dunnettreader + 1790s   9

Dafydd Moore - Patriotism, Politeness, and National Identity in the South West of England in the Late 18thC (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Fall, 2009), pp. 739-762 -- looks at Enlightenment sociability and culture and a focus on regional history as part of national identity to discuss one dimension of conservative reaction against French revolutionary radicalism -- part of bibliography covers "patriot" claims to historical sources of identity through 18thC, plus diversified approach to what constituted "conservatism" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  Enlightenment  18thC  1790s  French_Revolution  national_ID  regional_history  history_of_England  Antiquarianism  poetry  ancient_Britain  conservatism  anti-Jacobin  Patriots  patriotism  national_origins  national_tale  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Anna Plassart - The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution (to be released April 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Historians of ideas have traditionally discussed the significance of the French Revolution through the prism of several major interpretations, including the commentaries of Burke, Tocqueville and Marx. This book argues that the Scottish Enlightenment offered an alternative and equally powerful interpretative framework for the Revolution, which focused on the transformation of the polite, civilised moeurs that had defined the 'modernity' analysed by Hume and Smith in the 18thC. The Scots observed what they understood as a military- and democracy-led transformation of European modern morals and concluded that the real historical significance of the Revolution lay in the transformation of warfare, national feelings and relations between states, war and commerce that characterised the post-revolutionary international order. This book recovers the Scottish philosophers' powerful discussion of the nature of post-revolutionary modernity and shows that it is essential to our understanding of 19thC political thought. **--** Part I. The Burke–Paine Debate and Scotland's Science of Man: 1. The Burke–Paine debate and the Scottish Enlightenment *-* 2. The heritage of Hume and Smith: Scotland's science of man and politics **--** Part II. The 1790s: 3. Scotland's political debate *-* 4. James Mackintosh and Scottish philosophical history *-* 5. John Millar and the Scottish discussion on war, modern sociability and national sentiment *-* 6. Adam Ferguson on democracy and empire **--** Part III. 1802–15: 7. The French Revolution and the Edinburgh Review *-* 8. Commerce, war and empire
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Smith  Hume  Hume-politics  civil_society  civilizing_process  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  IR_theory  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  nationalism  national_ID  historiography-18thC  historiography-Whig  military  Military_Revolution  mass_culture  levée_en_masse  conscription  sociability  social_order  empires  empire-and_business  imperialism  Great_Powers  balance_of_power  philosophy_of_history  progress  social_theory  change-social  change-economic  Burke  Paine  Mackintosh_James  Millar_John  Edinburgh_Review  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Scottish_politics  1790s  1800s  1810s  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  democracy  morality-conventional  norms  global_economy  mercantilism 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright, eds. - Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre Re forming Literature 1789–1837 (2006 pbk) | Cambridge University Press
Tilottama Rajan, University of Western Ontario and Julia M. Wright, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia **--** Romanticism has often been associated with lyric poetry, or otherwise confined within mainstream genres. As a result, we have neglected the sheer diversity and generic hybridity of a literature that ranged from the Gothic novel to the national tale, from monthly periodicals to fictionalized autobiography. In this new volume some of the leading scholars of the period explore the relationship between ideology and literary genre from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The introduction offers a fresh examination of how genre was rethought by Romantic criticism. **--** Introduction Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright **--** Part I. Genre, History, and the Public Sphere: 1. Godwin and the genre reformers: on necessity and contingency in romantic narrative theory - Jon Klancher *-* 2. Radical print culture in periodical form - Kevin Gilmartin *-* 3. History, trauma, and the limits of the liberal imagination: William Godwin's historical fiction - Gary Handwerk *-* 4. Writing on the border: the national tale, female writing, and the public sphere - Ina Ferris. **--** Part II. Genre and Society: 5. Genres from life in Wordsworth's art: Lyrical Ballads 1798 - Don Bialostosky *-* 6. 'A voice in the representation': John Thelwall and the enfranchisement of literature - Judith Thompson *-* 7. 'I am ill-fitted': conflicts of genre in Elisa Fenwick's Secresy - Julia M. Wright *-* 8. Frankenstein as neo-Gothic: from the ghost of the couterfeit to the monster of abjection - Jerrold E. Hogle **--** Part III. Genre, Gender, and the Private Sphere: 9. Autonarration and genotext in Mary Hays' Memoirs of Emma Courtney - Tilottama Rajan *-* 10. 'The science of herself': scenes of female enlightenment - Mary Jacobus *-* 11. The failures of romanticism Jerome McGann -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_history  British_history  British_politics  genre  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  literary_journals  literary_history  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  narrative  narrative-contested  Hunt_Leigh  censorship  Hazlitt_William  Godwin_Wm  historical_fiction  historical_change  necessity  contingency  women-intellectuals  authors-women  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  Shelley_Mary  imagination  magazines  newspapers  gender  gender_history  Wordsworth  poetry  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Romanticism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Alexandra HYARD - DUGALD STEWART, LES « ÉCONOMISTES » ET LA RÉVOLUTION FRANÇAISE | JSTOR: Annales historiques de la Révolution française, No. 345 (Juillet/Septembre 2006), pp. 115-141
En 1789, Dugald Stewart (1753-1828) salue, comme de nombreux intellectuels écossais, la Révolution française. Il y voit la première tentative de mise en pratique des principes du rationalisme politique français, que la théorie politique des « Économistes » a, selon lui, fournis. Toutefois, au fil du temps, Stewart évoque en des termes de moins en moins élogieux cette expérience révolutionnaire. Mais, contrairement à la majeure partie de l'opinion publique écossaise, il ne rejette pas le projet des Français. Si au début des années 1800, ce philosophe écossais croit encore dans le bien-fondé des idées de 1789, c'est en raison, d'une part, de ses convictions whigs, qui le rendent sensible au rationalisme politique des Français, et, d'autre part, des solutions que la monarchie rationalisée des « Économistes » peut, en partie, apporter aux problèmes rencontrés par la monarchie anglaise. In 1789, Dugald Stewart (1753-1828), like many Scottish intellectuals, welcomed the French Revolution. He saw it as the first attempt to apply the principles of French political rationalism that the political theory of the « Economistes » had provided. Stewart, however, grew less and less laudatory about this revolutionary experience. In contrast to the greater part of Scottish public opinion, however, he did not reject the French experiment. If at the beginning of the 1800's, this Scottish philosopher still believed in the legitimacy of the ideas of 1789, it was partly because his whig convictions made him receptive to the political rationalism of the French, and partly because he felt that the solutions of a more rational monarchy as envisaged in the writing of the « Economistes » might prove useful in partially resolving problems encountered by the British monarchy. -- huge number of cites -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Stewart_Dugald  economic_theory  rationalist  institution-building  institutional_change  British_politics  monarchy  government-forms  reform-political  reform-economic  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc BELISSA - REPENSER L'ORDRE EUROPÉEN (1795-1802). DE LA SOCIÉTÉ DES ROIS AUX DROITS DES NATIONS | JSTOR: Annales historiques de la Révolution française, No. 343 (Janvier/Mars 2006), pp. 163-166
Brief summary of thesis defended 2005, l'Université Paris I Sorbonne - surprise, surprise, Lucien Bély on his committee with the notion of the 18thC as the last stage of the société des princes and the French Revolution forcing the end of the dynastic wars -- though focus is on the period of the Directoire and Napoleon up through Amiens, he places it in the context of the European dynastic system as structured by the Peace of Utrecht -- highlights an interdisciplinary approach -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  thesis  18thC  1790s  1800s  Europe  Europe-19thC  balance_of_power  French_Revolution  IR  IR_theory  Westphalia  sovereignty  dynasties  nation-state  diplomatic_history  political_culture  counter-revolution  Jacobins  republicanism  Europe-federalism  Peace_of_Utrecht  société_des_princes  national_interest  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  France  French_politics  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Directoire  monarchy  social_order  legal_system  international_law  international_system  natural_law  citizenship  subjects  property  elites  political_economy  economic_culture  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Carmel P. Murphy - History, revolution and the British popular novel: historical fiction in the romantic age (2013 PhD Thesis) | University College Cork.
Intro (pp.1-42) and Chapters 2 & 3 (pp.106-231) currently unavailable at request of author. -- Examining the complex intersection of the historical fiction genre with the political and historical dialogue generated by the French Revolution crisis, the thesis contends that contemporary fascination with the historical episode of the Revolution, and the fundamental importance of history to the disputes which raged about questions of tradition and change, and the meaning of the British national past, led to the emergence of increasingly complex forms of fictional historical narrative during the “war of ideas.” Considering the varying ways in which novelists (..) engaged with the historical contexts of the Revolution debate, (..) juxtaposes the manner in which English Jacobin novelists inserted the radical critique into the wider arena of history with (.use of.) the historical by anti-Jacobin novelists to combat the revolutionary threat and internal moves for socio-political restructuring. I argue that the use of imaginative historical narrative(..) represented a significant element within the literature of the Revolution crisis (.and..) a key context (.for.) the emergence of Scott’s national historical novel in 1814, and the broader field of historical fiction in the era of Waterloo. Tracing the continued engagement with revolutionary and political concerns evident in the early Waverley novels, Burney’s The Wanderer (1814), Godwin’s Mandeville (1816), and Mary Shelley’s Valperga (1823), my discussion concludes by arguing that Godwin’s and Shelley’s extension of the mode of historical fiction initially envisioned by Godwin in the revolutionary decade, and their shared endeavour to retrieve the possibility enshrined within the republican past, appeared as a significant counter to the model of history and fiction developed by Walter Scott in the post-revolutionary epoch. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  1790s  1800s  1810s  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  conservatism  Radical_Enlightenment  Jacobins  historical_fiction  novels  English_lit  historians-and-politics  counter-revolution  Scott_Sir_Walter  Burney_Frances  Godwin_Wm  Shelley_Mary  Tories  usable_past  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  history_as_examples  historiography-Tory  historiography-Whig  tradition  change-social  reform-political  reform-social  social_order  critique  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Seed - The Spectre of Puritanism: Forgetting the 17thC in Hume's "History of England" | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Nov., 2005), pp. 444-462
The seventeenth century was not finished in eighteenth-century England. The ghosts of the 'Great Rebellion' continued to haunt Hanoverian England as political groupings struggled for some kind of control of representations of the past. One of the explicit purposes of Hume's "History of England" (1752-64) was to exorcize these ghosts of the past and to delegitimize the political memories of Whigs, Tories and Jacobites, churchmen and dissenters. This article focuses on the account of the puritans in the "History of England." In significant ways this contravenes Hume's own agenda. Out of his anti-puritan history there emerges the negative figure of the radical political intellectual which was subsequently appropriated by Burke and by wider forces of political reaction in England in the 1790s. Far from escaping the obsolete antagonisms of the past which continued to shape Hanoverian political hostilities, Hume in his "History of England" contributed to their reproduction and even intensification from the 1770s. -- begins by contrasting Bolingbroke's upfront treatment of the power of collective memory to enflame party conflict with Hume's attempt to reframe the memories themselves -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  1770s  1790s  British_history  British_politics  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Bolingbroke  Dissertation_on_Parties  Remarks_on_History_of_England  history_of_England  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  dissenters  Whigs-Radicals  Burke  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader

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