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Twitter
Among those willing to do so, adopting a pet may ease symptoms of treatment-resistant major depressive disorder in some patients taking antidepressants. https://t.co/Cws3DW1qGi

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 14, 2018
research  parsingscience 
7 hours ago
Twitter
Those who experience violence at work may have 25% greater risk of heart and brain blood vessel problems, while those bullied at work may have a 59% greater risk. https://t.co/DlcnBXGHaC

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 14, 2018
research  parsingscience 
10 hours ago
Twitter
Study finds that people tend to identify themselves more broadly than only as a member of one particular nation when five combinations of attitudes either occur or not. https://t.co/nc6JXnjN5x

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 14, 2018
research  parsingscience 
12 hours ago
Twitter
Commentary on proposal to redefine the boundary of space. https://t.co/AidgUoZTsv

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 14, 2018
research  parsingscience 
13 hours ago
When teens sleep in, grades go up - Futurity
When school begins later, teens get more snooze time—and grades and attendance improve, a new study shows. After public schools in Seattle reorganized school start times, teens got more sleep on school nights—a median increase of 34 minutes of sleep each night. via Pocket
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14 hours ago
Huge Brain Study Uncovers "Buried" Genetic Networks Linked to Mental Illness - Scientific American
Brain conditions such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder have long been known to have an inherited component, but pinpointing how gene variants contribute to disease has been a major challenge. via Pocket
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14 hours ago
Once you lack folate, the damage can't be fixed - Futurity
Folate deficiency creates more problems in connection with cell division and DNA replication than previously thought, a study shows. Once a person lacks folate, the resulting damage is irreversible. The researchers therefore encourage people to be more aware of the level of folate in the blood. via Pocket
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14 hours ago
'Transmissible' Alzheimer's Theory Gains Traction | RealClearScience
Neuroscientists have amassed more evidence for the hypothesis that sticky proteins that are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases can be transferred between people under particular conditions — and cause new damage in a recipient's brain. via Pocket
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14 hours ago
CAS – Central Authentication Service
This Central Authentication Service (CAS) provides single sign-on access to Pepperdine University web services. Your log in to this CAS page allows you to access any of your web services for the next two hours, without having to log in again. via Pocket
research 
15 hours ago
Why Experts Are Thinking of Moving the Space Boundary | RealClearScience
On Thursday morning, just after 8AM PT, the two pilots on board Virgin Galactic's spaceplane ignited the vehicle's rocket engine high above the Mojave Desert for a total of 60 seconds, soaring to an altitude of 82.7 kilometers. via Pocket
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15 hours ago
Twitter
"Stone Age 'chewing gum' yields 5,700 year-old human genome and oral microbiome" https://t.co/sM34ccZKqd

— Joe Pickrell (@joe_pickrell) December 13, 2018
research  parsingscience 
23 hours ago
Twitter
Stability of core language skill underscores the importance of addressing delays in language skills early in children's development. https://t.co/XMRzjobIoT

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 14, 2018
research  parsingscience 
yesterday
Twitter
Increased life complexity of moon jellyfish found unrelated to the number of genes they possess. https://t.co/ntHVXzT0QF

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 14, 2018
research  parsingscience 
yesterday
Twitter
By learning from the bad behavior of their own bosses, prior victims of workplace abuse found to be more likely to treat their own subordinates better. https://t.co/7qVGeZsTem

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 13, 2018
research  parsingscience 
yesterday
Experiencing failure hurts your self-esteem but has no effect on actual performance, contrary to the commonly held view that failure begets more failure, finds a new study. In fact, failure could propel you forward to later success, but it depends on how
A new study published in the journal Psychology of Sport and Exercise looked at what happens to us after we fail. The researchers found that experiencing setbacks hurts your self-esteem but has no effect on actual performance. via Pocket
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yesterday
'Dropout' rate for academic scientists has risen sharply in past 50 years, new study finds. Half of the people pursuing careers as scientists at higher education institutions will drop out of the field after five years, according to a new analysis. : scie
Half of the people pursuing careers as scientists at higher education institutions will drop out of the field after five years, according to a new analysis from researchers at Indiana University Bloomington. Staša Milojević, Filippo Radicchi, and John P. Walsh. via Pocket
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yesterday
Cancer often comes back after surgery. Scientists developed a spray gel embedded with immune-boosting drugs that was successful half of the time in awakening immune systems in mice to stop the cancer from recurring after surgery and inhibit it from spread
Many people who are diagnosed with cancer will undergo some type of surgery to treat their disease — almost 95 percent of people with early-diagnosed breast cancer will require surgery and it’s often the first line of treatment for people with brain tumors, for example. via Pocket
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yesterday
In 200 years, humans reversed a climate trend lasting 50 million years, study says : science
4Posted byNGO|Climate Science14 minutes ago edition-m.cnn.com/2018/1... via Pocket
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yesterday
Twitter
Researchers find that as couples age negative behaviors, such as defensiveness and criticism, tend to wane as positive ones, such as humor and affection, become more prevalent. https://t.co/gfpWXemp1i

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 13, 2018
research  parsingscience 
yesterday
Twitter
Employing machine translation to tackle cuneiform #linguistics #in #AI https://t.co/D5ESKiiWhk

— Jennifer Dorman (@cliotech) December 12, 2018
research  parsingscience 
yesterday
Twitter
Study links earlier onset of girls' puberty and exposure to common household chemicals present in personal care products. https://t.co/a26RTggkPn

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 12, 2018
research  parsingscience 
2 days ago
Camera-connected hearing aid would "think" to help users hear
When trying to hear what another person is saying, hearing aid users are often stymied by loud background noises, such as the voices of other people in the same room. via Pocket
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2 days ago
New models sense human trust in smart machines -- ScienceDaily
The long-term goal of the overall field of research is to design intelligent machines capable of changing their behavior to enhance human trust in them. via Pocket
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2 days ago
New review of scientific studies confirms food cravings can be reduced -- ScienceDaily
However, an examination of 28 current peer-reviewed scientific studies largely substantiates findings that changes in diet, prescription medications, physical activity and bariatric surgery reduce craving, said Candice Myers, PhD, assistant professor -- research at LSU's Pennington Biomedical Resear via Pocket
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2 days ago
When humans are wiped from Earth, the chicken bones will remain | New Scientist
When humans have vanished from the planet, one of the most enduring marks of our impact on Earth will be the sudden appearance in the fossil record of copious chicken bones. Geologists have proposed that the age of humans constitutes a new epoch in Earth’s history, known as the Anthropocene. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Twitter
Kids prescribed opioids after wisdom tooth extraction found to be more than 5% more likely to show signs of addiction within the year. https://t.co/U8sm6jqYnT

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 12, 2018
research  parsingscience 
2 days ago
A single molecule could forecast what type of dementia a person will develop
View gallery - 2 images Researchers at UT Southwestern are continuing their remarkable discoveries into the neurological origins of dementia, revealing a new strategy that could potentially forecast what form of dementia a person may develop long before any symptoms of cognitive decline appear by st via Pocket
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2 days ago
It Could Be the Age of the Chicken, Geologically - The New York Times
With 65 billion chickens consumed each year, the signature fossil of the modern epoch may be the leftovers. It’s one thing to eat chicken every day. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Twitter
People found to be more likely to label their communities “urban” if they perceive local schools to be low in quality and their neighborhoods to be unsafe. https://t.co/sMlcW9CImw

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 12, 2018
research  parsingscience 
2 days ago
Twitter
Google data shows that people now search for conservation just as often as they do for climate change. https://t.co/ya01yRUdtj

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 12, 2018
research  parsingscience 
2 days ago
Men with more autistic traits were less influenced by people’s facial appearance to make judgements on trustworthiness, finds a new study, which suggests that as facial impressions are not accurate predictions of trustworthiness, failure to use them may
Hooper, J. J., Sutherland, C. A., Ewing, L. , Langdon, R. , Caruana, N. , Connaughton, E. , Williams, N. , Greenwell‐Barnden, J. and Rhodes, G. (2018), Should I trust you? Autistic traits predict reduced appearance‐based trust decisions. via Pocket
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2 days ago
'Planet of the chickens': How the bird took over the world - BBC News
With around 23 billion chickens on the planet at any one time, the bird is a symbol of the way we are shaping the environment, say scientists. Evolution usually takes place over a timescale of millions of years, but the chicken has changed in decades. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Global Warming Will Happen Faster Than We Think | RealClearScience
Prepare for the “new abnormal”. That was what California Governor Jerry Brown told reporters last month, commenting on the deadly wildfires that have plagued the state this year. He's right. California's latest crisis builds on years of record-breaking droughts and heatwaves. via Pocket
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2 days ago
New Experiment Casts Doubt on Claims to Have Identified Dark Matter : science
1Posted by24 minutes ago digitaltrends.com/cool-t... via Pocket
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2 days ago
Curious Kids: do people see the same colour when they look at something?
Curious Kids is a series for children of all ages, where The Conversation asks experts to answer questions from kids. All questions are welcome: find out how to enter at the bottom of this article. via Pocket
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2 days ago
“An additional reason to abandon learning styles” – teachers and pupils do not agree on the pupils’ preferred learning style – Research Digest
“Learning styles” – there can be few ideas that have created such a stark disconnect between the experts on the ground and the evidence published in scholarly journals. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Advanced DNA Technology May Help To Identify Korean War Unknowns : NPR
The Pentagon is exhuming all of the more than 650 Korean War unknowns in a Honolulu military cemetery. Advances in DNA technology and other forensics make their identification highly likely. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Why practicing empathy matters, and how VR can help
DANFUNG DENNIS: So right now, it's this really early crude technology, and it isn't possible to fully capture the full human experience. We can't yet inhabit someone else's body. We can't take perspective from behind their eyes. But we can get very close to that. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Scientists Just Found a Previously Unknown Nerve Pathway For Pain
To ease the sting of a paper cut, most of us will instinctively pop the afflicted finger in the mouth and suck for a moment or two. We rub barked shins, cool blistered skin, and shake a crushed hand. And it might represent a completely different kind of pain. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Cannabis use in teens not a gateway to conduct problems, study suggests – but risks still exist
With the legalization of cannabis for adults becoming increasingly widespread, more adolescents will be trying the drug. And parents will be wondering what the consequences will be for their teens should they try and continue to use marijuana. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
We Just Got a Surprising New Answer For What May Have Killed The Giant Megalodon
Throughout Earth's history, one question rises, again and again: what were the factors that killed off a species or a population of animals? Many of them are terrestrial in origin, but a mysterious event that killed off 36 percent of the ocean's genera 2. via Pocket
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2 days ago
How imaginary friends could boost children's development
Psychologists first became interested in imaginary friends in the early 19th century because they feared they could be a sign of emotional unstability or psychological problems in children. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Five reasons why 2018 was a big year for palaeontology
A lot happened in the world of palaeontology in 2018. Some of the big events included some major fossil finds, a new understanding of our reptile ancestors and a major controversy whose outcome could rewrite human history. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Search
This story is part of What Happens Next, our complete guide to understanding the future. Read more predictions about the Future of Aging.  The loneliness statistics among older persons can leave you feeling desolate. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Many babies don’t sleep through the night | Science News
I love to hate the phrase “sleep like a baby.” It’s a beautiful example of a saying that’s based on the exact opposite of what it’s intended to convey. Babies (many of them, anyway) are rotten sleepers. During my last pregnancy, I wondered if I might luck out with a good sleeper. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Improved understanding of the pathology of dwarfism may lead to new treatment targets -- ScienceDaily
"This is the first study linking ER stress to midline 1 protein (MID1), a microtubule stabilizer that increases mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in chondrocytes and other cell types. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Researchers suggest broiler chicken is the hallmark of the Anthropocene
A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.K. and one in South Africa has come to the conclusion that the broiler chicken offers perhaps the most striking evidence of the rise of the Anthropocene. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
Teachers don't understand the depth of dyslexia
Dyslexia is a common learning difficulty that most of us know for causing problems with writing, reading and spelling. But it is more than this, and can affect people in many different ways. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
'Eavesdropping' on groupers' mating calls key to survival: New technique to identify groupers by their sounds -- ScienceDaily
In a new study, researchers from Florida Atlantic University's College of Engineering and Computer Science and Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute and collaborators, have taken this technology to the next level using deep neural networks -- a set of algorithms modeled after the human brain. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Fixing gender gaps isn't just about women – men will benefit from a more equal society too
The UK is in the middle of a conversation about the gender pay gap. And rightly so. No matter how you look at it, the average 9.7% difference between the collective earnings of men and women suggests a structural disadvantage to women. via Pocket
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2 days ago
What We Know About Diet and Weight Loss - The New York Times
After decades of research, there are shockingly few firm conclusions. You’d think that scientists at an international conference on obesity would know by now which diet is best, and why. As it turns out, even the experts still have widely divergent opinions. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
Twitter
Physicists develop means of bending photons around sharp corners, paving the way for light-based computers. https://t.co/GnLCIRW1p1

— Parsing Science (@ParsingScience) December 12, 2018
research  parsingscience 
2 days ago
Urban Schools Are Improving, Despite Parents’ Beliefs - The Atlantic
In recent years, many of America’s urban schools have improved significantly. A 2016 report from the Urban Institute found that while all the country’s public-school students improved in the decade starting in 2005, the gain for those in large cities was double that of the U.S. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Brain Rhythms Guide How Humans Pay Attention | RealClearScience
Driving a car is a complex task for a brain to coordinate. A driver may drink a cup of coffee and have a conversation with a passenger, all while safely piloting a vehicle through traffic. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
The Neurons That Tell Time | RealClearScience
In June of 2007, Albert Tsao, a nineteen-year-old native of Silver Spring, Maryland, was working in Trondheim, Norway, at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
CAS – Central Authentication Service
This Central Authentication Service (CAS) provides single sign-on access to Pepperdine University web services. Your log in to this CAS page allows you to access any of your web services for the next two hours, without having to log in again. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
CAS – Central Authentication Service
This Central Authentication Service (CAS) provides single sign-on access to Pepperdine University web services. Your log in to this CAS page allows you to access any of your web services for the next two hours, without having to log in again. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
CAS – Central Authentication Service
This Central Authentication Service (CAS) provides single sign-on access to Pepperdine University web services. Your log in to this CAS page allows you to access any of your web services for the next two hours, without having to log in again. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
Childhood adversity linked to reduced inhibitory control and alterations in key brain networks
New research suggests that exposure to childhood adversity is associated with reduced cognitive control and alterations in key brain networks. via Pocket
research 
2 days ago
In a new study involving people over 70 who have exercised regularly for years, scientists discovered that the participants' hearts, lungs, and muscles were in equivalent shape to those of people in their 40s. : science
Simple resistance exercises have enormous benefits, especially for seniors. A substantial portion of admissions (1/3 I think) to nursing homes is due to frailty, as opposed to actual disease, that can be avoided through modest weight lifting. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Study of advanced Buddhist meditators suggests inducing near-death experiences can be learned and perfected
Near-death experiences are profound psychological events that typically occur in people close to actual or perceived death. New research has examined some Buddhist meditation practitioners who can willfully induce these experiences. The study was published in Mindfulness. via Pocket
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2 days ago
Study of advanced Buddhist meditators suggests inducing near-death experiences can be learned and perfected. : science
Van Gordon, W., Shonin, E., Dunn, T.J. et al. Mindfulness (2018) 9: 1794. Near-death experiences (NDEs) are life transformational events that are increasingly being subjected to empirical research. via Pocket
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2 days ago
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