dunnettreader + 14thc   54

Bruce Campbell: The Great Transition, Lecture 1 of 4 - Ellen McArthur Lectures 2013, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
See his 2016 book with CUP - The Great Transition: Climate, Disease and Society in the Medieval World - kindle-available
Lecture schedule
Lecture 1 - The 14th century as tipping point: From one socio-ecological status quo to another
Lecture 2 - The enabling environment: The Medieval Solar Maximum and Latin Christendom's high-medieval efflorescence
Lecture 3 - A precarious balance: Mounting economic vulnerability in an era of increasing climatic instability
Lecture 4 - Disease intervenes: The Black Death and the 'Great Transition' to an alternative socio-ecological equilibrium
video  lecture  economic_history  social_history  environmental_history  disease  Black_Death  medieval_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  Italy  urbanization  foreign_trade  Mongols  Mamluks  spice_trade  Central_Asia  genetics  weather  agriculture  demography  economic_growth  climate-history  climate_change  Little_Ice_Age  Italy-cities  international_finance 
november 2017 by dunnettreader
Neil Cummins - Longevity and the Rise of the West: Lifespans of the European Elite, 800-1800 (2014)
Longevity and the Rise of the West: Lifespans of the European Elite, 800-1800
I analyze the age at death of 121,524 European nobles from 800 to 1800. Longevity began increasing long before 1800 and the Industrial Revolution, with marked increases around 1400 and again around 1650. Declines in violence contributed to some of this increase, but the majority must reflect other changes in individual behavior. The areas of North-West Europe which later witnessed the Industrial Revolution achieved greater longevity than the rest of Europe even by 1000 AD. The data suggest that the `Rise of the West' originates before the Black Death.
Downloaded WP version via iPhone to DBOX
lifestyle  16thC  10thC  13thC  14thC  17thC  11thC  paper  medieval_history  economic_history  life_expectancy  social_history  downloaded  12thC  elites  warrior_class  feudalism  18thC  British_history  nobles  wealth  Western_Europe  15thC  demography  9thC  landowners 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages - European Review of Economic History
When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (National Research Council), ISSM-CNR, malanima@issm.cnr.it According to Allen, between 1500 and 1750, a “great divergence” among countries in the level of wages occurred in Europe. Italian real wages were already among the lowest in the late medieval and early modern age. Their relative level diminished even more from the seventeenth century. An analysis of prices and wages in Italy and England does not support this view. Actually, until the beginning of the eighteenth century, Italian real wages were either higher than in England (fourteenth and fifteenth centuries) or more or less equal (sixteenth and seventeenth). It was not until the eighteenth century that England began to overtake Italy. However, the disparity in wages before 1800 was modest. It increased fast from then onwards. Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
labor_history  Italy  15thC  medieval_history  labor_force_structure  competiveness-labor  wages  economic_history  British_history  14thC  economic_growth  downloaded  Renaissance  16thC  Labor_markets  17thC  article  prices  18thC  England 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 (2013) - European Economic History Review
The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (Naples) Italian National Research Council (CNR), malanima@issm.cnr.it The purpose of the article is to present the statistical reconstruction of a series of per capita output in central–northern Italy between 1300 and 1913. The various phases of both the statistical procedure and the results are presented and discussed. From the Renaissance until the 1880s, when modern growth starts, the curve of per capita GDP is downward bent. Output series together with three robustness tests, are collected in the Appendices.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
productivity  economic_growth  17thC  agriculture  18thC  16thC  Renaissance  economic_history  14thC  stats  urbanization  Italy  GDP  manufacturing  GDP-per_capita  economic_decline  downloaded  article  proto-industry  agriculture-productivity  19thC  commerce  15thC 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire. (Paperback 2009) - Princeton University Press
Avoiding a standard chronological account of the Byzantine Empire's millennium--long history, she identifies the fundamental questions about Byzantium--what it was, and what special significance it holds for us today. Bringing the latest scholarship to a general audience in accessible prose, Herrin focuses each short chapter around a representative theme, event, monument, or historical figure, and examines it within the full sweep of Byzantine history--from the foundation of Constantinople, the magnificent capital city built by Constantine the Great, to its capture by the Ottoman Turks.

She argues that Byzantium's crucial role as the eastern defender of Christendom against Muslim expansion during the early Middle Ages made Europe--and the modern Western world--possible. Herrin captivates us with her discussions of all facets of Byzantine culture and society. She walks us through the complex ceremonies of the imperial court. She describes the transcendent beauty and power of the church of Hagia Sophia, as well as chariot races, monastic spirituality, diplomacy, and literature. She reveals the fascinating worlds of military usurpers and ascetics, eunuchs and courtesans, and artisans who fashioned the silks, icons, ivories, and mosaics so readily associated with Byzantine art.

An innovative history written by one of our foremost scholars, Byzantium reveals this great civilization's rise to military and cultural supremacy, its spectacular destruction by the Fourth Crusade, and its revival and final conquest in 1453. - no ebook - lots of illustrations - Introduction downloaded to Tab S2
books  downloaded  Byzantium  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  elite_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islam-expansion  architecture  architecture-churches  diplomatic_history  military_history  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Orthodox_Christianity  Crusades  Constantinople  13thC  14thC  15thC  Ottomans  court_culture  courtiers  ritual  art_history  decorative_arts  popular_culture 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Goulding - Histories of Science in Early Modern Europe: Introduction to special issue (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 33-40 **--** Articles in the issue *--* James Steven Byrne, Humanist History of Mathematics? Regiomontanus's Padua Oration in Context (pp. 41-61) *--* Robert Goulding, Method and Mathematics: Peter Ramus's Histories of the Sciences (pp. 63-85) *--* Nicholas Popper, "Abraham, Planter of Mathematics": Histories of Mathematics and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (pp. 87-106) *--* Lauren Kassell, "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (pp. 107-122) -- helpful on recent historiography on humanists, science and history writing -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  history_of_science  mathematics  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  humanism  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  astrology  magic  education-higher  natural_philosophy  reading  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-writing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert C. Allen - Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR - The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003) , pp. 403-443
An econometric model of economic development is estimated with data from leading European countries between 1300 and 1800. The model explores the impact of population, enclosure, empire, representative government, technology, and literacy on urbanization, agricultural productivity, proto-industry, and the real wage. Simulations show that the main factors leading to economic success in north-western Europe were the growth of American and Asian commerce and, especially, the innovations underlying the export of the new draperies in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The enclosure of the open fields, representative government, and the spread of literacy did not play major roles. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  North-Weingast  agrarian_capitalism  literacy  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_Empire  Dutch  colonialism  trade  Asia  textiles  Innovation  agriculture  urbanization  wages  labor_history  manufacturing  productivity  export-led  Industrial_Revolution  proto-industry  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic: Can Black Death explain the Industrial Revolution? | globalinequality - Jan 11 2015
re presentation by a young scholar at Santa Fe suggesting that Why England (and Dutch) due to higher wages in Northern Europe post Black Death in contrast with South where non market repression or property arrangements were able to push adjustment costs inti agricultural workers without impact on wage rates. Milanovic compares with other theoretical approaches ie Pomerantz, Acemoglu & Robinson, Robert Allen etc. Link to 2007 paper by Pamuk Milanovic thinks may be 1st work to seriously look at differential impact of Black Death on northern & southern Europe as distinct from the common story if Western vs Central and Eastern Europe.
economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  Black_Death  North-Weingast  landowners  demography  economic_sociology  labor  agriculture  wages  productivity  colonialism  medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  institutional_economics  capital  capitalism  China  Japan  ancient_Rome  slavery  bibliography 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Alzada Tipton - Caught between "Virtue" and "Memorie": Providential and Political Historiography in Samuel Daniel's the Civil Wars | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 3/4 (1998), pp. 325-341
Daniel had Essex connections that got him in trouble for a play - his Civil Wars dealt with Lancaster and York from deposition of Richard Ii - another sensitive topic. Tension among ambitions as courtier, patronage limks with factions in upper elite, and artistic and historiographical standards that he intended to meet to obtain reputation as an author, though those standards were unclear and in the process of shifting in late Elizabethan and early Jacobean culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  history_of_England  14thC  15thC16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Wars_of_the_Roses  patronage  faction  censorship  historians-and-politics  exempla  Providence  courtiers  court_culture  playwrights  Elizabethan  Essex_rebellion  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
ERIC COCHRANE, The Transition from Renaissance to Baroque: The Case of Italian Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Feb., 1980), pp. 21-38
The meaning of the term "baroque" has been the subject of much debate. In the field of historiography, historians have not engaged in a dialogue on the subject and have accepted uncritically the value-judgments of eighteenth-century scholarship. One approach to be used in this author's new book, Historians and Historiography in the Italian Renaissance, compares the work of 782 Italian historians from earliest times through the seventeenth century. The humanist historiography of the Italian Renaissance exhibited the concepts of change, contingency, and epoch in history; relied on ancient forms; used methodological principles of causation; and taught moral and political lessons. Italian Baroque historiography, on the other hand, employed the forms of the new bulletins or avvisi, copied the prose style of its contemporaries, discounted its practical utility, and displayed a separation between history as literature and history as research. -- downloaded to Air
article  jstor  historiography  historicism  Renaissance  humanism  historiography-18thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  historiography-19thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Italy  Guicciardini  historical_change  contingency  Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Philippe Genet - La genèse de l'État moderne: Culture et société politique en Angleterre (2003) | Livres -- Amazon.fr
La genèse de l'État moderne est le fruit d'une lente évolution à partir de la seconde moitié du XIIIe siècle, qui a d'abord affecté les monarchies féodales d'Occident : il y a quelques années, elle a fait l'objet d'études systématiques de nombreux historiens en Europe, grâce au CNRS et à la Fondation européenne de la Science. Le présent ouvrage est une étude de cas, consacrée à l'Angleterre, à bien des égards la plus précoce et la plus cohérente des constructions politiques médiévales qui, paradoxalement, est peu étudiée par les historiens français. On y retrouve le primat de la guerre et de la fiscalité dans la dynamique de la genèse de l'État moderne, ainsi que la mise en place d'un système judiciaire garantissant la reproduction de la classe dominante dans des conditions satisfaisantes. Mais l'ouvrage permet surtout de relever et d'articuler la corrélation entre le développement et la vitalité de la société politique, dont l'existence est une condition sine qua non pour l'État moderne, et la mutation de la culture et du système de communication médiéval, tant au niveau des médias et de la langue qu'à celui des types de textes produits. Par l'analyse de plus de 2200 bio-bibliographies d'" auteurs " actifs dans les domaines de l'histoire et du politique, et au moyen d'une théorie des champs de production textuelle, se dégage ce qu'a été l'idéologie spécifique du féodalisme d'État. Alors naissent progressivement les catégories modernes du politique, ainsi que la notion d'une société politique " nationale " -- Recommended in Penguin history of England bibliographies
books  amazon.fr  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  13thC  14thC  15thC  nation-state  national_ID  political_culture  feudalism  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  judiciary  historiography  political_sociology  military_history  state-building  political_economy  elites  elite_culture  monarchy  taxes  fiscal-military_state  nobility 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Francisco Rico - Pétrarque au partage de midi | Italique, VII, 2004, 9-26
Italique [En ligne], VII | 2004, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.124. **--** dans voi ch’ascoltate comme en bien des endroits de l’œuvre de Pétrarque – qu’il s’agisse de prose ou de vers, de latin ou de langue vulgaire –, «errore» constitue à peu de choses près un terme technique emprunté à la tradition stoïcienne pour désigner la falsa opinio qui trouble la vision du commun des mortels, alimente les « speranze », le « dolore » et les autres affectus ou perturbationes animi, provoque la désagrégation de l’esprit en « pensieri » aussi « sparsi » que les rimes venant les refléter. De toute évidence, Pétrarque apparaît ici comme un « altr’ uom » : il n’est plus ce qu’il était autrefois, il arbore désormais l’air grave du sage stoïcien et n’hésite pas à dénoncer les poèmes du canzoniere comme autant de rerum vulgarium fragmenta dans leur fond et dans leur forme, comme de vulgaires morceaux dignes du « popol » ignorant. Il ne s’agit pas ici d’une simple fiction plus ou moins placée sous le signe des précédents bien connus offerts par la littérature latine et les troubadours : à plusieurs reprises, l’illustre Italien dont nous commémorons le septième centenaire a voulu se convertir en « altr’ uom » et y est parvenu. -- J’aimerais attirer un instant votre attention sur un des moments décisifs de cette trajectoire passionnée et émouvante : ce moment du partage de midi où, à la croisée des chemins, déjà à l’âge mûr, Pétrarque résout les incertitudes qui l’avaient hanté durant ses longues années de formation et s’engage d’un pas ferme sur la voie qui le conduira à son plein épanouissement, à la fois en tant qu’écrivain et en tant qu’homme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  intellectual_history  religious_history  14thC  Italy  Renaissance  humanism  Italian_lit  Petrarch  poetry  poetics  Stoicism  epistemology  epistemology-moral  perception  moral_philosophy  theology  self-examination  self-fashioning  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Arnaud Tripet - Pétrarque, la parole silencieuse | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 9-25.
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.112. *--* Les historiens s’accordent en général pour attribuer à Pétrarque une place inaugurale dans la culture dite humaniste, une culture qui sacrifie avant tout aux divinités de la parole. On restitue alors celle des Anciens. On valorise le verbe en lui conférant un pouvoir inédit sur les âmes, la capacité de les convertir au bien, au vrai et au beau. Son œuvre tant latine qu’italienne fournirait presque à l’infini des citations où la puissance bienfaisante du discours est proclamée au sein d’une épiphanie antique de la sagesse. Bientôt, et sous son influence, vont se créer en Italie, puis en Europe des écoles parallèles à celles déjà en place. Dans leurs programmes humanistes, le traditionnel trivium ne suffira plus, avec la logique, la rhétorique et la grammaire, pour qualifier les disciplines du langage en vue de la maîtrise ès arts. Va s’ajouter l’étude de l’histoire et de la poésie, laquelle n’existait précédemment que comme une variante de la rhétorique. Le souci d’élégance expressive ira de pair avec une certaine laïcisation des contenus. Humanisme dont on dira en simplifiant outrancièrement qu’il se construit ad maiorem hominis gloriam, de l’homme « parlant » en tout cas, et tenté souvent par une copia un peu complaisante, voire incontinente. Une question se pose alors : le silence va-t-il tempérer cette abondance ? Va-t-il nuancer la tentation de croire que le mot a valeur ontologique, et que l’on est ce qu’on dit ? Va-t-il suggérer que l’on est tout autant ce qu’on tait ? Sans autre préambule, je voudrais produire deux exemples tirés de Pétrarque. Ils parlent d’eux-mêmes et le silence y prend rang avec pleine dignité dans son discours.
article  revues.org  14thC  15thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  Italy  Italian_lit  humanism  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-moral_basis  self-fashioning  liberal_arts  historiography-Renaissance  exempla  vernacular  eloquence  self-government  self-examination  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Lina Bolzoni - Les Asolani de Pietro Bembo, ou le double portrait de l’amour | Italique, IX, 2006, p. 9-27
Italique [En ligne], IX | 2006, mis en ligne le 29 mai 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.103. **--** Les Asolani réalisent en outre une synthèse complexe de traditions et de modèles différents, littéraires et philosophiques, anciens et modernes, latins et en langue vulgaire. Ainsi la tradition du dialogue latin, classique et humaniste, est réécrite en vulgaire et utilisée également comme cadre et comme commentaire à un choix de poésies ; si le cadre narratif renvoie à son tour au Décaméron, le choix de poésies s’inspire de plus en plus du Pétrarque du Canzoniere. Différentes traditions philosophiques – en particulier la réflexion moderne sur l’amour des néoplatoniciens florentins – sont utilisées pour donner une nouvelle dignité théorique à la tradition lyrique en vulgaire et en même temps pour réaliser une difficile réconciliation entre vie et littérature, entre autobiographie et création d’un modèle idéal. La célébrité des asolani n’est pas seulement italienne : une traduction française, par Jean Martin, est publiée à Paris en 1545 et elle sera réimprimée plusieurs fois au cours du XVIe siècle.En outre, il ne faut pas oublier que Bembo est le protagoniste du dernier livre du cortegiano grâce justement à l’autorité dont il jouissait pour avoir écrit les asolani ; la célébrité européenne du cortegiano contribue à amplifier aussi la renommée de notre texte. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  Italy  Venice  France  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  16thC  Bembo  Petrarch  Dante  Boccaccio  poetry  poetics  prose  style  style-philosophy  elite_culture  Renaissance  courtiers  sprezaturra  love  humanism  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  reception  vernacular  neo-Latin  dialogue  publishing  manners  gentleman  otium  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Volker Kapp - Les Exempla dans les Triumphi et la culture oratoire de Pétrarque | Italique, XII, 2009, p. 9-31.
Italique [En ligne], XII | 2009, mis en ligne le 01 novembre 2012 - DOI : 10.4000/italique.220 *--* Les réserves des lecteurs du XXIe siècle contrastent avec le succès fulminant des Triumphi au Quattrocento dans les domaines littéraire et artistique. Le nombre élevé de manuscrits, ... confirme la haute estime dont ils jouirent pendant la Renaissance...pour ne pas parler des tableaux consacrés au thème du triomphe et influencés, plus ou moins, par Pétrarque. Pour expliquer ce changement surprenant des paramè­tres de la réception, on peut invoquer les divergences qui nous séparent de la civilisation humaniste.-- Et n’est-il pas légitime de renvoyer à la rhétorique qui caractérise l’humanisme européen précisément depuis Pétrarque dont on connaît l’ambition de se détacher par-là de la littérature et de la philosophie médiévales ? ...Nous proposons d’analyser cette problématique en insistant sur la figure rhétorique de l’exemplum. Afin de saisir l’impact de ce procédé à l’intérieur de la culture oratoire de Pétrarque, il faudra identifier quelques figures dans cette poésie, situer celle-ci parmi les formes du discours et évaluer ce qu’on a qualifié de « passion archéologique » de notre auteur, passion, dont relèvent les exempla tant dans son œuvre historique que dans les Triumphi. -- montrer que les exempla servent à mettre en scène le théâtre de la mémoire dans lequel le 'je' lyrique explore les présupposées et les enjeux de son éloge lyrique de Laure. Toute réflexion sur la rhétorique de Pétrarque doit partir de l’affinité entre l’art oratoire et la philosophie morale qu’il ne cesse de postuler. Cette convic­tion qu’il tire de Cicéron marque le dialogue intitulé De eloquentia du De remediis utriusque fortune. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  Petrarch  poetics  neo-Latin  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  humanism  Renaissance  Cicero  moral_philosophy  exempla  oratory  self-examination  reception  rhetoric-moral_basis  eloquence  Quintillian  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 3 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 3. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/873> -- Vol. 3 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including many essays on aspects of medieval law and some biographical essays. Includes trusts and corporations, canon law, miscellaneous bits on Elizabethan period, especially relations with Papacy-- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  medieval_history  legal_history  legal_system  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  Elizabeth  Reformation  canon_law  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Church_of_England  Wales  property  property-confiscations  corporations  corporate_law  trusts  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 1 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 1. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/871> -- Vol. 1 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including in vol. 1 his “Historical Sketch of Liberty and Equality”, an essay on Herbert Spencer, and essays on aspects of medieval law -- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  common_law  medieval_history  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  feudalism  English_constitution  property  contracts  torts  judiciary  Spencer_Herbert  Victorian  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe [1861] trans. Andrew R. Scoble, ed. Aurelian Craiutu - Online Library of Liberty
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, trans. Andrew R. Scoble, Introduction and notes by Aurelian Craiutu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/878> -- Guizot reflects on the principles, goals, and institutions of representative government in Europe from the fifth to the reign of the Tudors in England. In Part 1 he examines such topics as the “true” principles of representative government, the origin and consequences of the sovereignty of the people, and analyzes the architecture of the English Constitutional monarchy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  political_history  representative_institutions  constitutionalism  ancient_constitution  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Gothic_constitution  Goths  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Charlemagne  Papacy  canon_law  monarchy  nobility  Parliament  Parlement  estates  feudalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Germany  British_history  English_constitution  14thC  15thC  16thC  Anglo-French  Norman_Conquest  War_of_Roses  Hundred_Years_War  sovereignty  consent  popular_politics  political_participation  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 5 (Defence of the Constitutions Vols. II and III) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 5. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2103> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 5 contains volumes 2 [Italian Republics of the Middle Ages -Florence and Machiavelli] and 3 [other Italian Republics of the Middle Ages] of Defence of the Constitutions of the US. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  Medieval  13thC  14thC  15thC  Renaissance  Italy  city_states  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Florence  Machiavelli  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_order  faction  class_conflict  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (2003) Vol. I of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 1. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/911> -- Vol. 1 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains a long introduction by the editor and 13 parts of the Reports. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  English_constitution  legal_history  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  ancient_constitution  Parliament  monarchy  commonwealth  legislation  judiciary  civil_liberties  property  property_rights  James_I  Charles_I  taxes  prerogative  Magna_Carta  lawyers  equity  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Frances Coppola - Categorising the poor | Pieria May 2014
We should also stop trying to decide whether someone “deserves” social support. We have been trying to distinguish between the “deserving” and “undeserving” poor for over five hundred years, and we are no better able to make that judgement now than we were in the fourteenth century, or the sixteenth, or the nineteenth. We inevitably end up denying support to those who desperately need it. Let us give up this fruitless attempt to judge people's motives. Simply provide everyone with a basic income so that they can afford to live, then let them get on with whatever they want to do.
economic_history  British_history  British_politics  Poor_Laws  unemployment  Labor_markets  wages  welfare  14thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  21stC  economic_reform  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Literature index page
(1) Medieval Attitudes toward Literature (2) Literary Relations -- ** Dante and Boccaccio, ** The Proem of the Decameron: Boccaccio between Ovid and Dante, ** Authorship, ** The Decameron and the English Romantics -- (3) Narratology and Structural Exegesis -- ** Numerology in the Decameron, ** The Novella before Boccaccio, ** Performance and Interpretation, ** Performance and Interpretation 2, ** Nightingales and Filostrato's Apologia (V.4), ** The Rubrics of the Decameron, ** Madonna Filippa (VI.7): Feminist Mouthpiece or Misogynistic Tool? -- (4) Hypertext -- ** Hypertext, Hypermedia and the History of the Text, ** Boccaccio Online: Teaching the Decameron as Hypertext at Brown University -- (5) Theoretical Perspectives -- ** Poststructuralism and a Figural Narrative Model, ** Lotman and the Problem of Artistic Space, ** Weinrich and the Grammar of the Frame, ** The Narrative Frame, ** Framing the Decameron, ** Seduction by Silence in the Frame -- (6) La novella tra Testo e Ipertesto: il Decameron come modello
website  literary_history  lit_crit  Italian_lit  English_lit  14thC  Medieval  Renaissance  humanism  Latin_lit  Boccaccio  Ovid  Dante  Romanticism  narrative  literary_theory  digital_humanities 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Text - Italian
An XML-encoded version of the Italian text based on V. Branca, 1992
etexts  Boccaccio  Italian_lit  14thC 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web
In his Western Canon Harold Bloom thus recently acknowledges the crucial position of Boccaccio's Decameron : "Ironic storytelling whose subject is storytelling is pretty much Boccaccio's invention, and the purpose of this breakthrough was to free stories from didacticism and moralism, so that the listener or reader, not the storyteller, became responsible for their use, for good or for ill." The Decameron has elicited throughout the centuries fundamental discussions on the nature of narrative art, on the tenets of medieval versus modern morality, on the social and educational value of any form of artistic and literary expression. A true encyclopedia of early modern life and a summa of late medieval culture, the Decameron is also a universal repertory of perennially human situations and dilemmas: it is the perfect subject for an experiment in a new form of scholarly and pedagogical communication aimed at renewing a living dialogue between a distant past and our present. The guiding question of our project is how contemporary informational technology can facilitate, enhance and innovate the complex cognitive and learning activities involved in reading a late medieval literary text like Boccaccio's Decameron. We fundamentally believe that the new electronic environment and its tools enable us to revive the humanistic spirit of communal and collaboratively "playful" learning of which the Decameron itself is the utmost expression.
website  Medieval  Renaissance  14thC  Italy  Italian_lit  narrative  digital_humanities  Boccaccio  cultural_history  humanism  literary_history  lit_crit 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
The Loss of Final -e - Harvard Chaucer site
It is worth noting that this aspect of Chaucer's verse was unknown for centuries. By Shakespeare's time the final -e had been lost. That is why, though Shakespeare's pronunciation differed from our own, it is possible to read his works in a modern pronunciation: the rhythm of his lines remains the same, no matter how the vowels are pronounced, because except for a few exceptions ("Out damnéd spot!"), Shakespeare treated what had become in his time the "silent e" in the same way we do. Consequently, when Shakespeare read Chaucer he omitted the final -e, treating it as silent. The meter was ruined; though Shakespeare greatly admired Chaucer, he and his contemporaries thought that Chaucer was an archaic poet who could not write a smooth and pleasing meter in those distant early times. So too did John Dryden, who idolized Chaucer but thought he wrote in "the infancy of our Poetry". Not until the the late eighteenth century did scholars discover and demonstrate the importance of the final -e for Chaucer's versification.
Chaucer  English_lit  poetry  language  meter  Shakespeare  Dryden  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
The Criyng and the Soun: Chaucer Audio Files | Baragona's Literary Resources
These are links to web pages with excerpts from Chaucer’s works read by professors. The main purpose of these recordings is to help students improve their pronunciation of Chaucer’s Middle English. The emphasis is on accuracy of pronunciation, according to the most current scholarly thinking, though you will notice some individual variation among the readers.
Chaucer  poetry  English_lit  14thC  Medieval 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Interlinear Translations of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales Harvard Chaucer site
These translations of the Canterbury Tales are for those beginning their study of Chaucer's language. They supply merely a pony and by no means can they serve as a substitute for the original, nor even for a good translation. Often the syntax of the interlinear translation will be awkward in Modern English, since the aim is to supply a somewhat literal translation to make clear the meaning of the Middle English words. For the same reason there is no attempt to reproduce in Modern English the spirit and tone of the original (even if that were possible). The translation is more often "word for word" than "sense for sense."
etexts  translation  English_lit  14thC  Chaucer 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Canterbury Tales Project
The Canterbury Tales Project aims to investigate the textual tradition of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to achieve a better understanding of the history of its composition and publication before 1500. Here is how we work: (1) We have established a system of transcription for all the manuscripts and early printed books of the Canterbury Tales into computer-readable form. (2) We transcribe the manuscripts using this system. (3) We compare all the manuscripts, creating a record of their agreements and disagreements with a computer collation program (Collate). (4 )We use computer-based methods, some drawn from evolutionary biology, to help reconstruct the history of the text from this record of agreements and disagreements. (5) We publish all the materials, the results of our analysis, and the tools which we use in electronic form.-- We have published seven CD-ROMs to date, with more coming soon. We have begun internet publication with the Caxtons online, and you can see web samples of our Hengwrt, Miller's Tale and Nun's Priest's Tale CD-ROMs online. Altogether, we have published transcripts and images of over 5000 pages from manuscripts and early editions of the Tales, amounting to around 20% of all surviving fifteenth-century witnesses. -- we are active in promoting mass manuscript digitization: see the website we have established, in partnership with others. We are now at the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing at the University of Birmingham.
website  digital_humanities  English_lit  Chaucer  14thC  15thC  printing  manuscripts 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Cécile Alduy, Roland Greene - Forum Introduction - Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads | Republics of Letters - Volume 1, Issue 2 ( February 2010)
Nice overview of the entangling and untangling of our notions of experience and experiment from Petrarch to Montaigne -- downloaded pdf to Note -- TOC of Forum -- Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads by Cécile Alduy, by Roland Greene. (1) Artificial Men: Alchemy, Transubstantiation, and the Homunculus by Mary Baine Campbell. (2) Machines in the Garden by Jessica Riskin. (3) Atheism as a Devotional Category by George Hoffmann. (4) Montaigne: The Eclectic Pragmatist by Anthony Long. (5) Putting Experience First by Timothy Hampton
article  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  epistemology  empiricism  self  metaphor  cultural_history  literary_history  Seneca  Montaigne  scepticism  atheism_panic  pragmatism  alchemy  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
N. J. Mayhew - Population, Money Supply, and the Velocity of Circulation in England, 1300-1700 | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 48, No. 2 (May, 1995), pp. 238-257
The importance of monetary and demographic factors in the later medieval and early modern 'price revolutions' has been much debated. This article analyses this long period in the terms of the Fisher Identity MV=PT, but also fully recognizes the importance of demographic change, and its impact on GDP. Tentative estimates of money supply and GDP are discussed, and from them velocity of circulation is deduced. Velocity has tended to fall over this period, but rising Tudor velocity is regarded as a symptom of economic distress. -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  UK_economy  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  economic_growth  demography  population  prices  money_supply  money_velocity  money  commerce  dearth  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Newman, review - Nuttall, Jenni. The Creation of Lancastrian Kingship: Literature, Language and Politics in Late Medieval England | The Medieval Review June 2009
Nuttall, Jenni. The Creation of Lancastrian Kingship: Literature, Language and Politics in Late Medieval England. Cambridge Series in Medieval Literature. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. 187. $90.00. ISBN: 9780521874960.

Reviewed by:

University of Toronto This book provides a convincing account of how the Lancastrian literature offers not only another facet to the period's politics, but, circulating "side-by-side" with official and semi-official, "participates in the process of commentary, engaging closely with the Crown's own rhetoric" (127). Rather than bracket or dissolve the distinction between literary and non-literary texts, Nuttall puts them into conversation with one another. In this way, she reveals continuities between these different discourses, but and throws into relief the nuanced and layered qualities of Lancastrian literature which allow it to address differing messages to multiple readers. In this way, her book offers both a fresh and convincing take on Lancastrian political history and its rich, sustained readings of the period's literary texts restore their political valences without reducing them to partisan tokens.
books  reviews  kindle-available  14thC  15thC  British_history  British_politics  English_lit  intellectual_history  political_culture  monarchy  politics-and-literature  Cambridge_School  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
AHR Forum - Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism - JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 101, No. 1, Feb., 1996
Articles -- Introduction: Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism (pp. 107-109)  Ronald Witt -**- The Crisis after Forty Years (pp. 110-118)  Ronald Witt -**- Baron's Machiavelli and Renaissance Republicanism (pp. 119-129)  John M. Najemy -**- The Historical Petrarch (pp. 130-141)  Craig Kallendorf -**- Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism: A Comment (pp. 142-144)  Werner Gundersheimer
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  humanism  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  Italy  Petrarch  Machiavelli  republicanism  city_states  political_culture  cultural_history  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Alexander Lee: Roman Law and Human Liberty: Marsilius of Padua on Property Rights (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 23-44 -- pdf available -- builds on work of Brian Tierney and Annabelle Brett
article  jstor  14thC  intellectual_history  legal_history  church_history  Roman_law  property_rights  property  liberty  natural_rights  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
N. J. Mayhew: Money, prices, and growth in pre-industrial England | OUPblog August 2013
Blog post summarizes key findings in his P&P 2013 article downloaded to Note. Links to other recent economic history papers by other scholars. Summary: in the period 1250 to 1750 population levels and GDP were always closely associated, and estimates of the size of the money stock have little importance without an understanding of the size of the economy that the money stock has to service. In this sense, population levels find a place within the Quantity Theory, but the demographic role influences not only demand but also supply. If this is accepted, the long-standing and increasingly sterile battle between monetary and demographic explanations for the behaviour of prices can be drawn to a close. Money clearly influences the price level, as does velocity, but the size of the economy remains an essential element in the equation. Economic growth emerges as a fundamental influence on population and on price levels.The reassertion of Quantity Theory should not be seen as a victory for the Chicago school since Keynesian observations about the role of velocity (or its inverse, demand for money to hold) and the effect of time lags remain important qualifications. Still more importantly, much depends on the quality of our estimates of GDP, prices, and the money stock.
British_history  economic_history  Medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  population  economic_growth  inflation  commerce  social_history  links  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
N. J. Mayhew: Prices in England, 1170–1750 | P & P April 2013
N. J. Mayhew, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford...
Understanding the movement of prices must be one of the most fundamental of the economic historian’s tasks, but it remains one of the most difficult. This article seeks to understand the movement of English prices over the whole period 1170 to 1750, which saw two great episodes of inflation, each followed by long decades of price stability. It is argued that monetary factors exercised the most important influence on the general price level, though of course the size of the economy was determined above all by demographic changes. This article also argues that medieval and early modern prices behaved in similar ways, which have much in common with the behaviour of prices today. ?..
Downloaded pdf to Note
British_history  economic_history  Medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  economic_growth  inflation  prices  population  social_history  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Medieval France, Flanders, Burgundy - Crossbow competitions and civic communities | OUPblog August 2013
Great map of the counties and towns disputed between France and Burgundy - also the southern Netherlands, Picardy that became the cockpit in eg War of Spanish Succession
France  Netherlands  Medieval  14thC  15thC  map  War_of_Spanish_Succession 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

9thC  10thC  11thC  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  15thC16thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  abolition  Absolutism  agrarian_capitalism  agriculture  agriculture-productivity  alchemy  amazon.fr  ancient_constitution  ancient_Rome  Anglo-French  Anglo-Norman  Anglo-Saxons  Anglo-Scot  architecture  architecture-churches  aristocracy  article  art_history  Asia  astrology  atheism_panic  balance_of_power  Bembo  bibliography  Black_Death  Boccaccio  Bodin  Bolingbroke  books  Britain  Britain-Continent  British_Empire  British_Empire-military  British_history  British_politics  Byzantium  Calvinist  Cambridge_School  canon_law  capital  capitalism  censorship  center-periphery  Central_Asia  change-social  Charlemagne  Charles_I  Chaucer  China  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  church_history  Church_of_England  Cicero  cities  city_states  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  civil_liberties  civil_society  class_conflict  clergy  climate-history  climate_change  colonialism  commerce  commonwealth  common_law  competiveness-labor  consent  Constantinople  constitutionalism  contention  contingency  contracts  corporate_law  corporations  corruption  courtiers  court_culture  Crusades  cultural_history  Dante  dearth  decorative_arts  demography  development  dialogue  digital_humanities  diplomatic_history  disease  downloaded  Dryden  Dutch  economic_decline  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_reform  economic_sociology  education-higher  EF-add  elites  elite_culture  Elizabeth  Elizabethan  eloquence  empires  empiricism  England  English_constitution  English_lit  Enlightenment  environmental_history  epistemology  epistemology-moral  equity  Essex_rebellion  estates  etexts  Europe-Early_Modern  Europe-Medieval  exempla  experimental_philosophy  export-led  faction  feudalism  fiscal-military_state  Florence  foreign_trade  France  French_history  GDP  GDP-per_capita  genetics  gentleman  gentry  geohistory  Germany  Gothic_constitution  Goths  Great_Divergence  guerrillas  Guicciardini  Harrington  historians  historians-and-politics  historical_change  historical_sociology  historicism  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historiography-Renaissance  history_of_England  history_of_science  Hobbes  Holy_Roman_Empire  humanism  Hundred_Years_War  hypocrisy  imperialism  Industrial_Revolution  inequality  inflation  Innovation  institution-building  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutions  intellectual_history  international_finance  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  Islam  Islam-expansion  Islamic_civilization  Italian_lit  Italy  Italy-cities  James_I  Japan  journal  jstor  judiciary  kindle-available  labor  labor_force_structure  labor_history  Labor_markets  landowners  language  language-politics  late_antiquity  Latin_lit  lawyers  lecture  legal_culture  legal_history  legal_system  legislation  legitimacy  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberal_arts  liberty  lifestyle  life_expectancy  limited_monarchy  links  literacy  literary_history  literary_theory  Little_Ice_Age  lit_crit  Locke  love  Machiavelli  magic  Magna_Carta  Mamluks  manners  manufacturing  manuscripts  map  marriage  mathematics  medieval  medieval_history  MENA  mercenaires  metaphor  meter  military_history  militia  monarchy  money  money_supply  money_velocity  Mongols  Montaigne  moral_economy  moral_philosophy  narrative  nation-state  national_ID  natural_law  natural_philosophy  natural_rights  nature  neo-Latin  Neoplatonism  Netherlands  networks  networks-business  networks-religious  networks-social  nobility  nobles  Norman_Conquest  Norman_Quest  North-Weingast  oratory  Orthodox_Christianity  otium  Ottomans  Ovid  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  paper  Parlement  Parliament  patronage  perception  Petrarch  playwrights  Pocock  poetics  poetry  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_order  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_sociology  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  politiques  Poor_Laws  popular_culture  popular_politics  population  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  pragmatism  prerogative  prices  printing  productivity  property  property-confiscations  property_rights  prose  proto-industry  Providence  publishing  Quintillian  reading  reception  Reformation  religious_culture  religious_history  religious_wars  Renaissance  representative_institutions  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  resistance_theory  reviews  revues.org  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-writing  ritual  Romanticism  Roman_Empire  Roman_law  satire  scepticism  scholastics  Scotland  Scottish_history  self  self-examination  self-fashioning  self-government  Seneca  sexuality  Shakespeare  slavery  social_history  social_movements  social_order  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  sovereignty  Spencer_Herbert  spice_trade  sprezaturra  state-building  stats  Stoicism  style  style-philosophy  taxes  textiles  theology  torts  trade  translation  trust  trusts  Tudor  UK_economy  unemployment  urbanization  urban_development  urban_elites  urban_politics  US_economy  US_history  US_politics  Venice  vernacular  Victorian  video  wages  Wales  warrior_class  Wars_of_the_Roses  War_of_Roses  War_of_Spanish_Succession  War_of_the_Roses  wealth  weather  website  welfare  welfare_state  Western_Europe  women 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: