dunnettreader + academia.edu   35

Doohwan Ahn - From Greece to Babylon: The political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay (1686–1743) | History of European Ideas, Dec 2011 — ScienceDirect
History of European Ideas, December 2011, Vol.37(4):421–437, doi:10.1016/j.histeuroideas.2010.12.005 -- Doohwan Ahn , University of Cambridge, Hughes Hall
This paper explores the political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay with particular reference to his highly acclaimed book called A New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus (1727). Dedicated to Prince Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, to whom he was tutor, this work has been hitherto viewed as a Jacobite imitation of the Telemachus, Son of Ulysses (1699) of his eminent teacher archbishop Fénelon of Cambrai. By tracing the dual legacy of the first Persian Emperor Cyrus in Western thought, I demonstrate that Ramsay was as much indebted to Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet's Discourse on Universal History (1681) as he was to Fénelon's political romance. Ramsay took advantage of Xenophon's silence about the eponymous hero's adolescent education in his Cyropaedia, or the Education of Cyrus (c. 380 B.C.), but he was equally inspired by the Book of Daniel, where the same Persian prince was eulogised as the liberator of the Jewish people from their captivity in Babylon. The main thrust of Ramsay's adaptation was not only to revamp the Humanist-cum-Christian theory and practice of virtuous kingship for a restored Jacobite regime, but on a more fundamental level, to tie in secular history with biblical history. In this respect, Ramsay's New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus, was not just another Fénelonian political novel but more essentially a work of universal history. In addition to his Jacobite model of aristocratic constitutional monarchy, it was this Bossuetian motive for universal history, which was first propounded by the German reformer Philipp Melanchthon in his Chronicon Carionis (1532), that most decisively separated Ramsay from Henry St. John, Viscount Bolingbroke, author of another famous advice book for princes of the period, The Idea of a Patriot King (written in late 1738 for the education of Frederick Lewis, Prince of Wales, but officially published in 1749).
article  downloaded  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  universal_history  France  British_history  political_philosophy  Ramsay  Bolingbroke  Fenelon  Bossuet  Jacobites  monarchy  Patriot_King  mirror_for_princes  Bible-as-history  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  Xenophon  Old_Testament  Cyrus_the_Great  Melanchthon  constitutional_monarchy  constitutional_regime  limited_monarchy  Frederick_Prince_of_Wales  Bonnie_Prince_Charlie  kingship 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Édouard Mehl, -La philosophie au tribunal de la théologie ? Sur la dédicace des Méditations de Descartes à la Faculté de Théologie de la Sorbonne (2013)
Édouard Mehl, « La philosophie au tribunal de la théologie ? », Revue des sciences religieuses [En ligne], 87/4 | 2013, mis en ligne le 30 mars 2016, consulté le 24 septembre 2016. URL : http://rsr.revues.org/3102 ; DOI : 10.4000/rsr.3102 -- Descartes a soumis ses Meditationes de Prima Philosophia (1641) à l’examen de la Faculté de Théologie de la Sorbonne. Cette démarche peut surprendre, car la philosophie revendique ouvertement la séparation des domaines, et, dans le contexte de l’affaire Galilée, on s’interroge même sur la compétence des théologiens dans les matières de pure philosophie. La Sorbonne n’ayant pas, que l’on sache, donné suite à la demande cartésienne, on se tourne ici vers la censure romaine des œuvres de Descartes. L’article met en évidence un paradoxe : alors que le Saint Office n’a pas le moins du monde inquiété des auteurs de sensibilité averroïste, comme Zabarella, qui n’admettent que des preuves « faibles » de l’existence de Dieu (preuves de surcroît fondées sur le sable de la physique aristotélicienne), il n’a pas hésité à censurer la preuve métaphysique, originale, de l’existence de Dieu par son idée (Méditation III). C’est dire que si la théologie, tant réformée que romaine, et la philosophie cartésienne n’ont pas fait bon ménage, c’est sans doute plus par un malentendu quant au sens de ce que Descartes appelle l’ « idée naturelle de Dieu », que pour des raisons objectivement fondées dans le corps même de cette philosophie première. -- via Academia.edu - Downloaded via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
article  downloaded  Academia.edu  Evernote  intellectual_history  religious_history  17thC  science-and-religion  Descartes  Sorbonne 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Ilkka Pyysiainen - Religon: From mind to society and back (2012) | Academia.edu
Book chapter - Exploring the cognitive basis of the social sciences and trying to ground the social in the cognitive requires taking an explicit stance on reduction(ism) as discussed in philosophy of science. In social science and the humanities, the question of reductionism has been especially salient in the study of religion. This chapter begins with a philosophical analysis of reduction; after that, two relatively new research programs in the study of religious thought and behavior are discussed: the standard model of the cognitive science of religion and approaches based on gene-culture coevolutionary theories. Finally, the question of reductionism is addressed and the possibility of combining multilevel explanations of religious phenomena is evaluated. -- Downloaded to Tab S2
chapter  Academia.edu  downloaded  cognitive_science  religion  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  level_of_analysis  reductionism  religious_belief  religious_experience  neuroscience  cognition  cognition-social  gene-culture_coevolution  cultural_transmission  cultural_change  sociology_of_religion  naturalism  natural_selection  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  evolution-group_selection 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - [draft slides] Athletes in the Arena: Diderot and his Seneca | Academia.edu
Whereas Seneca's critics argue that his life and alleged compliance with Nero contradicts his Stoic, noble-sounding principles, discrediting the latter; in his two late books on the Stoic, Diderot argues that Seneca's continual attempts to mollify Nero's tyranny betters the philosophy.  Where Diderot's critics reduce the two works on Seneca to veiled attacks on Rousseau, Diderot is critical of those texts wherein Seneca advocated the withdrawal & “leisure of the sage” or the vita contemplativa, while Rome burnt (“Rousseau est la figure moderne et honnie du détachement, qui permet à Diderot de dissocier Sénèque du détachement stoïcien. » (Lojskine 2009))  Whether contra Rousseau or no, Diderot is most attracted—amongst all Seneca's works Diderot examines—to Seneca’s On Benefits, and wants to restore compassion, even justified anger, to Stoicism.  Whether to justify himself for his own naivety in trying to teach Catherine of Russia or not, Diderot defends Seneca’s attempts to mollify Nero, led by De Clementia; he appeals, a la Shaftesbury and others, to Seneca’s “coeur” and compassion, beyond his Stoicism, notably in On Benefits; he criticises Stoic fatalism and appeals to a paraStoic notion of “natural rights” to justify resistance to tyranny; famously celebrating the American revolution as as lesson to all Europe.  So, beneath the "miserable" polemics (Cittion), there remains a good deal of philosophy; beneath the rhetorical smoke, (to use a Stoic-ism) a good deal of theoretical fire.  This paper aims at retrieving this fire, and situating Diderot's mitigated Stoicism as a French avatar of the moral sentimentalist position, with roots in the Stoic idea of oikeosis (and of parental love as the elementary cell of sociablity), as articulated by CIcero. Research Interests: Stoicism, Roman Stoicism, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, and Philosophy as a way of life -- downloaded
paper  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  18thC  French_Enlightenment  philosophes  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Stoicism  Seneca  Diderot  Rousseau  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  eclecticism  Cicero  emotions  tyranny  Roman_Empire  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - 1750, Casualty of 1914: Lest We Forget the preKantian Enlightenment | Academia.edu
Draft of chapter for upcoming Crisis and Reconfigurations: 100 years since World War 1 collection. Argues that philosophical understanding (or increasingly, study and reading) of the French, British and preKantian German enlightenments, their intellectual origins and ends, has been a retrospective victim of the European horrors set in chain by 1914, despite a growing volume of excellent, countervailing studies (by Rasmussen, Lloyd, Israel, Wade, and others) in the history of ideas.
Research Interests: Critical Theory, Enlightenment, and Philosophy of the Enlightenment
Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  17thC  18thC  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  neo-Kantian  critical_theory  historiography  historiography-postWWII  historicism  historians-and-politics  Early_Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Enlightenment-sceptical  theodicy  progress  Löwith  Cassirer  Frankfurt_School  Heidegger  Blumenberg  historiography-19thC  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Kristine Haugen - Imagined Universities: Public Insult and the Terrae Filius in Early Modern Oxford (2000) | Academia.edu
Abstract: The 17th-century University of Oxford was plagued by an extremely insulting Latin commencement speaker known as the terrae filius, or "son of the earth." The speakers were routinely expelled from the university, while manuscript copies proliferated -- a few speeches were even owned by John Locke. How did such a custom arise, what were the social effects of the filius' speeches, and what forces surrounded the filius' eventual suppression? It's argued that in the heyday of the filius, his insults actually served a sort of rhetoric of the rotten apple: the observed transgressions of the few were held up against an imagined and far more virtuous, decorous, and pious Oxford. Meanwhile, the filius himself might be understood in terms of two long-established university social types -- the disputant and the tour guide.
More Info: History of Universities 16,2 (2000): 1-31 -- Publication Date: Jan 1, 2000 -- Publication Name: HISTORY OF UNIVERSITIES-OXFORD-
Research Interests: Rhetoric, Sociology of Knowledge, 17th-Century Studies, History of Universities, Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature, 18th Century British Literature, 17th Century British (Literature), University of Oxford, and Academic Satire
article  Academia.edu  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  British_history  university  Oxford  education-higher  satire  English_lit  rhetoric  sociology_of_knowledge  identity-institutions  downloaded  institution-building  intellectual_history  status  cultural_critique  cultural_capital  Amhurst  Craftsman  Bolingbroke  Bourdieu 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Poul F. Kjaer - The Function of Justification in Transnational Governance (2015) | Academia.edu
WZB Berlin Social Science Center Discussion Papers, SP IV 2015-808, 2015 - Developing a sociological informed social theory perspective, this article asks the question why social praxis’ of justification has moved to the centre-stage within the debate on transnational ordering. In contrast to perspectives which see the relationship between national and transnational forms or ordering as characterised by a zero-sum game, the coevolutionary and mutually reinforcing relationship between national and transnational forms of ordering is emphasised. It is, moreover, argued that this complementarity can be traced back to the fundamentally different function and position of national and transnational forms of ordering in world society. The widespread attempt to analyse transnational developments on the basis of concepts of law and the political which emerged in national contexts are therefore seen as problematic. Instead context adequate concepts of transnational law and politics are needed. It is on this background, that a discourse on justification has emerged in relation to transnational settings. Transnational justificatory praxis’ can be understood as functional equivalents to democracy in transnational settings in so far as both can be understood as reflexivity increasing instruments. The central difference is, however, that democratic frameworks implies an ex ante form of the political in contrast to the ex post emphasis of justificatory praxis’. In addition, law gains a central role as the framework through which justificatory praxis’ are structured in transnational settings. - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  Academia.edu  downloaded  sociology_of_law  political_sociology  nation-state  transnational_power  transnational_law  nation-state_decline  state-transnatiinal_relations  supranational_institutions  legitimacy  legitimacy-international  justice  democracy_deficit  political_participation  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  global_governance  regulation-harmonization  regulatory_avoidance  civil_society  NGOs  government-forms  government-roles  international_law  international_political_economy  MNCs 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - Stoic Virtue Ethics (2014) | Academia.edu - in Handbook of Virtue Ethics
The Handbook of Virtue Ethics, edited by Stan van Hooft et al, Acumen 2014 -- Research Interests: Virtue Ethics, Stoicism, Roman Stoicism, and Apatheia -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Stoicism  virtue_ethics  virtue_epistemology  eudaimonia  downloaded  1960s 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Annelien De Dijn - The Politics of Enlightenment: From Peter Gay to Jonathan Israel | Academia.edu - The Historical Journal (2012)
ANNELIEN de DIJN (2012). THE POLITICS OF ENLIGHTENMENT: FROM PETER GAY TO JONATHAN ISRAEL. The Historical Journal,55, pp 785-805 doi:10.1017/S0018246X12000301 -- Downloaded from http://journals.cambridge.org/HIS -- According to the textbook version of history, the Enlightenment played a crucial role in the creation of the modern, liberal democracies of the West. Ever since this view – which we might describe as the modernization thesis – was first formulated by Gay, it has been repeatedly criticized as misguided: a myth. Yet, as this paper shows, it continues to survive in postwar historiography, in particular in the Anglophone world. Indeed, Gay's most important and influential successors – historians such as Darnton and Porter – all ended up defending the idea that the Enlightenment was a major force in the creation of modern democratic values and institutions. More recently, Israel's trilogy has revived the modernization thesis, albeit in a dramatic new form. Yet, even Israel's work, as its critical reception highlights, does not convincingly demonstrate that the Enlightenment, as an intellectual movement, contributed in any meaningful way to the creation of modern political culture. This conclusion raises a new question: if the Enlightenment did not create our modern democracies, then what did it do? In answer to that question, this paper suggests that we should take more seriously the writings of enlightened monarchists like Nicolas-Antoine Boulanger. Studying the Enlightenment might not allow us to understand why democratic political culture came into being. But, as Boulanger's work underscores, it might throw light on an equally important problem: why democracy came so late in the day. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  historiography  modernization_theory  democracy  Ancien_régime  philosophes  monarchy  limited_monarchy  monarchical_republic  monarchists  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  government-forms  Boulanger_Nicholas-Antoine  historiography-19thC  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolution  enlightened_absolutism  political_culture  democratization  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - An Ethics of the Event: Deleuze’s Stoicism (2006) | Academia.edu
Angelaki, Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, Vol 11, No. 3, (Dec 2006) -- I may finally start to figure out what Deluze's project was from how Sellars positions him! -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  France  French_intellectuals  Deleuze  Stoicism  empiricism  James_William  Whitehead  Spinoza  Nietzsche  Kierkegaard  style-philosophy  metaphysics  ontology  ethics  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Gilles Deleuze and the History of Philosophy ( 2007) | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15, 3 (2007) 551-60 -
Research Interests: Gilles Deleuze and Historiography of philosophy -- didn't download
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  France  French_intellectuals  historiography  history_of_philosophy  commentaries  Deleuze  medieval_philosophy  ancient_philosophy 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Ontology and Plato's "Sophist" (2010) | Academia.edu
in V. Harte, M.M. McCabe, R.W. Sharples, A. Sheppard, eds, Aristotle and the Stoics Reading Plato, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, Suppl. 107 (2010), 185-203 -- Keywords: Metaphysics, Plato, and Stoicism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  metaphysics  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ontology  Being  nothing  ideas-theories  concepts  universals  categories  Plato  Platonism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  commentaries  late_antiquity  ancient_Rome  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Seneca's Philosophical Predecessors and Contemporaries (2013) | Academia.edu
in G. Damschen, A. Heil, eds, Brill’s Companion to Seneca (Leiden: Brill, 2013), 97-112. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Seneca, and Roman Philosophy -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  literary_history  Seneca  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Roman_Empire  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Augustine and The Stoic Tradition (2013) | Academia.edu
Publication Name: K. Pollmann et al., eds, The Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine, 3 vols (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), vol. 3, 1775-79 -- Keywords: Stoicism, Petrarch, Augustine, Blaise Pascal, Malebranche, and 3 more -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  religious_history  Augustine  Stoicism  Abelard  Renaissance  Petrarch  Pascal  Malebranche  Neostoicism  Justus_Lipsius  16thC  17thC  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Plato's Apology of Socrates, A Metaphilosophical Text (2014) | Academia.edu
Philosophy and Literature 38/2 (2014), 433-45 -- Plato’s Apology is not merely an account of Socrates’ trial, it is also a work of metaphilosophy, presenting Socrates’ understanding of the nature and function of philosophy. This is a vital part of the text’s apologetic task, for it is only with reference to Socrates’ understanding of what philosophy is that we can understand, and so justify, his seemingly antisocial behaviour. Plato presents to us Socrates’ metaphilosophy in two ways: via what Socrates says and what he does. This twofold method of presentation is appropriate, if not essential, given the conception of philosophy that Socrates is presented as holding. -- Keywords: Metaphilosophy, Plato, and Socrates -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Plato  Socrates  metaphilosophy  philosophy  philosophy-as-way-of-life  dialogue  rhetoric-writing  literary_theory  style-philosophy  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, review essay - Renaissance Philosophy (2012) | Academia.edu
Review article on Christopher C. Celenza, ed., Angelo Poliziano’s Lamia: Text, Translation, and Introductory Studies, and S. Clucas, P. J. Forshaw, V. Rees, eds, Laus Platonici Philosophi: Marsilio Ficino and His Influence, for British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/6 (2012), 1195-1204 -- Keywords: Renaissance Philosophy, Angelo Poliziano, and Marsilio Ficino -- complains that work on Early Modern tends to look at links to medieval and back to anciengs, ignoring Renaissance contributions for much of anything beyond translation (e.g. Ficino just regurgitating Neoplatonism) and these 2 volumes help to see both what was going on philosophically, that humanism wasn't just work on ancient texts, as well as links to Early Moderns. Didn't download
books  reviews  article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Renaissance  medieval_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  scholasticism  Aristotelian  Neoplatonism  humanism  Ficino  Poliziano  Cambridge_Platonists  More_Henry  identity  Locke-person 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Pomponazzi contra Averroes on the Intellect | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy (in press) -- This paper examines Pomponazzi’s arguments against Averroes in his De Immortalitate Animae, focusing on the question whether thought is possible without a body. The first part of the paper will sketch the history of the problem, namely the interpretation of Aristotle’s remarks about the intellect in De Anima 3.4-5, touching on Alexander, Themistius, and Averroes. The second part will focus on Pomponazzi’s response to Averroes, including his use of arguments by Aquinas. It will conclude by suggesting that Pomponazzi’s discussion stands as the first properly modern account of Aristotle’s psychology. -- Keywords: Renaissance Philosophy, Renaissance Aristotelianism, Averroes, and Pietro Pomponazzi -- looks like very helpful overview of interpretations of de Anima from Theophrastus onwards through Renaissance and comparing with some recent readings -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  soul  immortality  mind  Aristotle  Aristotelian  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Hellenism  late_antiquity  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  commentaries  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Averroes  Pomponazzi  Ficino  rationalist  empiricism  fideism  bibliography  Peripatetics  De_Anima  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Cosmopolitanism and Zeno's Republic | Academia.edu
History of Political Thought 28/1 (2007), 1-29 -- Modern accounts of Stoic politics have attributed to Zeno the ideal of an isolated community of sages and to later Stoics such as Seneca a cosmopolitan utopia transcending all traditional States. By returning to the Cynic background to both Zeno's Republic and the Cosmopolitan tradition, this paper argues that the distance between the two is not as great as is often supposed. This account, it is argued, is more plausible than trying to offer a developmental explanation of the supposed transformation in Stoic political thought from isolated community to cosmopolitan utopia. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Cosmopolitanism, Cicero, Cynicism (Ancient Greek Philosophy), and Zenon of Citium -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  cosmology  Stoicism  cynicism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  Diogenes_the_Cynic  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  cosmopolitanism  Cicero  imperialism  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Plato-Republic  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Aiôn and Chronos: Deleuze and the Stoic Theory of Time (2007) | Academia.edu
[published in Collapse 3 (2007), 177-205] -- Gilles Deleuze outlines a supposedly Stoic dual theory of time: on the one hand there is aiôn, comprising an infinite past and future; on the other there is chronos, the extended present. In the scholarly literature on Stoicism, however, either a single theory is reconstructed or the evidence is dismissed as too thin and incoherent. I offer an explanation for this distance between the Deleuzian and scholarly presentations of the Stoic theory of time. I conclude by answering the question to what extent, if any, the Deleuzian theory of aiôn and chronos deserves to be called Stoic.-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  late_antiquity  commentaries  Diogenes_Laertius  Plutarch  Stoicism  time  cosmology  ontology  20thC  Deleuze  poststructuralist  postmodern  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Fate in Justus Lipsius’s De Constantia and Physiologia Stoicorum (2014) | Academia.edu
Publication: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Oct 2014 In his De Constantia of 1584, Justus Lipsius examines the Stoic theory of fate, distancing himself from it by outlining four key points at which it should be modified. The modified theory is often presented as a distinctly Christianized form of Stoicism. Later, in his Physiologia Stoicorum of 1604, Lipsius revisits the Stoic theory, this time offering a more sympathetic reading, with the four modifications forgotten. It is widely assumed that Lipsius’s position shifted between these two works, perhaps due to a better grasp of the Stoic position by the time of the later work. I argue that in fact there is no great distance between the two accounts and that both find only one point of difficulty with the Stoic theory, a point that Lipsius himself presents in both works as merely a matter of expression. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Neostoicism, Justus Lipsius, and Stoic Tradition -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Stoicism  fate  Providence  free_will  determinism  Justus_Lipsius  Seneca  moral_philosophy  Neostoicism  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life (2015) | Academia.edu
Publication Name: Sophia (in press) -- This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Shaftesbury, Philosophy as a way of life, and Pierre Hadot -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Stoicism  Epictetus  philosophy-as-way-of-life  Marcus_Aurelius  Hadot_Pierre  Shaftesbury  moral_philosophy  psychology  passions  emotions  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, review - Askêmata, Shaftesbury's Philosophical Execises (2011) | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21/3 (2013), 613-16 -- high praise for edition of 4 notebooks as part of a Complete Works being produced in Stuttgart
books  reviews  Academia.edu  Shaftesbury  Stoicism  Epictetus  philosophy-as-way-of-life  17thC  18thC 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Is God a Mindless Vegetable? Cudworth on Stoic Theology (2011) | Academia.edu
Intellectual History Review 21/2 (2011), 121-33 -- In the late sixteenth century a number of influential writers claimed Stoicism to be compatible with Christianity but by the mid eighteenth century, Stoicism had come to be associated with atheism. What happened during the course of the reception of Stoicism in the intervening period? While it remains unclear who was the first person to call the Stoics atheists, there is no doubt that the most philosophically sustained analysis of Stoic theology during this period is to be found in Ralph Cudworth's True Intellectual System of the Universe, published in 1678. Cudworth's aim in this work is to catalogue and then attack all existing forms of atheism and one of the four principal forms of atheism he identifies he calls ‘Stoical’. However, in Cudworth's complex taxonomy of different forms of theism and atheism, Stoicism appears twice, first as a form of atheism but also as a form of imperfect theism. The aim of this study is to examine Cudworth's claims about Stoic theology, assessing their fairness, but also placing them within the wider context of the early modern reception of Stoicism. -- Keywords: Atheism, Stoicism, Cambridge Platonism, and Ralph Cudworth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Stoicism  theology  atheism  determinism  God-existence  God-attributes  Cambridge_Platonists  Cudworth  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, Stoics Against Stoics in Cudworth's A Treatise of Freewill (2012) | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/5 (2012), 935-52 -- In his A Treatise of Freewill, Ralph Cudworth argues against Stoic determinism by drawing on what he takes to be other concepts found in Stoicism, notably the claim that some things are ‘up to us’ (ἐφ᾽ ἡμῖν) and that these things are the product of our choice (προαίρεσις). These concepts are central to the late Stoic Epictetus and it appears at first glance as if Cudworth is opposing late Stoic voluntarism against early Stoic determinism. This paper argues that in fact, despite his claim to be drawing on Stoic doctrine, Cudworth uses these terms with a meaning first articulated only later, by the Peripatetic commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Alexander of Aphrodisias, Cambridge Platonism, Epictetus, Freewill and Determinism, and Ralph Cudworth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  determinism  free_will  late_antiquity  Alexander_of_Aphrodisias  Cambridge_Platonists  Cudworth  17thC  18thC  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Liam Hogan - The Myth of “Irish Slaves” in the Colonies (2015) | - Academia.edu
Recent years have seen the marked growth of the “Irish slaves” narrative, which is itself a subset of the “white slavery” myth. This myth has always existed in ultranationalist and white supremacist circles, and their promotion of it frequently occurs on social media. The myth has recently gone viral, partly due to the decision by popular newspapers and websites to endorse a spurious “Irish Slave Trade” article that conflates indentured servitude or forced labour with chattel slavery. Surprisingly, this claim has gone relatively unchallenged in the public domain, thus this paper will analyse its veracity. -- Research Interests: Irish Studies, Mythology, Slavery, Nationalism, History of Slavery, and 3 more -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  Academia.edu  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  Ireland-English_exploitation  West_Indies  North_America  American_colonies  colonialism  legal_history  slavery-Africans  slavery  slavery-law  property  Irish_migration  Ireland  racism  social_history  status  plantations  planters  national_tale  nationalism  white_supremacy  US_politics  US_politics-race  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Special Issue - Michael Oakeshott | Cosmos + Taxis, Vol 1, Issue 3, 2014
Editorial Note - Gene Callahan and Leslie Marsh *-* (1) The Critique of Rationalism and the Defense of Individuality: Oakeshott and Hayek - Chor-Yung Cheung *-* (2) Jane Jacobs’ Critique of Rationalism in Urban Planning - Gene Callahan and Sanford Ikeda *-* (3) Oakeshott on Modernity and the Crisis of Political Legitimacy in Contemporary Western Liberal Democracy - Noël O’sullivan. &-* (4) Oakeshott and the Complex Ecology of the Moral Life - Kevin Williams. *-* (5) Homo Ludens and Civil Association: The Sublime Nature of Michael Oakeshott’s Civil Condition - Thomas J. Cheeseman *-* (6) The Instrumental Idiom in American Politics: The ‘City on the Hill’ as a Spontaneous Order - Corey Abel *-* (7) Dogmatomachy: Ideological Warfare - David D. Corey. *-* Oakeshott on the Rule of Law: A Defense - Stephen Turner -- downloaded pdf to Note
journal  Academia.edu  article  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  political_culture  legitimacy  democracy  liberalism  Oakeshott  Jacobs_Jane  emergence  social_order  rationalist  modernity  Hayek  rule_of_law  Weber  fact-value  civil_society  associations  individualism  ideology  polarization  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
The Populist Phenomenon | Nadia Urbinati - Academia.edu
The paper advances an analytical rendering of populism and argues that the components that make it a recognizable phenomenon are simplification and polarization of political divisions in the view of achieving a deeper unification of the masses against the existing elites and under an organic narrative that most of the time a leader embodies. Populism is thus internal to and a challenge of representative democracy; it competes with it on the meaning and practice of representation since aims at a more genuine identification between the represented and the representatives. After a premise on the distinction between a popular movement and populism, the paper argues that to better understand this phenomenon we should situate it within the republican as Roman tradition. -- Research Interests: Quality of democracy and democratic consolidation. Parties and representative political institutions with a particular focus on legislative assemblies. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  Academia.edu  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  legitimacy  representative_institutions  populism  republicanism  parties  parties-transmission_belts  legislature  legislature-process  deliberation-public  mass_culture  masses-fear_of  polarization  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Nadia Urbinati - Representation as Advocacy: A Study of Democratic Deliberation - Political Theory, December 2000
Representation as Advocacy: A Study of Democratic Deliberation, Political Theory, December 2000 28: 758-786, doi:10.1177/0090591700028006003
article  Academia.edu  political_philosophy  representative_institutions  deliberation-public  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Lockean Empathy | Colin Marshall - Academia.edu - forthcoming, Southern Journal of Philosophy
This paper offers an epistemic defense of empathy, drawing on John Locke’s theory of ideas. Locke held that ideas of shape, unlike ideas of color, had a distinctive value: resembling qualities in their objects. I argue that the same is true of empathy, as when someone is pained by someone’s pain. This means that empathy has the same epistemic value or objectivity that Locke and other early modern philosophers assigned to veridical perceptions of shape. For this to hold, pain and pleasure must be a primary quality of the mind, just as shape is a primary quality of bodies. Though Locke did not make that claim, I argue that pain and pleasure satisfy his criteria for primary qualities. I consider several objections to the analogy between empathy and shape-perception, and show how Locke’s theory has resources for answering them. In addition, the claim that empathetic ideas are object-matching sidesteps Berkeley’s influential objection to Locke’s theory of resemblance. I conclude by briefly considering the prospects for a similar defense of empathy in contemporary terms.-- Philosophy of perception, John Locke, Empathy (Philosophy), and Empathy -- bookmark but didn't download
article  Academia.edu  Locke  primary_qualities  epistemology  mind-theory_of  perception  empathy  correspondence  Berkeley  pain  pleasure  cognition 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Mark S. Weiner - Imagining the Rule of Law in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Liberal Society and the Dialectic of the Clan | Academia.edu
In this essay, I provide a historical and theoretical framework for understanding the imaginative relation between the liberal rule of law and the kin-based form of socio-legal organization I call ‘the rule of the clan’ – a classic example of law created ‘from below’. I believe that a culturalist disciplinary perspective reveals that the modern liberal state and its more centralized rule of law always stand in an ironic, dialectical relation to the rule of the clan as a legal form. Liberal society nurtures itself through an anti-liberal utopian imaginary. This article provides an intellectual history backdrop for theorizing that dialectical relationship by examining two contrasting ways in which 19thC British intellectuals imagined the rule of law. Following the work of Charles Taylor and, more specifically in the legal field, Paul Kahn, my goal is to depict a social imaginary of modern liberalism that has been neglected within contemporary liberal theory – and, in doing so, provide a way to appreciate the cultural foundations of liberal legality. The article considers the stories that nineteenth-century British intellectuals told about the relation between the rule of law and the rule of the clan as a way to think about the rule of law today. It thus tacks between three different shores: the world of legal pluralism (the rule of the clan), the world of 19thC British analysis of the rule of the clan and the contemporary relation between culture and modern liberal society. Keywords: clan, rule of law, Albert Venn Dicey, Walter Scott, legal memory
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  19thC  British_history  British_politics  memory-group  rule_of_law  clans  kinship  liberalism  modernity  Scott_Sir_Walter  English_constitution  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Davidson's normativity | Stephen Turner - Academia.edu
Turner, Stephen. 2011. Davidson's Normativity. The definitive version of this paper has been published in Dialogues with Davidson: On the Contemporary Significance of His Thought ,edited by Jeff Malpas. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, all rights reserved. Pp. 343-370. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  Academia.edu  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  epistemology  downloaded  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty's Dawn: A People's History of the Industrial Revolution - Introduction | Emma Griffin - Academia.edu
Introduction to book using autobiographical writings of working class during 19thC to examine social and cultural transformations that accompanied economic - interrogating standard narrative that Britain's Industrial Revolution brought grinding misery and shattering of traditional social and cultural supports for lower orders, life stories show a more complex lived experience that expanded the horizons and possibilities for many (mainly men). -- Introduction has useful intellectual history of the Two Nations theme - both conservative and radical- much after mid 19thC a battle of economic historians and data. Griffin wants to challenge the intellectual classes version of what lower class experience must have been like as well as highlight that uneven development, which left some regions unindustrialized, could be as serious a source of experienced hardship. Bring agency of the lower orders back in, in EP Thompson tradition, but with fewer Marxist presuppositions.
paper  Academia.edu  18thC  19thC  British_history  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  intellectual_history  historiography-postWWII  working_class  lower_orders  Industrial_Revolution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Emma Griffin: A conundrum resolved? Courtship, marriage and the growth of population in eighteenth-century England. | Emma Griffin - Academia.edu
A cultural shift in marriage norms over the long 18thC has to be placed at the fore of explaining the downward shift in marriage age - earlier focus on economic explanation that economic growth allowed the earlier establishment of independent households leaves out the erosion of ability of communities to police marriage norms as economic mobility increased and competing norms or freedom to pursue individual preferences emerged. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  social_history  economic_history  cultural_history  demography  18thC  Britain  marriage  population  family  Industrial_Revolution  mobility  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  1960s  Abelard  Absolutism  Academia.edu  Alexander_of_Aphrodisias  American_colonies  Amhurst  analytical_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Ancien_régime  anthropomorphism  Aristotelian  Aristotle  article  associations  atheism  Augustine  Averroes  Being  Berkeley  Bible-as-history  bibliography  biology  Blumenberg  Bolingbroke  Bonnie_Prince_Charlie  books  Bossuet  Boulanger_Nicholas-Antoine  Bourdieu  Britain  British_Empire  British_history  British_politics  Cambridge_Platonists  Cassirer  categories  chapter  Cicero  civil_society  clans  cognition  cognition-social  cognitive_science  colonialism  commentaries  concepts  constitutional_monarchy  constitutional_regime  correspondence  cosmology  cosmopolitanism  Counter-Enlightenment  Craftsman  critical_theory  Cudworth  cultural_capital  cultural_change  cultural_critique  cultural_history  cultural_transmission  cynicism  Cyrus_the_Great  Deleuze  deliberation-public  democracy  democracy_deficit  democratization  demography  Descartes  determinism  De_Anima  dialogue  Diderot  Diogenes_Laertius  Diogenes_the_Cynic  downloaded  Early_Enlightenment  eclecticism  economic_history  education-higher  EF-add  emergence  emotions  empathy  empiricism  English_constitution  English_lit  enlightened_absolutism  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-sceptical  Enlightenment_Project  entre_deux_guerres  Epictetus  Epicurean  epistemology  ethics  eudaimonia  Europe-Early_Modern  Evernote  evolution-as-model  evolution-group_selection  evolution-social  fact-value  family  fate  Fenelon  Ficino  fideism  France  Frankfurt_School  Frederick_Prince_of_Wales  free_will  French_Enlightenment  French_intellectuals  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  gene-culture_coevolution  global_governance  God-attributes  God-existence  government-forms  government-roles  Great_Chain_of_Being  Hadot_Pierre  Hayek  Heidegger  Hellenism  historians-and-politics  historicism  historiography  historiography-19thC  historiography-postWWII  history_of_philosophy  humanism  human_nature  ideas-theories  identity  identity-institutions  ideology  immortality  imperialism  individualism  Industrial_Revolution  institution-building  intellectual_history  international_law  international_political_economy  IR-domestic_politics  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  Irish_migration  IR_theory  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Italian_Renaissance  Jacobites  Jacobs_Jane  James_William  journal  judgment-political  justice  Justus_Lipsius  Keynes  Kierkegaard  kingship  kinship  late_antiquity  legal_history  legal_system  legislature  legislature-process  legitimacy  legitimacy-international  level_of_analysis  liberalism  limited_monarchy  literary_history  literary_theory  Locke  Locke-person  lower_orders  Lucretius  Löwith  Malebranche  Marcus_Aurelius  marriage  masses-fear_of  mass_culture  medieval_philosophy  Melanchthon  memory-group  metaphilosophy  metaphysics  mind  mind-theory_of  mirror_for_princes  MNCs  mobility  modernity  modernization_theory  monarchical_republic  monarchists  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  More_Henry  nation-state  nation-state_decline  nationalism  national_tale  naturalism  natural_selection  neo-Kantian  neoclassical_economics  Neoplatonism  Neostoicism  neuroscience  NGOs  Nietzsche  North_America  nothing  Oakeshott  Old_Testament  ontology  Oxford  pain  paper  parties  parties-transmission_belts  Pascal  passions  Patriot_King  perception  Peripatetics  Petrarch  philosophes  philosophy  philosophy-as-way-of-life  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  plantations  planters  Plato  Plato-Republic  Platonism  pleasure  Plutarch  polarization  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_sociology  Poliziano  Pomponazzi  population  populism  post-WWII  postmodern  poststructuralist  primary_qualities  progress  property  Providence  psychology  racism  Radical_Enlightenment  Ramsay  rationalist  reductionism  regulation-harmonization  regulatory_avoidance  religion  religious_belief  religious_experience  religious_history  Renaissance  representative_institutions  republicanism  reviews  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Rousseau  rule_of_law  satire  scholasticism  science-and-religion  Scott_Sir_Walter  Seneca  Shaftesbury  slavery  slavery-Africans  slavery-law  social_history  social_order  social_sciences-post-WWII  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_law  sociology_of_religion  Socrates  Sorbonne  soul  species  Spinoza  state-transnatiinal_relations  status  Stoicism  style-philosophy  supranational_institutions  theodicy  theology  time  transnational_law  transnational_power  tyranny  universals  universal_history  university  US_politics  US_politics-race  virtue_epistemology  virtue_ethics  Weber  West_Indies  Whitehead  white_supremacy  working_class  Xenophon  Zenon_of_Citium 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: