What's Next: Avengers, MCU, Game of Thrones, and the Content Endgame | MZS | Roger Ebert
Whether what's truly being aped here is television, the theatrical cliffhangers of the 1940s and '50s, the serialized fiction of Charles Dickens and other 19th century magazine writers, or comic books and comic strips is ultimately a distinction without a difference. They're all manifestations of the same commercial/artistic impulse, to keep audiences on the hook, constantly craving dopamine rush that comes with narrative closure, even when it proves to be temporary, just a setup for the next cliffhanger. The takeaway here should be that television and cinema have merged into the endless, insatiable content stream, and the biggest, baddest examples of image-driven entertainment—the works that have the power to unite large sections of an otherwise fragmented society—are the ones that are more reminiscent of television as we've always known it.
film  cinema  tv  marvel  culture  gameofthrones 
november 2019
Twitter
Conquering my JavaScript related fears is going to be hard, but fruitful. I will be ready to answer JS related ques…
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november 2019
The troubling age of algorithmic entertainment
The point is that streaming is affecting content and we don't quite know how that will play out over time. Still, if there's one thing we know about algorithms, it's that they tend toward an odd mix of the flashy, the outrageous, and the comforting. And art that perhaps doesn't fit, or won't appeal to the way the algorithm works, may get pushed to the side. That isn't new exactly — that has almost always been the case with media that pushes against the status quo — but it's hardly the democratic utopia that digital's most prominent supporters promised us, either. Instead it represents a dumbing down, a dull sameness — and unlike a setting on a TV, the size and influence of the tech giants means it won't be something you can simply switch off.
culture  media  algorithm  film  tv  music 
november 2019
How Marvel films like Captain America: Civil War became the world's biggest TV show - Vox
Once you start to think about the MCU as a TV show, a lot of the common criticisms people tend to level at it take on a new context. For instance, you don't have to look far to find complaints that Marvel's films are formulaic, or lack the visual spark of other blockbusters, or shoehorn in story elements that don't exactly fit but are necessary to set up future films. But all these characteristics are fairly typical on television, where a director's influence is much lower than that of the showrunner.

In the case of Marvel's films, the showrunner is probably producer Kevin Feige, though he's hired others to take on the sorts of supervisory roles a co-executive producer might hold on a TV series. For instance, Joss Whedon — a great TV showrunner himself — oversaw much of Marvel's so-called "Phase Two," while Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely have written many of the company's recent releases. (For more on how Fiege, Markus, and McFeely collaborate, read this piece by Vox contributor Peter Suderman on Marvel's approach to connecting all of its films.)

But Feige is essentially the visionary behind Marvel's entire slate. And from his perspective, many of the complaints occasionally lobbed at Marvel's films become strengths of the MCU as a whole. The idea that Marvel's films are less artistic expressions and more pieces of corporate product — though I would push back against that criticism — makes less sense if you view the MCU as one big TV series.
marvel  by:emilyvanderwerff  film  filmmaking  tv  culture  criticism 
november 2019
4-Day Workweek Boosted Workers' Productivity By 40%, Microsoft Japan Says : NPR
In the U.S., Schawbel sees schedule flexibility and a four-day week as two ways for employers to ease what he calls an ongoing burnout crisis.

At the heart of the discussion of workplace burnout and schedule flexibility is technology. The same electronic tools that have made working from home easier than ever have also made it harder for employees to fully unplug from their jobs when they aren't in the office.
labor  japan  microsoft  productivity  work  workculture  techculture 
november 2019
Twitter
Mrs. Meyers has something called, I think, Iowa Pine, which is pretty nice, but tbh I have just put p…
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november 2019
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this 'Anglo-Saxon' debate prompts me to revisit my most nuclear sincerely held take - that history is only really v…
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november 2019
Twitter
Whew, I get the hype of parenting.
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november 2019
Twitter
Programme leakage on BBC iPlayer.
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november 2019
Twitter
reminder that anti-MSG hysteria is rooted in anti-Asian American narratives
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november 2019
Twitter
Thanks, I hate it (and I’m more enthusiastic about metadata than most)
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november 2019
Twitter
OMG this skit 🤣🤣🤣 Safe to assume that you're about to be in TEARS when this drops.

"Astronomy Club: The Sketch Sho…
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november 2019
Twitter
I won’t always do this, but here is a poem I’m working on right now — “Alive at the End of the World”:
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november 2019
Lena at VelocityConf Berlin on Twitter: "This. Power has become one of the main topics I think and talk with other managers about. Understanding our own power and its impact & navigating power dynamics around us, is so vital & so easy to underestimate. Bu
This. Power has become one of the main topics I think and talk with other managers about. Understanding our own power and its impact & navigating power dynamics around us, is so vital & so easy to underestimate. But it’s very real, and mishandling it can have disastrous effects.
management  1:1  leadership 
november 2019
Twitter
I love how much underscores what support managers can provide to folks returning from leave. Provide an op…
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november 2019
10 Filipino American books that made me feel more Filipino
We were barreling across the waters of Palawan when I saw it — Culion, a Philippine island that was once a leper colony. A flicker of recognition, and the pleasure that comes with it, washed over me.
I had read about this island before, had this feeling before: First, in a short story by Lysley Tenorio, “A View From Culion,” and then in a poem by Patrick Rosal, “Instance of an Island,” where he writes of a pair of “incurables,” Josefa and Filomena, who, despite having only 10 fingers between them, find solace jamming on the hospital’s sole guitar.


And now I was seeing the island itself, even if only from a distance, like a piece of a puzzle falling into place.
For years I’ve tried to forge a connection with the place where my parents grew up, tried to make sense of what it meant to be Filipino if I couldn’t speak the language, if I didn’t live there, if I kept getting food poisoning every time I visited. It’s a common experience for those of us who’ve spent their lives far from our parents’ old homes.

But, books. Books, I’ve found, are among the most powerful ways to develop this lineage of mine, one that felt tenuous at first but has grown stronger with each story, with each reference I recognize.
Here’s a list of my favorite Filipino American books, which is by no means conclusive. There are still so many more on my list to read, including Jon Pineda’s Let’s No One Get Hurt and Anthony Christian Ocampo’s The Latinos of Asia.

‘America Is Not the Heart’ by Elaine Castillo
Castillo’s debut novel — which takes us from a rebel army’s hideaway in the mountains in the Philippines to a Filipino community in the Bay Area and covers topics like class, queer love, and chosen families — had me choked up by the time I finished the prologue.

'Dream Jungle’ by Jessica Hagedorn
Start looking into Filipino fiction and you’ll find that Hagedorn is the queen, with her trademark spiky hair and penchant for bringing to life a frenzied array of characters: lowlifes, scammers, desperate lovers. In Dream Jungle, she imagines what it was like on the set of Apocalypse Now, which was filmed in the Philippines, and what was going on in the head of a man who said he had discovered a “lost” Filipino tribe.

'Uprock Headspin Scramble and Dive’ by Patrick Rosal
Read Patrick Rosal — whom Philly can claim as one of its own — for his poems about getting into barfights with light-skinned Filipinos. Read Rosal for his meditation on Los Angeles as a kind of afterlife for his mother. Read Rosal because who else can write as beautifully about fantasizing about Tyra Banks? Just read him, always read him.

'Monstress’ by Lysley Tenorio
My main memory of reading Lysley Tenorio’s short-story collection is lying on my Ninang’s couch and sobbing. That, and sharing it with my long-distance Filipina book club, who were similarly shook. His story, “Felix Starro,” was turned into a musical this year in a Filipino power collab with Queen Hagedorn.

‘In the Country’ by Mia Alvar
Another stirring short-story collection, whose title story explores a labor struggle at Manila’s City Hospital in the ’70s about a pay disparity between Filipino and American nurses and the lasting consequences for the nurse who led the strike.

‘Kuwento: Lost Things (An Anthology of New Philippine Myths)’ edited by Rachelle Cruz and Melissa Sipin
On the witches, ogres, and beasts that haunt Filipino children at night: aswangs, kapres, and the great bu’aia.

‘The First Impulse’ by Laurel Fantauzzo
I was gripped by this creative nonfiction work — a murder mystery, a love story, a tribute to the indie film scene in Manila — and even ordered a second copy so I could lend it out to more friends. Fantauzzo’s next is due in 2021.

‘The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States, & the Philippines’ by Paul Kramer
The Philippines was an American colony for almost 50 years — something I never learned in school. This book, which traces that overlooked history, is, at times, painful to read.

'Outsourceable Selves: An Ethnography of Call Center Work in a Global Economy of Signs and Selves’ by Alinaya Fabros
I’m a labor reporter! So of course I devoured this book about the Filipinos that do the hard, invisible work of customer service for corporations.

‘Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History’ by Catherine Ceniza Choy
Another Filipino labor reporter treasure, this one answering the question of why there are so many nurses from the Philippines in the States.
by:julianafreyes  philippines  books  list  asianamerica 
november 2019
Twitter
There’s Justice Porn and then there’s Justice Porn
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november 2019
Twitter
Biggest boost to my design chops in the olden days: Learning as much as possible about typography.

Heirarchy, gri…
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november 2019
How spoilers have changed the way we watch movies and TV - Vox
For me and apparently many others, knowing what’s going to happen in a movie before we see it helps us enjoy the experience more.
culture  tv  film  spoilers 
november 2019
Why is Chrissy Teigen’s new website so bad?
Traditional platforms provide plenty of fodder to react to and position around—you can stand out by being messy where others strive for perfection, or by matching the president’s foul language where others demure.
editorialdesign  editorialstrategy  culture  food  cooking  celebrities  chrissyteigen  branding  webdesign 
november 2019
Twitter
scorsese is a champion for diversity in the cinema landscape. whether or not he has diversity in his films simply i…
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november 2019
Twitter
baby refuses to swing in the baby swing
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november 2019
Twitter
Drupal and other CMSs are great at templated content, but unique, high-variation content like landing pages can be…
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november 2019
Twitter
I hope to one day live in a world where every child has access to a library and the archive of classic films from b…
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november 2019
Why Can’t New York City Build More Gems Like This Queens Library?
Today, City Hall has all but abandoned design excellence. A disconnected mayor demonstrates zero interest in good design or architecture or much of anything related to the physical fabric of the city and urban planning.
Jobs are now awarded to the lowest “responsible” bidders, which effectively means the lowest bidders. An architect on the excellence roster recently described to me a project on which the low bid was from a contractor with a long record of failure. The D.D.C. had just put the contractor on notice for the company’s inability to complete other projects, the architect said. Needless to say, the contractor got the job anyway. With predictable results.
How can the city attract good builders if the hiring process favors bottom feeders?


Or attract the best architects if the city often strips them of basic tools they employ to ensure the work is carried out properly?
The city also does its budgeting year-by-year. How can any public agency plan a multiyear building project when it can’t even be sure the money it needs will be there?
No wonder the golden ticket for many city agencies is the so-called “pass through” contract, which means a project has received ample private funding up front and is being overseen by an organization responsible and competent enough to handle construction itself. A few weeks ago, the New York Public Library unveiled its new Van Cortlandt branch in the Bronx. Library officials made sure to structure the financing to get the pass through.
Construction was completed on time and on budget.
Which means the city can clearly do better.
nyc  library  politics  via:nikisanders 
november 2019
Twitter
We sort of live in a reality where Smaugs fly around, stealing all available resources while hoarding unimaginable…
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november 2019
Twitter
Gen xers Love reminding you they didn’t give a shit and we just look around us at all this and say “yeah that was p…
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november 2019
Twitter
I keep seeing best of the decade lists. I'm bound to be asked for one, so here's a work in progress. In no particul…
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november 2019
Twitter
ALL OF MY DREAMS ARE COMING TRUE.
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november 2019
"You're Welcome" vs. "No Problem" Across Generations - Imgur
I don’t know if it’s useful, but reading this helped me think through this a bit:

A Millenial would typically be fairly uncomfortable saying “you’re welcome” as an acknowledgement of genuine thanks because the phrase is only ever used disingenuously.



“You’re welcome” means to Millenials what “no problem” means to Baby Boomers, and vice versa. The two phrases have converse meanings to the different age sets. I’m not sure exactly where this line gets drawn, but it’s somewhere in the middle of Gen X. This is a real pain in the ass if you work in customer service because everyone thinks that everyone else is being rude when they’re really being polite in their own language.
language  via:vruba  millenials  from twitter_favs
november 2019
Twitter
Don't think just because I live in the woods and am building a new life out of sticks and blackberries doesn't mean…
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november 2019
Cami Williams on Twitter: "There is a fellow introvert on the Sephora customer experience team who deserves A RAISE RIGHT NOW… "
Photo of two columns of baskets, labeled:

* RED: I would like to be assisted!
* BLACK: I would like to shop on my own!
design  introversion  sephora  cosmetics  retail 
november 2019
IndieWeb
## Your content is yours

When you post something on the web, it should belong to you, not a corporation. Too many companies have gone out of business and lost all of their users’ data. By joining the IndieWeb, your content stays yours and in your control.
indieweb  webdev  writing  blogging 
november 2019
Twitter
Am I wrong to hate "no worries" ??? Should I just get over the cringey vibe it gives me and accept it? (I find it m…
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november 2019
Frozen 2’s “Into the Unknown” is going to make the “Let It Go” plague seem pleasant.
If there’s one thing small children love, it’s cathartic release! They live for that shit.
music  film  film:frozen2  by:ruthgraham 
november 2019
How Bubble Tea Became a Complicated Symbol of Asian-American Identity - Eater
“In some ways, it is a quintessential passing of the baton from American hegemony to East Asian hegemony,” Ray says. “It’s symptomatic of East Asia’s location — of East Asian urban culture — in the global circulation of taste.”
via:cordeliayu  food  bobatea  asianamerica  unitedstates  culture 
november 2019
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