dunnettreader + 1690s   38

Daniel Vidal - La secte contre le prophétisme: les Multipliants de Montpellier (1719-1723) | JSTOR - Annales (1982)
Daniel Vidal, Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales, 37e Année, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 1982), pp. 801-825 -- The Multipliants were a sect that appeared in Montpellier at the turn of the 18th century. Because this was the same Calvinist territory that had witnessed the upsurge of prophétisme back in 1685, the Multipliants were for a long time regarded as the heirs to the inspirés of the Bas-Languedoc and the Cévennes. A careful analysis of the sect's archives, however, invalidates that assumption of continuity. From a description of certain sociological features of the sect, from a study of the spatial configuration of its places of worship, from an examination of the symbolic values assigned to objects, a distinctive social amalgam emerges. The Multipliants can in no way be reduced to a mere replica of the previous inspired movement. On the contrary, they constitute a tenacious attempt to put an end to prophetist preaching. One can therefore classify the sect, alongside the apparatus of the Reformation, as an institution dedicated to the reestablishment of order at any price in a religious terrain devastated by zealots. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  religious_history  17thC  18thC  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  1720s  France  fanatics  sectarianism  Huguenots  Calvinist  Cévannes  apocalyptic  millennarian  Edict_of_Nantes  Revocation_of_Edict_of_Nantes  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Nancy L. Rhoden, review - William A. Pettigrew, Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. February, 2015.
As a study of the politics of the RAC and its independent slave trading opponents, this is a successful book. What it does particularly well is offer a “lens of politics” (p. 16) through which to understand the British slave trade, and the victory of separate traders concerning deregulation. It is equally strong on the British political context and its detailed understanding of how post-1688 political institutions and culture shaped responses on the slave trade. These are valuable contributions, particularly the argument that understandings of liberty and popular consent after the Glorious Revolution provided an effective ideology for both the deregulation of and the growth of the slave trade. Less convincing is the argument about the impact of the RAC on later British abolitionism, however much one might admire the attempt. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  1710s  Harley  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  Royal_African_Co  slavery  monopolies  Parliament  parties  Glorious_Revolution  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Martin Mulsow - Enlightenment Underground: Radical Germany, 1680-1720, trans., H. C. Erik Midelfort (2015) | Amazon.com
Martin Mulsow’s seismic reinterpretation of the origins of the Enlightenment in Germany won awards and renown in its original German edition, and now H. C. Erik Midelfort's translation makes this sensational book available to English-speaking readers. Mulsow shows that even in the late17thC some thinkers in Germany ventured to express extremely dangerous ideas, but did so as part of a secret underground. Scouring manuscript collections across northern Europe, Mulsow studied the writings of countless hitherto unknown radical jurists, theologians, historians, and dissident students who pushed for the secularization of legal, political, social, and religious knowledge. Often their works circulated in manuscript, anonymously, or as clandestinely published books. Working as a philosophical microhistorian, Mulsow has discovered the identities of several covert radicals and linked them to circles of young German scholars, many of whom were connected with the vibrant radical cultures of the Netherlands, England, and Denmark. The author reveals how radical ideas and contributions to intellectual doubt came from Socinians and Jews, church historians and biblical scholars, political theorists, and unemployed university students. He shows that misreadings of humorous or ironic works sometimes gave rise to unintended skeptical thoughts or corrosively political interpretations of Christianity. This landmark book overturns stereotypical views of the early Enlightenment in Germany as cautious, conservative, and moderate, and replaces them with a new portrait that reveals a movement far more radical, unintended, and puzzling than previously suspected. -- November release date
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Germany  Republic_of_Letters  Socinians  political_philosophy  Biblical_criticism  secularization  heterodoxy  historiography  microhistory  publishing-clandestine  scepticism  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  circulation-ideas 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
William A. Pettigrew - Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 (2013) | UNC Press
Shortlisted for the 2013 Whitfield Prize, Royal Historical Society
In the years following the Glorious Revolution, independent slave traders challenged the charter of the Royal African Company by asserting their natural rights as Britons to trade freely in enslaved Africans. In this comprehensive history of the rise and fall of the RAC, William A. Pettigrew grounds the transatlantic slave trade in politics, not economic forces, analyzing the ideological arguments of the RAC and its opponents in Parliament and in public debate. Ultimately, Pettigrew powerfully reasons that freedom became the rallying cry for those who wished to participate in the slave trade and therefore bolstered the expansion of the largest intercontinental forced migration in history. Unlike previous histories of the RAC, Pettigrew's study pursues the Company's story beyond the trade’s complete deregulation in 1712 to its demise in 1752. Opening the trade led to its escalation, which provided a reliable supply of enslaved Africans to the mainland American colonies, thus playing a critical part in entrenching African slavery as the colonies' preferred solution to the American problem of labor supply. -- William A. Pettigrew is lecturer in history at the University of Kent.
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  slavery-Africans  African_trade  slavery-law  commerce  trading_companies  Royal_African_Co  Whigs  Whig_Junto  freedom  free_trade  maritime_history  West_Indies  North_America  American_colonies  Atlantic  colonialism  British_foreign_policy  Parliament  Harley  Bolingbroke  Peace_of_Utrecht  1690s  1700s  1710s  capitalism  plantations  colonial_governance  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  War_of_Jenkins_Ear 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Lorena S. Walsh, review - Nuala Zahedieh, The Capital and the Colonies: London and the Atlantic Economy, 1660-1700 (2010) | EH.net Review - Feb 2011
Zahedieh finds increasing concentration of plantation commerce among large merchants specializing in particular commodities and regions in the 1680s, when falling commodity prices and increased taxes eroded profit margins and drove out small traders. Colonial merchants seldom invested in overseas property, but made a massive contribution to expansion of empire in the form of short-term credit extended to settlers. The larger operators accumulated enough capital to diversify investment into shipbuilding, slave-trading, joint-stocks, insurance, wharves, industry, landed property, loans, and public credit. This decade was a turning point, as merchant concentration and specialization led to improved productivity, economies of scale, and reduced costs. (..) attempts of the later Stuarts to corner the profits of empire by restricting free trade among Englishmen as having limited success. (..) she sees the effect of the Glorious Revolution, not as leading to an economically optimal political arrangement, but as consolidating the capacity of the transatlantic trading elite to enforce regulation in its own interests and enhance the value and scale of rent-seeking enterprises at the expense of competition and efficiency, leading to a period of slower growth in colonial trade and shipping at the end of the century. Unlike trade with Europe, colonial commerce required an unusually large fixed capital investment in the greater tonnage needed to transport large volumes of bulky goods over long distances. (..) English- and plantation-built ships were better suited to most colonial commerce than were Dutch (..) it was long-distance commerce, rather than the protection of the Navigation Acts, that revived the English shipbuilding industry. By 1700 plantation shipping accounted for 40% of London's overseas trading capacity. (..) increased education among mariners (..) managerial skills, (..) navigational instruments. (..) London's prosperity by stimulating the construction of wharfs and warehouses, (.) naval refitting, repair, and provisioning trades. Although technology and unit input costs were fairly stable across the period, increased volumes and growing experience with colonial conditions led to organizational improvements which made more efficient use of inputs. - page encoding a mess on Note - try to save page or copy to EF in Air
books  bookshelf  reviews  17thC  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  London  colonialism  North-Weingast  American_colonies  West_Indies  trade  trade-policy  shipping  Navigation_Acts  1680s  1690s  entrepôts  economic_growth  economic_culture  Charles_II  James_II  Atlantic  capital  investment  trade_finance  Dutch  education-training  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City_politics  infrastructure  ports  technology  navigation  interlopers  regulatory_capture  commodities  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 4 (Essays on money and Two Treatises of Government) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
Essays on money -- SOME CONSIDERATIONS OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE LOWERING OF INTEREST, AND RAISING THE VALUE OF MONEY. IN A LETTER SENT TO A MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT, 1691. Having lately met with a little tract, entitled, “A Letter to a friend concerning usury,” printed this present year, 1660; which gives, in short, the arguments of some treatises, printed many years since, for the lowering of interest; it may not be amiss briefly to consider them. -- Of raising our Coin. *--* SHORT OBSERVATIONS ON A PRINTED PAPER, ENTITLED, For encouraging the coining silver money in England, and after for keeping it here. *--* FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING RAISING THE VALUE OF MONEY. [Dedicated to Lord Somers] -- converted to html -- didn't download
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  Glorious_Revolution  1690s  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  monetary_policy  interest_rates  commerce  currency  bimetalism  FX  prices  usury  Parliament  House_of_Commons  William_III  Whig_Junto 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
MATTHEW NEUFELD - PARLIAMENT AND SOME ROOTS OF WHISTLE BLOWING DURING THE NINE YEARS WAR | The Historical Journal / Volume 57 / Issue 02 / June 2014, pp 397-420 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
MATTHEW NEUFELD - University of Saskatchewan -- This article argues that the failed campaign of one former clerk against corruption in the Royal Navy's sick and wounded service during the Nine Years War sheds light on some roots of modern whistle blowing. During the 1690s, England's parliament took important steps towards becoming an organ of inquiry into the workings of all government departments. Parliament's desire for information that could assist it to check Leviathan's actions, coupled with the end of pre-publication censorship in 1695, encouraged the advent of pamphleteering aimed at showing how to improve or correct abuses within the administrative structure and practices of the expanding fiscal-military state. It was from this stream of informative petitioning directed at the Commons and the Lords that informants such as Samuel Baston, as well as George Everett, William Hodges, and Robert Crosfeild, tried to call time on either systematic injustices or particular irregularities within the naval service for what they claimed was the public interest. What they and others called ‘discovering’ governmental malfeasance should be seen as early examples of blowing the whistle on wrongdoing. -- This was post Queen Mary's death, and she was associated with sick and injured servicemen, Greenwich etc - did whistleblowers take advantage of that to position themselves not only as public servants re House of Commons, but drawing attention to government failure to implement the Royal will? Or was there an anti Dutch element?
article  paywall  17thC  British_history  British_politics  1690s  Nine_Years_War  British_Navy  Parliament  House_of_Commons  governance  oversight-legislature  political_press  censorship  scandale  pamphlets 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Historical Background - Reformation of Manners Campaigns - London Lives
Contents - The First Societies, 1690-1738 *--* 1757-63 Society *--* Opposition to Informers and Reforming Constables. *--* Legal Opposition. *--* The Proclamation Society, 1787. *--* Exemplary Lives. *--* Introductory Reading & Footnotes. -- Largely reliant on private prosecutions, the early modern criminal justice system did not facilitate the prosecution of large numbers of victimless offences such as immorality and irreligion. But despite increasing religious toleration, England in the 18thC remained a strongly Protestant country, and many people were offended by public displays of sin, not least because it was thought that such conduct led sinners down a slippery slope of increasingly criminal conduct which would lead inevitably to the gallows. The 18thC was the first great age of voluntary societies, and concerns about vice led to the formation, over the course of the century, of successive societies which aimed to suppress immorality. While members sought to promote reform through persuasion, in sermons and through the distribution of printed literature, they saw the need for coercion as well. With the Church Courts in decline, the reformers turned to the criminal justice system. Their methods attracted significant opposition, however, and the reformers frequently found themselves at the receiving end of often vexatious litigation aimed at undermining their activities. Ultimately, attempts to use the law to promote a reformation of manners were frustrated by a combination of both legal and popular opposition. The records included in this website provide evidence of both the reformers' activities and the opposition they engender.
website  18thC  British_history  British_politics  reformation_of_manners  1690s  legal_system  judiciary  crime  criminal_justice  gin_craze  Parliament  Church_of_England  church_courts  lower_orders  London  police  parish  litigation  evidence  immorality  prostitution  local_government  religious_lit  social_history  cultural_history  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, Encouragement of Irish Linen Manufacture (August 1697) - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, H.B. Fox Bourne, The Life of John Locke. In Two Volumes (London: Henry S. King, 1876). Vol. 2 pp. 363-372. 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2332> -- Available as Facsimile PDF 352 KB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book -- Locke’s detailed proposals to encourage the Irish linen industry which was quoted in full in Fox Bourne’s The Life of John Locke (1876), vol. 2, pp. 363-372.
etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  political_economy  Locke  biography  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  industry  agriculture  protectionism  development  interest_groups  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  Irish_Parliament  1690s  Whig_Junto  Board_of_Trade  UK_government-colonies  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, Proposed Poor Law Reform (October 1697) - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, H.B. Fox Bourne, The Life of John Locke. In Two Volumes (London: Henry S. King, 1876). Vol. 2 pp. 377-391. 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2331> -- Available as Facsimile PDF 638 KB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. -- Locke’s detailed proposals for the reform of the Poor Laws which was quoted in full in Fox Bourne’s The Life of John Locke (1876), vol. 2, pp. 377-391.
etexts  Liberty_Fund  17thC  British_history  British_politics  governmentality  reformation_of_manners  poverty  charity  Poor_Laws  reform-social  Locke  biography  1690s  Whig_Junto  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, The Divine Feudal Law: Or, Covenants with Mankind, Represented, trans. Theophilus Dorrington (1703), ed. Simone Zurbruchen - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, The Divine Feudal Law: Or, Covenants with Mankind, Represented, trans. Theophilus Dorrington, ed. with an Introduction by Simone Zurbruchen (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/10/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/177> -- The Divine Feudal Law sets forth Pufendorf’s basis for the reunion of the Lutheran and Calvinist confessions. This attempt to seek a “conciliation” between the confessions complements the concept of toleration discussed in Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion in Reference to Civil Society. In both works Pufendorf examines the proper way to secure the peaceful coexistence of different confessions in a state. -- Published posthumously in 1695 - likely that timing of translation part of ecumenical impulse within Protestantism, reinforcing the goal of the War of the Spanish Succession as protection of the Protestant Interest opposed to Louis XIV, despite being allied not only with German (Lutheran) members of the Holy Roman Empire but with the Catholic Emperor himself -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  Pufendorf  Lutherans  Calvinist  ecumenical  Christendom  Protestants  Protestant_International  anti-Catholic  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Nine_Years_War  tolerance  theology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion, in Reference to Civil Society, trans. Jodocus Crull (1698), ed. Simone Zurbuchen - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion, in Reference to Civil Society, trans. Jodocus Crull, ed. and with an introduction by Simone Zurbuchen (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/10/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/887> -- written in response to Revocation of the Edict of Nantes -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Pufendorf  Germany  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Edict_of_Nantes  religion-established  civil_society  tolerance  sovereignty  ecclesiology  natural_law  natural_rights  religious_belief  British_politics  1690s  dissenters  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Some Considerations of the Consequences of the Lowering of Interest and the Raising the Value of Money, by John Locke 1691
Part 1: Whether the Price of the Hire of Money can be regulated by Law *--* Part 2: Interest makes not Money Exchange for less of any Commodity. *--* Part 3: The Price of Land. -**- Part 4: An infallible sign of your decay of Wealth is the falling of Rents. *--* Part 5: This business of Money and Coinage is by some Men thought a great Mystery
etexts  Locke  monetary_policy  economic_history  economic_theory  17thC  1690s  currency  landowners  rents  agriculture  prices  interest_rates  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Nancy Kendrick, review - Mary Astell, Jacqueline Broad (ed.), The Christian Religion, as Professed by a Daughter of the Church of England // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
This first complete modern edition of Mary Astell's "most profound and significant scholarly achievement" is a much needed and welcome addition to Astell studies, and more generally, to the study of early modern philosophy. -- Follows 2nd edition published in 1717 (1st 1705). -- Drawing on her study of Astell in Women Philosophers of the 17thC (Cambridge, 2002), Broad [discusses] the Cartesianism that empowered Astell and other early modern women to assert themselves as intellectuals capable of engaging in philosophical discourse, and she explores the feminist message of Astell's work in 3 ways. First she examines the instructive purposes of The Christian Religion for its female readers with respect to the development of their reason and virtue and the control of their passions. -- Second, Broad emphasizes Astell's rejection of the implicit sexism of the works critiqued in The Christian Religion, including Locke's The Reasonableness of Christianity, which claimed that because women are incapable of grasping difficult concepts, they must be brought to religious understanding through plain and straight-forward commands. Third, Broad shows that some anti-Lockean positions advanced by the High-Church, Tory-sympathizing Astell are consistent with her feminist aims, despite appearances to the contrary. -- Broad does not, however, give much attention to the ... consequences of the maturation of her views to the feminist message of the text. In addition to advice-giving and instructive purposes, The Christian Religion addresses one of her long-standing philosophical preoccupations -- the metaphysical underpinnings of human relations. Astell's metaphysics was driven by her Platonism, which provided the solution to a concern... about the nature and possibility of friendship. In The Christian Religion, her views about friendship are expanded and developed in ways that highlight her interest in female-female, rather than female-male, social bonds. -- The review is a rich discussion of development of Astell's on reconciling friendship, love of God and the universal benevolence demanded by the Gospels.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_politics  Astell  feminism  Cartesian  Neoplatonism  theology  High_Church  Tories  1690s  1700s  1710s  Locke  Locke-religion  sexism  friendship  love  benevolence  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Smyth - 'Like Amphibious Animals': Irish Protestants, Ancient Britons, 1691-1707 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Dec., 1993), pp. 785-797
Ireland in the 1690s was a protestant state with a majority catholic population. These protestants sometimes described themselves as `the king's Irish subjects' or `the people of Ireland', but rarely as `the Irish', a label which they usually reserved for the catholics. In constitutional and political terms their still evolving sense of identity expressed itself in the assertion of Irish parliamentary sovereignty, most notably in William Molyneux's 1698 pamphlet, The case of Ireland's being bound by acts of parliament in England, stated. In practice, however, the Irish parliament did not enjoy legislative independence, and the political elite was powerless in the face of laws promulgated at Westminster, such as the 1699 woollen act, which were detrimental to its interests. One possible solution to the problem of inferior status lay in legislative union with England or Great Britain. Increasingly in the years before 1707 certain Irish protestant politicians elaborated the economic, constitutional and practical advantages to be gained from a union, but they also based their case upon an appeal to the shared religion and ethnicity of the sovereign's loyal subjects in the two kingdoms. In short the protestants insisted that they were English. This unionist episode thus illustrates the profoundly ambivalent character of protestant identity in late seventeenth-and early eighteenth-century Ireland. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note -- probably captures Swift's ambivalence including his hostility to Union of 1707 with Scotland and not Ireland
article  jstor  political_history  Ireland  British_politics  national_ID  Protestants-Ireland  Anglo-Irish_constitution  trade-policy  1707_Union  Three_Kingdoms  1690s  1700s  Molyneux  Swift  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen Quinn - The Glorious Revolution's Effect on English Private Finance: A Microhistory, 1680-1705 | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 61, No. 3 (Sep., 2001), pp. 593-615
The lending portfolio of a London banker is analyzed to better understand the relationship between public and private finance during England's Financial Revolution. The Glorious Revolution's political settlement appears to have reduced the risk premium on sovereign debt; but it seems to have raised, not lowered, rates on private debt. Two explanations for these higher private rates are suggested. During the war years 1690-1697, the government's improved capacity to borrow seems to have "crowded out" private borrowing. After peace was restored and the government's borrowing retrenched, the new political regime seems to have stimulated demand for loanable funds. -- check if final version in EagleFiler -- see jstor articles that have cited this - some interesting stuff from 2009 onwards by good authors
article  jstor  find  economic_history  political_economy  British_history  17thC  Glorious_Revolution  1690s  sovereign_debt  financial_system  banking  crowding_out  Nine_Years_War  North-Weingast  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Darrick N. Taylor -thesis - L'Estrange His Life: Public and Persona in the Life and Career of Sir Roger L'Estrange, 1616-1704 (2011)
KU ScholarWorks: Authors: Taylor, Darrick N. Advisors: Clark, Jonathan C.D. .....Downloaded pdf to Note..... The subject of this dissertation is the life and career of Roger L'Estrange, who was a licenser of Books and Surveyor of the Press for Charles II, as well as a royalist pamphleteer. It seeks to answer the question of how conceptions of public and private changed in late seventeenth century England be examining the career of L'Estrange, which involved him in many of the major pamphlet campaigns of the Restoration period. It argues that there was no stable "public sphere" in seventeenth century England, one that clearly marked it off from a private sphere of domesticity. It argues that the classical notion of office, in which reciprocal obligation and duty were paramount, was the basic presupposition of public but also private life, and that the very ubiquity of ideals of office holding made it semantically impossible to distinguish a stable public realm from a private one. Furthermore, the dissertation also argues that the presupposition of officium not only provided the basis for understanding relationships between persons but also of individual identity in seventeenth century England. It argues that L'Estrange saw his own identity in terms of the offices he performed, and that his individual identity was shaped by the antique notion of persona--of a mask that one wears, when performing a role--than to modern notions of individual identity. Lastly, it will argue that people in seventeenth century England still understood their world in terms of offices, but that changes in the way they understood office, visible in L'Estrange's writings, helped prepare the way for the reception of more modern ideas about public and private spheres that would eventually come to fruition in the nineteenth century.
thesis  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  1680s  1690s  1700s  L'Estrange  Charles_II  James_II  Whigs  Tories  political_press  pamphlets  censorship  propaganda  politics-and-religion  public_sphere  office  persona  identity  self  obligation  moral_philosophy  domesticity  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Urmi Bhowmik: Facts and Norms in the Marketplace of Print: John Dunton's Athenian Mercury (2003)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 36, No. 3 (Spring, 2003), pp. 345-365 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay discusses the division of knowledge within the context of a popular periodical, the Athenian Mercury (1691-1697). The separation of fields of knowledge in the Enlightenment was merely the prelude to the attempt to establish disciplines on a common basis. I trace a similar process in the Mercury', which treated questions about natural science and moral dilemmas as if they shared an analogous structure—of particular instantiations of universal laws. I argue that this identification of facts and norms constituted the public subject simultaneously as subject to the law and the authority before which the law must legitimate itself.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  cultural_history  17thC  1690s  publishing  Dunston  public_sphere  sociology_of_knowledge  disciplines  natural_law  natural_philosophy  moral_philosophy  norms  facts  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Seager - Review essay - Defoe at 350 | Eighteenth-Century Studies - 2011
Project_MUSE downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- Stephen H. Gregg, Defoe’s Writings and Manliness: Contrary Men (Farnham: Ashgate, 2009). Pp. x, 197. $99.95. --**-- Leon Guilhamet, Defoe and the Whig Novel: A Reading of the Major Fiction (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2010). Pp. 243.$56.50. --**-- Robert M. Maniquis and Carl Fisher, eds., Defoe’s Footprints: Essays in Honour of Maximillian E. Novak (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2009). Pp. vi, 273. $65.00. --**-- Andreas K. E. Mueller, A Critical Study of Daniel Defoe’s Verse: Recovering the Neglected Corpus of His Poetic Work, with a foreword by Robert Mayer (Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press, 2010). Pp. xiv, 288. $119.95. --**-- John Richetti, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Daniel Defoe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008). Pp. xiv, 248. $29.99. --**-- Dennis Todd, Defoe’s America (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010). Pp. xi, 229. $95.00.
books  reviews  Project_MUSE  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  1710s  1720s  English_lit  cultural_history  lit_crit  literary_history  politics-and-literature  novels  political_press  economic_culture  commerce  finance_capital  masculinity  Defoe 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Richard R. Johnson: Politics Redefined: An Assessment of Recent Writings on the Late Stuart Period of English History, 1660 to 1714 (1978)
JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Oct., 1978), pp. 691-732 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- doesn't look fabulous analytically, but fabulous collection of works after c 1960 including links to lots of studies of economic data -- although his critique of Plumb waiting for the appearance "of that portly deus ex machina" is delicious
article  jstor  historiography  bibliography  17thC  18thC  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  William_III  Queen_Anne  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  Hanoverian_Succession  political_history  economic_history  social_history  religious_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
David Hopkins: Dryden and the Garth-Tonson Metamorphoses (1988)
JSTOR: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 39, No. 153 (Feb., 1988), pp. 64-74 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  English_lit  literary_history  17thC  18thC  1690s  1710s  Dryden  Pope  Addison  publishing  imitation  translation  poetry  Ovid  networks-literary  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Judith Richards, Lotte Mulligan and John K. Graham: "Property" and "People": Political Usages of Locke and Some Contemporaries (1981)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1981), pp. 29-51-- downloaded pdf to Note -- comparison especially with Exclusion Crisis authors eg Sidney, Tyrrel, Henry Neville who were more prominent and used by Whigs in decades after Glorious Revolution. The potential radicalism of each depends on how they used same terms differently
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  language-politics  property  populism  people_the  17thC  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  British_politics  1680s  1690s  Locke  Sidney  Whigs-Radicals  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Randy Robertson: Swift's "Leviathan" and the End of Licensing (2005)
JSTOR: Pacific Coast Philology, Vol. 40, No. 2 (2005), pp. 38-55 -- a close reading of Tale of the Tub as a Hobbesian attack on pernicious political and religious controversialist press in wake of lapse of Licensing Act -- in lieu of censorship, shut down Grub Street with ridicule -- lots of references to evolution of law on freedom of the press, libel etc and history of the book
article  jstor  literary_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  religious_culture  publishing  public_sphere  political_press  politics-and-literature  religious_lit  censorship  free_speech  17thC  1690s  Swift  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Stephen H Gregg: Defoe and Descartes’ beast-machine: a brief bibliography | The Daniel Defoe Blog
Recently, I became rather obsessed with two small pieces in Defoe’s Review of March 27th, 1705 and the ‘Supplement of January 1705’ (published after March). They debate the extent to which dogs can reason. Researching the contexts for this involved a deep dive into the complex history of the debate about reasoning animals, the animal soul, and Descartes’ ‘beast-machine’ as outlined in his Discourse on Method. The debate spun across religious, philosophical, classical, literary, journalistic and scientific writings for over a century after. But I particularly needed to map out the writings published in the years immediately before Defoe’s 1705 piece.[1] The results revealed a gratifying surge in the English debate from around 1690.
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august 2013 by dunnettreader

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