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The Authoritarian Personality - Wikipedia
The "F" Scale (pre-Fascist):
- Conventionalism: Adherence to conventional values.
- Authoritarian Submission: Towards ingroup authority figures.
- Authoritarian Aggression: Against people who violate conventional values.
- Anti-Intraception: Opposition to subjectivity and imagination.
- Superstition and Stereotypy: Belief in individual fate; thinking in rigid categories.
- Power and Toughness: Concerned with submission and domination; assertion of strength.
- Destructiveness and Cynicism: hostility against human nature.
- Projectivity: Perception of the world as dangerous; tendency to project unconscious impulses.
- Sex: Overly concerned with modern sexual practices.
book  wiki  wikipedia  personality  psychology  sociology  theodor_adorno  elise_frenkel-brunswik  daniel_levinson  nevitt_sanford  research  uc_berkeley  1950  1950s  fascism  definition  america  holocaust  jewish  antisemitism  conservative  theory  politics  power  fear 
april 2017 by cluebucket
Suicide and the Economy - Elizabeth MacBride - The Atlantic
"My family had not only refused to speak of Roy, they rewrote the story of his death. Within hours, they closed ranks. A second cousin, a local policeman, told the newspaper Roy was subject to fainting spells. His mother said he died of a heart attack in a parking garage; according to another family story, he’d fallen in front of a train. Eventually, the lie became the truth. I flipped through the journals his mother wrote in 1950s. She mentioned Roy once, when a passerby reminded her of him. Then she went back later and whited out his name."
suicide  theatlantic  depression  economy  1920s  1930s  america  family  2013  2010s  death  memory  mental_health  crisis  psychology  employment  failure  life  library  news  roy_humphrey  nyc  new_jersey  elizabeth_macbride  stigma  society  survival  denial  guilt  shame  emotion 
september 2013 by cluebucket
Rachel Aviv: The Science of Sex Abuse : The New Yorker
“So you’re just willing to lie to a psychologist to appease them?” a prosecutor asked another inmate, Michael Riedel, who claimed that he had inflated the number and nature of his sex crimes. “They wouldn’t believe me when I said ‘one,’ ” he responded, “so what am I supposed to say?”

Recently, three prisoners at Butner wrote an anonymous thirteen-page report critiquing the Butner study, which they said had been “repeated so many times as to become fact in many places and in many minds.” Hernández, too, has publicly expressed concern about the way in which his study has been embraced by politicians and law-enforcement officials, warning that the scientific research is still “in its infancy.” But the study, because it confirmed a natural suspicion, has generated its own momentum. “The idea of this one-to-one correspondence—if you are attracted to children, you will act on it—is now a widespread misconception,” Michael Seto, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto, told me.

In 2011, Seto reviewed the only six studies he could find that drew on the self-reports of child-pornography offenders and found that the Butner study was a “statistical outlier.” The study had provided a politically expedient answer to a social dilemma that, upon further examination, was still ambiguous. In Seto’s review, roughly half of child-pornography offenders admitted that they had sexually abused at least one person. The difference between the two groups, Seto said, was that those whose deviant activity occurred only online did not have the antisocial traits, like lack of empathy and impulsiveness, that are common to all types of criminals. They represented a new species, “fantasy offenders,” Seto said. “In this weird, disinhibiting space, which lacks the usual social cues, they may do and say things they would never dare in real life.”
newyorker  writing  crime  pedophilia  america  abuse  prison  inmate  confession  predator  punishment  treatment  2013  2010s  2000s  internet  suspicion  lie  research  psychology  therapy 
january 2013 by cluebucket

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