3) not-for-profit research organization devoted to the proposition that a sound understanding of the dynamics of industrial development requires collaboration between academic scholars and industry experts. We engage in up-to-date, in-depth, and incisive research and commentary on issues related to industrial innovation and economic development. Our goal is to understand the ways in which, through innovation, businesses and governments can contribute to equitable and stable economic growth – or what we call “sustainable prosperity”.
website  economic_growth  industry  technology  Innovation  green_economy  development  business  business-and-politics  capitalism  global_economy  public-private_partnerships  public_policy  public_health  public_goods  urban_development  health_care  IP  Labor_markets  wages  unemployment  education-training  sustainability  financial_system  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  CSR  firms-theory  management  plutocracy  MNCs  international_political_economy  human_capital  OECD_economies  emerging_markets  supply_chains  R&D  common_good  1-percent  inequality  working_class  work-life_balance  workforce  regulation  regulation-harmonization  incentives  stagnation 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Whatever Happened to Corporate Stewardship? - Rick Wartzman - Harvard Business Review
Rick Wartzman is the executive director of the Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University. Author or editor of five books, he is currently writing one about how the social contract between employer and employee in America has changed since the end of World War II -- In November 1956, Time magazine explored a phenomenon that went by various names: “capitalism with a conscience,” “enlightened conservatism,” “people’s capitalism,” and, most popularly, “The New Conservatism.” No matter which label one preferred, the basic concept was clear: Business leaders were demonstrating an ever increasing willingness, in the words of the story, to “shoulder a host of new responsibilities” and “judge their actions, not only from the standpoint of profit and loss” in their financial results “but of profit and loss to the community.” -- It is easy to overly romanticize 1950s corporate America. People of color faced terrible workplace discrimination at that time, as did women. Late in the decade, many big companies hardened their stance against organized labor, hastening its steep decline. Business culture could be rigid and stifling. Fear of communism and socialism, as much as altruism, was often at the root of corporate generosity. But for all the faults of that period, an ethos has been lost. The University of Michigan’s Mark Mizruchi, in his book The Fracturing of the American Corporate Elite, describes it as “concern for the well-being of the broader society.” Notably, Mizruchi points to the 1956 Time article as a good representative of the ideas that then “dominated in the corporate discourse.”
CSR  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  shareholders  elites  elite_culture  labor  labor_history  post-WWII  neoliberalism  unions  US_history  US_economy  norms-business  business_cycles  business  business-and-politics  firms-theory  tax_havens 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Determining Materiality | Sustainability Accounting Standards Board
SASB’s Materiality Map™ creates a unique materiality profile for different industries. In order to comply with the SEC’s view of materiality, our approach is designed to provide a view into the information needs of the reasonable investor. The Map relies heavily on evidence of investor interest and evidence of financial impact, and it allows for adjustments based on financial impact and long-term sustainability principles. The quantitative model is designed to prioritize the issues that are most important within an industry, to keep the standards to a minimum set of issues that are likely to be material. Sustainability accounting standards are then developed based on both the quantitative results from the Map and a qualitative research process informed by SASB’s research team. The Map looks at 40+ sustainability issues and analyzes their importance in the context of the 80+ industries in SICS. -- Issues are classified under five categories: Environmental Capital, Social Capital, Human Capital, Business Model & Innovation, and Leadership & Governance. Traditionally, sustainability issues are classified under the common ESG structure; however, SASB uses a finer grained analysis in order to surface potential impacts on the company’s ability to create long-term value.
financial_regulation  accountability  accounting  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  corporate_citizenship  CSR  risk  sustainability  climate  investment  capital_markets  industry 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Vision and Mission | Sustainability Accounting Standards Board
Facts About SASB *--* The Sustainability Accounting Standards Board is an independent 501(c)3 non-profit. *--* Through 2016 SASB is developing sustainability accounting standards for more than 80 industries in 10 sectors. *--* SASB standards are designed for the disclosure of material sustainability issues in mandatory SEC filings, such as the Form 10-K and 20-F. -**- SASB is accredited to establish sustainability accounting standards by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Accreditation by ANSI signifies that SASB’s procedures to develop standards meet ANSI’s requirements for openness, balance, consensus, and due process. *--* SASB is not affiliated with FASB, GASB, IASB or any other accounting standards boards. --- For more information about the principles, processes and definitions relevant to SASB’s standards setting process, please read our Conceptual Framework. (Pdf downloaded to Note)
financial_regulation  accountability  accounting  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  corporate_citizenship  CSR  risk  sustainability  climate  investment  capital_markets  industry  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
An Insider’s Guide to The SASB Experience | Sustainability Accounting Standards Board - May 2014
After a year of research, stakeholder engagement, feedback and refinement, SASB celebrated the reveal of its latest research results with evocative discourse about the Services Industry and its role in non-financial reporting. With over 190 participants representing 120 companies, the May Delta Series, which is the research process capstone, brought together its Industry Working Group participants as well as other integral stakeholders, to discuss the outcomes of their sector-specific research. -- panelists discussed experience getting buy in from different parts of organization and Board -- how using the quarterly 10-K form provided a familiar focus for measurement and reporting -- links to CSR and risk management, not just profitability measures, were especially important for directors
financial_regulation  accountability  accounting  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  corporate_citizenship  CSR  risk  sustainability  climate  investment  capital_markets  industry 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Krista Bondy - The Paradox of Power in CSR: A Case Study on Implementation | JSTOR: Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 82, No. 2 (Oct., 2008), pp. 307-323
Although current literature assumes positive outcomes for stakeholders resulting from an increase in power associated with CSR, this research suggests that this increase can lead to conflict within organizations, resulting in almost complete inactivity on CSR. **Methods** A Single in-depth case study, focusing on power as an embedded concept. **Results** Empirical evidence is used to demonstrate how some actors use CSR to improve their own positions within an organization. Resource dependence theory is used to highlight why this may be a more significant concern for CSR. **Conclusions** Increasing power for CSR has the potential to offer actors associated with it increased personal power, and thus can attract opportunistic actors with little interest in realizing the benefits of CSR for the company and its stakeholders. Thus power can be an impediment to furthering CSR strategy and activities at the individual and organizational level.
article  jstor  CSR  incentives  organizations  busisness-ethics  firms-theory  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Yves Fassin - The Stakeholder Model Refined | JSTOR: Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 84, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 113-135
The popularity of the stakeholder model has been achieved thanks to its powerful visual scheme and its very simplicity. Stakeholder management has become an important tool to transfer ethics to management practice and strategy. Nevertheless, legitimate criticism continues to insist on clarification and emphasises on the perfectible nature of the model. The ambiguity and the vagueness of the stakeholder concept are discussed from managerial and legal approaches. The impacts of two major shortcomings of the popular stakeholder framework are examined: the boundaries and the level of the firm's environment, and the ambivalent position of pressure groups and regulators. Working pragmatically, with a focus on the managerial and organisational perspective, an attempt is made to clarify the categorisations and classifications by introducing new terminology with a distinction between stakeholders, stakewatchers and stakekeepers. -- didn't download -- large references list -- confirms my allergy to stakeholders
article  jstor  corporate_governance  CSR  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas Donaldson and Lee E. Preston - The Stakeholder Theory of the Corporation: Concepts, Evidence, and Implications | JSTOR: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Jan., 1995), pp. 65-91
The stakeholder theory has been advanced and justified in the management literature on the basis of its descriptive accuracy, instrumental power, and normative validity. These three aspects of the theory, although interrelated, are quite distinct; they involve different types of evidence and argument and have different implications. In this article, we examine these three aspects of the theory and critique and integrate important contributions to the literature related to each. We conclude that the three aspects of stakeholder theory are mutually supportive and that the normative base of the theory-which includes the modern theory of property rights-is fundamental. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- didn't download -- cited by more than 150 on jstor
article  jstor  corporate_governance  busisness-ethics  legal_theory  property_rights  externalities  CSR  lit_survey  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Elisabet Garriga and Domènec Melé - Corporate Social Responsibility Theories: Mapping the Territory | JSTOR: Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 53, No. 1/2 (Aug., 2004), pp. 51-71
The Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) field presents not only a landscape of theories but also a proliferation of approaches, which are controversial, complex and unclear. This article tries to clarify the situation, "mapping the territory" by classifying the main CSR theories and related approaches in four groups: (1) instrumental theories, in which the corporation is seen as only an instrument for wealth creation, and its social activities are only a means to achieve economic results; (2) political theories, which concern themselves with the power of corporations in society and a responsible use of this power in the political arena; (3) integrative theories, in which the corporation is focused on the satisfaction of social demands; and (4) ethical theories, based on ethical responsibilities of corporations to society. In practice, each CSR theory presents four dimensions related to profits, political performance, social demands and ethical values. The findings suggest the necessity to develop a new theory on the business and society relationship, which should integrate these four dimensions. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- didn't download -- cited by more than 40 on jstor
article  jstor  social_theory  business  business-and-politics  CSR  corporate_governance  capitalism  ethics  busisness-ethics  externalities  profit  civil_society  lit_survey  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Dirk Matten and Andrew Crane - Corporate Citizenship: Toward an Extended Theoretical Conceptualization | JSTOR: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 30, No. 1 (Jan., 2005), pp. 166-179
We critically examine the content of contemporary understandings of corporate citizenship and locate them within the extant body of research dealing with business-society relations. Our main purpose is to realize a theoretically informed definition of corporate citizenship that is descriptively robust and conceptually distinct from existing concepts in the literature. Specifically, our extended perspective exposes the element of "citizenship" and conceptualizes corporate citizenship as the administration of a bundle of individual citizenship rights--social, civil, and political--conventionally granted and protected by governments. -- cited by more than 35 in jstor -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_economy  liberalism  markets  nation-state  civil_society  business  business-and-politics  corporate_citizenship  CSR  civil_liberties  privatization  legal_system  international_political_economy  globalization  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Crane and Dirk Matten - Corporate Citizenship: Missing the Point or Missing the Boat? A Reply to van Oosterhout | JSTOR: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Oct., 2005), pp. 681-684
Short follow up to earlier article challenging mushy use of CC relative to CSR. This piece clarifies what they were tackling in the article and areas where the concept needs to be expanded to deal with what's happening. A decade later after Citizens United etc their distinction from CSR and expansion to deal with blurred boundaries between state, civil society, business, politics, citizen rights and responsibilities is even more appropriate. -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_economy  nation-state  civil_society  business  business-and-politics  corporate_citizenship  CSR  civil_liberties  privatization  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ulf Henning Richter - Liberal Thought in Reasoning on CSR | JSTOR: Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 97, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 625-649
In this article, I argue that conventional reasoning on corporate social responsibility (CSR) is based on the assumption of a liberal market economy in the context of a nation state. I build on the study of Scherer and Palazzo (Acad Manage Rev 32(4):1096-1120, 2007), developing a number of criteria to identify elements of liberal philosophy in the ongoing CSR debate. I discuss their occurrence in the CSR literature in detail and reflect on the implications, taking into account the emerging political reading of the firm. I conclude that the apolitical framework in the mainstream CSR literature has to be overcome since it does not reflect recent changes in the socio-economic conditions for economic actors in a globalizing world. -- over 200 references -- didn't download
article  jstor  international_political_economy  globalization  global_system  corporations  corporate_governance  CSR  nation-state  corporate_citizenship  firms-theory  regulation  accountability  business-and-politics  externalities  capitalism  political_economy  economic_sociology  management  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Locke - An economics that ignores the constitution of the firm lacks verisimilitude: Looking outside Anglo-Saxonia to Rhineland capitalism | Real-World Economics Review Blog Sept 2013
Since the 1980s, the evidence indicates that this sense of responsibility has in fact and even in public utterances diminished, as when The Business Roundtable (CEOs  from 200 of the largest US corporations) “explicitly abandoned previously subscribed to tenets of social responsibility.” ......In this retreat from CSR, neoclassical economics, with its anti-government, pro-market, pro greed, and ergodic science has been a powerful ideological ally of director-primacy governance and hence mal-distribution.  Usually in the debate the system of firm ownership and control is not discussed but taken for granted as a given.  Outside Anglo-Saxonia it has not been a given but a contested issue often with quite different ownership and control traditions and CSR outcomes.  
economic_history  20thC  21stC  US_economy  Germany  political_economy  corporate_governance  CSR  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
How CEOs Can Fix Capitalism - Harvard Business Review - eBook
The financial crisis of 2008 and the Great Recession caused a crisis of public confidence in business and American-style capitalism, with its focus on maximizing shareholder value. Corporate leaders understood that reform was needed and that they needed to commit themselves to the dual goal of producing benefits for society and their firms' bottom lines--to creating "shared value." But the specific actions they could take to bring about this change were less clear. This ebook offers some of the freshest thinking today on practical measures that businesses can implement to create shared value. Originally published in an online forum hosted by "Harvard Business Review," it offers valuable advice about how CEOs, other senior executives, and boards of directors can work together to engage stakeholders in new ways, change their companies' values, build healthier relationships with investors, revamp incentive systems to create long-term value, and develop stronger succession plans. The authors of this collection of short articles include current or former CEOs, such as Howard Schultz of Starbucks and Dominic Barton of McKinsey & Company, and an array of prominent academics and other thought leaders, including Roger Martin of the University of Toronto, Jeffrey Pfeffer of Stanford, and Alfred Rappaport of Northwestern. Its editors are Raymond Gilmartin, the former CEO of Merck and, until recently, an adjunct professor at Harvard Business School, and Steve Prokesch, a senior editor at "Harvard Business Review" who previously worked at the "New York Times" and "BusinessWeek" magazine. In their introduction, they offer five specific recommendations on how CEOs can restore public faith in capitalism.
corporate_governance  capitalism  CSR  books 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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