dunnettreader + 15thc   93

BBC Radio 4 - Germany: Memories of a Nation, Reichstag
Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, explores 600 years of Germany's complex and often challenging history using objects, art, landmarks and literature.
audio  entre_deux_guerres  15thC  German_unification  design  Reformation  20thC  18thC  19thC  Holy_Roman_Empire  Nazis  art_history  Modernism  Weimar  16thC  Bismarck  Europe-Early_Modern  social_history  medieval_history  cultural_history  Germany  post-WWII  17thC 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Bruce Campbell: The Great Transition, Lecture 1 of 4 - Ellen McArthur Lectures 2013, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
See his 2016 book with CUP - The Great Transition: Climate, Disease and Society in the Medieval World - kindle-available
Lecture schedule
Lecture 1 - The 14th century as tipping point: From one socio-ecological status quo to another
Lecture 2 - The enabling environment: The Medieval Solar Maximum and Latin Christendom's high-medieval efflorescence
Lecture 3 - A precarious balance: Mounting economic vulnerability in an era of increasing climatic instability
Lecture 4 - Disease intervenes: The Black Death and the 'Great Transition' to an alternative socio-ecological equilibrium
video  lecture  economic_history  social_history  environmental_history  disease  Black_Death  medieval_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  Italy  urbanization  foreign_trade  Mongols  Mamluks  spice_trade  Central_Asia  genetics  weather  agriculture  demography  economic_growth  climate-history  climate_change  Little_Ice_Age  Italy-cities  international_finance 
november 2017 by dunnettreader
Karaman
Theoretical work on taxation and state-building borrows heavily from early modern European experience. While a number of European states increased centralized tax revenues during this period, for others revenues stagnated or even declined and these variations have motivated alternative arguments for the determinants of fiscal and state capacity. This study reviews the arguments concerning the three determinants that have received most attention, namely warfare, economic structure, and political regime, and tests them by making use of a new and comprehensive tax revenue dataset. Our main finding is that these three determinants worked in interaction with each other. Specifically, when under pressure of war, it was representative regimes in more urbanized-commercial economies and authoritarian regimes in more rural-agrarian economies that tended to better aggregate domestic interests towards state-building. - Downloaded via iphone
tax_collection  taxes  state-building  nation-state  urban_politics  competition-interstate  political_culture  political_participation  agriculture-surplus  Absolutism  government_finance  fiscal-military_state  agriculture  Europe-Early_Modern  economic_history  article  bibliography  political_sociology  central_government  19thC  financial_instiutions  downloaded  18thC  15thC  urban_elites  military_history  political_economy  17thC  governing_class  constitutional_regime  local_government  fiscal_policy  16thC  government-forms  jstor  Crown_finance  financial_system 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Neil Cummins - Longevity and the Rise of the West: Lifespans of the European Elite, 800-1800 (2014)
Longevity and the Rise of the West: Lifespans of the European Elite, 800-1800
I analyze the age at death of 121,524 European nobles from 800 to 1800. Longevity began increasing long before 1800 and the Industrial Revolution, with marked increases around 1400 and again around 1650. Declines in violence contributed to some of this increase, but the majority must reflect other changes in individual behavior. The areas of North-West Europe which later witnessed the Industrial Revolution achieved greater longevity than the rest of Europe even by 1000 AD. The data suggest that the `Rise of the West' originates before the Black Death.
Downloaded WP version via iPhone to DBOX
lifestyle  16thC  10thC  13thC  14thC  17thC  11thC  paper  medieval_history  economic_history  life_expectancy  social_history  downloaded  12thC  elites  warrior_class  feudalism  18thC  British_history  nobles  wealth  Western_Europe  15thC  demography  9thC  landowners 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
K. Tonry - Agency and Intention in English Print, 1476–1526 | Brepols
K. Tonry Agency and Intention in English Print, 1476–1526 Add to basket -> XV+241 p., 15 b/w ill., 156 x 234 mm, 2016 ISBN: 978-2-503-53576-0 Languages:…
books  history_of_book  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  print_culture  publishing  British_history  cultural_history  cultural_change  from instapaper
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages - European Review of Economic History
When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (National Research Council), ISSM-CNR, malanima@issm.cnr.it According to Allen, between 1500 and 1750, a “great divergence” among countries in the level of wages occurred in Europe. Italian real wages were already among the lowest in the late medieval and early modern age. Their relative level diminished even more from the seventeenth century. An analysis of prices and wages in Italy and England does not support this view. Actually, until the beginning of the eighteenth century, Italian real wages were either higher than in England (fourteenth and fifteenth centuries) or more or less equal (sixteenth and seventeenth). It was not until the eighteenth century that England began to overtake Italy. However, the disparity in wages before 1800 was modest. It increased fast from then onwards. Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
labor_history  Italy  15thC  medieval_history  labor_force_structure  competiveness-labor  wages  economic_history  British_history  14thC  economic_growth  downloaded  Renaissance  16thC  Labor_markets  17thC  article  prices  18thC  England 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 (2013) - European Economic History Review
The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (Naples) Italian National Research Council (CNR), malanima@issm.cnr.it The purpose of the article is to present the statistical reconstruction of a series of per capita output in central–northern Italy between 1300 and 1913. The various phases of both the statistical procedure and the results are presented and discussed. From the Renaissance until the 1880s, when modern growth starts, the curve of per capita GDP is downward bent. Output series together with three robustness tests, are collected in the Appendices.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
productivity  economic_growth  17thC  agriculture  18thC  16thC  Renaissance  economic_history  14thC  stats  urbanization  Italy  GDP  manufacturing  GDP-per_capita  economic_decline  downloaded  article  proto-industry  agriculture-productivity  19thC  commerce  15thC 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Spencer Dimmock -The Origins of Capitalism in England 1400-1600 (2015) | Haymarket Books
ISBN: 9781608464852 - Drawing on an impressive array of original archival research and a series of critiques of recent accounts of economic development in pre-modern England, The Origin of Capitalism in England 1400-1600 offers a rich and multi-layered account of the historical rupture in English feudal society that led to the first sustained transition to agrarian capitalism and the industrial revolution. Weaving together political, social, and economic themes, Spencer Dimmock makes the case that capitalism should be viewed as a form of society rather than narrowly as an economic system. This wide-ranging work convincingly argues that the beginnings of capitalist society must be firmly located in a precisely defined historical context, rather than through reference to evolutionary and transhistorical commercial developments. This novel approach is sure to stimulate a thorough reappraisal of current orthodoxies on the transition to capitalism. -- Spencer Dimmock Ph.D. (1999), University of Kent at Canterbury, is an Honorary Research Fellow in History at Swansea University. He has published many articles and chapter contributions on pre-modern England and Wales.
books  economic_history  British_history  15thC  16thC  capitalism 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire. (Paperback 2009) - Princeton University Press
Avoiding a standard chronological account of the Byzantine Empire's millennium--long history, she identifies the fundamental questions about Byzantium--what it was, and what special significance it holds for us today. Bringing the latest scholarship to a general audience in accessible prose, Herrin focuses each short chapter around a representative theme, event, monument, or historical figure, and examines it within the full sweep of Byzantine history--from the foundation of Constantinople, the magnificent capital city built by Constantine the Great, to its capture by the Ottoman Turks.

She argues that Byzantium's crucial role as the eastern defender of Christendom against Muslim expansion during the early Middle Ages made Europe--and the modern Western world--possible. Herrin captivates us with her discussions of all facets of Byzantine culture and society. She walks us through the complex ceremonies of the imperial court. She describes the transcendent beauty and power of the church of Hagia Sophia, as well as chariot races, monastic spirituality, diplomacy, and literature. She reveals the fascinating worlds of military usurpers and ascetics, eunuchs and courtesans, and artisans who fashioned the silks, icons, ivories, and mosaics so readily associated with Byzantine art.

An innovative history written by one of our foremost scholars, Byzantium reveals this great civilization's rise to military and cultural supremacy, its spectacular destruction by the Fourth Crusade, and its revival and final conquest in 1453. - no ebook - lots of illustrations - Introduction downloaded to Tab S2
books  downloaded  Byzantium  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  elite_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islam-expansion  architecture  architecture-churches  diplomatic_history  military_history  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Orthodox_Christianity  Crusades  Constantinople  13thC  14thC  15thC  Ottomans  court_culture  courtiers  ritual  art_history  decorative_arts  popular_culture 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Martin Mulsow - Ambiguities of the Prisca Sapientia in Late Renaissance Humanism (2004) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 1-13 -- the assertion of a concordance between these early philosophies and their accordance with Christianity-in the sense of a Christian Platonism- implied the synthesis of fragementary philosophemes into a fully developed doctrine (...)
This program was formulated in a variety of ways during the 16th-17thC with differing protagonists and with diverse aims. Thus one could supplement the genealogy in a cabalist vein, introduce biblical characters such as Solomon or Moses, or (as was done by Bruno) use it to contest Christian doctrine. The genealogy could be read as culminating in various notable modem figures such as for example, Paracelsus. Aristotle could be included or excluded from it, depending on whether one wanted to assimilate the Aristotelian tradition or to distance oneself from it; and one could leave the end of this genealogical lineage open in order to exhort the necessity of a scientific and moral reform.
(...) the question of what became of this program during the late Renaissance, when two developments took place simultaneously: on the one hand, the utopia of the prisca sapientia set about to conquer the field formerly reserved to the Aristotelians, namely, natural philosophy; on the other hand, the first doubts arose about the overall validity of the historical-philological foundation of the program, especially the dating of the works of Hermes Trismegistus. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  natural_philosophy  Neoplatonism  Aristotelian  Kabbalah  alchemy  prisca_sapientia  Hermes_Trismegistus  Bible-as-history  chronology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_religions  Moses  ancient_Egypt  Renaissance  philology  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Black - Machiavelli and the Humanist Tradition (2013) | Warburg Institute - School of Advanced Study, University of London
Speaker(s):
Robert Black (Professor of Renaissance History, University of Leeds)
Event date:
Wednesday 19 June 2013
The Warburg Institute
Renaissance  video  Machiavelli  Florence  lecture  intellectual_history  humanism  15thC 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Monetary history - rural finance in northwest Europe from c 1400 | Real-World Economics Review Blog
a) Since at least 1400 rural lending and borrowing was at least in some regions common and tied to the life cycle of households and families, which (though…
Instapaper  economic_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  financial_innovation  rural  Netherlands  agriculture  family  inheritance  marriage  households  collateral  banking  from instapaper
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Carina L. Johnson - Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 597-622 -- describes shifting descriptions across the 15thC-16thC of religious practices and how they were increasingly reported on, analyzed, and categorized, starting with Aristotle's and mutating -- in travel lit, reports from exploration, missionaries, colonization and aggregations in published works from ethnography to large scale "cosmographies" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  15thC  16thC  17thC  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  publishing  travel_lit  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  religious_belief  religious_practices  religious_imagery  idolatry  ethnography  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  civilization-concept  primitivism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Goulding - Histories of Science in Early Modern Europe: Introduction to special issue (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 33-40 **--** Articles in the issue *--* James Steven Byrne, Humanist History of Mathematics? Regiomontanus's Padua Oration in Context (pp. 41-61) *--* Robert Goulding, Method and Mathematics: Peter Ramus's Histories of the Sciences (pp. 63-85) *--* Nicholas Popper, "Abraham, Planter of Mathematics": Histories of Mathematics and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (pp. 87-106) *--* Lauren Kassell, "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (pp. 107-122) -- helpful on recent historiography on humanists, science and history writing -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  history_of_science  mathematics  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  humanism  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  astrology  magic  education-higher  natural_philosophy  reading  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-writing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob T. Levy - Rationalism, Pluralism, and Freedom - Feb 2015 - Oxford University Press
Intermediate groups-- voluntary associations, churches, ethnocultural groups, universities, and more--can both protect threaten individual liberty. The same is true for centralized state action against such groups. Levy argues that, both normatively and historically, liberal political thought rests on a deep tension between a rationalist suspicion of intermediate and local group power, and a pluralism favorable toward intermediate group life, and preserving the bulk of its suspicion for the centralizing state. He studies this tension using tools from the history of political thought, normative political philosophy, law, and social theory. (..) retells the history of liberal thought and practice (..)from the birth of intermediacy in the High Middle Ages to the British Pluralists of the 20thC. (..) restores centrality to (..) ancient constitutionalism and to Montesquieu, (..) social contract theory's contributions to the development of liberal thought have been mistaken for the whole tradition. It discusses the real threats to freedom posed both by local group life and by state centralization, the ways in which those threats aggravate each other.(..) the elements of liberal thought concerned with the threats from each cannot necessarily be combined into a single satisfactory theory of freedom. (..) it must be lived with, not overcome. -- 3 parts and an epilogue Against Synthesis -history in Part 2 -- 4. Antecedents and Foundations -- 5. The Ancient Constitution, the Social Contract, and the Modern State -- 6. Montesquieu and Voltaire, Philosophes and Parlements -- 7. The Age of Revolutions -- 8. Centralization in a Democratic Age: Tocqueville and Mill -- 9. From Liberal Constitutionalism to Pluralism -- only in hardback so far
books  buy  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  liberalism  liberal_democracy  intermediate_groups  pluralism  central_government  liberty  ancient_constitution  social_contract  monarchy-proprietary  limited_monarchy  limited_government  associations  subsidiarity  feudalism  Absolutism  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Montesquieu  Voltaire  British_politics  France  Ancien_régime 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Ada Palmer - Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 3 (July 2012), pp. 395-416
In the Renaissance, Epicureanism and other heterodox scientific theories were strongly associated with heresy and atheism, and frequently condemned. Yet, when Lucretius’s Epicurean poem De Rerum Natura reappeared in 1417, these associations did not prevent the poem’s broad circulation. A survey of marginalia in Lucretius manuscripts reveals a characteristic humanist reading agenda, focused on philology and moral philosophy, which facilitated the circulation of such heterodox texts among an audience still largely indifferent to their radical content. Notes in later sixteenth century print copies reveal a transformation in reading methods, and an audience more receptive to heterodox science. Article is on Project MUSE - the jstor archive is open through 2011, closed for 2012, and has no later volumes. The jstor page for articles from 2012 has the advantage of the full set of footnotes. I've copied the footnotes to Evernote. -- update, I've downloaded it to Note
article  jstor  bibliography  intellectual_history  Lucretius  Epicurean  heterodoxy  atheism  15thC  16thC  Renaissance  humanism  philology  moral_philosophy  reading  reader_response  readership  atomism  determinism  cosmology  Scientific_Revolution  cultural_change  cultural_transmission  circulation-ideas  Evernote  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Tim Neff, review - Andrew Pettegree, The Invention of News: How the World Came to Know About Itself | Public Books — April 2015
How did we go from that to the news as we now know it, broadcast across the globe and in cycles measured in milliseconds? Pettegree, a professor of modern history at the University of St. Andrews, in Scotland, finds answers by linking the emergence of news as a mass commodity to Western Europe’s development of communications networks between the 15th and 18th centuries. This network perspective decenters news as a singular object. Instead, what we get is a richly detailed history that shows the invention of news as a messy cultural process, with abrupt turns and setbacks. Major advances in information networks were quickly followed by retreats. Printers would reinvent news, only to fold a year or two later. When newspapers first appeared, a mass readership had to learn how to read brief accounts that provided much less context than the narrative histories with which they were familiar. Pettegree’s history of news suggests that crisis has shadowed journalism from the start. The Invention of News divides the earliest stirrings of modern news into three epochs, starting with the 15th and early 16th centuries, when the printing press spurred the transition from largely private news networks to the earliest forms of public news industries. Next, in the 16th and early 17th centuries, improved communications networks enabled the news to spread faster and to more people at less cost. Finally, in the 17th and 18th centuries, advertising expanded circulations, and Enlightenment ideals brought an empirical approach to news that led it to shed moral overtones.
books  reviews  kindle-available  cultural_history  cultural_change  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  news  newspapers  publishing  readership  journalism  communication  information  information-markets  Enlightenment  mass_culture  networks-information  public_sphere  disinformation  witchcraft  public_opinion  public_disorder 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Maria Fusaro - Political Economies of Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean: The Decline of Venice and the Rise of England 1450–1700 (to be released April 2015) | Cambridge University Press
Maria Fusaro presents a new perspective on the onset of Venetian decline. Examining the significant commercial relationship between England and Venice in the period 1450–1700, Fusaro demonstrates how Venice's social, political and economic circumstances shaped the English mercantile community in unique ways. By focusing on the commercial interaction between them, she also re-establishes the analysis of the maritime political economy as an essential constituent of the Venetian state political economy. This challenging interpretation of some classic issues of early modern history will be of profound interest to economic, social and legal historians and provides a stimulating addition to current debates in imperial history, especially on the economic relationship between different empires and the socio-economic interaction between 'rulers and ruled'. **--* "For the first time Maria Fusaro gives us the English among the creeks and islands of the Venetian empire, as seen by the Venetians themselves. Using archives hitherto little-known or wholly unknown, she paints a lively picture of Anglo-Venetian commerce, diplomacy and war." Nicholas Rodger, University of Oxford **--** Introduction: political economies of empire *-* 1. The medieval background *-* 2. The reversal of the balance *-* 3. The Ottoman Levant *-* 4. Genoa, Venice and Livorno (a tale of three cities) *-* 5. Trade, violence and diplomacy *-* 6. Diplomacy, trade and religion *-* 7. The Venetian peculiarities *-* 8. The English mercantile community in Venice *-* 9. The English and other mercantile communities *-* 10. The goods of the trade *-* 11. Empires and governance in the Mediterranean *-* 12. Coda and conclusions -- marketing materials not yet available for download
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Mediterranean  Venice  Italy  city_states  Genoa  Livorno  British_history  mercantilism  trade  trading_companies  empires  Ottomans  Ottoman_Empire  maritime_history  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  commerce  privileges-corporate  trading_privileges  religion-and-economics  trade_finance  trade-cultural_transmission  governance-regional  maritime_law  commercial_law  commercial_interest  foreigners-resident  wars-causes  military_history  competition-interstate  mercantilism-violence  trade-policy_enforcement  naval_history  shipping  weaponry 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
NICOLAS GUILHOT - THE FIRST MODERN REALIST: FELIX GILBERT'S MACHIAVELLI AND THE REALIST TRADITION IN INTERNATIONAL THOUGHT | Modern Intellectual History (Feb 2015) - Cambridge Journals Online
Centre national de la recherche scientifique, New York University E-mail: nicolas.guilhot@nyu.edu -- In the disciplines of political science and international relations, Machiavelli is unanimously considered to be “the first modern realist.” This essay argues that the idea of a realist tradition going from the Renaissance to postwar realism founders when one considers the disrepute of Machiavelli among early international relations theorists. It suggests that the transformation of Machiavelli into a realist thinker took place subsequently, when new historical scholarship, informed by strategic and political considerations related to the transformation of the US into a global power, generated a new picture of the Renaissance. Focusing on the work of Felix Gilbert, and in particular his Machiavelli and Guicciardini, the essay shows how this new interpretation of Machiavelli was shaped by the crisis of the 1930s, the emergence of security studies, and the philanthropic sponsorship of international relations theory. -- * I would like to thank Samuel Moyn and three anonymous reviewers for their comments on a prior version of this paper. I greatly benefited from discussions with Volker Berghahn, Anthony Molho, and Jacques Revel. -- paywall
article  paywall  find  libraries  IR_theory  intellectual_history  IR-realism  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  strategic_studies  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guicciardini  historiography-postWWII  US_foreign_policy  hegemony  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert C. Allen - Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR - The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003) , pp. 403-443
An econometric model of economic development is estimated with data from leading European countries between 1300 and 1800. The model explores the impact of population, enclosure, empire, representative government, technology, and literacy on urbanization, agricultural productivity, proto-industry, and the real wage. Simulations show that the main factors leading to economic success in north-western Europe were the growth of American and Asian commerce and, especially, the innovations underlying the export of the new draperies in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The enclosure of the open fields, representative government, and the spread of literacy did not play major roles. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  North-Weingast  agrarian_capitalism  literacy  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_Empire  Dutch  colonialism  trade  Asia  textiles  Innovation  agriculture  urbanization  wages  labor_history  manufacturing  productivity  export-led  Industrial_Revolution  proto-industry  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic: Can Black Death explain the Industrial Revolution? | globalinequality - Jan 11 2015
re presentation by a young scholar at Santa Fe suggesting that Why England (and Dutch) due to higher wages in Northern Europe post Black Death in contrast with South where non market repression or property arrangements were able to push adjustment costs inti agricultural workers without impact on wage rates. Milanovic compares with other theoretical approaches ie Pomerantz, Acemoglu & Robinson, Robert Allen etc. Link to 2007 paper by Pamuk Milanovic thinks may be 1st work to seriously look at differential impact of Black Death on northern & southern Europe as distinct from the common story if Western vs Central and Eastern Europe.
economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  Black_Death  North-Weingast  landowners  demography  economic_sociology  labor  agriculture  wages  productivity  colonialism  medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  institutional_economics  capital  capitalism  China  Japan  ancient_Rome  slavery  bibliography 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Gustave Flaubert - Oeuvres (pdfs) | Ichiro Miyazawa at Kyoto University of Foreign Studies
Œuvres de jeunesse numérisées en mode image par Ichiro Miyazawa, site de Kyoto University of Foreign Studies -- via Centre Flaubert at U of Rouen -- the Kyoto site has pdfs of Flaubert's main works as well, but is linked for its extensive set of etexts of minor works and studies -- Les soirées d'étude, Narrations et discours, Mort du duc de Guise, Deux mains sur une couronne, Un parfum à sentir, Chronique normande du Xe siècle, La Femme du monde, Un secret de Philippe le Prudent, roi d'Espagne, La Peste à Florence, Bibliomanie, Rage et impuissance, La Dernière Heure, Une leçon d'histoire naturelle : genre Commis, La Main de fer, Rêve d'enfer, Passion et vertu, Agonies, Ivre et mort, Mémoires d'un fou, Étude sur Rabelais, Les Funérailles du Docteur Mathurin, Mademoiselle Rachel, Souvenirs, notes et pensées intimes, Novembre.
website  etexts  Flaubert  19thC  French_lit  fiction  literary_history  ancient_Rome  France  Wars_of_Religion  15thC  16thC  medieval_history  Rabelais 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
ERIC COCHRANE, The Transition from Renaissance to Baroque: The Case of Italian Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Feb., 1980), pp. 21-38
The meaning of the term "baroque" has been the subject of much debate. In the field of historiography, historians have not engaged in a dialogue on the subject and have accepted uncritically the value-judgments of eighteenth-century scholarship. One approach to be used in this author's new book, Historians and Historiography in the Italian Renaissance, compares the work of 782 Italian historians from earliest times through the seventeenth century. The humanist historiography of the Italian Renaissance exhibited the concepts of change, contingency, and epoch in history; relied on ancient forms; used methodological principles of causation; and taught moral and political lessons. Italian Baroque historiography, on the other hand, employed the forms of the new bulletins or avvisi, copied the prose style of its contemporaries, discounted its practical utility, and displayed a separation between history as literature and history as research. -- downloaded to Air
article  jstor  historiography  historicism  Renaissance  humanism  historiography-18thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  historiography-19thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Italy  Guicciardini  historical_change  contingency  Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Philippe Genet - La genèse de l'État moderne: Culture et société politique en Angleterre (2003) | Livres -- Amazon.fr
La genèse de l'État moderne est le fruit d'une lente évolution à partir de la seconde moitié du XIIIe siècle, qui a d'abord affecté les monarchies féodales d'Occident : il y a quelques années, elle a fait l'objet d'études systématiques de nombreux historiens en Europe, grâce au CNRS et à la Fondation européenne de la Science. Le présent ouvrage est une étude de cas, consacrée à l'Angleterre, à bien des égards la plus précoce et la plus cohérente des constructions politiques médiévales qui, paradoxalement, est peu étudiée par les historiens français. On y retrouve le primat de la guerre et de la fiscalité dans la dynamique de la genèse de l'État moderne, ainsi que la mise en place d'un système judiciaire garantissant la reproduction de la classe dominante dans des conditions satisfaisantes. Mais l'ouvrage permet surtout de relever et d'articuler la corrélation entre le développement et la vitalité de la société politique, dont l'existence est une condition sine qua non pour l'État moderne, et la mutation de la culture et du système de communication médiéval, tant au niveau des médias et de la langue qu'à celui des types de textes produits. Par l'analyse de plus de 2200 bio-bibliographies d'" auteurs " actifs dans les domaines de l'histoire et du politique, et au moyen d'une théorie des champs de production textuelle, se dégage ce qu'a été l'idéologie spécifique du féodalisme d'État. Alors naissent progressivement les catégories modernes du politique, ainsi que la notion d'une société politique " nationale " -- Recommended in Penguin history of England bibliographies
books  amazon.fr  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  13thC  14thC  15thC  nation-state  national_ID  political_culture  feudalism  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  judiciary  historiography  political_sociology  military_history  state-building  political_economy  elites  elite_culture  monarchy  taxes  fiscal-military_state  nobility 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Khan, B. - An Economic History of Copyright in Europe and the United States | EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. March 16, 2008
The US created a utilitarian market-based model of intellectual property grants which created incentives for invention, with the primary objective of increasing social welfare and protecting the public domain. The checks and balances of interest group lobbies, the legislature and the judiciary worked effectively as long as each institution was relatively well-matched in terms of size and influence. However, a number of scholars are concerned that the political influence of corporate interests, the vast number of uncoordinated users over whom the social costs are spread, and international harmonization of laws have upset these counterchecks, leading to over-enforcement at both the private and public levels. International harmonization with European doctrines introduced significant distortions in the fundamental principles of US copyright and its democratic provisions. One of the most significant of these changes was also one of the least debated: compliance with the precepts of the Berne Convention accorded automatic copyright protection to all creations on their fixation in tangible form. This rule reversed the relationship between copyright and the public domain that the US Constitution stipulated. According to original US copyright doctrines, the public domain was the default, and copyright a limited exemption to the public domain; after the alignment with Berne, copyright became the default, and the rights of the public and of the public domain now merely comprise a limited exception to the primacy of copyright. The pervasive uncertainty that characterizes the intellectual property arena today leads risk-averse individuals and educational institutions to err on the side of abandoning their right to free access rather than invite challenges and costly litigation. Many commentators are also concerned about other dimensions of the globalization of intellectual property rights, such as the movement to emulate European grants of property rights in databases, which has the potential to inhibit diffusion and learning.
article  economic_history  publishing  property  property_rights  legal_history  legal_system  IP  regulation-harmonization  natural_rights  natural_law  copyright  patents  US_constitution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  international_law  France  French_Revolution  censorship  British_history  authors  artists  playwrights  democracy  knowledge_economy  Internet  globalization  global_economy  digital_humanities  transparency  open_access  scientific_culture  science-public  education  R&D  education-higher  common_law  civil_code  civil_society  civic_humanism  US_legal_system 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
André Gendre - La Pléiade entre Bembo et l’Arioste | Italique, VI, 2003, p. 7-36
Italique [En ligne], VI | 2003, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.134 **--** L’imitation, en matière de poésie amoureuse par exemple, n’implique pas toujours la reconnaissance, fût-elle éphémère, d’une doctrine philosophique, d’une expérience commune, d’une affinité de sentiments ; elle est souvent comme un masque du sens qu’on emprunte pour le rendre ensuite. Elle correspond aussi à une séduction formelle momentanée. Ces pratiques aléatoires paraissent condamner la recherche d’une influence très particulière exercée sur nos poètes. Il est vrai que la Pléiade ne choisit souvent Bembo ou l’Arioste que pour leurs lieux communs pétrarquistes.Mais ces modèles sont trop grands poètes pour ne pas déterminer plus spécifiquement ceux qu’ils inspirent. -- Plan -- La sérénité néo-platonicienne de bembo. -- Le pittoresque de bembo -- L’arioste stimul. -- l’imaginaire sensuel des poètes de la pléiade. -- L’arioste et le portrait érotique. -- L’arioste inspire des imitations variées. -- Les Azolains éclairent-ils la composition des recueils français ? -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  Renaissance  Italy  France  Italian_lit  poetry  poetics  Ariosto  Bembo  French_lit  Pléiade  imitation  influence-literary  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas Hunkeler - Les « déviations » de l’esprit. Lire Délie de Maurice Scève à la lumière du Dolce Stil Nuovo | Italique, V, 2002, p. 53-75.
Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.146 **--** Aimer l’esprit, madame, c’est aimer la sottise. C’est par ce vers provocant que Ronsard ouvre en 1578, dans la première édition de ses sonnets pour hélène, le procès d’un platonisme qui s’est affadi, du moins de son avis, en un phénomène de cour et en une phraséologie largement dépourvue de portée philosophique. Au moment où Ronsard passe ainsi à l’attaque, le platonisme connaît en effet en France une seconde vague après celle des années 1530-40... Mais si, depuis Ronsard, le platonisme et a fortiori la notion d’amour platonique semblent figurer parmi les ingrédients aussi insipides qu’hypocrites de la littérature sentimentale, ce jugement ne trahit pas seulement un changement de goût ou de mœurs. Il résulte aussi d’une réception partielle, timorée et édulcorée, de la pensée ficinienne, qui a banalisé une pensée bien plus riche et bien plus ambivalente que ne le laisse croire la caricature de Ronsard. Une notion semble résumer à elle seule les enjeux, mais aussi les ambivalences de la pensée ficinienne : l’esprit. En effet, c’est dans la mesure où la notion d’esprit ou de spiritus a été banalisée lors de son importation en France, où on en a évacué tous les aspects qui n’entraient pas dans la tendance à la moralisation et à la spiritualisation qui marquait la réception de Ficin en France, qu’une réaction de rejet comme celle de Ronsard peut se comprendre. C’est dans une telle perspective que j’aimerais analyser, après avoir fait le point sur la notion de spiritus chez Ficin, le rôle que joue la notion d’“esprit” dans la réception de la pensée de Ficin en France entre 1500 et 1550, avant d’aborder plus en détail le cas de Maurice Scève. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  Italy  France  Renaissance  Ficino  Neoplatonism  humanism  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  sentimentalism  reception  court_culture  elite_culture  Pléiade  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Alessandra Villa - Le partage des ‘droits’ sur l’œuvre littéraire à la renaissance. Les cas d’Isabella d’Este | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 45-71
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.116. **--** la marquise s’avéra préférer, lorsqu’une œuvre lui était offerte, l’exclusivité de l’objet et le privilège de posséder une œuvre peu répandue et dont elle pouvait contrôler la diffusion ultérieure. Tout en répondant parfaitement à l’image d’une femme que l’historiographie dépeint véhémente, voire tyrannique, cette idée était très familière aux mécènes de la Renaissance et, à vrai dire, de tous les temps, du fait que la rareté est l’un des critères principaux pour estimer la valeur d’une quelconque collection, qu’elle soit d’œuvres d’art ou de livres. D’autre part, si les reproductions des œuvres d’art ne gardaient pas aux yeux des contemporains toute la valeur des originaux, les œuvres littéraires, ainsi que les œuves théâtrales et musicales, possédaient un haut degré de ‘volatilité’, pouvant être copiées à peu de frais et sans porter préjudice à leur valeur intrinsèque. Leur reproduction n’impliquait pas une perte d’aura. -- Pour protéger les trésors de leurs bibliothèques, les seigneurs se montraient jaloux et méfiants : ils prêtaient peu volontiers, et seulement à des amis fiables, auxquels ils demandaient cependant des garanties, parfois même en argent. Le prêt des œuvres était réglé par la loi du do ut des, et l’emprunteur était soumis au serment, implicite ou explicite, de ne pas trahir la confiance du prêteur en divulguant ultérieurement le manuscrit. Selon Luzio et Renier, on pourrait écrire une histoire de la littérature italienne de la période en étudiant les dédicaces offertes à Isabella. Vu la qualité et la quantité des œuvres et des auteurs intéressés par un tel recensement, cela paraît une affirmation bien fondée. Mais outre l’honneur, Isabella semble avoir réclamé un autre genre de prérogatives, plus matériel et à la fois plus indéterminé : le droit de partager avec l’auteur leur gestion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  15thC  16thC  cultural_history  literary_history  intellectual_history  Italy  Italian_lit  Renaissance  court_culture  courtiers  elite_culture  patronage  patrons  authors  playwrights  publishing  publishing-piracy  IP  copyright  property_rights  dedications-author  economics_of_cultural_production  bibliophiles  manuscripts  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Arnaud Tripet - Pétrarque, la parole silencieuse | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 9-25.
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.112. *--* Les historiens s’accordent en général pour attribuer à Pétrarque une place inaugurale dans la culture dite humaniste, une culture qui sacrifie avant tout aux divinités de la parole. On restitue alors celle des Anciens. On valorise le verbe en lui conférant un pouvoir inédit sur les âmes, la capacité de les convertir au bien, au vrai et au beau. Son œuvre tant latine qu’italienne fournirait presque à l’infini des citations où la puissance bienfaisante du discours est proclamée au sein d’une épiphanie antique de la sagesse. Bientôt, et sous son influence, vont se créer en Italie, puis en Europe des écoles parallèles à celles déjà en place. Dans leurs programmes humanistes, le traditionnel trivium ne suffira plus, avec la logique, la rhétorique et la grammaire, pour qualifier les disciplines du langage en vue de la maîtrise ès arts. Va s’ajouter l’étude de l’histoire et de la poésie, laquelle n’existait précédemment que comme une variante de la rhétorique. Le souci d’élégance expressive ira de pair avec une certaine laïcisation des contenus. Humanisme dont on dira en simplifiant outrancièrement qu’il se construit ad maiorem hominis gloriam, de l’homme « parlant » en tout cas, et tenté souvent par une copia un peu complaisante, voire incontinente. Une question se pose alors : le silence va-t-il tempérer cette abondance ? Va-t-il nuancer la tentation de croire que le mot a valeur ontologique, et que l’on est ce qu’on dit ? Va-t-il suggérer que l’on est tout autant ce qu’on tait ? Sans autre préambule, je voudrais produire deux exemples tirés de Pétrarque. Ils parlent d’eux-mêmes et le silence y prend rang avec pleine dignité dans son discours.
article  revues.org  14thC  15thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  Italy  Italian_lit  humanism  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-moral_basis  self-fashioning  liberal_arts  historiography-Renaissance  exempla  vernacular  eloquence  self-government  self-examination  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Lina Bolzoni - Les Asolani de Pietro Bembo, ou le double portrait de l’amour | Italique, IX, 2006, p. 9-27
Italique [En ligne], IX | 2006, mis en ligne le 29 mai 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.103. **--** Les Asolani réalisent en outre une synthèse complexe de traditions et de modèles différents, littéraires et philosophiques, anciens et modernes, latins et en langue vulgaire. Ainsi la tradition du dialogue latin, classique et humaniste, est réécrite en vulgaire et utilisée également comme cadre et comme commentaire à un choix de poésies ; si le cadre narratif renvoie à son tour au Décaméron, le choix de poésies s’inspire de plus en plus du Pétrarque du Canzoniere. Différentes traditions philosophiques – en particulier la réflexion moderne sur l’amour des néoplatoniciens florentins – sont utilisées pour donner une nouvelle dignité théorique à la tradition lyrique en vulgaire et en même temps pour réaliser une difficile réconciliation entre vie et littérature, entre autobiographie et création d’un modèle idéal. La célébrité des asolani n’est pas seulement italienne : une traduction française, par Jean Martin, est publiée à Paris en 1545 et elle sera réimprimée plusieurs fois au cours du XVIe siècle.En outre, il ne faut pas oublier que Bembo est le protagoniste du dernier livre du cortegiano grâce justement à l’autorité dont il jouissait pour avoir écrit les asolani ; la célébrité européenne du cortegiano contribue à amplifier aussi la renommée de notre texte. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  Italy  Venice  France  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  16thC  Bembo  Petrarch  Dante  Boccaccio  poetry  poetics  prose  style  style-philosophy  elite_culture  Renaissance  courtiers  sprezaturra  love  humanism  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  reception  vernacular  neo-Latin  dialogue  publishing  manners  gentleman  otium  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Volker Kapp - Les Exempla dans les Triumphi et la culture oratoire de Pétrarque | Italique, XII, 2009, p. 9-31.
Italique [En ligne], XII | 2009, mis en ligne le 01 novembre 2012 - DOI : 10.4000/italique.220 *--* Les réserves des lecteurs du XXIe siècle contrastent avec le succès fulminant des Triumphi au Quattrocento dans les domaines littéraire et artistique. Le nombre élevé de manuscrits, ... confirme la haute estime dont ils jouirent pendant la Renaissance...pour ne pas parler des tableaux consacrés au thème du triomphe et influencés, plus ou moins, par Pétrarque. Pour expliquer ce changement surprenant des paramè­tres de la réception, on peut invoquer les divergences qui nous séparent de la civilisation humaniste.-- Et n’est-il pas légitime de renvoyer à la rhétorique qui caractérise l’humanisme européen précisément depuis Pétrarque dont on connaît l’ambition de se détacher par-là de la littérature et de la philosophie médiévales ? ...Nous proposons d’analyser cette problématique en insistant sur la figure rhétorique de l’exemplum. Afin de saisir l’impact de ce procédé à l’intérieur de la culture oratoire de Pétrarque, il faudra identifier quelques figures dans cette poésie, situer celle-ci parmi les formes du discours et évaluer ce qu’on a qualifié de « passion archéologique » de notre auteur, passion, dont relèvent les exempla tant dans son œuvre historique que dans les Triumphi. -- montrer que les exempla servent à mettre en scène le théâtre de la mémoire dans lequel le 'je' lyrique explore les présupposées et les enjeux de son éloge lyrique de Laure. Toute réflexion sur la rhétorique de Pétrarque doit partir de l’affinité entre l’art oratoire et la philosophie morale qu’il ne cesse de postuler. Cette convic­tion qu’il tire de Cicéron marque le dialogue intitulé De eloquentia du De remediis utriusque fortune. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  Petrarch  poetics  neo-Latin  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  humanism  Renaissance  Cicero  moral_philosophy  exempla  oratory  self-examination  reception  rhetoric-moral_basis  eloquence  Quintillian  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Tudor Translations: Machiavelli, 2 vols. - Online Library of Liberty
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Tudor Translations: Machiavelli, with an Introduction by Henry Cust, M.P.. 2 Vols. (London: David Nutt, 1905). 09/01/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1741> -- A two volume collection of inlfuential English translations of the writings of Machiavelli during the Tudor period.-- pdf is of scan -- didn't download
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  political_philosophy  Machiavelli  Tudor  historiography-Renaissance  translation  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, Il Principe, edited by L. Arthur Burd, with an Introduction by Lord Acton (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1891) - Online Library of Liberty
Facsimile PDF 23.8 MB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. -- A heavily annotated edition by Burd with the famous introduction by Lord Acton. The text is in the original Italian. -- Burd has an enormous amount of context- historical background for all the players before and after invasion of Italy - and cross-references to other works by Machiavelli, Guicciardini etc -picks up language usage, concepts etc - and comments on previous commentaries on The Prince with which he agrees or has differences -- downloaded pdf to Note -- probably available in Google_Books
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_history  Renaissance  Italian_Wars  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guiccidarini  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Italy  Florence  Papacy  France  raison-d'-état  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  institutions  legal_history  state-building  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Historical Essays and Studies, edited by John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907) - Online Library of Liberty
A collection of Acton’s articles from journals such as the Quarterly Review, the English Historical Review, the Nineteenth Century, the Rambler, the Home and Foreign Review, the North British Review, and the Bridgnorth Journal. *--* I: WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *-* II: THE BORGIAS AND THEIR LATEST HISTORIAN. &-* III: SECRET HISTORY OF CHARLES II. *-* IV: THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA ITS PLACE IN HISTORY. *-* V: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MEXICAN EMPIRE *-* VI: CALVIN *-* VII: THE CAUSES OF THE FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR *-* VIII: THE WAR OF 1870 *-* IX: GEORGE ELIOT’S LIFE. *-* X: MR. BUCKLE’S THESIS AND METHOD. *-* XI: MR. BUCKLE’S PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. *-* XII: GERMAN SCHOOLS OF HISTORy. *-* XIII: TALLEYRAND’S MEMOIRS. *-* XIV: THE LIFE OF LORD HOUGHTON *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE PAPACY DURING THE PERIOD OF THE REFORMATION. *-*. XVI: A SHORT HISTORY OF NAPOLEON THE FIRST. By John Robert Seeley THE FIRST NAPOLEON: A SKETCH, POLITICAL AND MILITARY. By John Codman Ropes. *-* XVII: MABILLON ET LA SOCIÉTÉ DE L’ABBAYE DE SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS À LA FIN DU XVIIE SIÈCLE. Par Emmanuel de Broglie. *-* XVIII: A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 1837-1880.1 By the Rev. J. Franck Bright, D.D., Master of University College, Oxford. *-* XIX: A HISTORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. By H. Morse Stephens. Vol. II. *-* XX: WILHELM VON GIESEBRECHT -- downloaded kindle version of html
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jose Rabasa, Masayuki Sato, Edoardo Tortarolo, Daniel Woolf - The Oxford History of Historical Writing: Volume 3: 1400-1800 : : Amazon.com:
Volume III of The Oxford History of Historical Writing contains essays by leading scholars on the writing of history globally during the early modern era, from 1400 to 1800. The volume proceeds in geographic order from east to west, beginning in Asia and ending in the Americas. It aims at once to provide a selective but authoritative survey of the field and, where opportunity allows, to provoke cross-cultural comparisons. This is the third of five volumes in a series that explores representations of the past from the beginning of writing to the present day, and from all over the world. -- only hdbk
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august 2014 by dunnettreader
Joshua Clover, review essay - Autumn of the Empire [post the Great Recession] | The Los Angeles Review of Books July 2011
Books discussed - Richard Duncan, The Dollar Crisis: Causes, Consequences, Cures *--* Robert Brenner, The Economics of Global Turbulence *--* Giovanni Arrighi, The Long Twentieth Century: Money, Power and the Origins of Our Times *--* Giovanni Arrighi, Adam Smith in Beijing *--*--*--* All three authors are heterodox from view of what passes for informed discourse about economic theory or political economy - by the conclusion of the essay, Giovanni Arrighi's longue-durée of transitions of a succession of capitalist empires becomes the vantage point for discussions of how we got to the Great Recession as well as where we have to start thinking about another way of understanding the geopolitical dynamics of global capitalism (or the global capitalist dynamics of geopolitics) Other TAGGED AUTHORS - Jill Ciment, Paul Krugman, Fernand Braudel, Joseph Schumpeter, John Maynard Keynes, Karl Marx, T.S. Eliot *--* Other TAGGED BOOKS - Reinhardt and Rogoff, This Time It's Different, *--* Michael Lewis, The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine
books  reviews  global_economy  globalization  international_political_economy  financialization  financial_crisis  economic_history  geopolitics  empires  empire-and_business  world_history  world_systems  cycles  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Genoa  city_states  Dutch_Revolt  Dutch  British_Empire  US-China  US-empire  imperialism  imperial_overreach  trade  trading_companies  production  productivity  capitalism  competition  profit  investment  international_monetary_system  translatio_imperii  Annales  bubbles  labor  off-shoring  investors  American_exceptionalism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 3 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 3. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/873> -- Vol. 3 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including many essays on aspects of medieval law and some biographical essays. Includes trusts and corporations, canon law, miscellaneous bits on Elizabethan period, especially relations with Papacy-- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  medieval_history  legal_history  legal_system  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  Elizabeth  Reformation  canon_law  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Church_of_England  Wales  property  property-confiscations  corporations  corporate_law  trusts  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 1 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 1. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/871> -- Vol. 1 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including in vol. 1 his “Historical Sketch of Liberty and Equality”, an essay on Herbert Spencer, and essays on aspects of medieval law -- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  common_law  medieval_history  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  feudalism  English_constitution  property  contracts  torts  judiciary  Spencer_Herbert  Victorian  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages 1881] trans. and ed. Frederic William Maitland ( 1900) - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> -- image scan -' translation by F.W. Maitland of part of vol. 3 of Das deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (1881) entitled “Die publicistischen Lehren des Mittelalters.” It is a short history of the evolution of modern political thought which emerged during the Middle Ages -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Europe-Early_Modern  historiography-19thC  Germany  historicism  legal_history  legal_theory  nation-state  authority  government-forms 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe [1861] trans. Andrew R. Scoble, ed. Aurelian Craiutu - Online Library of Liberty
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, trans. Andrew R. Scoble, Introduction and notes by Aurelian Craiutu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/878> -- Guizot reflects on the principles, goals, and institutions of representative government in Europe from the fifth to the reign of the Tudors in England. In Part 1 he examines such topics as the “true” principles of representative government, the origin and consequences of the sovereignty of the people, and analyzes the architecture of the English Constitutional monarchy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  political_history  representative_institutions  constitutionalism  ancient_constitution  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Gothic_constitution  Goths  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Charlemagne  Papacy  canon_law  monarchy  nobility  Parliament  Parlement  estates  feudalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Germany  British_history  English_constitution  14thC  15thC  16thC  Anglo-French  Norman_Conquest  War_of_Roses  Hundred_Years_War  sovereignty  consent  popular_politics  political_participation  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Passmore, The Perfectibility of Man ( 3rd edition 2000) - Online Library of Liberty
John Passmore, The Perfectibility of Man (3rd ed.) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/670> -- A reviewer of the original edition in 1970 of The Perfectibility of Man well summarizes the scope and significance of this renowned work by one of the leading philosophers of the twentieth century: “Beginning with an analytic discussion of the various ways in which perfectibility has been interpreted, Professor Passmore traces its long history from the Greeks to the present day, by way of Christianity, orthodox and heterodox, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, anarchism, utopias, communism, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary theories of man and society. Both in its broad sweep and in countless supporting reflections, it is a journey through spiritual scenery of the most majestic and exhilarating kind.” Thoroughly and elegantly, Passmore explores the history of the idea of perfectibility – manifest in the ideology of perfectibilism – and its consequences, which have invariably been catastrophic for individual liberty and responsibility in private, social, economic, and political life. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  intellectual_history  metaphysics  theology  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Early_Christian  Renaissance  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  German_Idealism  Romanticism  political_economy  psychoanalysis  utopian  anarchical_society  communism  Enlightenment_Project  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  progress  perfectibility  human_nature  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 5 (Defence of the Constitutions Vols. II and III) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 5. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2103> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 5 contains volumes 2 [Italian Republics of the Middle Ages -Florence and Machiavelli] and 3 [other Italian Republics of the Middle Ages] of Defence of the Constitutions of the US. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  Medieval  13thC  14thC  15thC  Renaissance  Italy  city_states  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Florence  Machiavelli  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_order  faction  class_conflict  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (2003) Vol. I of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 1. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/911> -- Vol. 1 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains a long introduction by the editor and 13 parts of the Reports. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  English_constitution  legal_history  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  ancient_constitution  Parliament  monarchy  commonwealth  legislation  judiciary  civil_liberties  property  property_rights  James_I  Charles_I  taxes  prerogative  Magna_Carta  lawyers  equity  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Historical essays & studies (1907) - Google Books
Contents -- WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *--* The Borgias and their Latest Historian. *--* Secret History of Charles II. *--* The Civil War in America. *--* The Rise and Fall of the Mexican Empire. *--* Cavour. *--* The Causes of the Franco-Prussian War. *--* The War of 1870 *--* German Schools of History *--* Talleyrands Memoirs. *--* The Life of Lord Houghton. *--* A History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation. *--* A Sketch Political and Military. *--* Mabillon et la Société de l'Abbaye de Saint Germain des Pres a la Fin du XVIIeme Siècle. *--* A History of England 1837-1880 *--* A History of the French Revolution. *--* George Eliots Life. *--* Mr Buckles Thesis and Method. *--* Mr Buckles Philosophy of History. *--* Wilhelm von Giesebrecht *--* Appendix - Letter to Bishop Creighton -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  19thC  British_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-17thC  historicism  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Papacy  Henry_VIII  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  French_Revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  Romanticism  German_Idealism  philosophy_of_history  US_Civil_War  Italy  diplomatic_history  Talleyrand  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleon_III  empires  French_Empire  Eliot_George  Franco-German_relations  Franco-Prussian_war  Victorian  Edwardian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Susan Royal, review - Matthew Milner. The Senses and the English Reformation | H-Net Reviews
Milner points outthat the scholarship on this topic has inherited “protestant” views of late medieval sensuality... the first half of the book is devoted to a deep analysis of the senses and sensual experiences of worship prior to the Reformation. Chapter 1 lays out late medieval theories of sensing, explaining the usurpation of Augustinian principles by the revival of Aristotelian thought (chiefly Thomist). Milner explains the way sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch affected the components of tripartite anthropology, the body, spirit, and soul. -- ... the Renaissance rationalization of sense experiences, detailing the critique of medieval epistemological hierarchies and ...a shift from the tripartite anthropology of body, spirit, and soul to a dualist model of body and mind. Milner demonstrates the persistence of Aristotelian sensory theories in Tudor thought, -- Chapter 6 focuses mainly on the 1530s and 1540s, ...how reformers grappled with their position on sensual affectivity: while it was easy to reject aspects of traditional piety, it was much harder to describe how English churchgoers were supposed to connect sensibly with newly reformed practices. ...the senses into early doctrinal debates over justification and sanctification that would not be resolved until late in Elizabeth’s reign. ... -- the transition from recognizing abuse and misuse of traditional religion to its complete rejection with iconoclasm as the antidote. ...how parishioners were taught to replace traditional Eucharistic piety with spiritual communion, arguing that this in fact offered an even more sensuous experience of the sacred. -- the complex debates among conformists and nonconformists about sensing during worship in Elizabethan England. Milner argues that divisions ...concerning extemporaneous prayer, set readings, and even preaching were firmly rooted in concerns about hearing practices, and that the vestment controversy and arguments over the sign of the cross at baptism were connected to tensions about sight. Sitting somewhat awkwardly among all of these debates were those evangelicals receptive to the notion of adiaphora,..another source of conflict between conformists and nonconformists.
books  reviews  religious_history  church_history  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  British_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  liturgy  Puritans  perception  psychology  moral_psychology  soul  mind-body  Augustinian  Aristotelian  Thomism  Renaissance  salvation  piety  sacraments  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
The Loss of Final -e - Harvard Chaucer site
It is worth noting that this aspect of Chaucer's verse was unknown for centuries. By Shakespeare's time the final -e had been lost. That is why, though Shakespeare's pronunciation differed from our own, it is possible to read his works in a modern pronunciation: the rhythm of his lines remains the same, no matter how the vowels are pronounced, because except for a few exceptions ("Out damnéd spot!"), Shakespeare treated what had become in his time the "silent e" in the same way we do. Consequently, when Shakespeare read Chaucer he omitted the final -e, treating it as silent. The meter was ruined; though Shakespeare greatly admired Chaucer, he and his contemporaries thought that Chaucer was an archaic poet who could not write a smooth and pleasing meter in those distant early times. So too did John Dryden, who idolized Chaucer but thought he wrote in "the infancy of our Poetry". Not until the the late eighteenth century did scholars discover and demonstrate the importance of the final -e for Chaucer's versification.
Chaucer  English_lit  poetry  language  meter  Shakespeare  Dryden  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
The Great Vowel Shift
Site dedicated to the Great Vowel Shift with audio samples - plug ins don't work on Chrome
English_lit  language  Medieval  Latin_lit  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Canterbury Tales Project
The Canterbury Tales Project aims to investigate the textual tradition of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to achieve a better understanding of the history of its composition and publication before 1500. Here is how we work: (1) We have established a system of transcription for all the manuscripts and early printed books of the Canterbury Tales into computer-readable form. (2) We transcribe the manuscripts using this system. (3) We compare all the manuscripts, creating a record of their agreements and disagreements with a computer collation program (Collate). (4 )We use computer-based methods, some drawn from evolutionary biology, to help reconstruct the history of the text from this record of agreements and disagreements. (5) We publish all the materials, the results of our analysis, and the tools which we use in electronic form.-- We have published seven CD-ROMs to date, with more coming soon. We have begun internet publication with the Caxtons online, and you can see web samples of our Hengwrt, Miller's Tale and Nun's Priest's Tale CD-ROMs online. Altogether, we have published transcripts and images of over 5000 pages from manuscripts and early editions of the Tales, amounting to around 20% of all surviving fifteenth-century witnesses. -- we are active in promoting mass manuscript digitization: see the website we have established, in partnership with others. We are now at the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing at the University of Birmingham.
website  digital_humanities  English_lit  Chaucer  14thC  15thC  printing  manuscripts 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
James Hankins - Exclusivist Republicanism and the Non-Monarchical Republic | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 452-482
The idea that a republic is the only legitimate form of government and that non-elective monarchy and hereditary political privileges are by definition illegitimate is an artifact of late eighteenth century republicanism, though it has roots in the "godly republics" of the seventeenth century. It presupposes understanding a republic (respublica) to be a non-monarchical form of government. The latter definition is a discursive practice that goes back only to the fifteenth century and is not found in Roman or medieval sources. This article explains how the definition emerged in Renaissance Italy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  antiquity  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  concepts-change  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_Civil_War  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  city_states  monarchy  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  Old_Testament  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Cécile Alduy, Roland Greene - Forum Introduction - Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads | Republics of Letters - Volume 1, Issue 2 ( February 2010)
Nice overview of the entangling and untangling of our notions of experience and experiment from Petrarch to Montaigne -- downloaded pdf to Note -- TOC of Forum -- Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads by Cécile Alduy, by Roland Greene. (1) Artificial Men: Alchemy, Transubstantiation, and the Homunculus by Mary Baine Campbell. (2) Machines in the Garden by Jessica Riskin. (3) Atheism as a Devotional Category by George Hoffmann. (4) Montaigne: The Eclectic Pragmatist by Anthony Long. (5) Putting Experience First by Timothy Hampton
article  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  epistemology  empiricism  self  metaphor  cultural_history  literary_history  Seneca  Montaigne  scepticism  atheism_panic  pragmatism  alchemy  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
N. J. Mayhew - Population, Money Supply, and the Velocity of Circulation in England, 1300-1700 | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 48, No. 2 (May, 1995), pp. 238-257
The importance of monetary and demographic factors in the later medieval and early modern 'price revolutions' has been much debated. This article analyses this long period in the terms of the Fisher Identity MV=PT, but also fully recognizes the importance of demographic change, and its impact on GDP. Tentative estimates of money supply and GDP are discussed, and from them velocity of circulation is deduced. Velocity has tended to fall over this period, but rising Tudor velocity is regarded as a symptom of economic distress. -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  UK_economy  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  economic_growth  demography  population  prices  money_supply  money_velocity  money  commerce  dearth  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Rollison - The Specter of the Commonalty: Class Struggle and the Commonweal in England before the Atlantic World | JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 63, No. 2 (Apr., 2006), pp. 221-252
Part of what he developed as his book on the long commonwealth tradition and popular politics in England from early medieval period onwards. This article more academic and footnoted, so excellent bibliography as well as shorter version of a key part of his argument. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  kindle  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  15thC  16thC  17thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  popular_politics  populism  riots  commonwealth  body_politic  class_conflict  social_history  historiography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Epicureanism in Renaissance Moral and Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 53, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1992), pp. 573-583
Short but looks helpful - compares Lorenzo Valla attack on Aristotelian virtue ethics and Scholastics Christian Aristotelian hybrid with far more extensive engagement by Gassendi with Epicureanism. But both contributed to Christianity incorporating some notions of pleasure into sin and salvation. -- not much bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  theology  15thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Italy  France  Gassendi  Epicurean  virtue_ethics  Aristotelian  sin  salvation  pleasure  hedonistic  Christianity  materialism  corpuscular  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eyal Chowers - The Physiology of the Citizen: The Present-Centered Body and Its Political Exile | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 30, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 649-676
Shift from civic humanism's optimistic view of man's capacity to build for the future and control sociopolitical environment to pessimistic view of capacity of citizens under raison d'Etat -- 16thC and 17thC increasingly focused on multipart, shifting self and passions vs reason rather than the development of a stable character that Renaissance humanism concerned with. Ties shift to new views of anatomy (eg Harvey) and connections between physiology and psychology and impact on different notions of time relative to self, society and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  cultural_history  natural_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  British_history  France  Italy  Italian_Wars  Renaissance  humanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  raison-d'-état  Absolutism  emotions  physiology  psychology  medicine  self  time  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Descartes  Gassendi  Hobbes  Locke  Harrington  Harvey  identity  character  mechanism  thinking_matter  mind  mind-body  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
English Politeness: Conduct, Social Rank and Moral Virtue, c. 1400-c. 1900 - TOC -- JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12, 2002
English Politeness: Conduct, Social Rank and Moral Virtue, c. 1400-c. 1900: A Conference Held at the Huntington Library, San Marino, California, and the Institute of Historical Research, University of London -- Introduction (pp. 263-266) John Tosh. -- (1) From Civilitas to Civility: Codes of Manners in Medieval and Early Modern England (pp. 267-289) John Gillingham. -- (2) Rank, Manners and Display: The Gentlemanly House, 1500-1750 (pp. 291-310) Nicholas Cooper. -- (3) The Uses of Eighteenth-Century Politeness (pp. 311-331) Paul Langford. -- (4) Polite 'Persons': Character, Biography and the Gentleman (pp. 333-354) Philip Carter. -- (5) Topographies of Politeness (pp. 355-374) R. H. Sweet. -- (6) Polite Consumption: Shopping in Eighteenth-Century England (pp. 375-394) Helen Berry. -- 7) Creating a Veil of Silence? Politeness and Marital Violence in the English Household (pp. 395-415) Elizabeth Foyster. -- (8) Courses in Politeness: The Upbringing and Experiences of Five Teenage Diarists, 1671-1860 (pp. 417-430) Anthony Fletcher. -- (9) The Brash Colonial: Class and Comportment in Nineteenth-Century Australia (pp. 431-453) Penny Russell. -- (10) Gentlemanly Politeness and Manly Simplicity in Victorian England (pp. 455-472) John Tosh
journal  article  jstor  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  social_history  politeness  status  elites  consumers  education  domesticity  gentleman  manners  moral_reform  moral_philosophy  masculinity  houses  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Newman, review - Nuttall, Jenni. The Creation of Lancastrian Kingship: Literature, Language and Politics in Late Medieval England | The Medieval Review June 2009
Nuttall, Jenni. The Creation of Lancastrian Kingship: Literature, Language and Politics in Late Medieval England. Cambridge Series in Medieval Literature. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. 187. $90.00. ISBN: 9780521874960.

Reviewed by:

University of Toronto This book provides a convincing account of how the Lancastrian literature offers not only another facet to the period's politics, but, circulating "side-by-side" with official and semi-official, "participates in the process of commentary, engaging closely with the Crown's own rhetoric" (127). Rather than bracket or dissolve the distinction between literary and non-literary texts, Nuttall puts them into conversation with one another. In this way, she reveals continuities between these different discourses, but and throws into relief the nuanced and layered qualities of Lancastrian literature which allow it to address differing messages to multiple readers. In this way, her book offers both a fresh and convincing take on Lancastrian political history and its rich, sustained readings of the period's literary texts restore their political valences without reducing them to partisan tokens.
books  reviews  kindle-available  14thC  15thC  British_history  British_politics  English_lit  intellectual_history  political_culture  monarchy  politics-and-literature  Cambridge_School  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Chase: Firearms: A Global History to 1700: 9780521722407: Amazon.com: Books
Kenneth Chase traces the history of firearms from their invention in China in the 1100s to the 1700s, when European firearms had become clearly superior. In Firearms, Chase asks why it was the Europeans who perfected firearms, not the Chinese, and answers this question by looking at how firearms were used throughout the world. Early firearms were restricted to infantry and siege warfare, limiting their use outside of Europe and Japan. Steppe and desert nomads imposed a different style of warfare on the Middle East, India, and China--a style incompatible with firearms. By the time that better firearms allowed these regions to turn the tables on the nomads, Japan's self-imposed isolation left Europe with no rival in firearms design, production, or use, with lasting consequences.
books  military_history  economic_history  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Asia  China  India  Ottomans  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  Great_Divergence 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Anthony Molho: The State and Public Finance: A Hypothesis Based on the History of Late Medieval Florence (1995)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 67 (Dec., 1995), pp. S97-S135 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- questions fiscal-military_state as driver of centralizing state - provide conditions of external pressures but response function of internal politics
article  jstor  historical_sociology  state-building  fiscal-military_state  15thC  16thC  17thC  Italy  Florence  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Anthony Molho: Recent Works on the History of Tuscany: Fifteenth to Eighteenth Centuries (1990)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 62, No. 1 (Mar., 1990), pp. 57-77 -- among other things, model of centralizing Renaissance state being substituted with dualistic (more powerful prince and reinforcement of corporate liberties, especially territorial) - and accommodation between secular leadership and Papacy re governance
article  jstor  lit_survey  historiography  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Italy  state-building  Papacy  Italian_Wars  local_government  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Amanda Vickery: Golden Age to Separate Spheres? A Review of the Categories and Chronology of English Women's History (1993)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jun., 1993), pp. 383-414 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Two very powerful stories structure the history of the changing roles of English women. The tale of the nineteenth-century separation of the spheres of public power and private domesticity relates principally to the experience of middle-class women. The other story, emerging from early modern scholarship, recounts the social and economic marginalization of propertied women and the degradation of working women as a consequence of capitalism. Both narratives echo each other in important ways, although strangely the capacity of women's history to repeat itself is rarely openly discussed. This paper critically reviews the two historiographies in order to open debate on the basic categories and chronologies we employ in discussing the experience, power and identity of women in past time.
article  jstor  social_theory  cultural_history  historiography  Britain  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  women  women-work  women-property  public_sphere 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
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