dirtystylus + remotework   33

Actually, on Twitter: "Been working for a fully-distributed remote work company for about 15 years. I think one of the difficult things a lot of orgs are going to discover is that there's a big difference between "surviving WFH" and "being a remote-friend
Been working for a fully-distributed remote work company for about 15 years. I think one of the difficult things a lot of orgs are going to discover is that there's a big difference between "surviving WFH" and "being a remote-friendly company."
Individual workers are getting tons of advice right now, my only input is for people trying to wrangle teams:
1. Don't judge or micromanage what people are doing moment-to-moment. Let them accomplish their tasks however works for them.
2. Others have said this, but it's true: move as much explanatory communication as possible to shared docs with commenting/suggestion turned on, and a deadline for "closure."
3. Realtime meetings (esp with video) are cognitively and psychologically intensive, esp when team members are working in new/stressful/unfamiliar environments. Whenever possible save them for celebration, connection, ideation rather than information-dumps.
4. As a team lead/manager, dialing up the amount of time you spend in 1:1s seeing if people have what they need, and how they're doing, should be going up rather than down. When remote, you can't rely on "pass in the hall" nods and greetings to weigh how everyone's doing.
5. Finally, as a lead or manager, you have to be gentler on YOURSELF under current circumstances, too. Lots of things are going to fall through the cracks because there are more and bigger cracks. Tho it's not remote-specific,
@rands
has lots of great advice in "Managing Humans."
remotework  by:jeffeaton  1:1  coronavirus  teamwork  communication  management 
yesterday by dirtystylus
Zoom iOS App Sends Data to Facebook Even if You Don’t Have a Facebook Account - VICE
What the company and its privacy policy don't make clear is that the iOS version of the Zoom app is sending some analytics data to Facebook, even if Zoom users don't have a Facebook account, according to a Motherboard analysis of the app.
facebook  ios  zoom  remotework  privacy  analytics  via:beep 
5 days ago by dirtystylus
VOIP Flashcards (by @tom_armitage)
Designed for mobile. Tap to pick a message. Tap to clear. Hold up to your video conference.
tools  remotework  voip  communication 
6 days ago by dirtystylus
(1) Tom Armitage on Twitter: "I made some flashcards for you to hold up on videochat: https://t.co/tSPIEWqGWu You can install to your phone's homescreen, and it should work offline. Ideal for when you want to comment, but stay quiet - or perhaps tell some
I made some flashcards for you to hold up on videochat:

https://voipcards.tomarmitage.com

You can install to your phone's homescreen, and it should work offline.

Ideal for when you want to comment, but stay quiet - or perhaps tell someone else to pipe down for a bit.
tools  remotework  voip  communication 
6 days ago by dirtystylus
Parents On Childcare And Challenges In Coronavirus Isolation
“It’s not physically possible for two working parents to both work from home full time during regular workday working hours and care for a baby,” one mom named Melanie told me. That’s essentially asking parents to do two full-time jobs at the same time — when, as she pointed out, childcare alone is more than enough to keep full-time caregivers and stay-at-home moms working hard all day.

This situation is hard for parents of elementary-age children, who, depending on their district, are trying to sprinkle a mix of homeschooling and school-supplied activities throughout the day. It’s also hard on parents of toddlers because their kids can only self-entertain, even with a screen or movie, for about 10 to 15 minutes at a time.
parenting  coronavirus  children  education  remotework  relationships 
11 days ago by dirtystylus
Sara Wachter-Boettcher on Twitter: "Hosted our first remote @collectivestrng event last night! It's a monthly event series that we usually host for about 50-100 womxn and nb people on a weekday evening with snacks and drinks. Here's a thread about how it
Hosted our first remote
@collectivestrng
event last night! It's a monthly event series that we usually host for about 50-100 womxn and nb people on a weekday evening with snacks and drinks.

Here's a thread about how it went over Zoom.
We use Meetup for event listings/RSVPs. So we used Meetup to email guests the Zoom link day-of. This was an issue; not everyone got the email. Meetup wasn't designed to handle this, so there's no way to easily just give people joining info after they RSVP. (
@Meetup
pls fix this!)
Event format: we usually do either fireside chats with an expert (plus a group activity), or a fully interactive workshop. This month was a workshop I was facilitating with lots of group and 1:1 peer coaching work. We used Zoom breakout rooms for both.
Breakouts worked great, especially because we had tested the tech setup thoroughly and learned that there's no way to keep slides up when people are in breakouts. So we set up a separate google doc with all the prompts for all the breakouts, and gave that link out at the start.
One challenge is that a lot of the activities were 1:1 peer coaching, so you'd break out to a 1:1, come back to the group, then go back to the same 1:1. Issue: if someone has a tech difficulty, then someone's partnerless. If someone has to leave early, same.
So, we had
@theledu
jump in. She was on "crowd control" (making sure folks could hear, monitoring chat, etc.), so we'd just put her into a breakout if we needed her to make it even. That helped! But next time, I'll rely less on 1:1s for an event like this (free, community).
1:1s can totally work in a more formal setting, though -- if the workshop is with colleagues / part of work, or is a paid ticket, you'll get more consistency.
I'm still gathering feedback from attendees, but overall, the response was really positive. Someone said they cried happy tears at the connection they made! And it made my day to do something with this community even though I couldn't see them.
I missed the snacks, though. No one brought me a cheese plate :(
The biggest thing I can suggest to those moving somewhat complicated events to a remote format is to really, fully test the tech in advance—with some other people in the Zoom with you, ideally, so you can practice using all the features and understand precisely what does what.
For example, we got enough people in the test to run a couple breakouts and practice how long it *really* takes to move people into groups, have them join the groups, and then get them back from the groups. That helped us plan timing.
And I got to practice things like sending participants in breakout rooms an announcement when it was time for them to swap who was talking, or recreating the breakouts to go from small groups to 1:1.
All in all, a super positive experience, and we'll be doing more events this way. I've used basically all the conferencing software a lot of times in different ways, but this was a new bar. If you have questions about bringing your event to Zoom, hmu! I am happy to answer!
twitterthread  meetup  by:sarawachterboettcher  collectivestrength  philadelphia  remotework 
11 days ago by dirtystylus
Hand Mirror, for Mac
What is this?

It's a macOS app that lives in the menu bar, and when you click on it you get a view from your camera.

Yeah but why?

You know when you have to join a Zoom call but want to check your face first, or make sure nothing too embarrassing is in frame? And so you open Photo Booth or something? But that's like 5 keyboard-presses at best? Maybe a one-click thing might save you half a second or something?
app  macos  coronavirus  remotework  via:sarahdrasner 
12 days ago by dirtystylus
Coronavirus remote workforce: Working from home doesn’t mean working constantly.
Ideally, managers have also established work goals that are based on output, not activities. The way you assess whether someone is being productive is by looking at what outcomes they’re achieving, not by monitoring how they’re spending each individual minute of the day. And when it comes to those work goals, priorities will naturally need to shift for now. Things that can be pushed back should be pushed back.

Moreover, employers will need to extend grace to employees who are working at home under difficult conditions. Many employees will be working with their kids around because schools have closed. With young kids at home, those parents may be significantly more limited in what work they can complete, which is why, of course, in normal times most employers don’t allow parents of young children to telework unless they arrange separate child care. But that’s not practical right now. There’s no ideal solution here; the reality is employees in that situation probably can’t get as much done as their colleagues who aren’t simultaneously juggling child care. In normal times that wouldn’t feel fair—and yet it’s the situation right now. We certainly shouldn’t just fire everyone with kids or cut their pay dramatically. Instead, we’re going to have to recognize those constraints and be more flexible.
remotework  mentalhealth  coronavirus  teamwork  management  leadership 
13 days ago by dirtystylus
Ryan Pitts on Twitter: "I've been working from home for 7 years as of this month, ama (srsly, I mean it, I'm happy to share anything)" / Twitter
I've been working from home for 7 years as of this month, ama (srsly, I mean it, I'm happy to share anything)
One thing that others have said and I feel STRONGLY about: You have to set bounds on your days, mentally for sure and physically if possible. I'm super lucky to have a room that's for work and only for work.
Beyond that, a couple things really help me enter/exit that workspace.

* half an hour-ish of morning reading + coffee + scratching the dog. Not creative, I know, but feels REAL GOOD.
* I do some exercise at the end of the day. For me, the best shut-off-my-brain thing I've found.
That's what works great for me, at least. What they say is true: When you work from home it's super easy to feel like boundaries disappear and you're on all the time. Find some rituals that change where your head's at.
In my experience, where you want to blur boundaries is letting pieces of your personal life spill into work, not the other way around. Share those pet photos! Pay attention to your colleagues' hobbies and ask about them!
I try to make a habit of adding important context to boring checkin moments
If I'm done for the day and I'm about to crush a burrito, I will 100% let the team know I'm about to crush a burrito
At an in-person office you've probably been doing all this like breathing. It's just super easy to forget when everything's happening in Slack and Zoom, and you already have some nagging anxiety about making sure people feel like you're productive from home.
twitterthread  remotework  by:ryanpitts 
19 days ago by dirtystylus
jessicard/remote-jobs · GitHub
A lot of people are bringing up remote work. has been compiling an awesome resource for this.
list  remotework  from twitter_favs
october 2015 by dirtystylus

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