dirtystylus + techculture   220

Justin Dauer on Twitter: "The notion of a company / brand calling their employees [x]’ers (ex: “IBM’ers”) has never sat well with me. I get the C-suite’s desired sense of shared values and being one big team, but it’s always felt forced—bran
The notion of a company / brand calling their employees [x]’ers (ex: “IBM’ers”) has never sat well with me.

I get the C-suite’s desired sense of shared values and being one big team, but it’s always felt forced—branded property conformity—at the expense of anything inspiring.
workculture  techculture  language 
26 days ago by dirtystylus
The optimization trap: what you give up when you hustle - The Verge
In 2017, Ben Friedman, a Harvard economist, published a paper that explained why. “Keynes was right (so far) about output per capita, but wrong about the workweek,” he wrote. “The key reason is that he failed to allow for changing distribution. With widening inequality, median income (and therefore the income of most families) has risen, and is now rising, much more slowly than he anticipated.”

That means: we’re working harder for less now because the people who have more have so much more. The economy is optimized to push gains to the top. The whole point of personal optimization, on the other hand, is to increase your productivity in this system, to work harder in a way that mostly does not benefit you — at least not in the end.
economy  workculture  techculture  productivity  worklifebalance  humor  nyt  slackfodder 
5 weeks ago by dirtystylus
Why Susan Fowler blew the whistle on sexism at Uber - The Verge
The book that pushed her into the blog post was Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning, about surviving Nazi concentration camps. “I’m reading this, and I’m thinking, Would I actually be a good person if I was in that situation?” she says. “When we’re in these difficult situations, it’s our character that shows. I had just gone through this, and how dare I walk away and wash my hands of that whole situation.”

“HOW DARE I WALK AWAY AND WASH MY HANDS OF THAT WHOLE SITUATION.”
She sat down to compose and was very careful not to betray any emotion; she was a woman, after all, and her emotions could be used to discredit her. No names, only formal titles. And not a single sentence could be written without evidence. Its publication was months before the #MeToo movement when powerful men were accused of sexual misconduct, and Fowler’s work is different. Most #MeToo stories involved multiple women whose accounts were similar enough for a reporter to establish a pattern. And nearly all #MeToo stories focused closely on specific men, not the entirety of the system that protected them.

Fowler, on the other hand, presented Uber. Not one sexist manager. Not two. But all of them — and the HR system that shielded them. When Fowler wrote it, she didn’t imagine she would change much. She thought, maybe, someone else would be able to use it in a lawsuit. “I still have no idea what happened,” she says.
uber  susanfowler  sexualharassment  equity  toxicmasculinity  techculture  latecapitalism  ethics  womenintech 
6 weeks ago by dirtystylus
Slack rules of life | Seth's Blog
Create a new channel for every project.

Invite the right people to join the channel to work on it.

Every project has a beginning, and it has an ending as well. Don’t start a channel if you’re not prepared to end it.

When a project isn’t helping you reach your longer-term goals, leave the channel.

Direct messages demand clarity and care. And teams do better when communication is shared.

Remember that your reputation moves with you, from channel to channel.

Emotions are real, but emojis can be a distraction.
slack  teamwork  communication  techculture 
9 weeks ago by dirtystylus
People often come to me and ask “as a junior developer, how can stand out against the noise to get a response when applying for a job?”
People often come to me and ask “as a junior developer, how can stand out against the noise to get a response when applying for a job?”

I have a tip that I only share in my 1:1’s that I’m gonna share now.

I’m def gonna delete this later so screenshot it
There are a lot of different methods that I recommend but the top one that I like is to choose some of your top companies you want to work for then create projects based on their job descriptions.

What do I mean by that?
In my 1:1’s I will sometimes ask them to send me a couple jobs that they want to apply for. Let me choose an example.

Here’s a Full Stack engineering role at Snapchat in London
A lot of times a junior developer (esp bootcamp grad) will have a project or two with some of these qualifications. So they’d apply with the same projects that they’d apply to every company with.

They might get a response. They might not. But a way to really stand out is —

— to take a few weekends to play around with the technologies mentioned in the job description. But then incorporate those frameworks and languages with any open source libraries that company already has.

In this example: SNAP has a few public APIs. This job works w gaming
1 reply 2 retweets 16 likes
It asks for AWS experience, MongoDB, Python, etc. but primarily gaming.

If you have the access and ability to spend the time to create a small project with a few of these technologies, you’ll for sure get a longer glance at your resume
We’re fortunate enough to be in a field that allows us to create projects for free.

The people looking through your applications & resumes are *usually* not engineers.

So when they see experience matching what they’re looking for in any capacity, they’re going to pay attention
And if we’re being *completely* honest, a lot of bootcamp grads leave the bootcamp with very similar resumes. Very similar projects.
Another option is to pick and choose some of the languages and frameworks in the description, then choose a subject you *are* passionate about and create a project out of that.

Just have fun. I got noticed off an app about sex and zodiac signs
Like I said, I’m going to delete this thread bc I get paid for this type of help 1:1.

I do resume reviews, interview help, and general career help for our community members.

If ur interested in joining us or staying up to date, sign up for my email list
career  advice  techculture  hiring  webdev 
10 weeks ago by dirtystylus
Sonia Gupta on Twitter: "Tech loves "woke" white men because it's so seemingly unexpected. These men then use that to their advantage to market themselves as deserving of admiration, and ironically, they end up advancing in the ranks farther than the peop
Tech loves "woke" white men because it's so seemingly unexpected. These men then use that to their advantage to market themselves as deserving of admiration, and ironically, they end up advancing in the ranks farther than the people they're supposedly "woke" for.
by:soniagupta  performativewokeness  justice  techculture 
10 weeks ago by dirtystylus
kang👎 on Twitter: "this story confirms my belief that anything that is aggressively marketed to me on Instagram is a) run by dead-eyed ambition monsters b) only a play to do some private equity/VC money two-step that leaves everyone else screwed c) gar
this story confirms my belief that anything that is aggressively marketed to me on Instagram is

a) run by dead-eyed ambition monsters
b) only a play to do some private equity/VC money two-step that leaves everyone else screwed
c) garbage
awayluggage  burnout  management  techculture 
december 2019 by dirtystylus
Techniques | Technology Radar | ThoughtWorks
HOLD: 10X ENGINEERS

The old term 10x engineer has come under scrutiny these past few months. A widely shared Twitter thread essentially suggests companies should excuse antisocial and damaging behaviors in order to retain engineers who are perceived as having immense individual output. Thankfully, many people on social media made fun of the concept, but the stereotype of the "rockstar developer" is still pervasive. In our experience, great engineers are driven not by individual output but by working in amazing teams. It's more effective to build teams of talented individuals with mixed experiences and diverse backgrounds and provide the right ingredients for teamwork, learning and continuous improvement. These 10x teams can move faster, scale more quickly and are much more resilient — without needing to pander to bad behaviors.
techculture  dataviz  management  agency  research  agency:thoughtworks 
november 2019 by dirtystylus
4-Day Workweek Boosted Workers' Productivity By 40%, Microsoft Japan Says : NPR
In the U.S., Schawbel sees schedule flexibility and a four-day week as two ways for employers to ease what he calls an ongoing burnout crisis.

At the heart of the discussion of workplace burnout and schedule flexibility is technology. The same electronic tools that have made working from home easier than ever have also made it harder for employees to fully unplug from their jobs when they aren't in the office.
labor  japan  microsoft  productivity  work  workculture  techculture 
november 2019 by dirtystylus
Thank you, Guido | Dropbox Blog
“When asked, I would give people my opinion that maintainable code is more important than clever code,” he said. “If I encountered clever code that was particularly cryptic, and I had to do some maintenance on it, I would probably rewrite it. So I led by example, and also by talking to other people.”
dropbox  python  techculture  maintainability  codearchitecture  debugging  codestyle  technicaldebt 
november 2019 by dirtystylus
Google released research on what makes a good boss – do you agree? | Money | The Guardian
1 A good coach
Good bosses help employees through problems and use them as learning points.

2 Empowers the team instead of micromanaging
If your boss frequently tells you how to do small tasks that you are completely qualified to do on your own – like how to write an email – then you may have a micromanager on your hands. A good manager should empower you to use the skills that got you the job instead of trying to do everything for you.

3 Creates an inclusive team environment, and shows concern for success and wellbeing
If your boss leaves you feeling terrified of going to the toilet or asking questions, they probably haven’t done a great job at creating an inclusive team environment.

Google has refined its findings on this trait over time, showing that good managers ensure people feel comfortable to introduce new ideas, and don’t feel scared to ask questions or admit mistakes.

4 Productive and focused on results
Good bosses help out where necessary and make sure that you know what you are working towards.

5 A good communicator
This one is pretty self-explanatory: a good manager should be good at sharing information, and good at listening, too.

6 Supports career development and discusses performance
This means doing more than just giving criticisms or showing interest in an employee’s prospects – Google’s research has shown it has to be coupled with feedback that helps an employee work towards their goals.

7 Has a clear strategy for the team
A good boss let’s you know what is expected of you, and what you need to do to get there.

8 Has the technical skills needed to advise the team
Ideally, your boss should know how to do the job that they are asking you to do. If they are new, they will take time understanding the team before they make big changes.

9 Collaborates across the organization
Good managers don’t just have a good relationship with the people they manage, but other people in the organization, too.

10 Is a strong decision maker
Google has a lot of information on its website about how bosses should make informed decisions. In reality, most people just want their boss to make decisions quickly enough that they can go home on time and their work isn’t wasted.
google  research  management  leadership  techculture 
october 2019 by dirtystylus
Frank Chimero · A Like Can’t Go Anywhere, But a Compliment Can Go a Long Way
Suppose a person comes across something quite nice on Instagram or Twitter. They could write a pleasant comment, but they are probably going to Like the post instead (or heart, thumbs up, whatever term the platform uses). This creates a slight hitch in the brain of any reader: positivity gets compressed into a little block of Likes meta data that is about 100 pixels wide, no matter if it is one like or one thousand. Visually diminished positivity creates a challenge for the intellect to really understand the response. One must detach size from scale on social media, similar to how we detach size from value with a nickel and dime. A thousand likes doesn’t look much bigger than one, and this becomes important when considering the form of negativity on social media.
by:frankchimero  socialmedia  techculture 
september 2019 by dirtystylus
stacy-marie ishmael on Twitter: "I’ve spent a lot of time — in fact my entire career and the whole of undergrad — in spaces dominated by people so wealthy that they have never had to check a bank balance for any reason. This perspective, or lack of
I’ve spent a lot of time — in fact my entire career and the whole of undergrad — in spaces dominated by people so wealthy that they have never had to check a bank balance for any reason. This perspective, or lack of it, determines how you think about people who “need money”.
wealth  privilege  career  techculture  twitterthread  by:stacymarieishmael 
september 2019 by dirtystylus
bletchley punk on Twitter: "*attends event with 100+ women* ME: ugh I want to shave my head *sits in meeting where everyone is called "guys"* ME: ugh I want to paint my nails"
*attends event with 100+ women*
ME: ugh I want to shave my head
*sits in meeting where everyone is called "guys"*
ME: ugh I want to paint my nails
for people saying "both," yes of course

it's not that I can't do both, it's that both are efforts to be properly Seen
there's this Thing I keep running into, at the intersection of the tech industry and gender

I think it's mostly impactful in cultures where your job is a big part of who you are
I go to women in tech events and, invariably, I'm either the only woman or possibly one of two women who works in the infra space

most other women work in frontend or management or (sometimes) backend services
the number of women I know, in my local community, who do what I do? that is, infra and systems engineering and C and assembly and security and networking?

zero
I know a few from the Internet and some I've met in person!

but still, very very few
and because What We Do is so entwined with Who We Are, there's this odd...gendering that happens

tech roles have been gendered by history (a whole other discussion) but in turn I'm seeing/feeling Gender Defined By Tech Role
I attend events for women and none of them do what I do

and so I feel like I don't belong

and I wonder...am I not a woman?
because all these women write JS or manage teams and have career paths that look similar

and mine doesn't
and WHY aren't there more women like me? because they're not wanted! there's no in-roads. no retention. no encouragement. if you make it in, you're either held at arm's length or pushed out altogether.

I know this

and yet
it's far easier to feel awkward at WIT events and think "I feel awkward because I'm not a woman" than it is to think "I feel awkward because women like me are systematically culled"
because the latter part is far lonelier
because the latter part acknowledges that I will always be a bit lonely and a bit behind, compared to my WIT friends
gender  womenintech  techculture  misogyny  career  infrastructure  by:alicegoldfuss  twitterthread 
june 2019 by dirtystylus
Andy Bell on Twitter: "If we bake React into the browser, do we bake the toxic masculinity, links with a cesspit social network and the under-representation of folks who aren’t CIS-men? Or was it just the component model and diffing that you want?"
If we bake React into the browser, do we bake the toxic masculinity, links with a cesspit social network and the under-representation of folks who aren’t CIS-men?

Or was it just the component model and diffing that you want?
reactjs  browser  techculture 
june 2019 by dirtystylus
Always Own Your Platform
You know, it wasn't that long ago.

There was RSS.

There were blogs.

There were sub-groups and communities. The weirdos found each other. The non-weirdos found each other. It wasn't perfect. But it was distributed. It was ours.

It was yours.

Now? The original dream of the web is dying. Facebook, Google, Twitter, Medium, and YouTube entice us to give them our creative work.

They control what gets amplified and what gets monetized. A few conference rooms in Silicon Valley dictate our online culture.

It's time to take it back.

Stop giving away your work to people who don't care about it. Host it yourself. Distribute it via methods you control. Build your audience deliberately and on your own terms.

Be in charge of the relationship with your audience.

Deliver value and then ask for money. Avoid unnecessary middlemen.

Always. Own. Your platform.

Do you see someone in the wild, not owning their platform? Let them know:
rss  techculture  list  service  socialmedia 
may 2019 by dirtystylus
Matt Klein on Twitter: "Last week I sat for an internal interview about my career progression to high level IC engineer, with a focus on how I've never felt I needed to become a manager to gain influence. I thought I would share some of my career advice f
Last week I sat for an internal interview about my career progression to high level IC engineer, with a focus on how I've never felt I needed to become a manager to gain influence. I thought I would share some of my career advice for aspiring IC "lifers." Thread!

When asked for IC career advice the first thing I always say is: YOU grow your career and influence. Not management, not the company, YOU. This means constantly advocating for ways to grow: subjects to learn, projects with increased scope, and sometimes new teams or companies.

This also means "managing up" is critical. Don't assume your manager is acting in your best interest. Hopefully they are (when your interests *and theirs* align), but sometimes they aren't, and it's important to recognize that early and correct it, or eject if it's not fixable.

The job market for engineers has never been better. DO stay in a job if you are growing, learning, increasing your scope, and generally happy.

Do NOT stay in a job solely to get a promotion or more money, or if you are hungry for more growth, but finding it difficult to carve out opportunities. In these cases, consider switching jobs as a way to fast track your growth with less politics.

Speaking of promotions, the last time I got one was back in my early 20s. I have never seen a promotion process that is not subjective, political, and biased (I say this as a privileged white male, I shudder to think how others fare).

If you are growing in your abilities and generally happy at a job, and a promotion is a side effect, that's great. If your growth is stalled, consider switching jobs, and you will very likely get a promotion and more money, with less political heartache.

I recognize that not everyone can easily move jobs whether due to finances, visas, health, family, etc. and that it's a privilege to be able to do so. If you do have the ability, it provides a significant amount of flexibility and leverage to keep your career growing.

At higher IC levels, you will generally need to choose between focusing on "breadth" versus "depth." Breadth means having wide influence over the technical direction of a business. This typically requires staying at a company for a long time to build context/relationships.

Depth means working towards becoming an industry expert in a specialized field. I have chosen to become a depth IC. It's what I enjoy and I also think it allows for more job flexibility and leverage per above.

Finally, I will reiterate how critical networking and building relationships on the job is. Every job I have moved to (save 1) has been via previous colleagues. Finding people you like working with and for, and moving through the industry with them can be a great growth tactic.

Let's come back to the original subject of the interview which was influence as an IC vs manager. Influence is poorly defined, and situationally dependent, but to me it boils down to scope of impact.

At the highest levels, having large impact as an IC universally requires excellent technical and communication skills. Breadth ICs achieve large impact via cross org relationship building and technical leadership based on intimate knowledge of a business.

Depth ICs achieve large impact via company or industry leadership in a specialized field, therein advancing the state of the art, and having wide impact via novel technological outcomes.

^ requires finding the right opportunity that lets you visibly demonstrate your technical prowess to a wide audience. Determination and job switching if necessary helps, but luck is also a factor (i.e. I was in the right place at the right time with Envoy and executed well).

One last thing: don't let anyone tell you that the tech/engineering is the easy part. It's not. It's hard. Soft skills are also hard. It's ALL hard, and both are required to succeed.

In summary: focus on personal growth, learning, and relationships. Advocate for yourself relentlessly. Think about impact via breadth versus depth. Stay an IC If you like it. If switching teams or jobs helps realize your goals, and you have the ability to do so, make the leap.

P.S. It seems that "IC" is not a common term everywhere. It means individual contributor. Someone who has no direct reports and is not a people manager.
career  techculture  management  leadership  interview  via:polotek  by:mattklein  twitterthread 
may 2019 by dirtystylus
A thread written by @morganknutson
A massive F U to Google Plus
Also a study in designer entitlement
google  productdesign  twitterthread  teamwork  techculture  googleplus 
october 2018 by dirtystylus
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