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Doohwan Ahn - From Greece to Babylon: The political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay (1686–1743) | History of European Ideas, Dec 2011 — ScienceDirect
History of European Ideas, December 2011, Vol.37(4):421–437, doi:10.1016/j.histeuroideas.2010.12.005 -- Doohwan Ahn , University of Cambridge, Hughes Hall
This paper explores the political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay with particular reference to his highly acclaimed book called A New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus (1727). Dedicated to Prince Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, to whom he was tutor, this work has been hitherto viewed as a Jacobite imitation of the Telemachus, Son of Ulysses (1699) of his eminent teacher archbishop Fénelon of Cambrai. By tracing the dual legacy of the first Persian Emperor Cyrus in Western thought, I demonstrate that Ramsay was as much indebted to Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet's Discourse on Universal History (1681) as he was to Fénelon's political romance. Ramsay took advantage of Xenophon's silence about the eponymous hero's adolescent education in his Cyropaedia, or the Education of Cyrus (c. 380 B.C.), but he was equally inspired by the Book of Daniel, where the same Persian prince was eulogised as the liberator of the Jewish people from their captivity in Babylon. The main thrust of Ramsay's adaptation was not only to revamp the Humanist-cum-Christian theory and practice of virtuous kingship for a restored Jacobite regime, but on a more fundamental level, to tie in secular history with biblical history. In this respect, Ramsay's New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus, was not just another Fénelonian political novel but more essentially a work of universal history. In addition to his Jacobite model of aristocratic constitutional monarchy, it was this Bossuetian motive for universal history, which was first propounded by the German reformer Philipp Melanchthon in his Chronicon Carionis (1532), that most decisively separated Ramsay from Henry St. John, Viscount Bolingbroke, author of another famous advice book for princes of the period, The Idea of a Patriot King (written in late 1738 for the education of Frederick Lewis, Prince of Wales, but officially published in 1749).
article  downloaded  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  universal_history  France  British_history  political_philosophy  Ramsay  Bolingbroke  Fenelon  Bossuet  Jacobites  monarchy  Patriot_King  mirror_for_princes  Bible-as-history  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  Xenophon  Old_Testament  Cyrus_the_Great  Melanchthon  constitutional_monarchy  constitutional_regime  limited_monarchy  Frederick_Prince_of_Wales  Bonnie_Prince_Charlie  kingship 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Jacob Soll: Jean-Baptiste Colbert’s Republic of Letters | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Soll, Jacob. “Jean-Baptiste Colbert’s Republic of Letters.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/28. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Few figures better represent the world of scholarship at the turn of the seventeenth century than Bernard de Montfaucon, the French maurist monk and antiquarian who lived from 1655–1741..... Montfaucon wrote what was to become the central work on antiquarianism at the beginning of the Enlightenment: L'antiquité expliquée et représentée en figures (1719–24), which attempted to catalogue and show in engravings all known ancient sculptures and carvings. He also wrote on the collection of ancient manuscripts. For his work, Montfaucon was complimented by Bossuet and made royal confessor. Indeed, he represents a world of ecclesiastical scholarship, in the strain of Dom Jean Mabillon, that mixed antiquarianism, ecclesiastical scholarship and loyal service to royal power......[ Gave eulogy for Foucault who] began his career as Jean-Baptiste Colbert’s administrative assistant. In the early days working for Colbert, Foucault did not share information amongst public scholars. In fact, he was known for seizing books, and for the coerced conversions of Protestant nobles. And as he did this dirty work for the state, he learned and gained a taste for antiquarianism.The case of Foucault opens the door onto an aspect of the Republic of Letters that has been little discussed: the role of the state and coercive political power in relation to the phenomenon of the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  religious_culture  intelligentsia  scholarship  clerisy  Republic_of_Letters  17thC  18thC  antiquaries  historians-and-state  historians-and-religion  church_history  religious_history  ancient_history  philology  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  French_government  Colbert  intellectual_freedom  Bossuet  academies  Académie_des_Inscriptions  patronage  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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