dunnettreader + british_politics   377

BBC Radio 4 - Shakespeare's Restless World - Downloads
Making a selection of objects from the British Museum and collections across the UK, Neil MacGregor uncovers the stories they tell about Shakespeare's world.
Elizabethan  17thC  British_politics  British_history  Shakespeare-influence  English_lit  audio  London  cultural_history  16thC  Shakespeare  social_history 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Peter Müller - Hobbes, Locke and the Consequences: Shaftesbury's Moral Sense and Political Agitation in Early 18thC England (2013) - Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies - Wiley Online Library
This article examines the political (and Whig) agenda behind the earl of Shaftesbury's moral and religious thought, offering a reading of the so-called ‘moral sense’ that, based on Terry Eagleton's Marxist interpretation of moral-sense philosophy in general and Shaftesbury's use of the concept in particular, illuminates how far the moral sense serves a propagandistic purpose in Shaftesbury's writings. A close examination of this aspect, which has so far not been considered in the relevant literature on Shaftesbury, illuminates the anti-Hobbist and, by implication, anti-Tory (and High Church) tendency of his moral philosophy in the context of Low Church Anglicanism. -- Keywords: Shaftesbury; Thomas Hobbes; John Locke; Latitudinarianism; moral sense; Whiggism; Anglicanism
article  paywall  Wiley  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_culture  Shaftesbury  Hobbes  Locke  Church_of_England  High_Church  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  latitudinarian 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Does Welfare Spending Crowd Out Charitable Activity? Evidence from Historical England Under the Poor Laws - Boberg-Fazlić - 2015 - The Economic Journal - Wiley Online Library
This study examines the relationship between government spending and charitable activity. We present a novel way of testing the ‘crowding out hypothesis’, making use of the fact that welfare provision under the Old Poor Laws was decided at the parish level, thus giving heterogeneity within a single country. Using data on poor relief spending combined with data on charitable incomes by county before and after 1800, we find a positive relationship: areas with more public provision also enjoyed higher levels of charitable income. These results are confirmed when instrumenting for Poor Law spending and when looking at first differences.
See the LSE blog post that summarizes this study.
bad_economics  British_politics  British_history  Poor_Laws  18thC  budget_deficit  Industrial_Revolution  agriculture  fiscal_policy  Wiley  welfare  Tories  philanthropy  UK_economy  Labor_markets  UK_politics  unemployment  paywall  article  Brexit  19thC  landowners 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Philip Connell - British Identities and the Politics of Ancient Poetry in Later 18thC England (2006) | The Historical Journal on JSTOR
The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 161-192 - This article examines the scholarly recovery and popular reception of 'ancient poetry' in later eighteenth-century England, with a view to elucidating the relationship between cultural primitivism and more overtly politicized discourses of national identity. The publication of the poems of Ossian, in the early 1760s, gave a new prominence to the earliest cultural productions of Celtic antiquity, and inspired the attempts of English literary historians, such as Thomas Percy and Thomas Warton, to provide an alternative 'Gothic' genealogy for the English literary imagination. However, both the English reception of Ossian, and the Gothicist scholarship of Percy and Warton, were complicated by the growing strength of English radical patriotism. As popular political discourse assumed an increasingly insular preoccupation with Saxon liberties and ancient constitutional rights, more conservative literary historians found their own attempts to ground English poetic tradition in some form of Gothic inheritance progressively compromised. The persistence of ancient constitutionalism as a divisive element of English political argument thus curtailed the ability of Gothicist literary scholarship to function as an effective vehicle for English cultural patriotism.
article  jstor  18thC  English_lit  literary_history  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-literature  political_culture  political_discourse  Gothic  ancient_constitution  liberty  radicals  conservatism  antiquity  antiquaries  history_of_England  popular_culture  high_culture  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Philip Connell - MARVELL, MILTON AND THE PROTECTORAL CHURCH SETTLEMENT (2011) | Review of English Studies on JSTOR
CONNELL, PHILIP. "MARVELL, MILTON AND THE PROTECTORAL CHURCH SETTLEMENT." The Review of English Studies 62, no. 256 (2011): 562-93.
The question of church settlement was one of the most important—and intractable—issues faced by the Cromwellian Protectorate. This essay traces the literary response to the Protector's religious reforms in the poetry and prose of Andrew Marvell and John Milton. It confirms and extends our sense of their creative relationship during the mid-1650s as close, continued and reciprocal. But it also suggests that the two writers were fundamentally divided in their estimation of the Protectoral church. Milton's profound suspicion of that church was evident even at the height of his public support for Cromwell, in the Defensio Secunda. Marvell's The First Anniversary, in contrast, seeks to reconcile the older poet to the Protector's authority as godly magistrate and guarantor of 'sober Liberty'. Milton, however, was unpersuaded. His sonnet of 1655, 'Avenge O Lord', although closely connected to his official duties under the Protectorate, also intimates his deeply ambivalent attitude to Cromwell's self-appointed role as defender of the reformed faith. The essay begins and concludes by considering the extent to which their differences on ecclesiastical polity in the 1650s continued to inform the divergent positions assumed by Milton and Marvell in their responses to the first Restoration crisis, 20 years later.- 5-yr moving paywall
article  jstor  17thC  English_lit  British_history  British_politics  Church-and-State  Interregnum  Cromwell  Milton  Marvell  poetry  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  literary_history  religion-established  religion-and-literature 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Eric Nelson - "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75" (2011) | William& Mary Quarterly
Nelson E. "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75". The William and Mary Quarterly [Internet]. 2011;3rd ser., 68 (4) :533-596. With responses by Gordon S. Wood, Pauline Maier, and Daniel Hulsebosch, as well a reply to critics ("Taking Them Seriously: Patriots, Prerogative, and the English Seventeenth Century"). -- preliminary to his "Royalist Revolution" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  forum  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  US_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Patriot_King  Patriots  American_colonies  American_Revolution  checks-and-balances  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  limited_monarchy  prerogative  liberalism-republicanism_debates  Whigs-Radicals  Commonwealthmen  Charles_I  George_III  Adams_John  US_constitution  Early_Republic  legislature  exec_branch  US_government  US_President  majoritarian  democracy  masses-fear_of  federalism  federal_preemption  national_interest  states_rights  government-forms  constitutions  constitutional_regime  Royalists 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Ryu Susato - Hume's Advocacy of Religious Establishments | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (April 2012)
Taming "The Tyranny of Priests": Hume's Advocacy of Religious Establishments -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 2 (April 2012), pp. 273-293 -- excellent big bibliography, especially on reception of Hume and how his notions fit with other Scots -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  Hume-politics  Hume  Hume-religion  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Church_of_England  Kirk  tolerance  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Warburton  Enlightenment-conservative  clergy  priestcraft  enthusiasm  fanatics  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Scott Sowerby, review - Brian Cowan, The State Trial of Doctor Henry Sacheverell | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. August, 2014.
Cowan’s erudite edition of primary sources charts contemporary reactions to the Sacheverell trial. Cowan sees the trial as an instance of the personalization of political ideas, as long-standing debates about church and state became “focused on one figure—Sacheverell, who could now be cast as either a hero or a scoundrel, depending upon one’s politics” (p. 15, emphasis in original). Unlike so many studies of print culture that focus on production, this volume is attuned to reception, with reproductions of commonplace books and marginalia that alternately endorsed and disputed the standard printed accounts of the trial. Cowan’s edition assembles sources from eleven libraries on two continents. Most of his selections are from unpublished manuscripts; five are from publications so rare that they are found in only one repository. The footnotes alone are worth the price of admission, providing a blow-by-blow account of the trial for the uninitiated. The volume is splendidly illustrated, with photographs of manuscripts, satirical prints, engravings of Sacheverell’s portrait, and depictions of the courtroom. The extended introduction surveys the history of printed transcripts of the trial, from Jacob Tonson’s official record to competing accounts by Tory and Whig authors. A helpful timeline and a comprehensive biographical guide round out the edition.
books  reviews  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Sacheverell  1710s  1720s  parties  Tories  Whig_Junto  Whigs  Church_of_England  tolerance  comprehension-church  Protestant_International  church-in-danger  Queen_Anne  impeachment  Parliament  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  Revolution_Principles  Walpole  print_culture  reception  Tonson  rhetoric-political  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church-and-State  manuscripts  primary_sources 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Nancy L. Rhoden, review - William A. Pettigrew, Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. February, 2015.
As a study of the politics of the RAC and its independent slave trading opponents, this is a successful book. What it does particularly well is offer a “lens of politics” (p. 16) through which to understand the British slave trade, and the victory of separate traders concerning deregulation. It is equally strong on the British political context and its detailed understanding of how post-1688 political institutions and culture shaped responses on the slave trade. These are valuable contributions, particularly the argument that understandings of liberty and popular consent after the Glorious Revolution provided an effective ideology for both the deregulation of and the growth of the slave trade. Less convincing is the argument about the impact of the RAC on later British abolitionism, however much one might admire the attempt. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  1710s  Harley  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  Royal_African_Co  slavery  monopolies  Parliament  parties  Glorious_Revolution  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Melinda S. Zook - Turncoats and Double Agents in Restoration and Revolutionary England: The Case of Robert Ferguson, the Plotter (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Spring, 2009), pp. 363-378 -- The propagandist and conspirator, Robert Ferguson, so-called, The Plotter, has always been something of a puzzle to historians; his conversion from Whig to Jacobite following the Glorious Revolution has always been particularly troubling. This essay argues that Ferguson's winding career was far from unusual in the late Stuart era. Many politicians, prelates, playwrights and publicists altered their principles or even their religion within the fast changing political environment of Restoration and Revolution England. Secondly, this essay takes Ferguson seriously as a sophisticated political theorist, arguing that his political principles, from Whig to Jacobite, remained fairly consistent and revolve around his understanding of England's ancient constitution. His political life took many twists and turns, but his basic ideology remained the same. -- article published after her Radical Whigs and conspiracies book -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  British_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  Restoration  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  Whig_Junto  conspiracy  James_II  James_III  William_III  Queen_Anne  1715_uprising  ancient_constitution  ideology  political_philosophy  political_culture  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Kevin Killeen - Hanging up Kings: The Political Bible in Early Modern England | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (2011)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 72, No. 4 (October 2011), pp. 549-570 -- thinks the Biblical language in which so much 17thC political discourse, including the regicide, was conducted makes much of it out of our audible range, so he's undertaking some geological retrieval --:downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  politics-and-religion  politico-theology  James_I  Charles_I  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Interregnum  Cromwell  Parliamentarians  political_discourse  republicanism  Milton  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Bourke, R.: Empire and Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke. (eBook and Hardcover)
Drawing on the complete range of printed and manuscript sources, Empire and Revolution offers a vivid reconstruction of the major concerns of this outstanding statesman, orator, and philosopher.In restoring Burke to his original political and intellectual context, this book strips away the accumulated distortions that have marked the reception of his ideas. In the process, it overturns the conventional picture of a partisan of tradition against progress. In place of the image of a backward-looking opponent of popular rights, it presents a multifaceted portrait of one of the most captivating figures in eighteenth-century life and thought. While Burke was a passionately energetic statesman, he was also a deeply original thinker. Empire and Revolution depicts him as a philosopher-in-action who evaluated the political realities of the day through the lens of Enlightenment thought, variously drawing on the ideas of such figures as Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Hume. A boldly ambitious work of scholarship, this book challenges us to rethink the legacy of Burke and the turbulent era in which he played so pivotal a role. -- Richard Bourke is professor in the history of political thought and codirector of the Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of Peace in Ireland: The War of Ideas and the coeditor of Political Judgement. -- Big early chunk on Vindication of Natural Society -- TOC and Intro (24 pgs) downloaded to Note
books  buy  biography  kindle-available  Bolingbroke  Burke  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  social_sciences  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  imperialism-critique  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  parties  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-grandees  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  representative_institutions  political_participation  political_press  moral_philosophy  psychology  religion-established  Church_of_England  Catholics-and-politics  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  Catholic_emancipation  aesthetics  Montesquieu  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  Rousseau  American_colonies  American_Revolution  India  French_Revolution  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolutionary_Wars  politics-and-religion  politics-and-history  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  hierarchy  George_III  Pitt_the_Elder  Pitt_the_Younger  English_lit  human_rights  human_nature  philosophical_anthropology  sentimentalism  moral_sentiments  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  Enlightenment-conservative  British_Em 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
William A. Pettigrew - Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 (2013) | UNC Press
Shortlisted for the 2013 Whitfield Prize, Royal Historical Society
In the years following the Glorious Revolution, independent slave traders challenged the charter of the Royal African Company by asserting their natural rights as Britons to trade freely in enslaved Africans. In this comprehensive history of the rise and fall of the RAC, William A. Pettigrew grounds the transatlantic slave trade in politics, not economic forces, analyzing the ideological arguments of the RAC and its opponents in Parliament and in public debate. Ultimately, Pettigrew powerfully reasons that freedom became the rallying cry for those who wished to participate in the slave trade and therefore bolstered the expansion of the largest intercontinental forced migration in history. Unlike previous histories of the RAC, Pettigrew's study pursues the Company's story beyond the trade’s complete deregulation in 1712 to its demise in 1752. Opening the trade led to its escalation, which provided a reliable supply of enslaved Africans to the mainland American colonies, thus playing a critical part in entrenching African slavery as the colonies' preferred solution to the American problem of labor supply. -- William A. Pettigrew is lecturer in history at the University of Kent.
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  slavery-Africans  African_trade  slavery-law  commerce  trading_companies  Royal_African_Co  Whigs  Whig_Junto  freedom  free_trade  maritime_history  West_Indies  North_America  American_colonies  Atlantic  colonialism  British_foreign_policy  Parliament  Harley  Bolingbroke  Peace_of_Utrecht  1690s  1700s  1710s  capitalism  plantations  colonial_governance  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  War_of_Jenkins_Ear 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Noeleen McIlvenna - The Short Life of Free Georgia: Class and Slavery in the Colonial South | UNC Press
For twenty years in the eighteenth century, Georgia--the last British colony in what became the United States--enjoyed a brief period of free labor, where workers were not enslaved and were paid. The Trustees for the Establishment of the Colony of Georgia created a "Georgia experiment" of philanthropic enterprise and moral reform for poor white workers, though rebellious settlers were more interested in shaking off the British social system of deference to the upper class. Only a few elites in the colony actually desired the slave system, but those men, backed by expansionist South Carolina planters, used the laborers' demands for high wages as examples of societal unrest. Through a campaign of disinformation in London, they argued for slavery, eventually convincing the Trustees to abandon their experiment. In The Short Life of Free Georgia, Noeleen McIlvenna chronicles the years between 1732 and 1752 and challenges the conventional view that Georgia's colonial purpose was based on unworkable assumptions and utopian ideals. Rather, Georgia largely succeeded in its goals--until self-interested parties convinced England that Georgia had failed, leading to the colony's transformation into a replica of slaveholding South Carolina. -- Noeleen McIlvenna is associate professor of history at Wright State University and author of A Very Mutinous People
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  18thC  1730s  1740s  1750s  Georgia  colonialism  settler_colonies  slavery  labor_history  labor_standards  wages  Tories  Board_of_Trade  Parliament  planters  plantations  agriculture  hierarchy  elites  philanthropy  political_culture  economic_culture  American_colonies 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Josh Chafetz - Democracy’s Privileged Few: Legislative Privilege and Democratic Norms in the British and American Constitutions | Yale University Press - 2011
This book is the first to compare the freedoms and protections of members of the United States Congress with those of Britain’s Parliament. Placing legislative privilege in historical context, Josh Chafetz explores how and why legislators in Britain and America have been granted special privileges in five areas: jurisdictional conflicts between the courts and the legislative houses, freedom of speech, freedom from civil arrest, contested elections, and the disciplinary powers of the houses. Legislative privilege is a crucial component of the relationship between a representative body and the other participants in government, including the people. In recounting and analyzing the remarkable story of how parliamentary government emerged and evolved in Britain and how it crossed the Atlantic, Chafetz illuminates a variety of important constitutional issues, including the separation of powers, the nature of representation, and the difference between written and unwritten constitutionalism. This book will inspire in readers a much greater appreciation for the rise and triumph of democracy. -- see kindle sample
books  kindle-available  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  constitutions  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  democracy  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  representative_institutions  political_participation  UK_Government  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  American_colonies  US_constitution  Congress  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  House_of_Representatives  constituencies  judiciary  judicial_review  exec_branch  monarchy  monarchical_republic  MPs  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_culture  legitimacy  Founders  Madison  Blackstone  Mill  prerogative  bill_of_rights  bills_of_attainder  elections-disputed  Bolingbroke 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
John Dunn, ed. - The Economic Limits to Modern Politics (1992) | Cambridge University Press
The central problem of modern government and political action is how to choose and implement effective economic policies. For this reason, the economic considerations of public policy have assumed a more prominent place in contemporary political thought. Despite efforts among political scientists, economists, and sociologists to fathom the complexities of this added dimension, none of these solid sciences offers a satisfying approach to the problem. This volume attempts to display the historical novelty and intellectual importance of this dilemma, to uncover its origins, and to procure a remedy through a clearer and steadier focus. The book's contributors range from historians of ideas to economic theorists, who bring the approach of their own intellectual discipline to bear upon the issue. **--** Introduction, John Dunn *-* 1. The economic limits to modern politics, John Dunn *-* 2. The wealth of one nation and the dynamics of international competition, Istvan Hont *-* 3. The political limits to pre-modern politics, J. G. A. Pocock *-* 4. The economic constraints on political programs, Frank H. Hahn *-* 5. International liberalism reconsidered, Robert O. Keohane *-* 6. Capitalism, socialism, and democracy: compatibilities and contradictions John Dunn. -- ebook Adobe Reader - not clear whether in kindle format -- excerpt (10 ogs Intro) downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  economic_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  capitalism  competition-interstate  economic_growth  development  raison-d'-état  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  trade  trade-policy  Great_Divergence  economic_theory  political_culture  economic_culture  macroeconomic_policy  Innovation  innovation-government_policy  collective_action  property_rights  Labor_markets  redistribution  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  Davenant  Smith  social_order  social_democracy  liberalism  elites-political_influence  IR_theory  globalization  international_political_economy  public_finance  public_goods  class_conflict  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Daniel McCarthy - Why Liberalism Means Empire | Lead essay / TAC Summer 2014
Outstanding case made for "consrrvative" realist IR position of off-shore balancing - not really "conservative" but he needs to give it that spin for his aufience buy-in -- takes on not just the militarists, neicons and librral intrrventionists but thr "non-liberal" sbtu-interventionists like Kennan and Buchanan - he leaves out the corrosive, anti-liberal democracy effects of globalized, financial capitalism that undermines the narrative of gradualist liberal democratization and achievements in OECD rconomies - as Zingales putscit "save capitalism from the capitalists" beeds to be included with the hegemon's responsibilities along with off-shore balancing - dimensions of power beyond military, which Dan does stress in his sketch of ehy Britain could meet the military challenges until WWI
Pocket  18thc  19thc  20thc  anti-imperialism  balance-of-power  british_empire  british_history  british_politics  civil_rights  cold_war  competition-interstate  cultural_transmission  democracy  empires  entre_deux_guerres  europe  foreign_policy  french_revolution  geopolitics  germany  global  governance  globalization  great_powers  hegemony  hong_kong  human_rights  ideology  imperialism  international_system  ir  ir-history  iraq  japan  liberalism  military-industrial  military_history  napoleon  napoleonic  wars  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  naval_history  neocons  neoliberalism  peace  pinboard  political_culture  politics-and-history  post-wwii  power  rule_of_law  social_science  trade  us  history  us_foreign_policy  us_military  us_politics  uses_of_history  warfare  world  wwi  wwii 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alex Massie - What do they know of Britain who only England (or Scotland) know?
A long, long time ago, in the fading years of the last century, I was one half of a debating team that, representing Trinity College Dublin’s Philosophical…
Instapaper  UK_politics  UK_Government  English_constitution  Scotland  Scottish_politics  British_history  British_politics  political_culture  1707_Union  Tories  Labour  SNP  local_politics  Ireland  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob T. Levy - Rationalism, Pluralism, and Freedom - Feb 2015 - Oxford University Press
Intermediate groups-- voluntary associations, churches, ethnocultural groups, universities, and more--can both protect threaten individual liberty. The same is true for centralized state action against such groups. Levy argues that, both normatively and historically, liberal political thought rests on a deep tension between a rationalist suspicion of intermediate and local group power, and a pluralism favorable toward intermediate group life, and preserving the bulk of its suspicion for the centralizing state. He studies this tension using tools from the history of political thought, normative political philosophy, law, and social theory. (..) retells the history of liberal thought and practice (..)from the birth of intermediacy in the High Middle Ages to the British Pluralists of the 20thC. (..) restores centrality to (..) ancient constitutionalism and to Montesquieu, (..) social contract theory's contributions to the development of liberal thought have been mistaken for the whole tradition. It discusses the real threats to freedom posed both by local group life and by state centralization, the ways in which those threats aggravate each other.(..) the elements of liberal thought concerned with the threats from each cannot necessarily be combined into a single satisfactory theory of freedom. (..) it must be lived with, not overcome. -- 3 parts and an epilogue Against Synthesis -history in Part 2 -- 4. Antecedents and Foundations -- 5. The Ancient Constitution, the Social Contract, and the Modern State -- 6. Montesquieu and Voltaire, Philosophes and Parlements -- 7. The Age of Revolutions -- 8. Centralization in a Democratic Age: Tocqueville and Mill -- 9. From Liberal Constitutionalism to Pluralism -- only in hardback so far
books  buy  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  liberalism  liberal_democracy  intermediate_groups  pluralism  central_government  liberty  ancient_constitution  social_contract  monarchy-proprietary  limited_monarchy  limited_government  associations  subsidiarity  feudalism  Absolutism  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Montesquieu  Voltaire  British_politics  France  Ancien_régime 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Manning - Shifting the Balance of Power: Workers, Wages and Employers over the Next Parliament | Resolution Foundation - April 2015
Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics and Director of the Community Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE -- 40 years ago an improving labour market and prices rising faster than wages would have led trade unions to march into the boardroom demanding higher wages and threatening strike action if those demands were not met. Pretty soon, union leaders would have been invited round to Number 10 for beer and sandwiches to be cajoled into wage moderation to prevent an inflationary spiral taking hold. A lot has changed in the past 40 years.These days the Prosecco remains in the fridge and David Cameron used a speech to the British Chambers of Commerce in February to urge pay rises for workers, a somewhat surprising sight. But, there is a simple explanation. Since the crisis began, the average British worker has suffered a fall in living standards deeper and longer than anything experienced for more than a generation. The recent drop in oil prices and the resulting lower inflation will offer some respite but not much. -- Comparing the situation now and 40 years ago, it is hard to escape the conclusion that there has been a fundamental shift in the balance of power from workers to employers and that perhaps this shift has gone too far and it is time to redress the balance somewhat. -- copied to Pocket
article  political_economy  UK_economy  labor_history  Labor_markets  unemployment  wages  profit  productivity  productivity-labor_share  inequality  unions  British_politics  standard_of_living  employers  working_class  competition  Pocket 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Bernard, ed. - The Literary Correspondences of the Tonsons - Oxford University Press
The Tonsons were the pre-eminent literary publishers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. It is difficult to estimate their contribution to the formation of English literature accurately. Nevertheless, it is clear that they carried Shakespeare into the eighteenth century and started the practice of modern editing of him. Without Rowe's life and without the Pope-Theobald controversy, the history of Shakespeare studies would have been different, perhaps much less illustrious. The same is true of Milton, a figure who through his political sympathies was in disrepute, but on whom Jacob Tonson the elder (and his nephew after him) decided to lavish the care, eventually including illustration and annotation, usually reserved for the classics. Later they issued an edition of Spenser by John Hughes, thus creating the triumvirate who for many years were to dominate the study of English renaissance literature. It is not unreasonable to claim that the house of Tonson invented English literature as matter for repeated reading and study. In addition, of course, the Tonsons were Dryden's main publisher, the first to publish Pope, and the consistent supporters of Addison and Steele and their early periodicals, while Jacob Tonson the elder had earlier shaped the miscellany, the translation of classical poetry into English, the pocket Elzevier series, and the luxury edition - practices carried on by the Tonson firm throughout the eighteenth century. They were at the forefront of the creation of a Whig literary culture and Jacob Tonson the elder was the founder of the famous Whig Kit-Cat Club which, it has been said, saved the nation. This edition brings together the correspondences of the Tonsons for the first time and represents a major intervention in the field of the history of the book and literary production. It includes 158 letters, with translations where necessary, from major authors, politicians, and men and women of letters of the period, discussing their work and the role that the Tonsons played in getting literature to the press and the reading nation. The letters are accompanied by generous and insightful annotation, as well as brief biographies of each of the Tonsons, and special sections on publishing, patronage, and retirement.
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  elite_culture  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Whigs-grandees  Whigs-oligarchy  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  publishing  print_culture  printing  Dryden  Pope_Alexander  Addison  Steele  English_lit  poetry  theater  theatre-Restoration  theatre-politics  correspondence  EF-add 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuelle de Champs - Enlightenment and Utility: Bentham in French, Bentham in France (to be released March 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Jeremy Bentham (..) was a seminal figure in the history of modern political thought. This lively monograph presents the numerous French connections of an emblematic British thinker. (..) Placing Bentham's thought in the context of the French-language Enlightenment through to the post-Revolutionary era, (..) the case for a historical study of 'Global Bentham'. Examining previously unpublished sources, she traces the circulation of Bentham's letters, friends, manuscripts, and books in the French-speaking world. (..) transnational intellectual history reveals how utilitarianism, as a doctrine, was both the product of, and a contribution to, French-language political thought at a key time(..). The debates (re) utilitarianism in France cast new light on the making of modern Liberalism. **--** Intro **--** Part I. An Englishman in the Republic of Letters: 1. Languages of Enlightenment *-* 2. Satire and polemics *-* 3. Defining utilitarianism: private connections and correspondence **--** Part II. 'Projet d'un corps de loix complet' and the Reform of Jurisprudence in Europe: 4. The Genesis of Projet *-* 5. Projet in Enlightenment legal thought *-* 6. The politics of legal reform **--** Part III. Reflections for the Revolution in France: 7. Frenchmen and Francophiles: Lord Lansdowne's network *-* 8. British expertise for French legislators *-* 9. Utility, rights and revolution: missed encounters? **--** Part IV. Utile Dulcis? Bentham in Paris, 1802: 10. Dumont's editorship: from the Bibliothèque Britannique to Traités de législation civile et pénale *-* 11. A mixed reception *-* 12. Autumn 1802: Bentham in Paris **--** Part V. Liberty, Utility and Rights (1815–1832): 13. 'For one disciple in this country, I have 50 at least in France' *-* 14. Utilitarian arguments in French politics *-* 15. A Utilitarian moment? French liberals and utilitarianism *-* Epilogue: Bentham in the July Revolution *-* Conclusion -- marketing materials not yet available
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  legal_theory  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  Bentham  utilitarianism  utility  reform-political  reform-social  reform-legal  reform-economic  jurisprudence  civil_code  Republic_of_Letters  networks-policy  networks-information  Anglo-French  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomacy-environment  francophile  Landsdowne_Marquis_of  faction  British_politics  patrons  patronage  elite_culture  cross-border  cultural_history  cultural_influence  technical_assistance  criminal_justice  liberalism  rights-legal  rights-political  civil_law  civil_liberties  civil_society  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Peace_of_Amiens  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  July_Monarchy  legal_reasoning  positivism-legal 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Bogart - "There Can Be No Partnership with the King": Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England's East Indian Merchant Empire | via Brad DeLong - Equitablog
Dan Bogart, Department of Economics, UC Irvine - : “There Can Be No Partnership with the King”: Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England’s East Indian Merchant Empire: “The English East India Company helped build Britain’s colonial empire, but the Company was not a leader in East Asian trade for nearly a century after its founding in 1600. This paper argues that its early performance was hindered by a problem of regulatory commitment. It gives a brief history of the torturous renegotiations over its monopoly trading privileges and the fiscal demands by the monarchy. It also analyzes the effects of political instability, warfare, and fiscal capacity on the Company’s investment in shipping tonnage. Regressions show the growth of shipping tonnage declined significantly when there were changes in government ministers, when Britain was at war in Europe and North America, and when shipping capacity exceeded central government tax revenues. The findings point to the significance of regulatory institutions in Britain’s development and its links with politics and war. They also provide an important case where regulatory uncertainty lowers investment.” paper dated Jan 2015 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  downloaded  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  fiscal-military_state  state-building  UK_government-colonies  East_India_Company  trade-policy  trading_companies  trading_privileges  monopolies  British_Navy  17thC  institutional_capacity  regulation  monarchy-proprietary  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  taxes  political_culture  shipping  merchants  interlopers  military_history  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Glorious_Revolution  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  investment  uncertainty-regulation  uncertainty-political  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  parties  faction  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
JAMES LIVESEY, Review Essay - BERKELEY, IRELAND AND 18thC INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (Dec 2014) | Modern Intellectual History - Cambridge Journals Online
Department of History, School of Humanities, University of Dundee -- Books reviewed: (1) Marc A. Hight ed., The Correspondence of George Berkeley (Cambridge University Press, 2013), (2) Scott Breuninger , Recovering Bishop Berkeley: Virtue and Society in the Anglo-Irish Context (Palgrave, 2010), (3) Daniel Carey and Christopher J. Finlay , eds., The Empire of Credit: The Financial Revolution and the British Atlantic World, 1688–1815 (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 2011) -- 18thC Irish intellectual history has enjoyed a revival in recent years. New scholarly resources, such as the Hoppen edition of the papers of the Dublin Philosophical Society and the recently published Berkeley correspondence, have been fundamental to that revival. Since 1986 the journal Eighteenth-Century Ireland: Iris an dá chultúr has sponsored a complex conversation on the meaning and legacy of the 18thC in Irish history. Work in the journal and beyond deploying “New British” and Atlantic histories, as well as continuing attention to Europe, has helped to enrich scholarly understanding of the environments in which Irish people thought and acted. The challenge facing historians of Ireland has been to find categories of analysis that could comprehend religious division and acknowledge the centrality of the confessional state without reducing all Irish experience to sectarian conflict. Clearly the thought of the Irish Catholic community could not be approached without an understanding of the life of the Continental Catholic Church. Archivium Hibernicum has been collecting and publishing the traces of that history for a hundred years and new digital resources such as the Irish in Europe database have extended that work in new directions. The Atlantic and “New British” contexts have been more proximately important for the Protestant intellectual tradition. -- paywall
articles  books  reviews  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  Catholics-Ireland  Berkeley  Anglo-Irish_constitution  British_politics  reform-social  reformation_of_manners  virtue_ethics  civic_virtue  Protestant_Ascendancy  Whigs-oligarchy  Church_of_England  Church_of_Ireland  patronage  networks-political  networks-social  networks-information  fiscal-military_state  public_finance  taxes  credit  financial_innovation  financial_sector_development  economic_history  political_economy  politics-and-religion  politics-and-money 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Biancamaria Fontana - Rethinking the Politics of Commercial Society The Edinburgh Review 1802–1832 (hdbk 1985, pbk & ebook 2008) | Political philosophy | Cambridge University Press
This book explores the sources of modern British liberalism through a study of the Edinburgh Review, the most influential and controversial early nineteenth-century British periodical. Founded by a group of young Scottish intellectuals in 1802, the Review served as a principal channel through which the ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment gained wider currency, and did much to popularize the doctrines of economic and political reform. As Dr Fontana shows in this lucid and keen analysis, the first thirty years in the life of the Review clearly display the new social and economic problems confronting European society in the aftermath of the French Revolution. **--** Introduction *--* 1. Scottish theories of commercial society and the French Revolution *-* 2. Adam Smith's heritage: the Edinburgh reviewers and the Wealth of Nations *-* 3. The definition of political economy: political economy as a social science *-* 4. The Edinburgh reviewers and the Whig party *-* 5. Commercial society and its enemies: the debate on the First Reform Bill *-* Conclusion -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution-impact  civil_society  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  democracy  mass_culture  political_participation  British_politics  Edinburgh_Review  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  Whigs-grandees  liberalism  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  international_political_economy  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  social_order  reform-political  reform-social  reform-finance  reform-economic  Reform_Act_1832  Parliament  parties  trade-policy  trade-theory  trade-cultural_transmission  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright, eds. - Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre Re forming Literature 1789–1837 (2006 pbk) | Cambridge University Press
Tilottama Rajan, University of Western Ontario and Julia M. Wright, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia **--** Romanticism has often been associated with lyric poetry, or otherwise confined within mainstream genres. As a result, we have neglected the sheer diversity and generic hybridity of a literature that ranged from the Gothic novel to the national tale, from monthly periodicals to fictionalized autobiography. In this new volume some of the leading scholars of the period explore the relationship between ideology and literary genre from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The introduction offers a fresh examination of how genre was rethought by Romantic criticism. **--** Introduction Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright **--** Part I. Genre, History, and the Public Sphere: 1. Godwin and the genre reformers: on necessity and contingency in romantic narrative theory - Jon Klancher *-* 2. Radical print culture in periodical form - Kevin Gilmartin *-* 3. History, trauma, and the limits of the liberal imagination: William Godwin's historical fiction - Gary Handwerk *-* 4. Writing on the border: the national tale, female writing, and the public sphere - Ina Ferris. **--** Part II. Genre and Society: 5. Genres from life in Wordsworth's art: Lyrical Ballads 1798 - Don Bialostosky *-* 6. 'A voice in the representation': John Thelwall and the enfranchisement of literature - Judith Thompson *-* 7. 'I am ill-fitted': conflicts of genre in Elisa Fenwick's Secresy - Julia M. Wright *-* 8. Frankenstein as neo-Gothic: from the ghost of the couterfeit to the monster of abjection - Jerrold E. Hogle **--** Part III. Genre, Gender, and the Private Sphere: 9. Autonarration and genotext in Mary Hays' Memoirs of Emma Courtney - Tilottama Rajan *-* 10. 'The science of herself': scenes of female enlightenment - Mary Jacobus *-* 11. The failures of romanticism Jerome McGann -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_history  British_history  British_politics  genre  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  literary_journals  literary_history  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  narrative  narrative-contested  Hunt_Leigh  censorship  Hazlitt_William  Godwin_Wm  historical_fiction  historical_change  necessity  contingency  women-intellectuals  authors-women  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  Shelley_Mary  imagination  magazines  newspapers  gender  gender_history  Wordsworth  poetry  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Romanticism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
N.H. Keeble - The Restoration: England in the 1660s (2002) | Wiley Online Library
This cultural history challenges the standard depiction of the 1660s as the beginning of a new age of stability, demonstrating that the de following the Restoration was just as complex and exciting as the revolutionary years that preceded it. -- very large endnotes available as free access -- downloaded pdf to Air
books  bibliography  downloaded  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  cultural_history  religious_history  politics-and-religion  English_Civil_War  monarchy  Charles_II  James_II  Parliament  dissenters  tolerance  persecution  religion-established  Church_of_England  social_history 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Clause IV [British Labour Party constitution] - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Adopted in 1918, the clause proclaimed that the party endorsed an economy where there was "common ownership" of the means of production. 1944 Labour Party victory seen as a mandate for nationalization, though the party had no well-developed plans. They proceeded rapidly to address major sectors and "commanding heights", starting with the Bank of England, and moving rapidly on: civil aviation in 1946, railways and telecommunications in 1947, along with the creation of the National Coal Board, which was responsible for supplying 90% of UK's energy needs. 1946 also saw the establishment of the National Health Service which came into force in July 1948. Also in 1948 came the nationalisation of railways, canals, road haulage and electricity. By 1951 the iron, steel and gas industries had been brought into public ownership. When they lost the general election of 1959, leader Gaitskell blamed it on nationalization becoming unpopular. It was a topic of ongoing intra-party disputes for the next few decades. Arguing that the text of clause 4 confused ends and means and ignored the necessity of ongoing need to modernize the party's approach as the nature of the economy changed, Blair made the party finally revise the text in 1995 -- seen by pundits as the moment when New Labour finally defeated the old guard, though the new text describes the party as "democratic socialist" thereby retaining "socialist" in the party's "modernized" constitution.
British_history  political_economy  British_politics  20thC  Labour  post-WWII  nationalization  socialism  social_democracy  utilities  transport  health_care  energy  post-Cold_War  Blair_Tony  neoliberalism  Third_Way  unions 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hopper (lecture transcript) - Turncoats and Renegadoes in the English Civil Wars (2011) | National Army Museum (UK) - Lunchtime Lectures
Recorded on 22 September 2011 (transcript updated 2013) -- Dr Andrew Hopper, Lecturer in English Local History at the University of Leicester, discusses the practice of side changing and the role of treachery and traitors during the English Civil Wars -- gave the lecture a couple of weeks before he finished his Oxford University Press book of the same name -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  lecture  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Dr Elliot Vernon, review essay - Andrew Hopper, Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars | Reviews in History (Nov 2013)
Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars - Oxford University Press, 2012, hardback ISBN: 9780199575855; 272pp.; - paperback 2014 - as of Jan 2015 no ebook -- 1st rate review essay, and looks like fascinating book that will be useful for notions of "treason" and, during and after "regime change", factional abuse of legal process against their opponents by tarring them with turncoat accusations - not just revolutions (English_Civil_War, French_Revolution, Russian Revolution) but also Glorious Revolution, Hanoverian Succession -- see also Pinboard bookmark for the lecture Hopper gave on the topic in 2011 at the National Army Museum -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  find  buy  libraries  political_history  political_culture  legal_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
A. G. R. Smith, review - John Cramsie, Kingship and Crown Finance under James VI and I, 1603-1625 | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), pp. 568-569
Mixed review re the book but the short review has some interesting background re James I's finances relative to some of the revisionist historians of the English Civil War etc and some of the difficulties getting a handle on the system of government finance during the period. Downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  economic_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  James_I  Buckingham_1st_Duke  public_finance  patronage  Crown_finance  Elizabeth  favorites  court_culture  courtiers  nobility  sovereign_debt  revisionism  English_Civil_War  historiography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
François Jarrige, « E. P. Thompson, une vie de combat » | La Vie des idées, 6 janvier 2015
Grand historien de la classe ouvrière anglaise, figure intellectuelle majeure des débats sur le marxisme dans les années 1960-1970, militant antinucléaire à l’origine d’une critique écologiste du capitalisme : tels furent les visages multiples d’Edward Palmer Thompson, dont l’œuvre continue d’imprégner en profondeur l’ensemble des sciences sociales. -- the French are (re)discovering Thompson and his particular version of a Marxian approach that was highly allergic to Theory. -- extensive footnotes -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  historians  historians-and-politics  historiography  historiography-postWWII  20thC  social_history  Europe-Early_Modern  British_history  British_politics  18thC  19thC  working_class  Thompson_EP  moral_economy  morality-conventional  norms  Industrial_Revolution  Marxist  social_theory  social_sciences  political_philosophy  Marxism  industrialization  Whigs-oligarchy  property_rights  capitalism  capitalism-systemic_crisis  environment  sustainability  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Report of the Commission on Inclusive Prosperity | Center for American Progress - Jan 15 2015
Trans-Atlantic social dems - lead signers L Summers & Ed Ball -Our report is about embracing the new economic opportunities of the 21st century by finding ways to ensure they serve the vast majority of society. In previous eras, political institutions have responded to economic transformations to ensure prosperity is shared: the New Deal in the United States and the European social welfare state; the “third-way” politics of putting people first of Clinton and Blair by investing in people and reforming institutions. Just as it took the New Deal and the European social welfare state to make the Industrial Revolution work for the many and not the few during the 20th century, we need new social and political institutions to make 21st century capitalism work for the many and not the few. We offer this report on the urgency of achieving inclusive prosperity because we believe democracy must serve this common good, the cause of social justice and the aspirations of parents for their children. For democracies to thrive, rising prosperity must be within reach of all of our citizens. - downloaded pdf to iPhone
report  downloaded  political_economy  economic_growth  inequality  labor  democracy  common_good  US_politics  British_politics  austerity 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Alexandra HYARD - DUGALD STEWART, LES « ÉCONOMISTES » ET LA RÉVOLUTION FRANÇAISE | JSTOR: Annales historiques de la Révolution française, No. 345 (Juillet/Septembre 2006), pp. 115-141
En 1789, Dugald Stewart (1753-1828) salue, comme de nombreux intellectuels écossais, la Révolution française. Il y voit la première tentative de mise en pratique des principes du rationalisme politique français, que la théorie politique des « Économistes » a, selon lui, fournis. Toutefois, au fil du temps, Stewart évoque en des termes de moins en moins élogieux cette expérience révolutionnaire. Mais, contrairement à la majeure partie de l'opinion publique écossaise, il ne rejette pas le projet des Français. Si au début des années 1800, ce philosophe écossais croit encore dans le bien-fondé des idées de 1789, c'est en raison, d'une part, de ses convictions whigs, qui le rendent sensible au rationalisme politique des Français, et, d'autre part, des solutions que la monarchie rationalisée des « Économistes » peut, en partie, apporter aux problèmes rencontrés par la monarchie anglaise. In 1789, Dugald Stewart (1753-1828), like many Scottish intellectuals, welcomed the French Revolution. He saw it as the first attempt to apply the principles of French political rationalism that the political theory of the « Economistes » had provided. Stewart, however, grew less and less laudatory about this revolutionary experience. In contrast to the greater part of Scottish public opinion, however, he did not reject the French experiment. If at the beginning of the 1800's, this Scottish philosopher still believed in the legitimacy of the ideas of 1789, it was partly because his whig convictions made him receptive to the political rationalism of the French, and partly because he felt that the solutions of a more rational monarchy as envisaged in the writing of the « Economistes » might prove useful in partially resolving problems encountered by the British monarchy. -- huge number of cites -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Stewart_Dugald  economic_theory  rationalist  institution-building  institutional_change  British_politics  monarchy  government-forms  reform-political  reform-economic  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Richard Moores - Representations of France and the French in English satirical prints, c. 1740-1832 (2011 PhD thesis) - White Rose Etheses Online - University of York
This thesis explores representations of France and the French in English satirical prints in the period c. 1740-1832. This was an era of rivalry and conflict between the two nations. It has been suggested that hostility towards France at this time contributed to the formation of English, or British, national identity. This coincided with England’s ‘golden age of caricature’. While much of the satirical art produced focussed on France, most studies of this material have dealt with how the English portrayed themselves and each other. Those which have discussed representations of the French have promoted the view that English perceptions of the French were principally hostile. While there is a temptation to employ such prints as evidence of English Francophobia, a closer investigation reveals greater satirical complexities at work which do not simply conceptualise and employ the French ‘Other’ as target of hatred. Informed by war and rivalry, as well as by trade, travel, and cultural exchange, the prints projected some positive characteristics onto the French ‘Other’, they contain varying degrees of sympathy and affinity with the French, and are demonstrative of a relationship more distinct and intimate than that shared with any other nation. At the same time, the prints expose many of the tensions and divisions that existed within Britain itself. French characters were employed to directly attack British political figures, while in other instances domestic anxieties were projected onto images of the French. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  France  Anglo-French  satire  cultural_history  social_history  national_ID  francophile  xenophobia  prints  popular_culture  popular_politics  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  travel  fashion  political_culture  political_press  art_history  caricature  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Restoration-France  July_Monarchy  reform-political  anti-Catholic  Catholic_emancipation  émigrés  exiles  ruling_class  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Carmel P. Murphy - History, revolution and the British popular novel: historical fiction in the romantic age (2013 PhD Thesis) | University College Cork.
Intro (pp.1-42) and Chapters 2 & 3 (pp.106-231) currently unavailable at request of author. -- Examining the complex intersection of the historical fiction genre with the political and historical dialogue generated by the French Revolution crisis, the thesis contends that contemporary fascination with the historical episode of the Revolution, and the fundamental importance of history to the disputes which raged about questions of tradition and change, and the meaning of the British national past, led to the emergence of increasingly complex forms of fictional historical narrative during the “war of ideas.” Considering the varying ways in which novelists (..) engaged with the historical contexts of the Revolution debate, (..) juxtaposes the manner in which English Jacobin novelists inserted the radical critique into the wider arena of history with (.use of.) the historical by anti-Jacobin novelists to combat the revolutionary threat and internal moves for socio-political restructuring. I argue that the use of imaginative historical narrative(..) represented a significant element within the literature of the Revolution crisis (.and..) a key context (.for.) the emergence of Scott’s national historical novel in 1814, and the broader field of historical fiction in the era of Waterloo. Tracing the continued engagement with revolutionary and political concerns evident in the early Waverley novels, Burney’s The Wanderer (1814), Godwin’s Mandeville (1816), and Mary Shelley’s Valperga (1823), my discussion concludes by arguing that Godwin’s and Shelley’s extension of the mode of historical fiction initially envisioned by Godwin in the revolutionary decade, and their shared endeavour to retrieve the possibility enshrined within the republican past, appeared as a significant counter to the model of history and fiction developed by Walter Scott in the post-revolutionary epoch. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  1790s  1800s  1810s  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  conservatism  Radical_Enlightenment  Jacobins  historical_fiction  novels  English_lit  historians-and-politics  counter-revolution  Scott_Sir_Walter  Burney_Frances  Godwin_Wm  Shelley_Mary  Tories  usable_past  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  history_as_examples  historiography-Tory  historiography-Whig  tradition  change-social  reform-political  reform-social  social_order  critique  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Andrew Berman - The Architects of Eighteenth Century English Freemasonry, 1720 - 1740 (2010 thesis) | University of Exeter
Advisors: Black, Jeremy & Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas -- Date Issued: 2010-09-22 --
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/2999 -- Following the appointment of its first aristocratic Grand Masters in the 1720s and in the wake of its connections to the scientific Enlightenment, ‘Free and Accepted’ Masonry rapidly became part of Britain’s national profile and the largest and arguably the most influential of Britain’s extensive clubs and societies. (..) Freemasonry became a vehicle for the expression and transmission of the political and religious views of those at its centre, and for the scientific Enlightenment concepts that they championed. The ‘Craft’ also offered a channel through which many sought to realise personal aspirations: social, intellectual and financial. Through an examination of relevant primary and secondary documentary evidence, this thesis seeks to contribute to a broader understanding of contemporary English political and social culture, and to explore the manner in which Freemasonry became a mechanism that promoted the interests of the Hanoverian establishment and connected and bound a number of élite metropolitan and provincial figures. A range of networks centred on the aristocracy, parliament, the magistracy and the learned and professional societies are studied, and key individuals instrumental in spreading and consolidating the Masonic message identified. The thesis also explores the role of Freemasonry in the development of the scientific Enlightenment. The evidence suggests that Freemasonry should be recognised not only as the most prominent of the many 18thC fraternal organisations, but also as a significant cultural vector and a compelling component of the social, economic, scientific and political transformation then in progress. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  British_history  British_politics  Enlightenment  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-politics  Freemasonry  cultural_history  intellectual_history  networks-social  networks-political  networks-business  sociology_of_science_&_technology  elites  aristocracy  Parliament  MPs  political_nation  economic_sociology  economic_culture  commerce-doux  finance_capital  banking  capital_markets  capital_as_power  history_of_science  historical_sociology  historical_change  center-periphery  provinces  clubs  social_capital  judiciary  professions  professionalization  religious_culture  science-and-religion  latitudinarian  natural_religion  Newtonian  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Colin Kidd - Civil Theology and Church Establishments in Revolutionary America | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1007-1026
The discourse of America's founding generation, it is now widely recognized, was rich and variegated in its composition, drawing upon the commonwealth tradition, the English common law, Montesquieu, Locke, Scottish moral philosophy, and the classics. These sources yield significant clues as to how eighteenth-century Americans viewed religious liberty and church-state relations, subjects of the First Amendment to the Constitution. Supplementing the work of legal historians on the religious provisions of the early state constitutions, the study of political ideas suggests the parameters of the eighteenth-century debate over the effects which various types of religious belief and ecclesiastical establishment had upon manners and institutions. It also reveals the ideological underpinnings of the apparently inconsistent legal provisions for religion at the state level, and, far from settling the elusive question of `original intent', highlights the nature of the divisions within the founding generation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_religion  civil_liberties  tolerance  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  Founders  bill_of_rights  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Commonwealthmen  Locke-religion  Hutcheson  Smith  Montesquieu  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_legal_system  US_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Clement Fatovic - Reason and Experience in Alexander Hamilton’s Science of Politics | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Spring 2013), pp. 1-30
Alexander Hamilton is often described as an enterprising modernist who promoted forward-looking reforms that broke with established institutions and ideas. However, the scale and apparent novelty of his reforms have tended to obscure the extent to which those innovations were rooted in a belief that knowledge and practice must be guided by “experience.” This article argues that even Hamilton’s most far-reaching reforms were grounded in a Humean understanding of the limits of rationality in explaining and controlling the world. Hamilton’s agreement with David Hume on the epistemic authority of experience helps explain his positions on constitutional design, executive power, democratic politics, public opinion, and other important political issues. Moreover, the epistemological underpinnings of Hamilton’s political thought are significant because they suggest that a “science of politics” grounded in experience can avoid some of the dangers associated with more rationalistic approaches yet still be quite open to significant innovation in politics. - as much or more Hume's various essays as Hamilton
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  US_constitution  US_politics  US_economy  political_economy  political_culture  economic_culture  epistemology  epistemology-social  US_government  public_opinion  public_finance  democracy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  fiscal-military_state  sovereign_debt  Hume  Hume-politics  Hamilton  Founders  Early_Republic  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
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december 2014 by dunnettreader
Donald E., Jr. Wilkes - Habeas Corpus Proceedings in the High Court of Parliament in the Reign of James I, 1603-1625 - 54 Am. J. Legal Hist. 200 (2014). :: SSRN
University of Georgia Law School -- This Article focuses on the parliamentary habeas corpus proceedings that occurred in the reign of James I (and)corrects several misunderstandings relating to the history of the writ of habeas corpus in England and to the history of the English Parliament (which in the 17thC commonly was referred to as the High Court of Parliament). Part I concerns the historical background and context -- What was the parliamentary privilege of freedom from arrest, the violation of which could lead to the granting of habeas corpus relief by the House of Lords or the House of Commons? What was the civil arrest system in effect in 17thC England which made it likely that from time to time the parliamentary privilege from arrest would be violated and the parliamentary habeas remedy thereupon invoked? What other remedies were available to deal with infringements of the parliamentary arrest privilege? And what were the contours of the parliamentary habeas corpus remedy itself, which appears not to have been successfully invoked prior to the reign of James I? Parts II and III conclusively demonstrate that in the reign of James I the High Court of Parliament at times functioned as the High Habeas Court of Parliament. Part II habeas corpus proceedings in the House of Lords and Part III in the House of Commons during the reign. The Article concludes with a detailed discussion of the three major changes this work mandates in our understanding of English legal history

Number of Pages in PDF File: 66

Keywords: habeas corpus, legal history, England, Parliament, House of Commons, House of Lords, High Court of Parliament, King James I,
paper  SSRN  legal_history  English_constitution  17thC  British_history  British_politics  James_I  Parliament  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  judiciary  criminal_justice  prerogative  Parliamentarians  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Alzada Tipton - Caught between "Virtue" and "Memorie": Providential and Political Historiography in Samuel Daniel's the Civil Wars | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 3/4 (1998), pp. 325-341
Daniel had Essex connections that got him in trouble for a play - his Civil Wars dealt with Lancaster and York from deposition of Richard Ii - another sensitive topic. Tension among ambitions as courtier, patronage limks with factions in upper elite, and artistic and historiographical standards that he intended to meet to obtain reputation as an author, though those standards were unclear and in the process of shifting in late Elizabethan and early Jacobean culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
John Clive, review - Joseph Hamburger, Macaulay and the Whig Tradition | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 49, No. 3 (Sep., 1977), p. 488
Rather than Macaulay the arch Whig, this study correctly shows Macaulay as a trimmer in the tradition of his hero, zHalifax, with a focus on statesmanship to navigate crises avoiding extremes -- didn't download
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Clive Holmes, review - (1) Joel Samaha, Law and Order in Historical Perspective: The Case of Elizabethan Essex and (2) A. Hassell Smith, County and Court: Government and Politics in Norfolk, 1558-1603 | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 49, No. 3
Very useful discussion of the very different tales told re administrative efficiency of local government and judiciary in Elizabethan Norfolk and Essex. Particularly noteworthy was the factionalism that emerged after the fall of the Duke of Norfolk when Norfolk gentry fought for the various powers and control of patronage that had been monopolized by the Duke. The disappearance of the top status figure removed a key organizing part of the structure of ranks and status recognition, producing what sounds like a free-for-all vicious competition. Of course factions tried to develop court connections they could exploit. In addition to contributing local conflicts to central court confkicts, the central-local links also worked the other way. The Elizabethan government, frustrated by the variability and often poor quality of implementation by locals of central policies and concerns, including for security and defense, resorted to delegating particular matters to narrower groups than the overall county structures - e,.g. militia commissions and even letters patent. This selectivity would feed local factional competition. But the disputes fed back into conflicts at the central level in the latter part of Elizabeth's reign even Parliamentary constitutional debates challenging the prerogative to circumvent local government structures.
books  reviews  16thC  Elizabethan  British_history  British_politics  local_government  English_constitution  central_government  centralization  prerogative  judiciary  status  patronage  criminal_justice  bureaucracy  rationalization-institutions  state-building  faction  political_culture  elites  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Glenn Burgess, The Politics of the Ancient Constitution: An Introduction to English Political Thought, 1603-1642 | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 100, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 516-517
Helpful discussion of where Burgess fits within historiography debates, both with respect to the legal and political issues of the ancient constitution, (dominated by Pocock) and the broader "causes of the English Civil War" revisionism, anti revisionism, post revisionism etc. Burgess analyzes 3 different discourses each for a different sphere (e.g. king-in-parliament, prerogative, taxation and judicial review spoke the language of law and ancient constitution whereas religious sphere was a discourse of obedience). Major increase in tensions when a sphere (e.g. religious) deployed language from another sphere (e, g. divines advocating taxation in sermons). and juduc Main criticism by Hirst is Burgess significantly reduces the importance of Coke. On the positive side, Burgess explains the nearly universal consensus re significance of the ancient constitution, the common law and role of the judiciary and most of the monarch's prerogative powers. Hirst says Burgess has provided a framework for the consensus that gives a coherent foundation for distinctive key figures like Bacon and Selden. That serves to highlight where constructive ambiguity maintained consensus, where fault lines were hidden, where and how major conflicts emerged and a logic of the dynamics of how conflicts played out. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Laura Lunger Knoppers, review - Derek Hirst, Richard Strier eds, Writing and Political Engagement in 17thC England; Brendan Dooley, Sabrina Baron, eds, The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR: Renaissance Quarterly, Vol. 56, No. 1 (Spri
Review gives a thumbnail of each contribution to the 2 collections. In the Hirst book his chapter on Marvell's satire of Mr. Bays looks particularly interesting, also a chapter on Algernon Sidney and his attack on Filmer. The information book looks more "ground breaking" studying the pattern across the 17thC of how people in England got news and where print comes in, the continuing life of manuscript newsletters, etc. The latter part of the book has chapters on a number of Continental polities (including Venice, Dutch Republic, Spain), highlighting major periods of development and comparing with the English pattern. -- worth hunting down in a library though since it's from 1999 a lot more news and information studies have been published, so it may be a bit dated -- didn't download
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Paul Slack, From Reformation to Improvement: Public Welfare in Early Modern England | JSTOR: The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Winter, 2001), pp. 442-444
The review is a useful summary of Slack's argument re trends and episodic bursts of trying to deal with the poor. Looks at what these episodes show re state capacity, ceter and region relations, movements that cut across other ideological, religious or political alignments, use of appeals to Parliament for lawmaking that were driven by a range of public and private agendas. Download pdf to Note -- see if this is on Questia
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Ethan H. Shagan, review - Derek Hirst, England in Conflict, 1603-1660: Kingdom, Community, Commonwealth | JSTOR: Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2001), pp. 378-379
High marks for thoroughly updated successful textbook - focuses on high politics and sorts out the 3 kingdoms, antecedents to political and constitutional tensions from the 1620s, patterns of political alignments not capable of simplifying by "party", very well-written narrative -- didn't download
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Mrinalini Sinha, review - Kathleen Wilson, The Island Race: Englishness, Empire and Gender in the Eighteenth Century | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 1 (February 2004), pp. 253-254
Very enthusiastic -- 5 essays with "performativity" common thread in development of national ID. The theme of performance has less to do with postmodernism and Butler and more to do with the sort of work of 18thC scholarship on self and fluid categories capable of different performance, masquerading etc of Wahrman etc. Several essays linked to Captain Cook"s voyages -- e.g. how lower social status of the heroic captain could be accommodated in an emerging "empire of the seas" narrative. Wilson tracks how initial reports of cultures with extremely alien sexual practices get gradually framed in the rigid taxonomy that Wahrman showed appearing suddenly in last quarter of 18thC - Wilson links this more to evangelicals than ethnography per se. Downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Deborah Valenze, review - Hilda L. Smith, All Men and Both Sexes: Gender, Politics, and the False Universal in England, 1640-1832 | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 1 (February 2004), pp. 251-252
Looks like a mess, both in what she selects to dig into in episodes from medieval guilds to 1832 Reform - and in not engaging with previous work of scholars on the shift of valorisation of independent male citizen vs dependent disappearing status of women -- Downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Edward Gregg, review - Daniel Szechi, George Lockhart of Carnwath, 1681-1731: A Study in Jacobitism | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 1 (February 2004), p. 251
Szechi is best placed to write this bio, and given how it weaves events in Scotland, post-Union Britain and Continental Jacobites, plus House of Hanover, will be a "must" for those interested in 1st 3 decades of 18thC. -- Downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  1707_Union  Jacobites  1715_uprising  Lockhart_George  House_of_Commons  Bolingbroke  Tories  Queen_Anne  downloaded 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Chris Kyle, Jason Peacey eds. - Parliament at Work: Parliamentary Committees, Political Power and Public Access in Early Modern England | JSTOR: The English Historical Review, Vol. 119, No. 484 (Nov., 2004), pp. 1418-1419
Hirst praises John Adamson's chapter in particular for showing how Independents (looks like links to the cast of his Noble Revolt) were able to mount a coup to restructure military and stymie peace negotiations via their skills in committee, avoiding a larger forum where their policies wouldn't have prevailed. Several other chapters look interesting, though Hirst says the collection doesn't have major surprises or examine larger issues (of the sort he takes up in his "petitioning the Republic article) -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Parliament  legislature-committees  governance  legislature-process  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Making Contact: Petitions and the English Republic | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 45, No. 1 (January 2006), pp. 26-50
A broader study of petitioning is particularly warranted when the prevailing narratives—as of the years of the republic of 1649–609—concentrate on revolution, coercion, and exclusion and thus put a singular slant on the relations of rulers and ruled. (...) The sword certainly put the republic in place, but it neither wrote all its history nor dictated all its practices. In fact, familiar patterns and mechanisms of reciprocity counterpointed the disturbances of revolutionary change, held groups and individuals together, and constituted assets on which the republic could draw. (...) This article will take petitions and the responses they elicited as a measure of the openness, of the responsiveness, of the regime.... In its examination of petitioning—the process, problems of access, tactics, and language used—the article will work within certain narrow limits. Wartime exigencies had proliferated committees and commissions (accounts, army, excise, indemnity, navy, and plundered ministers...) to which countless parties petitioned, before which they pleaded, and from which they often appealed to higher authorities. This article confines itself for several reasons to solicitations of those higher authorities, (...) The descent of Leveller petitioners on parliament, whether in 1649–50, 1653–54, or 1659, certainly produced some revealing exchanges—on each side coercive intentions and language tended to run high—but what was revealed tends to reinforce the traditional picture of an embattled and exclusionary order. This article will accordingly look elsewhere, to more mundane business of governance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Nicholas McDowell, The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630–1660 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 44, No. 2 (April 2005), pp. 368-369
Reviewed work(s): Nicholas McDowell. The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630–1660. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pp. 219. $72.00 (cloth). ISBN 0‐19‐926626‐3. -- The review puts the book in histriographical debates since Christopher Hill and his "world turned upside down" thesis of radicalism originating from below. Milton wasn't unusual as highly educated among committed radical authors. The review shorthands the historiography debates unfortunately - Peter Lake is a star, but what and who he was revising? where was there pushback? Who else beyond Lake and David Cuomo a couple of other names tossed out? Also mentions parallels with Spinoza and confirming Pocock claim Enlightenment parentage via radicals. -- McDowell has a literary history PhD - this is reworked dissertation - so he's great on digging out obscure texts and tracking authorship, but not a wide scope to his background in all the interrelated streams of political, religious etc thought -- Review this again after looking at more of the last 2 decades of historiography for 17thC intellectual_history and political thought.
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell (Yale ed., 2 vols) and The Poems of Andrew Marvell (Nigel Smith ed.) | JSTOR: Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Winter, 2004), pp. 697-700
Review of (1) The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell, eds, Annabel Patterson; Martin Dzelzainis, Nicholas von Maltzahn, N. H. Keeble and (2) The Poems of Andrew Marvell, ed. Nigel Smith -- the poetry volume is dinged for not fully reflecting new work on Marvell, not surprisingly since Hirst with Zwicker have led the way on repositioning Marvell's biography (ambiguous sexuality, fraught relationships with families and the constantly shifting system of patronage, and childhood abuse) to see both his politics and poetry dufferently, The more substantive critique of the 2 volume prose works is Patterson hauling Marvell and her co-editors into a "liberal avant la lettre" frame where Marvell generally doesn't belong. Par for Patterson who wants to claim all good things in 17thC and 18thC English_lit to liberalism and "Whig culture" -- 3 pgs, didn't download
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674 (2004) | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 111, No. 4 (October 2006), p. 1247
Derek Hirst, Washington University in St. Louis -- Reviewed work(s): Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 2004. Pp. xii, 370. $49.50. -- mixed review. -- he thinks she's on to a major way of looking how various metaphors were deployed and evolved in 17, with her readings of Hobbes and Milton 1st rate. She gets some facts and cites wrong when she strays out of her lane (cavalier not in the 17thC sense). But more damning is her lack of sufficient familiarity with Elizabethan and French discourses of romance, passions and bodies politic. Short -- didn't download
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Bodies and Interests: Toleration and the Political Imagination in the Later 17thC | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 401-426
Religious fragmentation threatened the notion of a unitary body politic, and conservative Anglicans in the Restoration exploited the organic figure to excoriate dissenters. While scriptural patterns drew the godly too to that trope, its ecclesiastical implications often left them parsing uncomfortably as they urged concessions. In this article Derek Hirst argues that they were largely rescued from such parsing by the new discourse of “interest.” When the promise of trade was taking the court by storm, Independents and Presbyterians had much to gain in re-imagining the polity more pluralistically in terms of interest; Locke too was part of this process. But though the general drift is clear, partisan circumstance could occasion surprising cross-currents, in England and Ireland alike. -- Keywords body politic, religious toleration, John Owen, discourse of “interest”, John Locke -- downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst and Steven Zwicker - High Summer at Nun Appleton, 1651: Andrew Marvell and Lord Fairfax's Occasions | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jun., 1993), pp. 247-269
Andrew Marvell's country-house epic, Upon Appleton House, has long been understood as a meditation on conventional philosophical themes. An exact dating allows us to see the topical and polemical force of those themes. Moreover, situating the poem within particular chronological and geographical confines, the summer of 1651 and the household of the recently retired Lord General as well as the political geography of the vale of York, reveals the continuities and the patronage-afflicted contours of the poet's engagement with the crisis of the English revolution, a crisis he had so searchingly explored in An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's return from Ireland. -- Major paper as part of rethinking and repositioning Marvell's poetry and politics -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Marvell  political_philosophy  poetry  poetics  sexuality  Cromwell  patronage  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst and Steven Zwicker - Andrew Marvell and the Toils of Patriarchy: Fatherhood, Longing, and the Body Politic | JSTOR: ELH, Vol. 66, No. 3 (Fall, 1999), pp. 629-654
More of Hirst and Zwicker repositioning Marvell and his poetry and politics after their important reading of Appleton House - they're especially interested in Marvell's personal tortured relations with father figures, patronage and loss of patrons, and homoeroticism -- didn't download
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Joad Raymond - Framing Libery: Marvell's "First Anniversary" and the Instrument of Government | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 313-350
1st Anniversary has been treated as the middle poem in a triptych of Marvell's poems on Cromwell. What Marvell's doing in this poem has been the subject of an extreme variety of interpretations, and the structure criticized as fragmented or reflecting the awkwardness of Marvell's political commitments in an environment in flux, the demands of propaganda, or panageric tainted by patronage. Raymond sees the poem as focused not on Cromwell but on the 1st anniversary of the Instrument of Government. The positions of Cromwell in the poem represent tensions between the logic of the Instrument to shape governmental action and political behavior and conflict vs the outsized person of Cromwell, whose manner of governing and leadership both made the success of the Instrument more likely yet threatened the core logic of the Instrument. He extensively tracks the specific debates in 1654, including ephemeral publications of propaganda and controversy, arguing that one reason later readers don't follow Marvell's structure and argument is that, beyond failing to understand the subject is the constitution, Marvell is engaging in specific contemporary arguments and the language in which they were then framed, which are unfamiliar to later readers. He looks at positions that would later become identified with The Good Old Cause and Commonwealthmen, and Harringtinian republicanism. Interesting bibliography Raymond in recent books has been specializing in the development and changes in 17thC print culture(s) -- downloaded pdf to Note
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