dunnettreader + aristotle   58

Jeffrey Edward Green - Rawls and the Forgotten Figure of the Most Advantaged: In Defense of Reasonable Envy toward the Superrich (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
politics-and-money  political_participation  inequality-wealth  regulatory_capture  political_philosophy  political_culture  tax_havens  Early_Republic  inequality  estate_tax  intellectual_history  inheritance  republicanism  Plato-Republic  elites-political_influence  Jefferson  Harrington  crony_capitalism  Europe-Early_Modern  fairness  article  Aristotle  social_capital  social_theory  Rawls  social_democracy  Machiavelli  Plato  inequality-opportunity  jstor  bibliography  ancient_Rome  regulation  justice  liberalism  egalitarian  regulatory_avoidance  interest_groups  legitimacy  deliberative_democracy  political_history  class_conflict  downloaded  education-elites  social_order  elites-self-destructive  Roman_Republic  ancient_Greece  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
ReasonIO - Courses Home page
Click on course either links to purchase/sugn-up page or Course Curriculum page for those already purchased or enrolled
Sadler_Greg  Aristotle  Patreon  philosophy  Stoicism  Hegel 
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Ricardo Salles, ed - Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought (2005) - Oxford University Press
Richard Sorabji Bibliography
1. Intellectual autobiography, Richard Sorabji
Metaphysics
2. Intrinsic and relational properties of Atoms in the Democritean ontology, Alexander P. D. Mourelatos
3. Necessitation and Explanation in Philoponus' Aristotelain Physics, Sylvia Berryman
4. A Contemporary Look at Aristotle's Changing Now, Sarah Broadie
5. On the individuation of times and events in orthodox Stoicism, Ricardo Salles
6. Stoic metaphysics at Rome, David Sedley
7. Platonism in the Bible: Numenius of Apamea on Exodus and eternity, Myles Burnyeat
The Senses and the Nature of the Soul
8. Platonic Souls as Persons, A. A. Long
9. Aristotle versus Descartes on the concept of the mental, Charles H. Kahn
10. Perception Naturalized in Aristotle's de Anima, Robert Bolton
11. The Spirit and the letter: Aristotle on perception, V. Caston
12. The discriminating capacity of the soul in Aristotle's theory of learning, Frans A. J. de Haas
13. Alexander of Aphrodisias on the nature and location of vision, Bob Sharples
Ethics
14. Plato's Stoic View of Motivation, Gabriela Roxana Carone
15. The Presence of Socrates and Aristotle in the Stoic Account of Akrasia, Marcelo D. Boeri
16. Extend or identify: Two Stoic Accounts of Altruism, Mary Margaret McCabe
17. Competing Readings of Stoic Emotions, Christopher Gill
18. Were Zeno and Chysippus at odds in analysing emotion?, A. W. Price
19. Seneca on Freedom and Autonomy, Brad Inwood
books  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Stoicism  soul  moral_philosophy  metaphysics  Seneca  Democritus  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  mind  Descartes  emotions 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Ludovic Duhem - L’idée d’« individu pur » dans la pensée de Simondon | Appareil 2009
Le projet ontologique de Gilbert Simondon est de penser l’individu à travers l’individuation dans tous les domaines de réalité : physique, biologique, et psycho-social ou « transindividuel ». Il s’agit précisément pour lui de renverser le privilège ontologique accordé par la métaphysique à l’être sur le devenir, au résultat sur l’opération, à l’individu sur l’individuation, et d’en faire la condition de toute connaissance complète de la réalité. Or, l’idée d’individu pur, telle qu’elle est développée dans deux textes de L’individuation à la lumière des notions de forme et d’information, dans le domaine biologique et psycho-technique, semble contrarier le maintien de ce renversement en réintroduisant une forme de substantialisme. Cette difficulté portant Simondon à sa propre limite sera l’occasion d’examiner deux cas d’individuation et, à travers eux, la cohérence et la portée de sa pensée.
individuation  essence  hylomorphism  epistemology  French_intellectuals  social_process  techne  20thC  Aristotle  modernity  technology  metaphysics  downloaded  substance  Simondon  article  ontology  continental_philosophy 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
André Lang - La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines (2005) - Cairn.info
I - L’anacyclosis révisée
II - Les constitutions à l’épreuve de l’histoire
III - Le retour au principe
IV - Le moment Romuléen et le moment Numéen
V - Le principe comme puissance de régénération
VI - Les exécutions ou l’équivoque politique du retour à l’origine
VII - Brutus ou la part souveraine de la violence des principes
De l’exécution à l’exécutif : conclusion et perspectives
Pour citer cet article

Lang André, « La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 213-230
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-213.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0213.
Aristotle  class_conflict  political_participation  Pocock  Polybius  corruption  state_of_exception  republicanism  violence  article  norms  dialectic-historical  common_good  political_philosophy  Machiavelli  interest_groups  civic_virtue  downloaded  politics-and-history  mixed_government  historical_change  history_as_examples  cyclical_history  rule_of_law  cycles  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Sino Knuuttila - Medieval Theories of Future Contingents [updated 2015] | (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Related Entries
Auriol [Aureol, Aureoli], Peter | Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus | fatalism | free will: divine foreknowledge and | future contingents | Gersonides | Gregory of Rimini | Holkot [Holcot], Robert | modality: medieval theories of | prophecy
contingency  Boethius  modal_logic  logic  free_will  Cicero  divine_​omniscience  Aristotle  fate  Abelard  Aquinas  necessity  SCOTUS  Providence  prophecy  medieval_philosophy  future_contingents  God-attributes 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Kuni Sakamoto - Pierre Gassendi's Reception of Keplerian Ideas | JSTOR Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2009)
The German Hercules's Heir: Pierre Gassendi's Reception of Keplerian Ideas -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 69-91 -- big interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  ancient_philosophy  natural_philosophy  natural_history  Plato  Aristotle  Pliny_the_Elder  Albert_Magnus  medieval_philosophy  astronomy  astrology  cosmology  Kepler  Gassendi  atomism  generation  divine_intellect  causation  mathematization  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Adam Takahashi - Nature, Formative Power and Intellect in the Natural Philosophy of Albert the Great | JSTOR - Early Science and Medicine (2008)
Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 5 (2008), pp. 451-481 -- The Dominican theologian Albert the Great (ca. 1200-1280) was one of the first to investigate into the system of the world on the basis of an acquaintance with the entire Aristotelian corpus, which he read under the influence of Islamic philosophers. The present study aims to understand the core of Albert's natural philosophy. Albert's emblematic phrase, "every work of nature is the work of intelligence" (omne opus naturae est opus intelligentiae), expresses the conviction that natural things are produced by the intellects that move the celestial bodies, just as houses are made by architects moving their instruments. Albert tried to fathom the secret of generation of natural things with his novel notion of "formative power" (virtus formativa), which flows from the celestial intellects into the sublunary elements. His conception of the natural world represents an alternative to the dominant medieval view on the relationship between the artificial and the natural. -- large bibliography of secondary sources post WWII -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  medieval_philosophy  13thC  Albert_Magnus  natural_philosophy  Aristotle  Aristotelian  causation  cosmology  laws_of_nature  divine_intellect  generation  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Pomponazzi contra Averroes on the Intellect | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy (in press) -- This paper examines Pomponazzi’s arguments against Averroes in his De Immortalitate Animae, focusing on the question whether thought is possible without a body. The first part of the paper will sketch the history of the problem, namely the interpretation of Aristotle’s remarks about the intellect in De Anima 3.4-5, touching on Alexander, Themistius, and Averroes. The second part will focus on Pomponazzi’s response to Averroes, including his use of arguments by Aquinas. It will conclude by suggesting that Pomponazzi’s discussion stands as the first properly modern account of Aristotle’s psychology. -- Keywords: Renaissance Philosophy, Renaissance Aristotelianism, Averroes, and Pietro Pomponazzi -- looks like very helpful overview of interpretations of de Anima from Theophrastus onwards through Renaissance and comparing with some recent readings -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  soul  immortality  mind  Aristotle  Aristotelian  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Hellenism  late_antiquity  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  commentaries  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Averroes  Pomponazzi  Ficino  rationalist  empiricism  fideism  bibliography  Peripatetics  De_Anima  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Mediaeval Logic and Philosophy - Paul Vincent Spade
Translations, notes, course materials and articles downloadable as pdfs -- he wrote the William of Ockham entry for the Stanford EP, lots if materials on universals, and goes back to Boethius, including B's commentary on Porphyry questions
Neoplatonism  medieval_philosophy  universals  translation  courses  Boethius  logic  website  Ockham  article  etexts  nominalism  Aristotle 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley, eds. - Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality | Classical Philosophy | Cambridge University Press (hbk 2010, obk 2015)
In honor of A. A. Long: Publications 1963–2009 -- Table of Contents 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge, Andrea Wilson Nightingale -- 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe -- 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus, Kathryn A. Morgan -- 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue, David Sedley -- 5. Divine contemplating mind, Allan Silverman -- 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism, Alan Code -- 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents, Stephen White -- 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in Stoicism, Richard Bett -- 9. How dialectical was Stoic dialectic?, Luca Castagnoli -- 10. Socrates speaks in Seneca, De vita beata 24-28, James Ker -- 11. Seneca's Platonism: the soul and its divine origin, Gretchen Reydams-Schils -- 12. The status of the individual in Plotinus, Kenneth Wolfe -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Plato  Platonism  Aristotle  Stoicism  Seneca  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  epistemology-moral  God-attributes  eudaimonia  aporia  soul  imago_dei  virtue_ethics  virtue  self-knowledge  self-examination  self-development  dialectic  beauty  good  sociability  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Barry Allen, "Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition" (Harvard University Press, 2015)
Barry Allen's new book carefully considers the problem of knowledge in a range of Chinese philosophical discourses, creating a stimulating cross-disciplinary dialogue that's as much of a pleasure to read as it will be to teach with. Taking on the work of Confucians, Daoists, military theorists, Chan Buddhists, Neo-Confucian philosophers, and others, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition (Harvard University Press, 2015) looks at the common threads and important differences in the ways that scholars have attempted to conceptualize and articulate what it is to be a knowing being in the world. Some of the major themes that recur throughout the work include the nature of non-action and emptiness, the relationship between knowledge and scholarship, the possibility of Chinese epistemologies and empiricisms, and the importance of artifice. Allen pays special attention to the ways that these scholars relate knowledge to a fluid conception of "things" that can be "completed" or "vanished into" by the knower, and to their understanding of things as parts of a collective economy of human and non-human relationships. The book does an excellent job of maintaining its focus on Chinese texts and contexts while making use of comparative cases from Anglophone and European-language philosophy that brings Chinese scholars into conversation with Nietzsche, Latour, Deleuze and Guattari, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, and beyond - 1 hour interview
books  interview  audio  intellectual_history  Chinese_philosophy  China  Chinese_history  Asian_philosophy  epistemology  Buddhism  Confucianism  empiricism  epistemology-social  ontology  human_nature  human-non-human_relations  military_theory  military_history  Neo-Confucian  Nietzsche  Deleuze  Aristotle  Machiavelli  Plato  Latour  consciousness  perception 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Book Announcement: From Aristotle’s teleology to Darwin’s genealogy
see kindle sample - covers why scientific revolution didn't have the sort of impact that mathematization had in physical sciences - claims that yhe cornerstones of thinkijg re human sciences remained essentialist and fixistmore due to late scholastic snd Rensissance incorporation of Aristotelian principles than religiously driven creationusm - they fid converge and, especially in Anglo countries, reinflorced by 18thC "natural theology" - Darwin uses the anomalies that have no adaptationist utility, like sightless moles, to blow up the functionalist teleological foundation of yhe Aristotelian approach to species
Pocket  17thc  18thc  19thc  Darwin  ancient_greece  aristotle  bible-as-history  biology  books  creationist  deism  early_modern  evolution  geology  history_of_science  intellectual_history  kindle-available  medieval  natural_theology  physiology  renaissance  scholasticism  scientific_revolution 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Originalism's Promise, and Its Limits by Lee J. Strang :: SSRN - 63 Cleveland State Law Review 81 (2014) (rev' June 2015)
University of Toledo College of Law -- In this Symposium Essay, I summarize originalism’s promise and limits. Part II succinctly explains originalism’s promise. Part III briefly describes originalism’s limits. Part IV then suggests that originalism’s limits contribute to its promise. -- PDF File: 20 -- Keywords: constitutional interpretation, originalism, nonoriginalism, normatively attractive, judicial capacity, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas -- saved to briefcase
article  SSRN  US_constitution  constitutional_law  originalism  Aristotle  Aquinas  hermeneutics  judiciary  judicial_review  natural_law 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Denis Larrivee and Adriana Gini - Neuroplasticity and the Reemergence of Virtue | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2014
Opinion ARTICLE - Front. Hum. Neurosci., 18 September 2014 | doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00731 -- Is the philosophical construct of “habitus operativus bonus” compatible with the modern neuroscience concept of human flourishing through neuroplasticity? A consideration of prudence as a multidimensional regulator of virtue - Denis Larrivee1* and Adriana Gini2 - 1Educational Outreach Office, Catholic Diocese of Charleston, Charleston, SC, USA - 2Neuroradiology Division, Neuroscience Department, San Camillo-Forlanini Medical Center, Rome, Italy Unlike ancient Greece where personal virtue was the route to fulfillment, modern man typically seeks to improve human well-being by external means, in a process known as the medicalization of society. The apparent novelty of recent proposals in psychological theory to develop character strength, therefore, lies in their reemphasis on a personal implementation of positive values. Among the factors contributing to a new look at self-determination has been the capacity for the neural substrate to selectively alter itself via neuroplasticity. Indeed, the confluence of past and contemporary thinking may presage a consideration of neurobiological instantiation within which virtuous behavior may be enhanced in accord with principles governing neuroplastic change. But what are virtues and positive traits? And to what extent can these conceptions inform our growing understanding of the neural contribution to human behavior? -- full title is enormous, referring to Aquinas formula and written by at least one author committed to Catholic Thomism - discussion of Aristotle also -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  Aquinas  Thomism-21stC  moral_philosophy  mind  habit  neuroscience  cognition  plasticity  prudence  practical_reason  character  virtue  psychology  brain  brain-development  self-development  self-regulation  phronesis  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Hegel's Theory of Mental Activity by Willem A. deVries (pdfs of Cornell University Press 1988)
Hegel's Theory of Mental Activity - Originally copyright Cornell University Press, 1988; Cornell kindly gave me back the copyright when the book went out of print, which change has been duly registered with the Copyright Office. So it is now copyright Willem A. deVries. The files contained here are graphical reproductions of the original text with an invisible text overlay, so they reproduce the look and pagination of the original, but can also be searched using Acrobat's find function. My grateful thanks to Stephen Butterfill for scanning the book and putting it into PDF format.
books  etexts  downloaded  intellectual_history  philosophes  German_Idealism  Hegel  17thC  18thC  19thC  Plato  Aristotle  Kant  empiricism  rationalist  mind  logic  logic-Hegelian  perception  rationality  phenomenology  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Bernacer J and Murillo JI - The Aristotelian conception of habit and its contribution to human neuroscience (2014) | Frontiers of Human Neuroscience. 8:883. - doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00883 Frontiers | The Aristotelian conception of habit and its contribut
Mind-Brain Group, Institute for Culture and Society, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain, Edited by: Jose Angel Lombo, Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, Italy -- Reviewed by: Katie A. Jennings, University of Oxford, UK - Carol Seger, Colorado State University, USA - Hypothesis & Theory ARTICLE - The notion of habit used in neuroscience is an inheritance from a particular theoretical origin, whose main source is William James. Thus, habits have been characterized as rigid, automatic, unconscious, and opposed to goal-directed actions. This analysis leaves unexplained several aspects of human behavior and cognition where habits are of great importance.(..) We summarize the current notion of habit in neuroscience, its philosophical inspiration and the problems that arise from it, mostly centered on the sharp distinction between goal-directed actions and habitual behavior. We then introduce the Aristotelian view and compare it with that of James. For Aristotle, a habit is an acquired disposition to perform certain types of action. If this disposition involves an enhanced cognitive control of actions, it can be considered a “habit-as-learning”. The current view of habit in neuroscience, which lacks cognitive control and we term “habit-as-routine”, is also covered by the Aristotelian conception. He classifies habits into three categories: (1) theoretical, or the retention of learning understood as “knowing that x is so”; (2) behavioral, through which the agent achieves a rational control of emotion-permeated behavior (“knowing how to behave”); and (3) technical or learned skills (“knowing how to make or to do”). Finally, we propose new areas of research where this “novel” conception of habit could serve as a framework concept, from the cognitive enrichment of actions to the role of habits in pathological conditions. In all, this contribution may shed light on the understanding of habits as an important feature of human action. Habits, viewed as a cognitive enrichment of behavior, are a crucial resource for understanding human learning and behavioral plasticity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  human_nature  behavior  habit  psychology  epistemology  learning  neuroscience  cognition  brain-development  memory  Aristotle  Aristotelian  James_William  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Xavier Marquez -Cicero and the Stability of States by (2010) :: SSRN
Victoria University of Wellington -- APSA 2009 Toronto Meeting Paper -- History of Political Thought, Vol. 32, No. 3, pp. 397-423, 2011 -- I argue for the originality and interest of Cicero’s views on the stability of political communities. After a survey of ancient ideas on the mixed constitution (the framework for thinking about the stability of political communities in the ancient world), I show how Cicero adapted these ideas to analyze the Roman situation of his time. Cicero’s version of the theory of the mixed constitution is notable for two innovations: an argument that stability is possible even under conditions of high inequality, and an account of constitutional mixture that emphasizes the role of the “monarchic” element in promoting concord and stability and meeting unexpected challenges. I show, however, that this account unfortunately made it clear that the Roman crisis of Cicero’s time was more or less insoluble in ways that would preserve the republic. -- PDF File: 42 pgs -- Keywords: Cicero, History of Political Thought, States, Stability, Plato, Aristotle -- downloaded to Dropbox
article  SSRN  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  Cicero  Plato  Aristotle  stability  Roman_Republic  government-forms  adaptability  mixed_government  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  inequality  class_conflict  limited_monarchy  monarchical_republic  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Iakovos Vasiliou interview with Richard Marshall - Plato aims at virtue » 3:AM Magazine
Blurb of his book, Aiming at Virtue in Plato -- This study of Plato's ethics focuses on the concept of virtue. Based on detailed readings of the most prominent Platonic dialogues on virtue, it argues that there is a central yet previously unnoticed conceptual distinction in Plato between the idea of virtue as the supreme aim of one's actions and the determination of which action-tokens or -types are virtuous. Appreciating the 'aiming/determining distinction' provides detailed and mutually consistent readings of the most well-known Platonic dialogues on virtue as well as original interpretations of central Platonic questions. Unlike most examinations of Plato's ethics, this study does not take as its centrepiece the 'eudaimonist framework', which focuses on the relationship between virtue and happiness. Instead, it argues that the dialogues themselves begin with the idea of the supremacy of virtue, examine how that claim can be defended, and address how to determine what constitutes the virtuous action. -- professor at CUNY
books  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  eudaimonia  virtue  virtue_ethics  deontology  Williams_Bernard 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Bellah - The renouncers « The Immanent Frame - August 2008
This post is a condensed version of a keynote delivered at a conference "The Axial Age and its Consequences for Subsequent History and the Present" sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation in cooperation with Robert Bellah and Hans Joas. -- After discussing Habermas' theory of a legitimation crisis in the axial civilizations and the critique - political, moral and religious - of the key axial age figures whom he calls "the renouncers" -- The great utopias served for the renouncers as stark contrasts to the actual world, and their vision of that other world could be called “theory” in Plato’s sense. But the very distance they felt from the world to which they returned made possible another kind of “theory,” another kind of seeing—that is, a distant, critical view of the actual world in which they lived. The renouncer sees the world with new eyes: as Plato says of the ones who have returned to the cave, they see the shadows for what they are, not naively as do those who have never left. One could say that the ideological illusion is gone. Once disengaged vision becomes possible then theory can take another turn: it can abandon any moral stance at all and look simply at what will be useful, what can make the powerful and exploitative even more so. -- The axial age gave us “theory” in two senses, and neither of them has been unproblematic ever since. The great utopian visions have motivated some of the noblest achievements of mankind; they have also motivated some of the worst actions of human beings. Theory in the sense of disengaged knowing, inquiry for the sake of understanding, with or without moral evaluation, has brought its own kind of astounding achievements but also given humans the power to destroy their environment and themselves. Both kinds of theoria have criticized but also justified the class society that first came into conscious view in the axial age. They have provided the intellectual tools for efforts to reform and efforts to repress. It is a great heritage. ... It has given us the great tool of criticism. How will we use it? -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
sociology_of_religion  intellectual_history  religious_history  axial_age  cultural_critique  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Buddhism  Old_Testament  prophets  China  India  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Confuscianism  ancient_religions  Chinese_history  Plato  Plato-Republic  Aristotle  phronesis  utopian  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Timothy Chappell - John Cottingham, Philosophy and the Good Life: Reason and the Passions in Greek, Cartesian and Psychoanalytic Ethics | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 197 (Oct., 1999), pp. 560-562
Cottingham doesn't think much of current moral_philosophy that treats "beliefs" and "desires" as transparent entities that can be manipulated in theory -- they have abandoned not only Freudian insights but even the purported ultra rationalist Descartes who was clued in to the physiology of emotions, and that reason is embodied -- Chappell highly recommends -- didn't download
books  find  reviews  jstor  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  psychoanalysis  mind-body  passions  reason-passions  emotions  Aristotle  Descartes 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - "Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy" by | Phronesis 50.1 (2005): 1-42.
Devin Henry, The University of Western Ontario -- Historically embryogenesis has been among the most philosophically intriguing phenomena. In this paper I focus on one aspect of biological development that was particularly perplexing to the ancients: self-organisation. For many ancients, the fact that an organism determines the important features of its own development required a special model for understanding how this was possible. This was especially true for Aristotle, Alexander, and Simplicius who all looked to contemporary technology to supply that model. However, they did not all agree on what kind of device should be used. In this paper I explore the way these ancients made use of technology as a model for the developing embryo. However, my purpose here is more than just the historical interest of knowing which devices were used by whom and how each of them worked; I shall largely ignore the details of how the various devices actually worked. Instead I shall look at the use of technology from a philosophical perspective. As we shall see, the different choices of device reveal fundamental differences in the way each thinker understood the nature of biological development itself. Thus, the central aim of this paper is to examine, not who used what devices and how they worked, but why they used those particular devices and what they thought their functioning could tell us about the nature of embryological phenomena. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  natural_philosophy  history_of_science  ancient_Greece  biology  generation  inheritance  development-biological  embryology  scientific_culture  scientific_method  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry. "Organismal Natures" | Apeiron: a journal for ancient philosophy and science (2008): 47-74.
Aristotle agrees with the negative conclusion of Galen that the growth and development of living things cannot be due to material forces operating according to chance. For Aristotle, the process of development is structured according to the form of the organism being generated by it. Development ‘follows upon’ the organism’s substantial being and exists for the sake of it rather than vice versa. This confers a certain order and direction on the process that cannot be accounted for in terms of the random motions of atoms or the undirected actions of Love and Strife (Empedocles). He accepts that natural generation involves material-level forces of the sort Democritus proposed; however, he insists that when operating by themselves these undirected causes would only produce a living thing by chance. And generation is far too regular for that. But Aristotle rejects the further inference — endorsed by Galen — that the teleological structure imposed on a developing organism must be traced to an intelligent agent that puts the organism together according to its end like some kind of internalized Demiurge. Nature, Aristotle says, does not deliberate. -- By invoking ‘natures’ as the cause of development, Galen says, Aristotle offers an account which is entirely vacuous. On the other hand, Denis Walsh has recently argued that the concept of Aristotelian natures plays the same role in development as the modern concept of phenotypic plasticity and that in this sense Aristotelian natures have an indispensable role to play contemporary evolutionary biology. -- My aim in this paper is not to defend an Aristotelian approach to modern biology but rather to explore the concept of organismal natures in the context of Aristotle’s teleology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  natural_philosophy  history_of_science  biology  generation  inheritance  development-biological  teleology  design-nature  materialism  Democritus  Empedocles  Galen  forms  evolutionary_biology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - "Aristotle's Pluralistic Realism" | The Monist 94.2 (2011): 198-222
The University of Western Ontario -- In this paper I explore Aristotle’s views on natural kinds and the compatibility of pluralism and realism, a topic that has generated considerable interest among contemporary philosophers. I argue that, when it came to zoology, Aristotle denied that there is only one way of organizing the diversity of the living world into natural kinds that will yield a single, unified system of classification. Instead, living things can be grouped and regrouped into various cross-cutting kinds on the basis of objective similarities and differences in ways that subserve the explanatory context. Since the explanatory aims of zoology are diverse and variegated, the kinds it recognizes must be equally diverse and variegated. At the same time, there are certain constraints on which kinds can be selected. And those constraints derive more from the causal structure of the world than from the proclivities of the classifier (hence the realism). This distinguishes Aristotle’s version of pluralistic realism from those contemporary versions (like Dupré’s “promiscuous realism”) that treat all or most classifications of a given domain as equally legitimate and not just a sub-set of kinds recognized by the science that studies it. By contrast, Aristotle privileges scientifically important kinds on the basis of their role in causal investigations. On this picture natural kinds are those kinds with the sort of causal structure that allows them to enter into scientific explanations. In the final section I argue that Aristotle’s zoology should remain of interest to philosophers and biologists alike insofar as it combines a pluralistic form of realism with a rank-free approach to classification. - didn't download
article  intellectual_history  Aristotle  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  ancient_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  natural_kinds  classification  species  explanation  causation  biology  animals  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Lennon, Thomas M., Stainton, Robert J. (Eds.) 2008 The Achilles of Rationalist Psychology
Downloaded Introduction pdf to Note -- Series: Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind, Vol. 7 -- newly written papers addressing each of the main contributors to the discussion of the Achilles. Despite the historical importance and intrinsic interest of the argument, very little has been written about it. *--* Contents. *--* Did Plato Articulate the Achilles Argument?. *-- Aristotle on the Unity of Consciousness. *-- The Neoplatonic Achilles. *-- The Unity of the Soul and Contrary Appetites in Medieval Philosophy. *-- Hume, Spinoza and the Achilles Inference. *-- Locke and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Reverse Achilles in Locke. *-- Cudworth and Bayle: An Odd Couple?. *-- The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke Collins Correspondence. *-- Leibniz’s ‘Achilles’. *-- Hume’s Reply to the Achilles Argument. *-- Kant and Mendelssohn on the Implications of the ‘I Think’. *-- Kant on the Achilles Argument. *-- William James and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Binding Problem: Achilles in the 21st Century.
books  intellectual_history  mind  mind-body  consciousness  perception  thinking_matter  materialism  soul  immortality  substance  Plato  Neoplatonism  Aristotle  Aquinas  Duns_Scotus  Ockham  Augustine  Descartes  Spinoza  Malebranche  Cartesian  Bayle  Locke  Clarke  Collins_Anthony  Leibniz  Hume  Kant  Mendelssohn  Fichte  cognition  neuroscience  psychology  natural_philosophy  metaphysics  rationalist  James_William  history_of_science  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"CORRECTIVE JUSTICE AND THE REVIVAL OF JUDICIAL VIRTUE" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- Aristotle's discussion of corrective justice has been generally thought to mark the beginning of the philosophical examination of tort law. Many scholars also consider corrective justice, of one form or another, the main normative alternative to the economic analysis of law. Most discussions of Aristotle’s conception of corrective justice in the law review literature, however, have failed to account for the established reading of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics as proposing a teleological form of ethics. Accordingly, Corrective Justice and the Revival of Judicial Virtue argues for a teleological interpretation of Aristotle's conception of corrective justice. The teleological conception of corrective justice does not attempt to analyze corrective justice merely as a formal (Weinrib), substantive (Wright), or political (Heyman) conception of equality or freedom that can be applied by technical reason to various circumstances. Rather, it maintains that corrective justice is a moral virtue of the judge that cannot be fully understood without specifying its relationship to practical wisdom and the telos of the good life. Under this reading, Aristotle’s conception of corrective justice specifies a method of judicial decision making whereby only the practically wise (i.e., morally virtuous) judge can know the content of corrective justice in all cases. Judging requires moral virtue not technical, philosophical or legal, expertise. Consequently, this article advocates a revival of Aristotle’s notion that judicial virtue requires moral virtue. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "CORRECTIVE JUSTICE AND THE REVIVAL OF JUDICIAL VIRTUE" Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities 12.2 (2000): 249-298. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  moral_philosophy  Aristotle  virtue_ethics  phronesis  eudaimonia  justice  torts  law-and-economics  civic_virtue  judiciary  juddgment-moral  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-political  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Vernon J. Bourke - THE SYNDERESIS RULE AND RIGHT REASON | JSTOR: The Monist, Vol. 66, No. 1 (JANUARY, 1983), pp. 71-82
Vol. 66, No. 1, Right Reason in Western Ethics - didn't download - "synderesis" term from Aquinas - considerable discussion of Aquinas "avoid evil and do good" combines practical reason in sense of prudence and moral philosophy - disagrees with modern natural law types like Finnis
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  practical_reason  prudence  Aristotle  Aquinas  Kant  natural_law  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Philip H. Jos - Moral Autonomy & the Modern Organization | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 21, No. 2 (Winter, 1988), pp. 321-343
Modern organizations are thought by many to exacerbate the problem of individual ethical integrity by discouraging nonconfirmity and independent judgement. Yet, studies of the effect of organizational structure on individual personality and behaviour have commonly been vague as to the precise nature of the capacities for independent ethical judgement that are endangered and about the structural and situational characteristics of organizations that threaten these capacities. This article seeks to clarify these ambiguities. Borrowing from Aristotle and more recent writers, the author develops a conception of moral autonomy that encompasses concerns about bureaucratic domination and the creation of "organization man." He then addresses the threats posed by organization: the Weberian and Decision Process models. - a lot of Kant - downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  organizations  social_psychology  accountability  Aristotle  virtue_ethics  Kant-ethics  autonomy  bureaucracy  Weber  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) - Home
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) (ISSN 1055-7660) publishes timely open-access, peer-reviewed reviews of current scholarly work in the field of classical studies (including archaeology). This site is the authoritative archive of BMCR's publication, from 1990 to the present. Reviews from August 2008 on are also posted on our blog.
website  books  reviews  intellectual_history  literary_history  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  archaeology  art_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  poetry  theater  Augustan_Rome  pre-Socratics  Plato  Socrates  Aristotle  Hellenism  Cicero  Stoicism  Epicurean  Virgil  Horace  Ovid  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Roman_law 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael J. Griffin, review - Carlo Natali, D. S. Hutchinson (trans & ed.), Aristotle: His Life and School // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
D. S. Hutchinson has delivered a meticulously edited and revised English translation of Carlo Natali's standard-setting philosophical biography of Aristotle. The result is an outstanding, accessible book that manages to improve on its predecessor, blending narrative concision with a comprehensive appraisal of the sources and shifting gracefully between storytelling, detective work, and institutional history. Intact here are Natali's most important and original findings of 1991: Aristotle's biography culminates in the discovery, defense, and institutionalization of a new way of life, the bios theoretikosor intellectual life, understood not as a vocation ("a Beruf in the Weberian sense,") nor as a contribution to the socialization and education of the young (paideia), but as a personal choice, "a way of giving meaning" to an aristocratic Greek's life by expending scholē (freedom, leisure) on philosophy; the Peripatetic school down to Lyco, then, was a foundation facilitating the pursuit of this way of life on the part of a small community. Natali's helpful treatment of Aristotle's methods of teaching, the importance of books in the Peripatos (ch. 3) and the course of Aristotelian studies since Zeller (ch. 4) are also substantially unchanged, though improved in details, and augmented by a new postscript taking account of developments in scholarship since 1991. This is really an updated and improved edition of the 1991 book in a new language, with the full collaboration of the author and a weighty dose of enhancement and refinement by an editor who is respected as a scholar in his own right.
books  reviews  biography  intellectual_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  education  elite_culture  leisure  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
The Benjamin Franklin Effect: The Surprising Psychology of How to Handle Haters | Brain Pickings
“We are what we pretend to be,” Kurt Vonnegut famously wrote, “so we must be careful about what we pretend to be.” But given how much our minds mislead us, what if we don’t realize when we’re pretending — who are we then? That’s precisely what David McRaney explores in You Are Now Less Dumb: How to Conquer Mob Mentality, How to Buy Happiness, and All the Other Ways to Outsmart Yourself (public library) — a “book about self-delusion, but also a celebration of it,” a fascinating and pleasantly uncomfortable-making look at why “self-delusion is as much a part of the human condition as fingers and toes,” and the follow-up to McRaney’s You Are Not So Smart, one of the best psychology books of 2011. -- pretty Aristotelian
books  habit  character  Aristotle  Franklin_Ben  moral_psychology  self-development  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton, "Aesthetics and Evolutionary Psychology" in The Oxford Handbook for Aesthetics, edited by Jerrold Levinson (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003).
Starts with Aristotle and Hume - common elements of human nature that would make certain aspects of poetics common across cultures and over time and make visual and aural experiences aestheticly pleasing. Attacks 20thC extreme blank slate as cultural relativism. Goes through evolutionary psychology theories about sexual selection and fitness, including costliness of effort and display. Returns to Kant re limits on evolutionary psychology that the more reductionist of evo-devo types seem incapable of understanding.
article  books  aesthetics  intellectual_history  Aristotle  Hume  Kant  human_nature  cultural_history  relativism  judgment-aesthetics  taste  evolutionary_biology  psychology  evo_psych  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Edward Schiappa - Sophistic Rhetoric: Oasis or Mirage? | JSTOR: Rhetoric Review, Vol. 10, No. 1 (Autumn, 1991), pp. 5-18
Survey of what the move to the Sophists as alternative to Plato and Aristotle rhetoric -- pedagogy, social and political issues, epistemic position of rhetoric --heavily cited -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  social_theory  literary_theory  epistemology-social  Sophists  deliberation-public  Plato  Aristotle  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - "Rights" in Aristotle's "Politics" and "Nicomachean Ethics"? | JSTOR: The Review of Metaphysics, Vol. 55, No. 2 (Dec., 2001), pp. 269-295
Follows up lengthy debates (especially Review of Metaphysics symposium in mid 1990s) - she argues that rights weren't part of Greek political or ethical theories re justice etc. -- useful for lit survey as well as how she sees Politics and Nicomachean Ethics working together or leaving some things not addressed --didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Aristotle  natural_rights  human_rights  justice  civic_virtue  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue -Living Alone Together [Introduction and key article by Tzvetan Todorov] | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1, Winter, 1996
Issue Introduction - Living Alone Together (pp. 1-14) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* Replies to Introduction *--* (1) Community and Individuality (pp. 15-24) Patricia H. Werhane. *--* (2) A Reply to Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 25-34) Frances Ferguson. *--* (3) "Living Together Alone or Together": Commentary on Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 35-41) Stephen A. Mitchell. *--* (4) [downloaded] Todorov's Otherness (pp. 43-55) Robert Wokler. *--* (5) Misanthropology (pp. 57-72) Gary Saul Morson. *--* (6) Conflict and Sociability in Hegel, Freud, and Their Followers: Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 73-82) Daniel Burston. *--* (7) Regarding Others (pp. 83-93) Stewart Justman. *--*--* Response *--* The Gaze and the Fray (pp. 95-106) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* A. Self and Others in Culture. *--* Keeping the Self Intact during the Culture Wars: A Centennial Essay for Mikhail Bakhtin (pp. 107-126) Caryl Emerson. *--* Cultural Dreaming and Cultural Studies (pp. 127-144) Marianne DeKoven. *--* Orality, Literacy, and Their Discontents (pp. 145-159) Denis Donoghue.
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  literary_theory  human_nature  social_theory  moral_philosophy  psychology  sociability  self  self-love  self-development  bildung  self-and-other  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Platonism  Socrates  Aristotle  Cicero  community  individualism  authenticity  constructivism  Rousseau  Hegel  Freud  conflict  Bakhtin  conversation  dialogue  literacy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Cotton - James Harrington as Aristotelian | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Aug., 1979), pp. 371-389
Rather than Harrington within tradition of Machiavelli and Aristotle (Pocock), Cotton argues for direct appropriation from Aristotle -Oceana as polity, Agrarian Law etc. Contra Strauss who denies Harrington as Aristotelian. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_politics  Harrington  Machiavelli  civic_humanism  mixed_government  classes  property  Agrarian_Laws  social_order  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Aristotle  Pocock  Strauss  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Cary J. Nederman - The Puzzle of the Political Animal: Nature and Artifice in Aristotle's Political Theory | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 56, No. 2 (Spring, 1994), pp. 283-304
Several recent scholars have raised afresh the question of what Aristotle meant in Politics 1 by the statement that men are "by nature" political, that is, are political animals. This article addresses this quandary by reference to Aristotle's psychology and his notion of political education. It is argued that by concentrating on Aristotle's theory of human locomotion and its implications for moral choice, we may identify the relation he conceived between the polis and human nature. Specifically, the ability of humans to live according to their natures requires the systematic education afforded by the laws and institutions of the polis. - downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  ancient_Greece  human_nature  Aristotle  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - WHAT DID THE GREEKS EVER DO FOR GOD? | Pandaemonium Dec 2013
Xenophanes (c 570-476 BCE), one of the earliest of the Presocratics, savaged Homer and Hesiod for ‘attributing to the gods everything that men find shameful and reprehensible – stealing, adultery and deceiving one another.’ Humans possessed false ideas of gods because they fashioned them in their own image. So, ‘Ethiopians say their gods are flat-nosed and black, and Thracians that theirs have blue eyes and red hair.’ And if horses and cows possessed gods, they would undoubtedly be ‘horse-like gods, cow-like gods’.

There could only be one God, Xenophanes insisted, ‘since it is sacrilege for any of the gods to have a master’. This God could be ‘in no way similar to mortal men in body or in thought’. God must have always existed, for there is nothing superior that could have created Him, and He could not have been created by an inferior being. He is a living being but unlike like organic beings there are no parts in Him. He has no physical contact with anything in the world but ‘remains for ever in the same place, entirely motionless’ and ‘effortlessly, he shakes all things by thinking with his mind.’ This notion of a wholly simple God came to be important in both Islam and Christianity.
theology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  anthropomorphism  monotheism  polytheism  Plato  Aristotle  cosmology  God-attributes  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
In the Middle: Do Stones Have Souls? -Jeffrey Cohen - Nov 2013
Additional material from the final chapter of a book to be published Spring 2015. -- impact of Aristotle and anima on 13thC notions of souls (tripartite for human - vegetative, sensible, rational), classification of material world, and Albertus Magnus opus on minerals, insisting they had no souls yet assigning agency to features of particular minerals especially as linked with biology, human usage. -- notes of references and reader comments of interest
13thC  medieval_history  Medieval  Aristotle  soul  theology  history_of_science  intellectual_history  alchemy  microcosm  bibliography  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Carlos Fraenkel's "Philosophical Religions" Reviewed by Peter Gordon | New Republic
In a remarkable and important book, Carlos Fraenkel characterizes Lessing as one of the late exponents for an intellectual tradition of philosophical religion that stretches as far back as late antiquity. This is a tradition that united pagan thinkers such as Plato with Christians (Origen and Eusebius) and Muslims (Al-Fārābī and Averroes) and Jews (Philo and Maimonides) in a shared philosophical vision, according to which historically distinctive religions should not be understood in the literal sense. They must be interpreted instead in allegorical fashion, so as to grasp their higher and purely rational content. This allegorical content is far from self-evident. But those who are incapable of philosophizing, or have not yet arrived at the requisite intellectual maturity, are not lost: the historical forms of a given religion offer just the sort of moral and political instruction most of us need if we are to conduct our lives with virtue and for the common good. Only the philosopher will understand that the historical forms have an educative function
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Judaism  Islam  Medieval  theology  Early_Christian  Spinoza  allegory  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  Strauss  Enlightenment  Bolingbroke  monotheism  reason  Neoplatonism  Aquinas  scholastics  Deism  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Timothy C. Johnson - Reciprocity as the Foundation of Financial Economics | SSRN - Oct 2013
This paper argues that the fundamental principle of contemporary financial economics is balanced reciprocity, not the principle of utility maximisation that is important in economics more generally. The argument is developed by analysing the mathematical Fundamental Theory of Asset Pricing with reference to the emergence of mathematical probability in the seventeenth century in the context of the ethical assessment of commercial contracts. This analysis is undertaken within a framework of Pragmatic philosophy and Virtue Ethics. The purpose of the paper is to mitigate future financial crises by reorienting financial economics to emphasise the objectives of market stability and social cohesion rather than individual utility maximisation. -- Downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  economic_history  legal_history  economic_theory  Aristotle  Aquinas  Papacy  medieval_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  moral_philosophy  moral_economy  financial_innovation  probability  mathematics  commerce  risk  interest_rates  prices  pragmatism  virtue_ethics  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
J. S. Maloy: The Aristotelianism of Locke's Politics (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 235-257 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Locke takes up Aristotle attack in Plato mixing political with family power, which Filmer adopts
article  jstor  17thC  Britain  political_philosophy  Locke  Filmer  patriarchy  family  power  Aristotle  Plato  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
B DeLong: Notes: Polanyi: Aristotle Discovers the Economy May 2003
Karl Polanyi, "Aristotle Discovers the Economy," in Trade and Market in the Early Empires...A whole bunch of this article is simply wrong: the claims that "in the fourth century... Greeks initiated the gainful business practices that in much later days developed into the dynamo of market comnpetition" are false. This means that Polanyi is wrong when he says that Aristotle is examining a new phenomenon when he looks at the economy. Aristotle is examining an old phenomenon from the point of view of an Athenian aristocrat.But there is much of value in Polanyi's exposition of what Aristotle says...
political_economy  historical_sociology  economic_history  ancient_Greece  Aristotle  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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