dunnettreader + africa   17

Jonathan Sheehan - Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe - Issue Introduction (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 561-570 **--** Articles in issue on idolatry *--* Jonathan Sheehan, Introduction: Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe (pp. 561-570) *-* Joan-Pau Rubiés, Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry (pp. 571-596) *--* Carina L. Johnson, Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (pp. 597-622) *--* Sabine MacCormack, Gods, Demons, and Idols in the Andes (pp. 623-648) *--* Jonathan Sheehan, The Altars of the Idols: Religion, Sacrifice, and the Early Modern Polity (pp. 649-674) *--* Peter N. Miller, History of Religion Becomes Ethnology: Some Evidence from Peiresc's Africa (pp. 675-696) *--* Martin Mulsow, Idolatry and Science: Against Nature Worship from Boyle to Rüdiger, 1680-1720 (pp. 697-712) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  journal  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_experience  ritual  idolatry  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  theology  sociology_of_religion  political-theology  science-and-religion  historicism  relativism  demons  devil  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  comparative_history  sacrifice  science_of_man  social_sciences  human_nature  Africa  Latin_America  pagans  nature  natural_religion  nature_worship  religious_imagery  religious_practices  Boyle  Antiquarianism  natural_history  Peiresc  virtuosos  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Frankema, Jeffrey G. Williamson, Woltjer - An economic rationale for the African scramble | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal- 14 July 2015
Ewout Frankema, Jeffrey G. Williamson, Pieter Woltjer -- The partitioning of Africa by European imperial powers in the late 19th century irreversibly transformed the long-term development trajectories of African economies. Yet, the motives for, and timing of, the scramble remain poorly understood. This column argues that the changes in African international trade over the course of the 19th century created an economic rationale for the African scramble. This episode offers insights that are relevant for current African economic development. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_history  Africa  African_trade  19thC  20thC  imperialism  British_Empire  French_Empire  Industrial_Revolution  raw_materials  natural_resources  globalization  Sub-Saharan_Afric  economic_growth  development  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Justin E.H. Smith - Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy (2015) | Princeton University Press
People have always been xenophobic, but an explicit philosophical and scientific view of human racial difference only began to emerge during the modern period. Why and how did this happen? Surveying a range of philosophical and natural-scientific texts, dating from the Spanish Renaissance to the German Enlightenment, (Smith) charts the evolution of the modern concept of race and shows that natural philosophy, particularly efforts to taxonomize and to order nature, played a crucial role. Smith demonstrates how the denial of moral equality between Europeans and non-Europeans resulted from converging philosophical and scientific developments, including a declining belief in human nature’s universality and the rise of biological classification. The racial typing of human beings grew from the need to understand humanity within an all-encompassing system of nature, alongside plants, minerals, primates, and other animals. While racial difference as seen through science did not arise in order to justify the enslavement of people, it became a rationalization and buttress for the practices of trans-Atlantic slavery. From the work of François Bernier to Leibniz, Kant, and others, Smith delves into philosophy’s part in the legacy and damages of modern racism. -- Smith is university professor of the history and philosophy of science at the Université Paris Diderot—Paris VII. ...author of Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life (PUP), coeditor and cotranslator of The Leibniz-Stahl Controversy -- downloaded introduction to Note -- only hdbk, will be in ebook
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  racism  racialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  exploration  Spanish_Empire  Spain  Renaissance  natural_philosophy  biology  taxonomies  Latin_America  West_Indies  North_America  Native_Americans  indigenous_peoples  slavery  West_Africa  Africa  African_trade  life_sciences  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  French_Enlightenment  Leibniz  Kant  anatomy  Adam  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  science-public  science_of_man 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter K. J. Park - Africa, Asia, and the History of Philosophy: Racism in the Formation of the Philosophical Canon 1780-1830 | SUNY Pess 2013
... a penetrating account of a crucial period in the development of philosophy as an academic discipline. (..) a number of European philosophers influenced by Kant began to formulate the history of philosophy as a march of progress from the Greeks to Kant—(..) supplanted existing accounts beginning in Egypt or W. Asia at a time when European interest in Sanskrit and Persian lit was flourishing. Not without debate, these traditions were ultimately deemed outside the scope of philosophy and relegated to the study of religion. Park uncovers this debate and recounts the development of an exclusionary canon of philosophy in the decades of the late 18thC and early 19thC. To what extent was this exclusion of Africa and Asia a result of the scientization of philosophy? To what extent was it a result of racism? (..)the most extensive description available of Gérando’s Histoire comparée des systèmes de philosophie, F. Schlegel’s lectures on the history of philosophy, Ast’s and Rixner’s systematic integration of Africa and Asia into the history of philosophy, and the controversy between Hegel and the theologian Tholuck over “pantheism.” 1. The Kantian School and the Consolidation of Modern Historiography of Philosophy -- 2. The Birth of Comparative History of Philosophy: Joseph-Marie de Gérando’s Histoire comparée des systèmes de philosophie -- 3. India in Friedrich Schlegel’s Comparative History of Philosophy -- 4. The Exclusion of Africa and Asia from the History of Philosophy: The Formation of the Kantian Position -- 5. Systematic Inclusion of Africa and Asia under Absolute Idealism: Friedrich Ast’s and Thaddä Anselm Rixner’s Histories of Philosophy -- 6. Absolute Idealism Reverts to the Kantian Position: Hegel’s Exclusion of Africa and Asia -- 7. The Comparative History of Philosophy in August Tholuck’s Polemic against Hegel -- downloaded excerpt
books  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  19thC  philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_India  Sanskrit  Persia  religious_history  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  Kant  Schlegel  German_Idealism  Hegel  German_scholarship  philohellenism  ancient_history  ancient_religions  history_of_science  biology  racism  Africa  Asia  Enlightenment  comparative_religion  pantheism  philology  teleology  cosmopolitanism  colonialism  comparative_history  comparative_anthropology  philosophical_anthropology  human_nature  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
The Reformation in Global Perspective
Abstract Concepts and methods introduced by the “new world history” present important opportunities to contextualize the European Reformation in transregional frames of reference. A global approach allows historians to situate the Reformation more fully within the orbit of people, ideas, and cultural goods that interacted with one another across the early modern world. A number of historians who study missionary encounters, especially those of Jesuits, have already initiated global methodologies in analyzing the Reformation overseas. Other scholars have pointed to ways in which an engagement with the wider world influenced European societies. These works indicate the rich possibilities for looking at the Reformation with new eyes. In assessing this scholarship, this article discusses the prospects and challenges for adopting global perspectives in the study of the Reformation.
religious_history  missionaries  cultural_history  latin  america  article  16thc  east  asia  historiography  china  reformation  catholics  africa  colonialism  world  history  counter-reformation  17thc  north  protestants  india  mena  paywall  cross-border 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Philip Jenkins: The Lost History of Christianity | Amazon.com: Kindle Store
Publishers Weekly - Revisionist history is always great fun, and never more so than when it is persuasively and cogently argued. Jenkins, the Penn State history professor whose book The Next Christendom made waves several years ago, argues that it's not exactly a new thing that Christianity is making terrific inroads in Asia and Africa. A thousand years ago, those continents were more Christian than Europe, and Asian Christianity in particular was the locus of tremendous innovations in mysticism, monasticism, theology and secular knowledge. The little-told story of Christianity's decline in those two continents—hastened by Mongol invasions, the rise of Islam and Buddhism, and internecine quarrels—is sensitively and imaginatively rendered. Jenkins sometimes challenges the assertions of other scholars, including Karen Armstrong and Elaine Pagels, but provides compelling evidence for his views. The book is marvelously accessible for the lay reader and replete with fascinating details to help personalize the ambitious sweep of global history Jenkins undertakes. This is an important counterweight to previous histories that have focused almost exclusively on Christianity in the West.
books  amazon.com  kindle-available  religious_history  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  medieval_history  church_history  religious_culture  MENA  Africa  Asia  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Buddhism  mysticism  monasticism  science-and-religion  Mongols  Eurasia  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Olakunle George - Modernity and the Promise of Reading | JSTOR: Diacritics, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Winter, 1995), pp. 71-88
Didn't download -- interesting on Adorno re the essay as critique -- purpose to put Adorno and Taylor in dialogue with an African poet. Looking at postcolonial as needing more than an affirmative to counter the negative images from colonialism. Eurocentrism isn't an ethnic superiority complex but the conditions of global capital social relations.
article  jstor  social_theory  lit_crit  modernity  Eurocentrism  post-colonial  Adorno  Taylor_Charles  Africa  multiculturalism  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Farr - Locke, Natural Law, and New World Slavery | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Aug., 2008), pp. 495-522
This essay systematically reformulates an earlier argument about Locke and new world slavery, adding attention to Indians, natural law, and Locke's reception. Locke followed Grotian natural law in constructing a just-war theory of slavery. Unlike Grotius, though, he severely restricted the theory, making it inapplicable to America. It only fit resistance to "absolute power" in Stuart England. Locke was nonetheless an agent of British colonialism who issued instructions governing slavery. Yet they do not inform his theory--or vice versa. This creates hermeneutical problems and raises charges of racism. If Locke deserves the epithet "racist," it is not for his having a racial doctrine justifying slavery. None of this makes for a flattering portrait. Locke's reputation as the champion of liberty would not survive the contradictions in which new world slavery ensnared him. Evidence for this may be found in Locke's reception, including by Southern apologists for slavery.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  17thC  British_history  colonialism  American_colonies  West_Indies  indigenous_peoples  Native_Americans  Africa  slavery  Locke  Grotius  natural_law  just_war  conquest  liberty  individualism  liberalism  Southern_states  abolition  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eliga H. Gould - Entangled Atlantic Histories: A Response from the Anglo-American Periphery (2007)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 112, No. 5 (Dec., 2007), pp. 1415-1422 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- overview of shifts in Atlantic historiography re center periphery relations and much more going on in periphery especially where interacts with indigenous populations and other empires
article  jstor  historiography  American_colonies  West_Indies  British_Empire  Three_Kingdoms  Ireland  Scotland  Spanish_Empire  Africa  Dutch  Native_Americans  slavery  political_history  political_culture  British_politics  maritime_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paul E. Lovejoy and David Richardson: 'This Horrid Hole': Royal Authority, Commerce and Credit at Bonny, 1690-1840 (2004)
JSTOR: The Journal of African History, Vol. 45, No. 3 (2004), pp. 363-392 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This article suggests that differences in local political structures and credit protection regimes largely account for Bonny's displacement of Old Calabar as the principal slave port of the Bight of Biafra in the eighteenth century, despite Bonny's reputation for being particularly unhealthy for Europeans. We argue that this displacement occurred in the 1730s, several decades earlier than previously thought. We suggest that this was made possible by the early growth and consolidation of royal authority at Bonny. The use of state authority to enforce credit arrangements in Bonny proved more effective than the mechanisms adopted at its closest rival, Old Calabar, where, in the absence of a centralized political authority similar to the monarchy at Bonny, credit protection before 1807 was based on pawnship.
article  jstor  economic_history  economic_sociology  institutional_economics  17thC  18thC  19thC  Africa  Britain  British_Empire  slavery  trade  credit  finance_capital  Atlantic  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Beware Africa's "Middle Class" - Bright B. Simons - Harvard Business Review
This amazing contradiction in most African societies — of an expanding educated underclass and an 'uneducated' rising economic class — sums up why the African economy is struggling to acquire the characteristics one would expect of an economy bursting with middle-class vibes. Simply put, even were the number of middle-class people expanding as dramatically as some observers claim, there is no guarantee that market and consumer behavior would look anything like what emerged in other societies when their middle-class population begun to approach critical mass.For the prospective investor in Africa, then, it is obvious that qualitative factors should matter more than quantitative factoids in shaping your strategy.
development  Africa 
june 2013 by dunnettreader
Climate, ecosystem resilience, and the slave trade | vox
Fascinating. Warmer years reduced agricultural productivity. Since reduced ability of local elites to extract resources needed to manage slave trade, reduced number of slaves exported. Which improved odds of long-term development, despite the negative impact on development of the reduced climate-induced productivity and increased mortality.
economic_history  economic_growth  Africa  slavery  climate  elites  population  social_theory 
june 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

16thc  17thc  18thC  19thC  20thC  abolition  Adam  Adorno  africa  African_trade  amazon.com  america  American_colonies  anatomy  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_India  ancient_religions  Antiquarianism  aristocracy  article  asia  Atlantic  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  bibliography  biology  books  Boyle  Britain  British_Empire  British_history  British_politics  Buddhism  catholics  china  Christianity  church_history  citizens  climate  colonialism  commerce  commercial_law  common_law  comparative_anthropology  comparative_history  comparative_religion  conquest  corruption  cosmopolitanism  counter-reformation  counter-terrorism  credit  cross-border  cultural_history  democracy  democracy_deficit  demons  development  devil  dignity  downloaded  Dutch  Early_Christian  east  East_India_Company  ecclesiology  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_sociology  education-women  EF-add  elites  energy  Enlightenment  enthusiasm  entrepreneurs  epidemics  Eurasia  Eurocentrism  Europe-Early_Modern  exploration  FDI  finance_capital  financial_system  French_Empire  French_Enlightenment  German_Idealism  German_scholarship  globalization  Grotius  GWOT  health_care  Hegel  heterodoxy  historical_sociology  historicism  historiography  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  history  history_of_science  human_capital  human_nature  human_rights  idolatry  imperialism  india  indigenous_peoples  individualism  Industrial_Revolution  infrastructure  Innovation  institutional_economics  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  international_system  Ireland  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islamist_fundamentalists  Jesuits  journal  jstor  just_war  Kant  kindle-available  landowners  late_antiquity  latin  Latin_America  legal_history  legal_system  legitimacy  Leibniz  liberalism  liberty  life_sciences  lit_crit  Locke  maritime_history  medieval_history  mena  mercantilism  merchants  migration  missionaries  modernity  monasticism  Mongols  monotheism  moral_philosophy  Moravians  multiculturalism  mysticism  Native_Americans  natural_history  natural_law  natural_philosophy  natural_religion  natural_resources  nature  nature_worship  networks  north  North_America  Obama  Obama_administration  pagans  pantheism  Papacy  paper  paywall  Peiresc  Persia  philohellenism  philology  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy  philosophy_of_science  Pocket  political-theology  political_culture  political_history  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  population  post-colonial  poverty  progress  protestants  querelle_des_rites  racialism  racism  rational_religion  raw_materials  reformation  regional_blocs  relativism  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_experience  religious_history  religious_imagery  religious_practices  Renaissance  renewables  reviews  ritual  sacrifice  Sanskrit  Schlegel  science-and-religion  science-public  science_of_man  scientific_culture  Scientific_Revolution  Scotland  sectarianism  self  slavery  SMEs  social_history  social_sciences  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_religion  Southern_states  Spain  Spanish_Empire  speech  spirituality  Sub-Saharan_Afric  Sub-Saharan_Africa  taxonomies  Taylor_Charles  technical_assistance  technology_transfer  teleology  theology  Three_Kingdoms  trade  trade-agreements  trade-policy  trading_companies  universalism  US_foreign_policy  US_military  virtuosos  West_Africa  West_Indies  world 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: