dunnettreader + 1700s   34

Daniel Vidal - La secte contre le prophétisme: les Multipliants de Montpellier (1719-1723) | JSTOR - Annales (1982)
Daniel Vidal, Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales, 37e Année, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 1982), pp. 801-825 -- The Multipliants were a sect that appeared in Montpellier at the turn of the 18th century. Because this was the same Calvinist territory that had witnessed the upsurge of prophétisme back in 1685, the Multipliants were for a long time regarded as the heirs to the inspirés of the Bas-Languedoc and the Cévennes. A careful analysis of the sect's archives, however, invalidates that assumption of continuity. From a description of certain sociological features of the sect, from a study of the spatial configuration of its places of worship, from an examination of the symbolic values assigned to objects, a distinctive social amalgam emerges. The Multipliants can in no way be reduced to a mere replica of the previous inspired movement. On the contrary, they constitute a tenacious attempt to put an end to prophetist preaching. One can therefore classify the sect, alongside the apparatus of the Reformation, as an institution dedicated to the reestablishment of order at any price in a religious terrain devastated by zealots. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  religious_history  17thC  18thC  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  1720s  France  fanatics  sectarianism  Huguenots  Calvinist  Cévannes  apocalyptic  millennarian  Edict_of_Nantes  Revocation_of_Edict_of_Nantes  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Nancy L. Rhoden, review - William A. Pettigrew, Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. February, 2015.
As a study of the politics of the RAC and its independent slave trading opponents, this is a successful book. What it does particularly well is offer a “lens of politics” (p. 16) through which to understand the British slave trade, and the victory of separate traders concerning deregulation. It is equally strong on the British political context and its detailed understanding of how post-1688 political institutions and culture shaped responses on the slave trade. These are valuable contributions, particularly the argument that understandings of liberty and popular consent after the Glorious Revolution provided an effective ideology for both the deregulation of and the growth of the slave trade. Less convincing is the argument about the impact of the RAC on later British abolitionism, however much one might admire the attempt. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  1710s  Harley  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  Royal_African_Co  slavery  monopolies  Parliament  parties  Glorious_Revolution  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Kristin M. Girten - Unsexed Souls: Natural Philosophy as Transformation in Eliza Haywood's Female Spectator (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 55-74 -- Though love and marriage are Eliza Haywood's central concerns in The Female Spectator, the first periodical written by a woman with a primarily female audience in mind, in a series of issues devoted to the study of Baconian empiricism, Haywood turns her attention away from such concerns to the natural world. This essay aims to determine what is at stake in the Female Spectator's philosophical interactions with nature. It argues that, for Haywood, natural philosophy is a tool with which women may expand the horizon of, and thereby reshape, the sphere to which they are consigned.-- lots of primary sources from Margaret Cavendish and Robert Boyle through 1st few decades of 18thC plus lit survey on gender, patriarchy etc in last few decades in literary history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  gender_history  17thC  18thC  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  women-intellectuals  empiricism  Haywood  1700s  1710s  Boyle  virtue_epistemology  self-development  self-knowledge  domesticity  science-public  publishing-women  Spectator  Cavendish_Margaret  Astell  bibliography 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Martin Mulsow - Enlightenment Underground: Radical Germany, 1680-1720, trans., H. C. Erik Midelfort (2015) | Amazon.com
Martin Mulsow’s seismic reinterpretation of the origins of the Enlightenment in Germany won awards and renown in its original German edition, and now H. C. Erik Midelfort's translation makes this sensational book available to English-speaking readers. Mulsow shows that even in the late17thC some thinkers in Germany ventured to express extremely dangerous ideas, but did so as part of a secret underground. Scouring manuscript collections across northern Europe, Mulsow studied the writings of countless hitherto unknown radical jurists, theologians, historians, and dissident students who pushed for the secularization of legal, political, social, and religious knowledge. Often their works circulated in manuscript, anonymously, or as clandestinely published books. Working as a philosophical microhistorian, Mulsow has discovered the identities of several covert radicals and linked them to circles of young German scholars, many of whom were connected with the vibrant radical cultures of the Netherlands, England, and Denmark. The author reveals how radical ideas and contributions to intellectual doubt came from Socinians and Jews, church historians and biblical scholars, political theorists, and unemployed university students. He shows that misreadings of humorous or ironic works sometimes gave rise to unintended skeptical thoughts or corrosively political interpretations of Christianity. This landmark book overturns stereotypical views of the early Enlightenment in Germany as cautious, conservative, and moderate, and replaces them with a new portrait that reveals a movement far more radical, unintended, and puzzling than previously suspected. -- November release date
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Germany  Republic_of_Letters  Socinians  political_philosophy  Biblical_criticism  secularization  heterodoxy  historiography  microhistory  publishing-clandestine  scepticism  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  circulation-ideas 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
William A. Pettigrew - Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 (2013) | UNC Press
Shortlisted for the 2013 Whitfield Prize, Royal Historical Society
In the years following the Glorious Revolution, independent slave traders challenged the charter of the Royal African Company by asserting their natural rights as Britons to trade freely in enslaved Africans. In this comprehensive history of the rise and fall of the RAC, William A. Pettigrew grounds the transatlantic slave trade in politics, not economic forces, analyzing the ideological arguments of the RAC and its opponents in Parliament and in public debate. Ultimately, Pettigrew powerfully reasons that freedom became the rallying cry for those who wished to participate in the slave trade and therefore bolstered the expansion of the largest intercontinental forced migration in history. Unlike previous histories of the RAC, Pettigrew's study pursues the Company's story beyond the trade’s complete deregulation in 1712 to its demise in 1752. Opening the trade led to its escalation, which provided a reliable supply of enslaved Africans to the mainland American colonies, thus playing a critical part in entrenching African slavery as the colonies' preferred solution to the American problem of labor supply. -- William A. Pettigrew is lecturer in history at the University of Kent.
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  slavery-Africans  African_trade  slavery-law  commerce  trading_companies  Royal_African_Co  Whigs  Whig_Junto  freedom  free_trade  maritime_history  West_Indies  North_America  American_colonies  Atlantic  colonialism  British_foreign_policy  Parliament  Harley  Bolingbroke  Peace_of_Utrecht  1690s  1700s  1710s  capitalism  plantations  colonial_governance  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  War_of_Jenkins_Ear 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
BRENT S. SIROTA -- THE OCCASIONAL CONFORMITY CONTROVERSY, MODERATION, AND THE ANGLICAN CRITIQUE OF MODERNITY, 1700–1714 (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 81-105 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
BRENT S. SIROTA - North Carolina State University -- The occasional conformity controversy during the reign of Queen Anne has traditionally been understood as a straightforward symptom of the early eighteenth-century ‘rage of party’. For all the pious rhetoric concerning toleration and the church in danger, the controversy is considered a partisan squabble for short-term political gain. This traditional interpretation has, however, never been able to account for two features of the controversy: first, the focus on ‘moderation’ as a unique characteristic of post-Revolutionary English society; and second, the prominence of the Anglican nonjurors in the debate. This article revisits the occasional conformity controversy with an eye toward explaining these two related features. In doing so, it will argue that the occasional conformity controversy comprised a referendum on the Revolution settlement in church and state. Nonjurors lit upon the practice of occasional conformity as emblematic of the broader malady of moderation afflicting post-Revolutionary England. From their opposition to occasional conformity, the nonjurors, and soon the broader Anglican high-church movement, developed a comprehensive critique of religious modernity that would inform the entire framework of debate in the early English Enlightenment. -* I thank James Vaughn, Steve Pincus, Bill Bulman, Robert Ingram, and the participants in the ‘God and the Enlightenment’ conference at Ohio University in October 2012 for their generous engagement with earlier drafts of this article. Thanks also to Phil Withington and the anonymous reviewers for their assistance in shaping this article into its final form.
article  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  1700s  1710s  occasional_conformity  nonjurors  High_Church  Church_of_England  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political_press  pamphlets  political_participation  tolerance  latitudinarian  secularization  atheism_panic  partisanship  Tories  Whigs  dissenters  Whig_Junto  moderation  modernity  Enlightenment  Queen_Anne  Harley  Bolingbroke  comprehension-church  Convocation  church-in-danger  sermons  religious_lit  cultural_critique  Atterbury  popular_politics  popular_culture  Revolution_Principles  Glorious_Revolution  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, The Divine Feudal Law: Or, Covenants with Mankind, Represented, trans. Theophilus Dorrington (1703), ed. Simone Zurbruchen - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, The Divine Feudal Law: Or, Covenants with Mankind, Represented, trans. Theophilus Dorrington, ed. with an Introduction by Simone Zurbruchen (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/10/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/177> -- The Divine Feudal Law sets forth Pufendorf’s basis for the reunion of the Lutheran and Calvinist confessions. This attempt to seek a “conciliation” between the confessions complements the concept of toleration discussed in Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion in Reference to Civil Society. In both works Pufendorf examines the proper way to secure the peaceful coexistence of different confessions in a state. -- Published posthumously in 1695 - likely that timing of translation part of ecumenical impulse within Protestantism, reinforcing the goal of the War of the Spanish Succession as protection of the Protestant Interest opposed to Louis XIV, despite being allied not only with German (Lutheran) members of the Holy Roman Empire but with the Catholic Emperor himself -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  Pufendorf  Lutherans  Calvinist  ecumenical  Christendom  Protestants  Protestant_International  anti-Catholic  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Nine_Years_War  tolerance  theology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Pierre Bayle - A Philosophical Commentary on These Words of the Gospel, Luke 14.23, ‘Compel Them to Come In, That My House May Be Full’ - Online Library of Liberty
Pierre Bayle, A Philosophical Commentary on These Words of the Gospel, Luke 14.23, ‘Compel Them to Come In, That My House May Be Full’, edited, with an Introduction by John Kilcullen and Chandran Kukathas (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/163> This edition of the Philosophical Commentary is an amended version of the first English translation, which appeared in London in 1708. The author of the translation, which remains the only complete rendering of the Commentary into English, is unknown. A more recent translation by Amie Godman Tannenbaum was published in 1987, but it omits Part III and the Supplement. We have checked the text of the 1708 translation against the French text and made silent changes to correct omissions, misprints, and mistranslations and to clarify places where change in the meaning of English words would make the translation unintelligible or misleading to the modern reader.2 We have also implemented the corrigenda of the 1708 edition. We have not tried to make the translation more literal; in our judgment it is rather free (in the manner of the time), but substantially very faithful, and lively. We have identified and supplied details for Bayle’s various references and translated passages quoted in foreign languages, unless Bayle himself supplies a translation or paraphrase -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  translation  17thC  Bayle  tolerance  Augustine  Biblical_exegesis  Huguenots  Edict_of_Nantes  1700s  London  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Nancy Kendrick, review - Mary Astell, Jacqueline Broad (ed.), The Christian Religion, as Professed by a Daughter of the Church of England // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
This first complete modern edition of Mary Astell's "most profound and significant scholarly achievement" is a much needed and welcome addition to Astell studies, and more generally, to the study of early modern philosophy. -- Follows 2nd edition published in 1717 (1st 1705). -- Drawing on her study of Astell in Women Philosophers of the 17thC (Cambridge, 2002), Broad [discusses] the Cartesianism that empowered Astell and other early modern women to assert themselves as intellectuals capable of engaging in philosophical discourse, and she explores the feminist message of Astell's work in 3 ways. First she examines the instructive purposes of The Christian Religion for its female readers with respect to the development of their reason and virtue and the control of their passions. -- Second, Broad emphasizes Astell's rejection of the implicit sexism of the works critiqued in The Christian Religion, including Locke's The Reasonableness of Christianity, which claimed that because women are incapable of grasping difficult concepts, they must be brought to religious understanding through plain and straight-forward commands. Third, Broad shows that some anti-Lockean positions advanced by the High-Church, Tory-sympathizing Astell are consistent with her feminist aims, despite appearances to the contrary. -- Broad does not, however, give much attention to the ... consequences of the maturation of her views to the feminist message of the text. In addition to advice-giving and instructive purposes, The Christian Religion addresses one of her long-standing philosophical preoccupations -- the metaphysical underpinnings of human relations. Astell's metaphysics was driven by her Platonism, which provided the solution to a concern... about the nature and possibility of friendship. In The Christian Religion, her views about friendship are expanded and developed in ways that highlight her interest in female-female, rather than female-male, social bonds. -- The review is a rich discussion of development of Astell's on reconciling friendship, love of God and the universal benevolence demanded by the Gospels.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_politics  Astell  feminism  Cartesian  Neoplatonism  theology  High_Church  Tories  1690s  1700s  1710s  Locke  Locke-religion  sexism  friendship  love  benevolence  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Paulina Kewes - "The State Is out of Tune": Nicholas Rowe's "Jane Shore" and the Succession Crisis of 1713-14 | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 283-308
Well done analysis of the political topicality that Rowe exploited while avoiding a factional position. Identifies areas that had some resonance but Rowe avoided making direct allegory, analogy or character personation, including the Duchess of Marlborough and Abigail Masham flaps with Queen Anne. Includes discussion of several lines deleted by the censor that was made infamous in 1730s when Bolingbroke accused of hypocrisy for being a censor in 1710s -- most references to literary criticism point to failure to pick up political relevance - other references to some bits of cultural, literary or political history during last 4 years of Queen Anne -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  1700s  Hanoverian_Succession  Queen_Anne  Harley  Bolingbroke  Marlborough_Duchess  Masham_Lady  Richard_III  Rowe_Nicholas  theatre-politics  Whigs  Tories  Jacobites  James_III  succession  Parliament  censorship  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Smyth - 'Like Amphibious Animals': Irish Protestants, Ancient Britons, 1691-1707 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Dec., 1993), pp. 785-797
Ireland in the 1690s was a protestant state with a majority catholic population. These protestants sometimes described themselves as `the king's Irish subjects' or `the people of Ireland', but rarely as `the Irish', a label which they usually reserved for the catholics. In constitutional and political terms their still evolving sense of identity expressed itself in the assertion of Irish parliamentary sovereignty, most notably in William Molyneux's 1698 pamphlet, The case of Ireland's being bound by acts of parliament in England, stated. In practice, however, the Irish parliament did not enjoy legislative independence, and the political elite was powerless in the face of laws promulgated at Westminster, such as the 1699 woollen act, which were detrimental to its interests. One possible solution to the problem of inferior status lay in legislative union with England or Great Britain. Increasingly in the years before 1707 certain Irish protestant politicians elaborated the economic, constitutional and practical advantages to be gained from a union, but they also based their case upon an appeal to the shared religion and ethnicity of the sovereign's loyal subjects in the two kingdoms. In short the protestants insisted that they were English. This unionist episode thus illustrates the profoundly ambivalent character of protestant identity in late seventeenth-and early eighteenth-century Ireland. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note -- probably captures Swift's ambivalence including his hostility to Union of 1707 with Scotland and not Ireland
article  jstor  political_history  Ireland  British_politics  national_ID  Protestants-Ireland  Anglo-Irish_constitution  trade-policy  1707_Union  Three_Kingdoms  1690s  1700s  Molyneux  Swift  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rowan Strong - A Vision of an Anglican Imperialism: The Annual Sermons of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts 1701–1714 | Journal of Religious History 2006 - Wiley Online Library
This article examines the first two decades of the oldest continuing Anglican missionary society, the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, founded in 1710. It argues that, contrary to the prevailing historiography of the British missionary movement, this early eighteenth-century society was genuinely evangelistic and marks the real beginning of that movement. The society also marks the beginning of a formal, institutional engagement by the Church of England with the British Empire. In the Society's annual anniversary sermons, and influenced by the reports sent by its ordained missionaries in North America, the Church of England's metropolitan leadership in England constructed an Anglican discourse of empire. In this discourse the Church of England began to fashion the identities of colonial populations of Indigenous peoples, white colonists, and Black slaves through a theological Enlightenment understanding.
article  Wiley  paywall  religious_history  church_history  imperialism  18thC  1700s  1710s  British_Empire  Church_of_England  missionaries  Evangelical  slavery  ethnic_ID  American_colonies  Berkeley  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Darrick N. Taylor -thesis - L'Estrange His Life: Public and Persona in the Life and Career of Sir Roger L'Estrange, 1616-1704 (2011)
KU ScholarWorks: Authors: Taylor, Darrick N. Advisors: Clark, Jonathan C.D. .....Downloaded pdf to Note..... The subject of this dissertation is the life and career of Roger L'Estrange, who was a licenser of Books and Surveyor of the Press for Charles II, as well as a royalist pamphleteer. It seeks to answer the question of how conceptions of public and private changed in late seventeenth century England be examining the career of L'Estrange, which involved him in many of the major pamphlet campaigns of the Restoration period. It argues that there was no stable "public sphere" in seventeenth century England, one that clearly marked it off from a private sphere of domesticity. It argues that the classical notion of office, in which reciprocal obligation and duty were paramount, was the basic presupposition of public but also private life, and that the very ubiquity of ideals of office holding made it semantically impossible to distinguish a stable public realm from a private one. Furthermore, the dissertation also argues that the presupposition of officium not only provided the basis for understanding relationships between persons but also of individual identity in seventeenth century England. It argues that L'Estrange saw his own identity in terms of the offices he performed, and that his individual identity was shaped by the antique notion of persona--of a mask that one wears, when performing a role--than to modern notions of individual identity. Lastly, it will argue that people in seventeenth century England still understood their world in terms of offices, but that changes in the way they understood office, visible in L'Estrange's writings, helped prepare the way for the reception of more modern ideas about public and private spheres that would eventually come to fruition in the nineteenth century.
thesis  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  1680s  1690s  1700s  L'Estrange  Charles_II  James_II  Whigs  Tories  political_press  pamphlets  censorship  propaganda  politics-and-religion  public_sphere  office  persona  identity  self  obligation  moral_philosophy  domesticity  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Yannick Deschamps- Daniel Defoe’s Contribution to the Dispute over Occasional Conformity: An Insight into Dissent and “Moderation” in the Early Eighteenth Century (2013) - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Project MUSE - Yannick Deschamps. "Daniel Defoe’s Contribution to the Dispute over Occasional Conformity: An Insight into Dissent and “Moderation” in the Early Eighteenth Century."Eighteenth-Century Studies 46.3 (2013): 349-361
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  18thC  1700s  Harley  Defoe  political_press  propaganda  politics-and-religion  dissenters  Parliament  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Seager - Review essay - Defoe at 350 | Eighteenth-Century Studies - 2011
Project_MUSE downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- Stephen H. Gregg, Defoe’s Writings and Manliness: Contrary Men (Farnham: Ashgate, 2009). Pp. x, 197. $99.95. --**-- Leon Guilhamet, Defoe and the Whig Novel: A Reading of the Major Fiction (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2010). Pp. 243.$56.50. --**-- Robert M. Maniquis and Carl Fisher, eds., Defoe’s Footprints: Essays in Honour of Maximillian E. Novak (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2009). Pp. vi, 273. $65.00. --**-- Andreas K. E. Mueller, A Critical Study of Daniel Defoe’s Verse: Recovering the Neglected Corpus of His Poetic Work, with a foreword by Robert Mayer (Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press, 2010). Pp. xiv, 288. $119.95. --**-- John Richetti, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Daniel Defoe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008). Pp. xiv, 248. $29.99. --**-- Dennis Todd, Defoe’s America (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010). Pp. xi, 229. $95.00.
books  reviews  Project_MUSE  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  1710s  1720s  English_lit  cultural_history  lit_crit  literary_history  politics-and-literature  novels  political_press  economic_culture  commerce  finance_capital  masculinity  Defoe 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Richard R. Johnson: Politics Redefined: An Assessment of Recent Writings on the Late Stuart Period of English History, 1660 to 1714 (1978)
JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Oct., 1978), pp. 691-732 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- doesn't look fabulous analytically, but fabulous collection of works after c 1960 including links to lots of studies of economic data -- although his critique of Plumb waiting for the appearance "of that portly deus ex machina" is delicious
article  jstor  historiography  bibliography  17thC  18thC  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  William_III  Queen_Anne  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  Hanoverian_Succession  political_history  economic_history  social_history  religious_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Patricia Springborg: Mary Astell (1666-1731), Critic of Locke (1995)
JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 89, No. 3 (Sep., 1995), pp. 621-633 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- In the now considerable literature reevaluating the reception of Locke's Two Treatises, no mention has been made of perhaps his first systematic critic, the commissioned Tory political pamphleteer, Mary Astell. Contemporaneous with Charles Leslie, who is usually credited with the honor, Astell had diagnosed Locke's political argument by 1705 and perhaps as early as 1700. Why has her contribution remained unacknowledged for so long? It is argued here that for too long commentators have been looking for the wrong person in the wrong place. Astell correctly saw that Locke's political philosophy was inextricable from his psychological and theological systems, addressing all three in works that were political, theological and homiletic. But why Locke, and why in 1700-1705? Did Astell already know the authorship of the Two Treatises, only officially established in 1704 with the publication of the codicil to Locke's will?
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  epistemology  17thC  18thC  Britain  Locke  Astell  Church_of_England  Tories  Whigs  Glorious_Revolution  1700s  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Aileen Douglas: Reading Swift: Papers from the Third Munster Symposium on Jonathan Swift ed by Hermann J. Real; Helgard Stover-Seidwig(2000)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr, Vol. 15 (2000), pp. 197-199 -- looks mostly uninteresting except D Hayton on High Church part in the Irish Convocation 1703-1713
books  reviews  jstor  18thC  1700s  1710s  Anglican  Protestants-Ireland  High_Church  church_history  Swift  find  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Pascale Verèb: Alexis Piron défenseur des Modernes ou un épisode inédit de la querelle des Anciens et des Modernes (1995)
JSTOR: Revue d'Histoire littéraire de la France, 95e Année, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1995), pp. 282-293 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- useful chronology and references to the revival of the querelle in early 18thC --Piron was a Moderne malgré lui
article  jstor  French_lit  18thC  1700s  1710s  culture_wars  Ancients_v_Moderns  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review of Nicola Parsons, Reading Gossip in Early Eighteenth-Century England | Digital Defoe
Parsons follows in the hallowed footsteps of Jürgen Habermas’s The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere (German 1962; English 1989) and its most eminent recent endorsement, Michael McKeon’s The Secret History of Domesticity (2005). In Reading Gossip in Early Eighteenth-Century England, Nicola Parsons identifies Queen Anne’s reign (1702–14) as a pivotal moment of political reorganization wherein a residual absolutist ideology predicated on state secrets (arcana imperii) completed its transition to a new order in which there was a demand that political processes be subjected to public scrutiny. Parsons argues that in works by Delarivier Manley, Sir Richard Steele, Daniel Defoe, and Jane Barker gossip functioned to negotiate the as-yet-tenuous split between public and private. The crux of Reading Gossip is, in many respects, the development discussed in Parsons’s chapter on the fall-out of the Sacheverell riots in 1710 and Defoe’s modification of the secret history genre in response to the backlash against his patron, Robert Harley, following Anne’s death. In line with Rebecca Bullard’s recent Politics of Disclosure (2009), Parsons resists analyses of the secret history that produce a neat account of the rise of liberalism, instead proposing that the Sacheverell riots posed a dilemma for the Whig party, which needed to adopt Tory anti-mob rhetoric to maintain civic order, while maintaining its traditional stance that vox populi dictated polity. The Tories and Whigs therefore unwittingly “collaborated in the rhetorical construction of a more or less unified ‘public’” (78) and consolidated a political class with its own interests over against the public at large. The test case is Defoe’s sequence of three pamphlets entitled The Secret History of the White-Staff (1714–1715),
books  kindle-available  reviews  18thC  1700s  1710s  British_history  British_politics  Queen_Anne  Harley  Defoe  political_culture  political_history  political_press  parties  Whig_Junto  Tories  Manley  Marlborough  Marlborough_Duchess  Steele  public_sphere  public_opinion  Bolingbroke  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Jess Edwards, Review: Aino Mäkikalli and Andreas K. E. Mueller eds, Positioning Defoe’s Non-Fiction: Form, Function, Genre | Digital Defoe
What most previous studies of Defoe’s non-fiction have tended not to do, and this includes the editorial introductions to the Pickering and Chatto editions, according to John Richetti, is pay attention to the formal properties of these works in their own right, as products of generic pressures and literary craft (Richetti 38). In their explorations of various kinds of moral challenge and crisis, their attempts to represent the particularities of time and space, and their occasional dramatic dialogues, Defoe’s non-fictional works help us to understand the genesis of his groundbreaking experiments in realist narrative, as well as some of their peculiarities. They also provide us, in their own right, with an opportunity to explore the relationship between history and form. Mäkikalli and Mueller’s collection, Positioning Daniel Defoe’s Non-Fiction, addresses this gap in scholarship.
books  reviews  18thC  English_lit  non-fiction  Defoe  rhetoric  satire  travel  London  1700s  1707_Union  British_history  Scotland  dissenters  conduct  cultural_history  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Stephen H Gregg: Defoe and Descartes’ beast-machine: a brief bibliography | The Daniel Defoe Blog
Recently, I became rather obsessed with two small pieces in Defoe’s Review of March 27th, 1705 and the ‘Supplement of January 1705’ (published after March). They debate the extent to which dogs can reason. Researching the contexts for this involved a deep dive into the complex history of the debate about reasoning animals, the animal soul, and Descartes’ ‘beast-machine’ as outlined in his Discourse on Method. The debate spun across religious, philosophical, classical, literary, journalistic and scientific writings for over a century after. But I particularly needed to map out the writings published in the years immediately before Defoe’s 1705 piece.[1] The results revealed a gratifying surge in the English debate from around 1690.
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august 2013 by dunnettreader

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