dunnettreader + addison   15

Steven Shapin - How Foods Tasted in the Early Modern Period and How They Taste Now (2012) | School of Advanced Study, University of London
Speaker(s):
Professor Steven Shapin, ST Lee Visiting Professorial Fellow, 2011/12, Franklin L. Ford Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University
Event date:
Tuesday 22 May 2012
School of Advanced Study, University of London
sensation  Europe-Early_Modern  Addison  intellectual_history  Locke-Essay  video  consumer_revolution  lecture  perception  food  botany  medicine  physiology  cultural_history  taste  humours 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Bernard, ed. - The Literary Correspondences of the Tonsons - Oxford University Press
The Tonsons were the pre-eminent literary publishers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. It is difficult to estimate their contribution to the formation of English literature accurately. Nevertheless, it is clear that they carried Shakespeare into the eighteenth century and started the practice of modern editing of him. Without Rowe's life and without the Pope-Theobald controversy, the history of Shakespeare studies would have been different, perhaps much less illustrious. The same is true of Milton, a figure who through his political sympathies was in disrepute, but on whom Jacob Tonson the elder (and his nephew after him) decided to lavish the care, eventually including illustration and annotation, usually reserved for the classics. Later they issued an edition of Spenser by John Hughes, thus creating the triumvirate who for many years were to dominate the study of English renaissance literature. It is not unreasonable to claim that the house of Tonson invented English literature as matter for repeated reading and study. In addition, of course, the Tonsons were Dryden's main publisher, the first to publish Pope, and the consistent supporters of Addison and Steele and their early periodicals, while Jacob Tonson the elder had earlier shaped the miscellany, the translation of classical poetry into English, the pocket Elzevier series, and the luxury edition - practices carried on by the Tonson firm throughout the eighteenth century. They were at the forefront of the creation of a Whig literary culture and Jacob Tonson the elder was the founder of the famous Whig Kit-Cat Club which, it has been said, saved the nation. This edition brings together the correspondences of the Tonsons for the first time and represents a major intervention in the field of the history of the book and literary production. It includes 158 letters, with translations where necessary, from major authors, politicians, and men and women of letters of the period, discussing their work and the role that the Tonsons played in getting literature to the press and the reading nation. The letters are accompanied by generous and insightful annotation, as well as brief biographies of each of the Tonsons, and special sections on publishing, patronage, and retirement.
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  elite_culture  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Whigs-grandees  Whigs-oligarchy  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  publishing  print_culture  printing  Dryden  Pope_Alexander  Addison  Steele  English_lit  poetry  theater  theatre-Restoration  theatre-politics  correspondence  EF-add 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Sandra Shapshay, review - Emily Brady, The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
Review good on cognitive dimension in Kant compared with Burke about which Shapshay has written zz In this book Emily Brady seeks to 'reassess' and 'reclaim' the concept of the sublime in order to show the continuing relevance of this aesthetic category for debates in contemporary aesthetics and environmental thought. This aim is important, and it is one with which I have great sympathy. In recent years the concept has been used, on the one hand, too liberally by postmodern philosophers who have stretched 'the sublime' beyond conceptual coherence, and, on the other hand, too little by Anglo-American philosophers who have largely forgotten this aesthetic category. ..sublime responses, especially to natural environments, are still with us today, and may be even more frequent than in former times given that "Places that were once distant and inaccessible have become much closer through adventure tourism and the like." In addition, Brady supports the claim that contemporary tastes in landscapes have not changed radically since the 18th century .... -- The book is divided into two roughly equal parts. In Part I, Brady aims to characterize the core meaning of the sublime by tracing its development from the rhetorical sublime of Longinus into a category largely of nature appreciation in the 18th century with the aesthetic theories of Addison, Gerard, Burke, and Alison (in Britain) and Mendelssohn and Kant (in Germany). In Chapter 4 she continues the narrative with subsequent developments of the category of the sublime affected by Schiller, Schopenhauer and British Romanticism. In Part II, Brady considers the relevance of this core meaning of the sublime she derives from the history of aesthetic theory for contemporary aesthetics and environmental thought, taking up the following questions. Can artworks be sublime in a non-derivative sense? What distinguishes the sublime from neighboring categories such as 'grandeur,' 'terrible beauty,' and 'wonder'? How does sublime response compare with an engagement with tragedy? And what is the relevance of the sublime for valuing the environment both aesthetically and ethically?
books  reviews  intellectual_history  21stC  aesthetics  environment  nature  sublime  art_history  art_criticism  18thC  19thC  British_history  German_Idealism  Germany  Addison  Burke  Kant-aesthetics  Schiller  Schopenhauer  Romanticism  Grand_Tour  analytical_philosophy  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Lincoln - The Culture of War and Civil Society in the Reigns of William III and Anne | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 44, No. 4 (SUMMER 2011), pp. 455-474
The essay examines the representation of war in poems and church services during the reigns of William III and Queen Anne. It identifies relations between social discipline and the imaginative participation in violence, and considers how war—described by poets as a test of heroism, and represented by the church as the occasion for spiritual purgation—served the interests of those who wanted to regulate and refine the manners of civil society. It argues that the promotion of gentler manners did not undermine the commitment to military aggression, but worked in the service of it. -- huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  English_lit  poetry  sermons  politeness  reformation_of_manners  militarism  William_III  Marlborough  heroes  Providence  religious_culture  elite_culture  Elias_Norbert  Addison  publishing  public_sphere  civil_society  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Mary Waters - Sociable Criticism in England, 1625-1725 by Paul Trolander and Zeynep Tenger | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Summer, 2008), pp. 593-595
Interesting discussion of coterie practices and shift to public criticism post Glorious Revolution - 1st with Dennis, who was much resented and viewed as violating sociability rules, then with Addison, who in The Spectator found a formula for public readers and public judgment, literary criticism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  English_lit  coterie  court_culture  lit_crit  Dennis  Dryden  Addison  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Howard Erskine-Hill: The Medal against Time: A Study of Pope's Epistle To Mr Addison (1965),
JSTOR: Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, Vol. 28 (1965), pp. 274-298 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Pope's self image as an Augustan with decline anxieties - Dunciad an inverted Renaissance towards Dark Ages - Addison Medal Epistle belongs with his important poems, not miscellany as in Twickenham
article  jstor  lit_crit  literary_history  18thC  Augustan  Pope  Addison  Dunciad 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
David Hopkins: Dryden and the Garth-Tonson Metamorphoses (1988)
JSTOR: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 39, No. 153 (Feb., 1988), pp. 64-74 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  English_lit  literary_history  17thC  18thC  1690s  1710s  Dryden  Pope  Addison  publishing  imitation  translation  poetry  Ovid  networks-literary  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Roger D. Lund - Wit, Judgment, and the Misprisions of Similitude (2004) | JHI on JSTOR
Wit, Judgment, and the Misprisions of Similitude
Roger D. Lund
Journal of the History of Ideas
Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 53-74
True wit is Nature to advantage dress' d
What oft was thought but ne'er so well ecpress' d
Downloaded pdf to Note - duplicate somewhere in Dropbox EF libraries
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  faculties  reason  understanding  imagination  wit  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-emotions  gentleman  poetry  genius  creativity  Innovation  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  Locke  Malebranche  deception  Pope  Dryden  English_lit  French_lit  Addison  downloaded 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Markku Peltonen: Politeness and Whiggism, 1688-1732 (2005)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 391-414 Downloaded pdf to Note Good challenge to Pocock on Whigs modernizing civic virtue to accommodate commerce via non-aristocratic politeness - especially dismantles Klein's simplistic Shaftsbury=Spectator=Whiggism=anti-Tories Useful bibliography, both English and French, 17thC-18thC Focus on Mandeville and Cato's Letters as anti Shaftsbury
jstor  article  17thC  18thC  Britain  France  cultural_history  political_history  British_politics  Whigs  Addison  Steele  Shaftesbury  Locke  Mandeville  Cato's_Letters  elites  aristocracy  commerce  urban  moral_philosophy  Tories  Ramsay  Fenelon  historiography  political_philosophy  civic_virtue  Pocock  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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